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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 4, 1974 - Page 5

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - February 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Old Capitol Request Draws Early Favor Hy Frank Nye BBS MOINES leaders of both political parties reacted favorably Monday to an unanti- cipated request for to make the Old Capitol building in Iowa City slruduarlly sound before proceeding with restora- tion plans. Gov. Uobert Hay and l.t. Cov. Arthur Neu were joined by all but one of the legislative leaders in expressing the view thai the building, which served as the first slate capitol, is a part of Iowa's heritage that must be preserved in the best possible condition as a historic land- mark. Governor Hay, a member ofi the Old Capitol Restoration committee, headed by Susan Handier of Iowa City, said: "I want to see the Old Capitol restored. Much progress has al- ready been accomplished and now this new revelation of structural deterioration is going to require additional funding. "The legislature must con- sider the budget we've al- ready submitted first and make sure they can handle these items of absolute neces- sity. Then, of course, it can be determined if there will be an ability to finance this latest request. "Old Capitol's situation is un derstandable, and is of a nature that those involved in the resto- ration would have had difficulty in anticipating. "One of the merits of this pro- posal is that it would be 'one- shot' funding in the event funds are available after the budget needs I have already submitted to the legislature have been ful- filled. It would not be a new Di- on-going program. "Old Capitol is a part of our Iowa heritage. We must pre- serve it and those who have been deeply involved in this en- terprise deserve the apprecia- tion of all lowans interested in historic preservation." Lieutenant Governor Neu told The Gazette. "I'd like to see Old Capitol restored to its original condition but it doesn't make sense to go ahead with the restoration until it is structurally sound." Unusually High .House Speaker Andrew Varley (R-Stuart) injected a cautionary note: "We do not have adequate in- formation to make any judg- ment at this time. The requesl for funds seems unusually high The building must be in terrible shape." Senate Republican Leadei Clifton Lamborn a member of the restoration committee, had this comment: "Old Capitol is one of our best historic projects and it should be put in prime condition. "When you have taken in as much iu private funds for resto- ration as the committee lias done, it is not asking loo much for the state to put some money into the building to make it structurally sound." More than a half million dollars has been raised from private contributions and sev- eral hundred thousand more have come in from federal funds available for such proj- ects. Senate Democratic Leader James Schabcn said: "t feel pretty strong about his historic project and think lie state should help on this We've suffered too much from bulldozitis in Iowa in thc'past." House Republican Leader Mgar llolden (R-Oavcnport) iredictcd the legislature will Governor Ray .his. I think most of the legisla- .ors agree Old Capitol should be preserved. "I haven't heard any legisla- ior who's against it. We've dis- cussed it in our leadership meetings." House Democratic Leader Dale Cochran Grove) aid: "I'd say the Old Capitol build- ing is a cherished historical landmark and should definitely be preserved. "In order to fully complete MASONVILLE David L. Ross, 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Ross, died at Delaware Counly Memorial hospital ir Manchester at p.m. Satur- day after an accident on the family farm earlier in the eve- ning. The youth, a student at Wcsl Delaware junior high in Man- chester, was fatally injured when caught in the power shafl of a grain auger. Surviving in addition to his parents are a sister, Joyce Ellen; paternal grandmother, Mrs. Melvin Wiggcr, and mater- nal grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Lcs Rubner, all of Mason- ville; paternal great-grandfa- ther, Fred Longhoff of Marion, and maternal groat -grand- mothcr, Mrs. Laura Wolfe of Worlhington. Friends may call at Shelley's in Manchester after 7 p.m. Mon- day. Rosary Monday at 8 p.m. and parish wake service Tues- day at 8 p.m. at Shelley's. Fu- neral services will be held at Immaculate Conccplion church in Masonvillc Wednesday at a.m. the project will support a stale appropriation." Committee I'light Mrs. Handier explained the committee's plight in letters to the leaders of the two parties last week. She pointed out in the letters that the committee did not learn the building has structural de- fects until interior walls were stripped to their original sur faces, displaying much deterio- ration. Archilects also found wooden roof beams in weakened condi- tion and said it would be useless to restore the building unless il is to be made structurally sound. They estimated it would take lionor the request for funds, to accomplish this goal. g: Mrs. llanchcr wrote party "I don't think we'll have any loaders that the would .rouble getting the money to du" ng: be used to: 1. Repair walls now known to be in weakened condition. Reinforce the cupola. 3. Repair and replace certain portions o fine roof and gutters. 4. Flame-proof Ihe original wooden rafters supporting the roof where they are still usable. 5. Provide a ramp at one o! the lower level entrances. G. Install smoke detection am sprinkler systems. 7. Install an elevator for use by those unable to use the stair- Crisis Gives McCausland Cause for Lengthy Pause By Harrison Weber DES MOINES (IDPA) Somebody put more than a tiger in the gasoline tank of Stanley McCausland. McCausland, who is director of the state's general services department, was in Dubuque Thursday to go over plans with an architect for the proposed multi-million dollar state agricul- ture 'building. On his return trip to Des Moines he.stopped at a service station just south of Dubuque on highway 61 to get -some gaso- line. McCausland asked the young girl attendant whether he would 'be limited to ten gallons or if he could fill up the tank. No limit, she replied, and proceeded to pour 17 gallons gasoline into McCausIand's personal car which has a 20-gallon tank. McCausland paid the bill and was on his way. Well, almost on his way. He got about 20 yards and the engine stopped. McCausland went back to the station and the girl suggest- ed he call a mechanic, which -he did. It seems McCausland was the first customer at the service station after its tanks had been filled and a considerable amount of water was mixed with the gasoline that he had received. His car had to be lowed lo a garage where it thawed .out. Not only was the fuel line frozen but so was the bottom of the gasoline tank. It was about 10 degrees at the time, he recalled. After draining the tank, the mechanic has to use an air hose to blow out beads of ice from the bottom of the tank. Mc- Causland estimates he had six or seven gallons of water in the tank. Some four hours later, McCausland, with a new insight on the energy crisis, was on his way back to Des Moines, where he requested that Agriculture Secretary Robert Lounsberry check on the trucker who filled the station's tanks. Gas Storage Tank Warning Issued DES MOINES Fire Marshal Wilbur Johnson has warned that above ground gasoline storage tanks are illegal in municipal- ities, and create a fire hazard. "Numerous calls have been coming in from cities asking about the use of above ground Johnson said. "With the energy crisis, many people have been getting 200-300 gallon tanks to store gasoline." Above ground tanks, Johnson said, create a fire danger. "It's easy for people to spill gasoline while removing it, lip the tank over or have an overflow. Any spark can ignite the gasoline causing a fire which is easily spread in a municipality." Above ground tanks on farms are legal, if the lank is at least feet from a building, Johnson said. AflvcrtKerncnl Tormenting Rectal Itch Of Hemorrhoidal Tissues Promptly Relieved Gives Prompi, Temporary Relief from Such' Burning Itch and Pain in Many Cases. TIio ImrninK itch niul nnin caused hy infection nnd inflam- mation ill lirnwrrlioiiliil I issued can cause much (liens is mi exclusive formula tiiin llml in ninny cases prompt relief for hniira from Mils itch nnd pain so llml. I be sufferer in inuro comforlnblo iiKiiin. .11 also uclually hems Nhi-ink swelling of licmnrrbnidiil tissues cumuli by infliimmiilion nnd infi'Cliini. 'Jtaln by doctors on ImmlrmlH of pnllon'ls In Now York City, Washlwilon, 1'UJ. mill nt n Mlil- wiil Medical (Junior rcporta! similar successful results in many cases. This is Ibo same medication you cim buy nl any (Irutf counter under tbo name Preparation Preparation 11 also lubricates to protect. Ihu inflnmcd sur- face area nnd it doesn't sting or- nmnrl. In fuel, II hns very south- which make il CHpecinlly helpful iltmnK the liilthl when itcliinn becomes mom intense. There's no other formula Preparation IT. In, ointmcmt or suppository form, The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Mon., Feb. 4, 1974 Sioux City Woman Jewel Holdup Victim SIOUX CITY (UPI) Police continued their searcli Monday for two men who stole an esti- mated worth of jewels from a residence here Satur- day night. Authorities said two men en- tered the home of Patricia Pi- rogh here, and robbed her of most of her jewelry that she said was valued at Miss Pirogh told police that the men lied her up with some tape shortly after midnight Sun- day, took her jewelry and fled. DISHWASHER REPLACEMENT CENTER Bullt-ln Foaluro-Packod Dishwasher MODEL QSD B61 Qonortil Eloclilc can show you Uila, OocnusD wo hnvo Iho dlsliwnshora OjIDII Snlunlny 106 2nd Avo. SW Phono 363-0283 Here's a handy analysis of the Senior Citizens' Property tax Relief Act. CUJAIi JIAI'JDS M.NA-1K 01MU.; 414 SGA BUILDING CliOAIt RAPIDS, IOWA 52-101 TELEPHONE: Dear Friend: enate .STATIC OF IOWA l Asxinitlily STATK 1IOUSK 3lotim 50319 COMMIT! EKS Jtiw IARV, Chairman Arj'HuriiiAiiONs" HULKS 'Chiiiriiiiui, Sun-CoM ON EDUCATION Many of my older consliluents have asked me for information about the new Senior Citizens' Properly Tax Relief Act, (Senate File U7fi) which goes into effect this year. AK a result, I prepared a detailed analysis with the hope it would answer most everybody's questions. If you still have any questions or want assistance in completing the claim forms, which will soon be available, please contact my Cedar Rapids office, 414 SGA Building, phone 366-5681, or write to: Senator Tom Riley Stale House Des Monies, Iowa 50319 Best Regards, Purpose of bill.. Who is eligible? What is "house- hold What qualifies as a home What is "totally Why renters are included What constitutes property taxes, .rent, etc. What are the benefits? How are benefits paid to home- owners? How are benefits paid to renters? When and where to file What if your rent is increased? P.S. If anyone, because of physical infirmity or other hardship, cannot get to the courthouse lo pick up a claim form, please write or call my office and I'll obtain the form and mail it to you. to provide property tax relief to low-income homeowners and renters who are either senior citizens or are totally disabled. (a) Must be at least 65 or totally disabled on December 31. (b) Homeowners must have lived in Iowa all of preceding year and renters, part of that year. (c) Household income is less than (a) Income of all persons in the household related by blood or marriage; including wages, alimony, child support, capital gains, public assistance, pensions, annuities, social security, workmen's compensation. (Doesn't include gifts, surplus foods or food stamps.) (b) 10% of a person s net worth over is added to income. (This is to prevent well-to-do persons qualifying for benefits during periods of low income.) (a) House and up to 1 acre of land, or (b) Mobile home, or (c) That part of a multi-dwelling, used as a residence of claimant. The inability to engage in substantial gainful employment by reason of medically, determinable physical or mental impairment (which lasts 1 year or Our new law considers that 20% of rent is used by the landlord to pay property taxes on the rental unit. Thus, if senior citizen pays monthly rent, a month a year) is considered property taxes paid by him. See ex- amples below. Property taxes do not include special assessments or delinquent interest. Rent does not include utility charges. Note: The bill limits benefits to the first of property taxes even though they may actually be higher. As proposed by the Ways Means Committee, the bill had a maximum limit of but my amendment raised the amount to thus increasing benefits from to depending on a claimant's income. Benefits are based on income and the amount of taxes paid by homeowner or considered paid by renter for the year preceding filing the claim: If your household income is: Your taxes are reduced by: 95 percent 80 percent 65 percent 50 percent 35 percent 25 percent NOTE: Those now receiving double homestead can continue to do so in lieu of the new benefits if it is to their advantage. This year homeowners will pay the 1st taxes when due; then, no later than Sept. 25, the homeowner will receive a check for his (her) benefit made payable to him (her) and the county treasurer to be applied toward the 2nd property taxes. If the benefit exceeds the 2nd the excess will be applied to the property taxes payable in 1975. Renters will get a check no later than Sept. 25 payable only to them. (a) Obtain a claim form from the city or county assessor's or county trea- surer's office; mail it like you would an income tax return to the: "Director of Revenue, Lucas State Office Building, Des Moines, Iowa 50319." (b) Mail it on or before July 31 each year. If you complain and the Dept. of Revenue finds the increase was primarily because of the renters' receiving benefits, the Dept. can order the landlord to reduce the rent. EXAMPLES OF BENEFITS (a) A man and wife's only income during the year is of social security and their gross property taxes (i.e. before homestead and veteran's exemptions) is They would pay only a reduction of versus the old double homestead reduction of (b) A man and wife's only income is social security and they pay rent of per month or a year. Twenty percent of that is considered property taxes or They are eligible for a refund of Pnld r-nr nv ilalo Senator loin Rllcv   

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