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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 29, 1974 - Page 9

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 29, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Dr. Brown, Power Behind Executive Woman Ity Call-Ida McCormnck NKW Y011K (Ul'l) _ On squash court or over lunch at the Harvard club, male exccu- lies bat around ideas and trade business scads. The female executive, a Janic-come-lately lo execu- tives suites of the land, doesn't have so many chances for rockbottom talk about the high road to bigger and better profits. That's why Dr. Sandra M. Brown, self-employed in the adventure capital field, three months ago put her cashbox behind a new publishing ven- ture, the Executive Woman. The national monthly news- letter, for women in business, roams the range of executive interests from financing a new enterprise to selling up tax shelters. Dr. Brown said in an interview thai the publi- cation is the female equiva- lent to the idea arena bounded for males by the squash court and lunch al Ilie Harvard club. Works Outside Establishment Dr. Brown is a study in risk- taking herself. Five years ago she left formal channels in the education establishment. Her aim: To accomplish outside the establishment necessary change but faster. She hyys and sells compa- nies, mostly in She education field. Last March, for exam- ple, when Kids magazine was on the verge of bankruptcy, Dr. Brown bought it. It is now growing robust, getting pieces of mail a week from readers. It also has doubled in circulation. The publication is a showcase for writing by kids. Dr. Brown also is a power behind Me-books. These are Teleohoto In an effort to give the female executive more oppor- tunity in the business world, Dr. Sandra M. Brown, above, three months ago, put her money behind a new publishing venture, the Executive Woman. The national monthly news- letter for women roams the range of executive interests from financing a new enterprise to setting up tax shelters. computer written books for young readers and have the child's name inserted at various appropriate places. Nothing makes a kid read on like seeing his or her name in print. For females inching their way lo the top, Ihe graduate of Mount Holyoke college has more than the executive woman newsletter on Ihe fire. Through a series of regional dinners she hopes lo establish a network of women execu- tives who can and will do business with one another. "The aim is to establish a nucleus witMn the female business community which has strength and unity and within which women can free- ly trade business, financial help, sales leads and con- Dr. Drown said. These dinners will be at- tended by female executives in various regions and will include subscribers to the Ex- ecutive Woman. Dr. lirown said (hoy are 50-50 self- employed versus company- employed. "They have a high salary she said. "Korly to 50 percent of them make over a year. "By all being involved, we can multiply our success." Dinner Speakers Tile first of Ihe executive woman dinners was held in New York recenlly. Many of Ihe most successful women in New York's business commu- nity participated and traded shoptalk. Speakers included Patricia Carbine, of Ms. magazine; Muriel Sichcrt, only female member of the New York Stock Exchange; Madeline McWhinne'y, new president of the First Women's Bank and Trust Co., a n d feminist Jacqueline Michot Ceballos, head of her own firm. Dr. Brown, asked to define woman executive, declined. "To do she said, "might eliminate some who are but can't be told by their salary." Dr. Brown is senior editor on more than 20 major educa- tional programs, sales of which are projected to reach more than million within the next five years. Before she became self-employed she taught in East Windsor, Conn., and was, among other things, reading supervisor in the Middleton, Conn., schools. tor The Odar Rapids Gazette: Tuej., Jan. 29, 1914 9 Meat-Stretching Products Beef Up Protein Contents By Jeanne Lesem NEW YORK (UPI) By one expert expects all the hamburger and half of all the meat eaten in the United States to contain textured veg- etable protein as a means of stretching meat supplies for expanding world population. The prediction was made at a seminar here by Aaron M. Altschul, a Georgetown uni- versity professor of communi- ty medicine' and international health. The meeting was spon- sored by Miles Elkhart, Ind. Altschul and Dr. Walter A. Compton, chairman and chief executive officer, said these vegetable protein substitutes are beneficial lo both health and pocketbook. They beef up the protein content of meat but are free from fat and cholesterol. Chil- dren who cannot tolerate milk have been raised entirely on soy products with no dif- ference noted between them dren who cannot tolerate milk based products, Altschul said. According to Dr. Compton, one acre of land that can provide 500 pounds of soy- beans for consumption as veg- etable protein can yield at best only 50 pounds of animal protein. Selling Well With the meat industry pre- dicting price increases for beef and pork during the re- mainder of the winter, cheaper substitutes already are selling well. Patties mixes ground beef containing hydraled, or reconstituted, textured vege- 'ta'ble'protein are -available in many supermarkets and in- dependent groceries where are said to outsell pure ground beef by impressive percentages. Textured vegetable protein mixes for combination dishes such as chili, meat loaf and spaghetti sauce are in region- al distribution. One pouch of a soy product added as the label directs lo one pound of ground meat, makes 23 ounces or one ounce less than 114 pounds. The soy extender's protein content is 53 percent, which is higher than that of the meat it re- places. The manufacturer says it should be handled like ground meat alone, once the mixture is prepared. It can be refrigerated safely for a day, or cooked and frozen to be reheated later. Here are two recipes using new textured soy i protein products. Apple sauce meat loaf made with beef pattie mix contain- ing hydrated textured vegeta- ble protein makes 12 servings, enough for one hot meal and cold sandwiches for a second one.. Meal Loaf In a large bowl, mix 3 eggs, slightly beaten, with 1 cup finely chopped onion, 1 table- spoon of salt, Vi teaspoon of pepper, ,2' tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce and 3 cups of apple sauce. Add 3 cups of pattie mix and com- bine lightly but well. Shape into a loaf, mounding the top, in a greased 9-By-6- inch loaf pan. Bake in pre- heated 350-degree oven 1 to 114 hours, until loaf is done and lop is browned. Cool 10 minutes before removing from pan and slicing. Chili Apio Chili apio containing 1 pound of ground beef, 1 1.65- ounce pouch of textured soy protein and kidney beans makes 8 protein-rich servings. Mix the pouch of soy prod- uct (with cup of water as label directs. Then mix it with beef as label directs. Brown the.._meat-soy mixture in a lightly oiled large pot or Dutch oven. Add tea- spoons of salt, teaspoon each of ground pepper and chili powder and 14 cup of chopped onion. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are tender. Add 2 (15-ounce) cans of tomato juice, cup each of chopped celery and chopped green pep- per, 2 (1-pound) cans of red kidney beans, drained, and a dash or two of hot pepper sauce. Simmer uncovered about Hi hours. Makes 8 cups. ilty Abigail Van Duren DKAH ABBY: 1 fell in love; jwith a guy I'll call Motorhead. All he loved was his car. He lost his job and I finished making his car payments. also pajd some other bills for 'him and even paid back some money he owed. My friends told me I was crazy, hut I was stubborn and wouldn't listen. Motorhead got a job and now that he is working he is going with another girl and people say he is going to marry her. I feel like a fool but what can I do? How can I get my money back without my parents knowing? I don't want to go to court and I don't have any kind of written "I.O.U." from this guy. A FOOL DEAR FOOL: Unless you have something in writing, you can't prove that Mnlorhead owes you anything. Call it the "tuition" you paid for your edu- cation and try to learn from it. Sorry. DEAR ABBY: I have lived icrc for 30 years and my hus- >and is a respected member of .he community, so I am unable .0 explain why I should have .his problem. I first noticed it in the depart ment store where I shop regu- arly. The minute I enter, wzzer goes off, and the store detectives appear and slarl watching me. Also, I notice the salespeople look at me suspi- ciously, so I don't dare even handle any merchandise. I went to the dime store anc noticed the same thing hap pened there, so I called the manager and asked him why was being watched. He very sarcastically said I wasn't, bu if I had a clear conscience I hac nothing to worry about. I lef immediately without buyini what I had come for. I now get the same feelini when I go the supermarket. I've never stolen anything, but peo pie keep watching me as thoug! I were a thief. Should I bring suit agains these people who are harassm, me? I now order everything on the telephone because walking into a store is so humiliating. INNOCENT DEAR INNOCENT: It's entire ly possible that you are no being Harassed, but that your imagination is working over time. If you haven't discussei this wifti your doctor, you should. An imagined harass ment is as damaging as a real one. 30 YEARS AGO William Allen White, 75, known as the 'Sage of died. HARDWICK The Finest Name in Kitchen. RANGES See our largest selection of gas or electric models. 30" Cnnk it now Serve it Inter. You am wilh Hnrdwick's Chnletjt with built-in temperature controlled wnrming shelf. You get n big 24" oven, top elements, plus n beautiful, durnblo filnss shelf Ihnl will keep thoso delayed mcnls bot nnd lusty, nnd the soft, diffused lluoresrent light ing highlights tbe beautiful styling of Ibis series. BIG TRADE-IN ON YOUR OLD RANGE EASY TERMS FREE PEOPLES FURNITURE Phono 366-2436 or 362-3919 Opon Thursday Monday 'Til 9iOO P.M. More stories...and more of a story. That's what the Gazette offers you every day. Sports to finance; politics to Hollywood gossip; police news to Home EC features our job is to keep you informed and entertained. Where else can you turn for all these stories and features? Only here. The place you always turn when you want to know the whole story about Eastern Iowa and the world. CEDAR RAPIDS ANSWERS TO QUIZ: WORLDSCOPEj I.QI 7- 3-Tntn; 4-n; 5- Trun NEWSNAME: Anwnr Sodol WATCHWORDS, 1-cj 2 3-tii 4-b, 5-d .NEWSPICTllREi Alnkinndr Solihoniliyn SPORRIGIIT: 1-c; 2-a: 3- True, 4-Gciro Yopiemian; 5- Ilillin Jnnn Kinfl A Long Way To Go -AP WlrePhoto Lettie M. Jenks, 65, begins her walk to Washington -from downtown Cleveland to bring attention to her belief that President Nixon should be impeached. Mrs. Jenks, who has spinal arthritis, began her walic with and a cart containing a folding chair, bread, meat, blankets and clothing. Top-or-the-stove, one-pan recipe. no-bake Macaroni 'n Cheese Stir it up; boil 10 minutes. J ONE PAN MACARONI AND CHEESE V, Add the cheese and let it stand. 2 CUDS uncooked American Beauly Elbo-Roni (8 ozj sharpcheddar cheese, diced 1 can (4 02.) mushrooms, pieces and stems, drained celery or cf earn of mushroom soup 2 soup cans milk 1 soup can waler ibs-margarine i-itSD. saH tsp. pepper In 3 quarl sauce pan, blend all ingredients excepl Elbo-Roni. cheese and mushrooms. Bring to boil stir in Elbo-Roni. relurn to boil and cook un qovered. 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Add cheese, stir unlit melied, add mushrooms. Turn oil heal, let stand on burner 10 minutes. Makes 6 cups. flmerican Beauty SEARS WILL BE CLOSED PI.AZA Sears STORE OPENS WED. 6 P.M. Wednesday, January 30 Until 6 P.M. for Inventory YELLOW TAG DAYS Starts Wednesday 6 P.M. Sharp Be Hero Early lor Gigantic Savings in Every Department! SHOP AT SKAUS ANP SAVK w Vow A- PiiONE 393-8400 FREE PARKING LINDALE PLAZA SKA's. uor.nUCK ANVco. CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA Entertainment Pages Dally Via The Gazette   

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