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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 29, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                'They needed a little coaxing, J.B., but I think you'll agree the car poof's working nicely' Editorial Page TuewJay, January 19, 1974 Ray for an OEM JN HIS SPECIAL message to the JL legislature last week on "Energy and Governor Ray left no doubt where he stands on the question of whether an energy crisis exists. Ho repeated what he has said before: We have an energy crisis and it is going to get worse. He emphasized his belief in these words: "It (the energy crisis) cannot be ignored. You will not wish it away. You will not debate it out of exis- tence. It is real. It is here. It is serious. And it is going to be witli us for some time." That left little room for skep- tics, yet skeptics there are. A high percentage of lowans and Americans, particularly motorists who are experiencing little dif- ficulty getting gasoline to run their cars, are skeptical that there is an energy crisis. There is reason to question it, of course, because of another shor- tage stemming from Washington for the last several years, starting with the Vietnam war and running through Watergate. This one is in some ways worse than an energy shortage. It is, of course, the credibility shortage. When the people know they haven't been getting the truth from their pofitical leaders in other areas, they have a right to skepticism when they are told there is an energy shortage that many have not yet experienced firsthand. Governor Ray has not been guilty of incredibility during his more than five years as governor. But the incredibility stamp rubs off even on those who have done nothing to deserve it. That's why there is skepticism in "som'e quarters including legislative quarters over his emphasis on the need to face up to the shortage and get ready to deal with it. We are not possessed of any special facts to prove there is, or is not, an energy crisis worthy of the name. That seems to be a question only time can answer. But certainly there is no harm in being prepared to meet such a crisis if and when it develops to the point where lowans will have to sacrifice a good deal more than they have to today. Therefore, we commend the governor for Urging the legisla- ture to create an Office of Energy Management to deal with problems arising from either a real or purported crisis. The governor's proposal calls for an 11-member council com- posed of nine individuals already on the state payroll the geologist, comptroller, civil defense director, commerce com- mission chairman, environmental quality director and four legisla- tors plus two representatives of the public. People's forum Deputies' salaries To the Editor. Recently an article in Tlie Gazelle- slated that two deputy sheriffs had applied for and received food stamps. Their need apparently had arisen due to a wage-hike proposal of the deputies that foil short of what they expected to receive from the county supervisors. The day following the news release on the food stamps, the Linn county sheriff was interviewed in regard to the depu- ties' actions. In his statement, Sheriff Grant stated that he fell the fond-stamp move was a power play by the deputies over (heir wage dispute. I feel Sheriff Grant completely missed the point that the deputies were trying to stress. If these deputies are in a situation where they can tonally turn to the use of welfare help, there is a definite flaw in the system. VVliy should a person working in a service-related field, such as a deputy sheriff, have to resort to food stamps? They work 45 or more hours a week in a difficult, dangerous and demanding job, then tnke home a paycheck that they cannot live on in u semi-comfortable mnnner. Some incentive! This council would employ a paid director and would develop policy dealing with energy needs. It would have charge of adminis- tering state reserves under the federal mandatory fuel allocation program. It would handle gasoline rationing if it is imposed. It would direct research into possible energy sources "including inquiry into possible conspiratorial prac- tices." It would look into the possibility of establishing mass transit sys- tems capable of moving more people with less energy than through the everybody-use-a-car system we know today. Details of the bill creating an OEM have yet to be worked out. Certainly they should empower the presiding officers of house and senate to appoint the council's legislative members, with the governor appointing the public representatives. Certainly they should provide for termination of OEM once the crisis, or purported crisis, ends, as recommended by the governor. Then, too, transportation problems should be transferred from OEM to a department of transportation if and when it is created by the legislature, again as recommended by the governor. In summation, it is better to be prepared than not to be prepared. That's why the legislators, skep- tics and believers alike, should follow the governor's recommen- dation as we head into the unpredictable energy future. DST disparaged TN FLORIDA, eight children J. have been killed in early- morning traffic accidents, repor- tedly because they were too hard for motorists to see in the school- time darkness brought about by all-year Daylight Saving time.. A survey of utility officials na-. tionwide reportedly also has elicited the view that DST so far is cutting people's electricity con- sumption, by only a fraction of 1 percent. Consequently, Florida's gover- nor has summoned the legislature into session to repeal DST, the governor of Utah has called for repeal, and Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield is urging DST's repeal at the national level. The dead-ol'-winter pper-gy ad- vantages of Daylight Saving time were highly doubtful from Hie start. By the time a general repeal could come about, however, the natural onset of earlier sunrise times will reduce the risks and bolster saving fuel. The prime concern of legislators now should be with whether DST remains acceptable for next winter's darkest months. Aid-to-poor denial: 'Bipartisan neglect' By James Reston WASHINGTON One of the bitter tragedies of the present world crisis is that the heaviest blows are falllnK. as usual, on the poor earth. For the rich. Inflation, the eni'rgy shortage and rising food prices and unemployment are un Irritation and at worst an inconvenience, but for the poor they are a disaster. The point is obvious, but it seems In have been missed by the house of representatives in its recent vote to kill President Nixon's bill to aid the world's poorest countries through the World Bank's International Development Assn. This vote tells a lot about the present mood of the congress and the state of presidential and democratic leadership. Though the danger of mass starvation in sub-Sahara Africa and in India and Bangladesh is now alarming, the house against the relief sought by the administration, with 108 Democrats votlnjj for it and 118 against it, and 130 Republicans voting against Ihe President and only 47 Republicans supporting him. Now we are beginning to see the con- sequence of Vietnam, Watergate and the turmoil of the Middle East. The house is G- IRS on Nixon's taxes Singular grit, group bungling Moral predicament for man who knew By Don Oakley TTERE'S an ethical enigma for you: The Internal Revenue Service employe who leaked information about President Nixon's income tax returns to a Providence. R. I., newspaper has been forced to resign under threat of being fired. HP'S lucky that's all that happened to him. Hu could, have faced criminal acr lion. Tax rpUinis are confidential and Uipir unauthorized disclosure is illegal. sAs it should he. It would bo a hock of a situation if everybody's private finances would be made public knowledge, at the whim of any revenue) service purposes of embarrassment, business or political revenge, or any other personal grievance. But nothing like that was involved in I wonder if the people and board of supervisors of Linn county could sleep nights securely without deputies? When they're needed it's nice to have them around. But when it comes time to pay them their worth that's an entirely different ballgame. Having been in the armed forces and now in law enforcement, I sympathize with the deputies. There is simply n sad lack of public support for dangerous, necessary and frequently hard-to-fill ser- vice positions. Thomas C. Krceg 141 Twentyfiflli street SW Wild horses To Ihe Editor: For some time now animal lovers, nat- uralists, and sportsmen have been complaining about the useless slaughter of certain wild animals that arc near ex- tinction. But little or no attention has been paid to one of this country's national heritages: the wild horse. For years men have been unmercifully killing these beautiful animals, and I think that it is time we gave these horses a little attention. Laws have been made and are being enforced in regard to authentic wild animals, but the wild horse Is known as a wild animal emce domesticated but turned wild. Therefore, these laws don't apply to wild horses. It's time that a bill is enacted na- tionally to protect the remaining herds. "Stop ploying with that hula hoop, and start looking for some tax-deductible historic papers." The wild horse is very nearly extinct. If we don't stop their useless killing, they also may join such other heedlessly slaughtered species as the' carrier pigeon, whooping crane and bison. Palti Picket! 3701 Klmwood drive NE Retrench To the Editor: It has become apparent to me as a consumer that Americans for far too long have been induced to consume more and more to keep production humming, prosperity rolling, and the profits gushing in. As a result, we consume 40 percent of the world's resources while constituting only 8 percent of the earth's population. As the energy crisis begins to affect the lives of all, people are becoming aware that our natural resources are far more valuable than money and should not be needlessly expended. .lust as Americans have been Induced to consume waslefully, I believe we can be induced to consume conservatively. We can start by writing letters of per- suasion to electric, telephone, and water companies in our area that could help considerably Ihroiigh policies giving the consumer reduced rates for consuming less Instead of present policies allowing for reduced rates with greater consump- tion. Factories. Industries, Insl Mulleins mid this case. Apparently the employe was so incensed at what he found in the President's reaction now- shared by millions of taxpaying he decided to violate IRS regulations. Had he not done so, had he not broken the law to reveal the rather unheroic behavior of the nation's first the President paid a measly in federal income taxes in 1970 and 1971 by virtue of some exceedingly dubious deductions and write-offs, which both the IRS and a congressional committee are taking a second look Ihe White House ever have voluntarily revealed this information? Not likely, even though it is informa- tion (he American people have a right-ip know about their President. ;Did (he end thpn justify the means in (jijs ease? If it justify similane.x- pfisuro of siinie other prominent person in the future? would you' have done if you had been the "employe? Newsppper Enterprise Assoclotlon Federal gumshoes gummed-up inquiry By Jack Anderson WASHINGTON The Internal Revenue Service muffed the inves- tigation last year into President Nixon's controversial' 1970 and 1971 tax returns, according Ip inside sources. The tax agents tried to run down our story that a secret cash gift from billionaire Howard Hughes had been delivered to Bebc Rcbozo for the President. Yet the agents never bothered to look at the President's bank records, which were kept in a special vault at Rebozo's Key Biscayne bank. large organizations should be made aware that they could help relieve the fuel shortage by offering advantages to those whose automobiles carry a large number of passengers per car. One such possibility is to allow cars with large numbers of people to have close parking. We need to let our legislators know that we arc in favor of bills to allow for deposits on nonreturnable bottles. We could encourage reuse of metals by sug- gesting that recycling be made more profitable. In this way metals already processed could be reused saving great amounts of energy. I believe that if we let people know that we arc ready and willing to practice bet- ter consumer melhexls, those in a position to help will help by advocating better consumer methods. Colleen Grccnhaw Route; I, Marion Doves' beauty To the Editor: Anyone who loves and enjoys the beauty of nature as much as our family does must share our anxiety over the recent Introduction (lo Ihe Iowa house) of o bill to legallze'the hunting of mourning doves. We count among our pleasures In life hearing the haunllngly beaullful call of these creatures. No artist can capture their full beauty the delicate pink- shaded breast to the soft gray of the back: Ihe sense of dignity Ihese lovely birds Rebozo has sworn that the gathered dust in a safety deposit box. Yet the agents made no real effort to check who had access to the box, whether money was removed and to whom it was distributed. Rebozo also collected cash from other fat-cats in Nixon's behalf. Yet the agents made no attempt to run down who con- tributed, how much they coughed up and what happened to the money. Nor did the agents challenge a tax deduction, which Nixon claimed for donating his vice-presidential papers to the government. Yet the President's appraiser didn't even select which papers should be donated until four months after the July 25, 1969, deadline had passed for claiming such deductions. The President -paid such low taxes in 1971 and in 1972 on an income that averaged more than a year that the computers automa- tically targeted his returns tor audit. Most of his income, including his presidential salary checks, were routed to his tax attorney, Frank DeMarco, in California. Then DeMarco would relay them back across the country to Rebozo's bank. In May of 1973, the agents spent less than eight hours with DeMarco going over the President's books. They found the paperwork in order. A few days later, the superficial Inter- nal Revenue investigation fizzled out. On June 1, IRS District Director William Wallers wrote the President: "Our examination of your income (tax returns for the years 1971 and 1972 revealed that they arc correct... I want to compliment you on the care shown in the preparation of your returns." But like so many other statements concerning Ih6 President, this, too, has turned nut to be inoperative. Tax agents are now back investigating the President's returns again for evidence of possible fraud and tax evasion. United Feolure Syndicate exude, perched on a fence or wire; their tender devotion to their young; their gentle existence in Ihe weeds and grasses of Iowa. How anyone can derive pleasure from blasting to pieces any living thing such as this in the name of sport is beyond our understanding. U has the same logic as lipping tombstones for fun and cutting down trees in a park for excitement. Apparently the congressman from Oel- wein who suggests that "the revenue from the dove stamps can be used to improve their habitat" feels that being killed, mortally wounded, tracked and hunled by the most ruthless of predators (man) is an "improvement" in habitat. We don't agree. The greatest "improvement" would be lo leave them in peace. He also suggests "If it appears they are becoming extinct, the legislature can again bun hunting doves." I can't help but think this man's talents are being wasted in Iowa. He should be in Washington working with Ihe Individuals who are conserving our energy with win- tertime Daylight Saving time. All renders who possess a true sensi- tivity to the weinelers of nature and humble creatures such UH our mourning doves as things of beauty help protect Iheni by conlncllng their representatives lo vole agalnat thin bill. Mourning dove, do yon mourn for theme1 too blind In see, or for your future' le'fl lo me? Beverly llannon llenile> 'i. Aminiosn surlv and frustrated, with foreign aid and foreign adventure, and hostile a President who Impounds funds tor the poor at home while seeking more aid for cenmtries ewerseas. Presdient Nixon anticipated this mood but he underestimated it. By diligent private negotiating over the last year, and with the help eif Robert MeNamara the head of the World Bank, he manafial to persuade the other Industrial nations of the world to Increase their "soft loans" to the pewrcst countries from 40 percent to 66.7 percent, allowing the United States to reduce its contribution to one- third from 40 percent. Even at 40 percent of the total funds contributed by the rich nations through I.D.A. to the poor nations, the United States was putting up less of its gross national product than 14 of the 111 most prosperous countries. Nevertheless, though inflation bus reduced the value of I.D.A.'s soft loans by almost 30 percent in the last few years, and though starvation is an immediate problem in most of the countries con- cerned, the vote for relief in the house wasn't even close. If this were an isolated case of na- tionalism, it might be passed over as a regrettable and correctable offense, but the tide of nationalism is running strong in the world again, and there is little doubt that the vote in the house will probably be popular with the voters in this country. Wherever you look in the advanced countries today, you will find leaders ar- guing for a new world order and pointing to the monetary crisis and.the energy crisis as evidence that this is an increasingly inter-dependent world, requiring mutual aid and cooperative action between nations. But at the same time, many of these same nations turn protectionist whenever they get in trouble. Europe is trying to James Reston form a more cooperative union, but when Holland irritates the Arab oil-producing countries, the Europeans leave the Dutch to fend for themselves. Likewise, though Europe is engaged in the most delicate monetary negotiations in order to bring stability to its curren- cies, the French float and devalue the franc on their own. Now it is the house of representatives that recognizes the danger of world hunger .but votes against relief. The leadership on both sides of the aisle was appalling during the debate. A White House preoccupied with its per- sonal and legal problems gave US bill very little support in fact, the President's name was seldom-mentioned by his house the Democrats were just as bad. Rep. George Mahon of Texas, who is normally a sensible man except in elec- tion years, warned the house that he wouldn't be for appropriating the money requested by the President, even if Ihe house authorized it, and Rep. Wayne Hays, Ohio's gift lo diplomacy, was even worse. He argued that money voted for the poor countries would merely be used lo pay for higher gas and oil prices, and thus would probably wind up in (he pockets of Ihe oil sheiks. This was like saying that if you're gouged by the ric'.i, you are justified In turning round and kicking the poor. The situation is particularly awkward now, not only because Ihe World Bank will run out of "soft-loan" funds at Ihe end of June, but because no nation is obliged to meet ils commitments lo I.D.A. if other nations refuse lo meet their quotas. Secretary of Stale Henry Kissinger and Secretary of the Treasury .George Shullz reacted immediately and strongly against Ihe house vote, but the following day, Kissinger weis condemiied on Capilol Hill for doing so. Accordingly, they are now tunilnf lo Ihe senate for a more careful reappraisal of the problem. Their aim Is lo gel Hie elecislon reversed or m least modified before Feb. II, when (lie world oil producers and consumers meet here lo discuss cooperative action on Ihe cost and distribution of fuel. can we e'Xpecl e'ooperallon on oil If we will nol hi relieve links. Mm COIII-ITSS Inw UN mind on m Ihe I're'Mldenl.   

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