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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 27, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Daily Record C. R. Weather High Saturday........... ;iil 11 p.m. Saturiliiy......... Barometer, rising 29.56 Humidity at 11 Wind direction and velocity at Gazette weather station at II p.m. W at is m.p.li. Sun rises Monday, sun sets, li: Year Ago Today High, -12; low, 30; rainfall, none. Births Mercy Jan. 25 Mr. and Mrs. Frank I'usaterl jr., 2000 Wash- ington nvcniie SE, a son. Births Luke's Jan. 25 the families o Donald U Miller of Swisher, daughter; Merrill Massurc, KiOt Thirty-fourth street NE, a son GUOI-KP II. Slonim, 270 Bornit; drive NW, a daughter; Deai McDcnnott, 2126 North Town place NK, a ilitughtor. Jan. 26 tbo families o nioliaril Prtmmilli. 3000 street SW, a son, and Terrj Muller, 3312 O nvemio NW, daughter. Iowa Deaths Brandon Isabella Hnrtl R2. Services Monday at 10, St Joseph's church, Marion. Rosa ry Sunday at 7, Baxter's in Marion. Calmar Thomas Malone 63. Services Tuesday at 11, St Aloysius church. Rosary Sun day and Monday at 8, French's where friends may call aftci 1 Sunday. Independence Mic ha e Kelly, 75. Services Monday a St. John's church. Ro- saries at 8 tonight and 3 Sun- day; wake service at 8 Sunday White's. North English G Faas, 77. Services Monday a Christian church. Po well's. Talo Hoy Albert Thomas 71. Services Monday at Turner chapel west. T r a e r Mrs. Amanda Moeller, 88. Services at Monday at Zion Lutheran church in Dysart. Overlon's. Victor Adaline Shaw, 73 Services Monday at 2, McAn- inch's. Whcalland Lucy Buxton Andresen. Chapman's. (Continued from Page 1.) Ing age (15 to 44 The official figures were re leased after UPI checked popu lation trends in every state anc the District of Columbia anc found that in 1973 the birth rate dropped to the lowest level since records first were kept in i number of states. The popula tion in some cases increased al a slower pace than had been predicted by demographers the people who keep track o. such trends only a year earlier. The contraceptive pill, the economic pinch and a host of other developments such as le- galized abortions were cited by different authorities as possible factors. California and New York, the two most populous states in the nation, recorded only fractiona increases in their- numbers in the past year. California's popu- lation rose by to'an es- timated while in New York it was up only to ,'100. Illinois Down Illinois may actually have losl people. According to the latcsl figures available from the Illi- nois department of public, health, the population was on 1973, a clror. of as against that of 12 months earlier. Despite the slowed population growth, the UPI survey found that outside the biggest states the increase in populations ap- peared to dip only slightly in most middle and sparsely- populated slates. A handful ol slates where unusual economic factors occurred we're the ex- ception. (Continued from Page 1.) was justified by the companies on Hie grounds that although the may have bwn liifjh, it assured security of supply and stability of price for a five- j year period. "Instead, we have had in- stability of price and insecurity of Church said, noting that the Arab-Israeli war has been blamed for these conse- quences. Church asked, "long before the war occurred, did the companies and the U.K. government have reason to be- lieve that the agreement was house of cards'. Should an at Icntlvc government have known Ihis from the start, and takei appropriate measures to streng then our market position? Migh we then have been better pro pared to confront the difficul lies we, and our allies, have Objections Church (old newsmen the state department objected to release of the testimony, claim ing it would damage Akins abilities to perform in his pros ent post as ambassador to Saudi Arabia. He said he mighl make other documents public il the state and defense depart mcnts and the National Securitj Council refuse his request tha they he declassified. Church's aides said Akins am; justice department anti-trusi lawyer were kept wailing in a New York law office in Janu- ary, 1971, while representatives of 39 oil companies met behind closed doors to design the anti- trust exemption they wanted. Akins said that though he com- mented on the agreement, it was basically written by the in- dustry. Church said Akins' testimony 'shows the subordinate if not iubservient role of the govern- ment in dealing with the oil in- dustry." "What best serves the oil companies best serves the American people is an assump lion we have indulged in too Church said. In other developments: The Nixon administration is weighing a proposal to help workers hunt new employmen: and relocate at government ex pense. J. Usery, Presiden: Nixon's newly appointed specia assistant f o r energy-relaW labor problems, says this is one of several possibilities for eas- ing the employment crunch. The head of the American Pc- r o 1 e u m Institute criticizcc congress Saturday for adopting a punitive attitude toward the oil industry without getting down to the fundamentals ol solving the energy problem. AP 'resident Frank Ikard told UPI n an interview that he deplores .he "shrill voice" being used b> critics of the oil producers. A house subcommittee has subpoenaed two interior deparl- nent officials in an investiga- ion of the recent million ease of oil shale lands in Co- orado. Rep. John Dingell (D- chairman of the small business subcommittee, said the department originally estimated .lie value of the land as only million. The five big oil companies serving Hawaii were called be 'ore a special hearing Saturday o disclose how much gasoline they have stored in the slate which begins the nation's firsl mandatory rationing program Monday. Highway fatalities'in 18 states enforcing lower speed limit: were down an average of 25 per cent for last December from a 'car earlier, the National High vay Traffic Safety Administra- tion said Saturday. Non-Contract NEW WANT AD DEADLINES PM Wed. AM Sat. AM Sot. Corrections and cancella- tions B AM 'III 9 AM day ol publication. 'Til AM Sat. for Sunday. Want Ad Dept. Closes at Noon Saturday DIAL 398-8234 e- (Continued from Page I.) James Schlcsingcr, who las denied the spy ring cxislcd,  rojudicing the upcoming New fork trial of former Ally. Gen. John Mitchell and former Com- nercc Secretary Maurice Slans. new starting dale was an- louncod. fail tin- il j'l'nm PIERSON'S ISM ICU.IS BLVD. NW CENTURY BURIAL VAULTS Since 11127 Cliiirles, llnnrlolla, It Churli's Jr. I'ochobriidsKy MT. VKIINON IIP. S.K. illU-T'lVK The Cedar Kapids Gazette: Sun.. Jan. 27, 1974 Obituaries G. L. Peet Cj.U Peel, a former resident from Iowa Falls, and was owner and operator of the C.H. Blom Df Cedar Ilapids and who for- incrly operated a hatchery in Kly, died Friday at his home in Corona, Calif. Services will be I held there Monday. Cedar Rapids firemen extinguished a blaze which started in the attic of a three-story home at 1013 Third avenue SE, shortly after noon Saturday. Lisa Lane, three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lane, was listed in fair con- dition Saturday night at Mercy hospital with burns on her hands, face and feet suffered in the blaze. The fire caused extensive damage to Ihe attic and heat, smoke and water damage throughout the rest of the house. Cause of the fire is still under investigation. More Layoffs in Auto Industry Are Predicted DETROIT (AP) With auto sales off 30 percent and stocks of big cars still at record levels, .he nation's automakers may lave to extend the cutbacks that have virtually wiped out more than jobs. General Motors has warned another employes that hey will be subject to layoffs [or "varying periods of time" between now and the end of March, and Ford has an addi- tional workers on tempo- rary furloughs. Industry analysts estimate 'hat stockpiles of new cars dropped only slightly following .he first wave of plant shut- downs and layoffs in December. Thurs far in 1974, 64.175 workers have been given indefi- nite layoffs by the auto firms. This includes at GM, at Chrysler and at Ford. The automakers still are sit- ing on about 1.6 million autos far ahead of the previous leak of 1.46 million in .1969, vhen the inventories were more evenly divided among different car sizes. Now, because of concern over .he availability of fuel, the makers.report a 110-day supply of the big slandard-sized models. At the same time, small car supplies are at what is consid- ered to.be the lowest possible loint about 15-20 days' worth. David Sullivan Charged in Crash David Sullivan, 21, of Man- chester, has been charged with driving left of center after a car accident Saturday afternoon in he 6600 block of C avenue NE vhich resulted in injuries to limsclf and another person. Sul- ivan and Susan Ovcl, 24, of 2031 3ark avenue SE, were treated at it. Luke's hospital and released. Police said Sullivan was going south on C avenue and attempt- id to pass a car. The Ovcl car, leaded north, attempted to ivoid the Sullivan car, but went iroadside in the road. Sullivan's car struck Mrs. Ovcl's car in he right side. Hospitals Urged To Be Ready for Flu Increase DBS MOINES (UPI) State lealth department officials Sat- urday warned hospital adminis- trators that a significant in- crease in admissions can be an- ticipated if the current flu out- break continues. A department spokesman said school absenteeism has exceed- ed 10 percent in five Iowa coun- ties, and that additional out- breaks may be forthcoming. Counties where the absenteeism rate was greater than 10 percent during the last week were Clay- ton, Fayette, Mitchell, Dickin- son and Union. Schools Closed The spokesman said that "se- veral schools have been closed because of absenteeism which has been associated with symp- toms consistent with influenza." In addition, Ihe department advised school officials and hospital administrators to take steps to cope with the possi- ble flu epidemic. "Hospital administrators may anticipate an increased demand 'or sp-ace and staff during the next few weeks as the epidemic continues, which it can he ex- pected to do if it is indeed influ- the official said. "It may advisable to postpone elec- tive admissions during this period and to curtail all but es- sential hospital visiting privi- leges." However, the department's in- fectious disease control division said that "closing of schools is not a recommended measure 'or controlling an outbreak of suspected influenza in a com- munity although unnecessary congregation of large groups should be avoided." School closings, Ihe depart- ment said, may be practical iccausc of "excessive absen- eeism among students and fac- u 11 y preventing meaningful operation." Gultcnbcrg schools, closed ast week, were to reopen Mon- day. However basketball games Saturday night and, next Tues- day night were canceled. Seek Virus Type The Iowa official said Wiscon- sin health officials have isolated an influenza type B virus from three patients in the LaCrosse area and that school closings have been reported in the neigh boring states of Illinois, Min nesota and Michigan. "Pending laboratory iden lification of an agent causing the current outbreaks in Iowa, i seems reasonable to consider il to be influenza, possibly the same as isolated in [he spokesman said. Charge C.R. Woman With False Report Joanna Marie Jagerson, 20, of 209 Seventh avenue SW, was charged Saturday with making a false report to police. According to police, the charge stemmed from a report she made to police Wednesday concerning some of her checks which were supposedly lost. She signed a promise to ap- pear and was released. fHKSII I'mmpl III) I I.mVlill SHOP 5008 Center PI. Ud. N.E. 39.1-5565 riNlr. MEMORIALS SINCE 1892 203 14th Ave. SE Phone 364-4439 Markers, Monuments and Private Mausoleums when words aren't enough send sympathy with flowers FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 PHONE ANSWERED 24 HOURS EVERY DAY Struck by Car, C.R. Youth, 16, Listed as Fair A 16-year-old Cedar Rapids ioy was listed in fair condition at Mercy hospital Saturday night after he was hit by a car on Waconia avenue SW near its ntersection with J street. Duane Williams, son of Mrs Elma Williams, 909 Tenth ave nue SW, suffered a skull frac ture and head cuts. Police said he was struck by car driven by Richard Magoon 49, route two. Magoon was head ing east on Waconia when th Williams boy appeared in fron of the car running west, polic said. Magoon was unable to stop o the wet pavement. No charge; were filed. Michael McAlerney Charged with Assault A rural Cedar Rapids man las been charged with assault with intent to do great bodily in- ury after allegedly threatening a woman with a knife. Michael McAlerney, 22 who isted his address as highway 94, posted bond and was after he was arrested on the charge Saturday. Deborah Brady, 116 Second ivenue SW, told police McAlcr- icy threatened her with a knife early Saturday at her apnrl- ncnl. Rites Monday for Roy Thomas, Palo PALO Roy Alberl Thomas 71, died Wednesday following a jrief illness. A longtime Palo resident, he vas born April 2, 1902, at Todd- ville. He was a retired employe of the Pickwick Co. Surviving are two sisters, Anna Mae Mefferd of Glenview, 11., and Charlotte Rebelski of !edar Rapids, and two brothers, John Thomas of Cedar Rapids and Paul Thomas of Marion. Services: Monday at i.m. in Turner chapel west, Cedar Rapids. Burial: Dunkard cemetery. Friends may call at .he chapel. unlil his retirement in 1966. He was a member of First Luther- an church and the Keen Agers club. j Surviving are his wife; a Clarence H. Blom (daughter, Mrs. Marlys Purkisof Clarence H. Blom, 74, of 921i'f "II.; a son, Allen, of lakland road NE, died Saturday ('odar RaPlds: two following fternoon lness a short lemorial. Friends may call at Burners cast after 5 p.m. Sun- onc f'cr> Christensen of Oak Park, III., and one brother Andrew, of He was horn June 5, 1899, urlington and was married to he former Senora Swenson on are pcndmg at First an. 21, 19113, in Ames. He had uthcran church' Burlal: Cctlar ccn a resident of Cedar Rapids ;nce 1942 when he moved here City Briefs (Mare liriaj on Page RA) Returned Home Naomi oran, 715 Eighteenth street SE, as returned from Oklahoma ity where she was called for ic death of her brother, Hugh Kecnan, a former Marion esident. Purse Stolen Webber, 950 Third street, Marion, re- orlcd her purse worth and ontaining In cash and over 50 in food stamps was taken aturday while she was shop- ing at K mart east, 180 Collins oad NE. Coat Taken coat valued at 100 belonging to Gary Smejkal, 440 Fruitland boulevard SW, 'as reported taken from a coat oom at the Roosevelt hotel Fri- ay night. Convalescing De- muth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. oe Becker, is convalescing at er parents' home after break- ng her leg. Her infant son is also visiting. Music Stolen Dam- nann, 802 Fifteenth avenue SW old police a stereo tape player vorth two speakers wortl and a tape were taken 'rom his car parked at his resi dence Friday night. Cub Scoufs Pack following boys received awaroVs at Starry school, Marion: David Luzum, Scott Van Wcy, Paul Ward, Todd Hogan, Bryan Stow, Allen Slow, Tim Hogan, Brad Adams, Mike Hnran, Peter Christiansen, Todd Fuller, Frank Reynolds, Mark Cracraft. TEAHEN FUNERAL HOME j Since 1936 I Marian F. Tcahcn Elden li. Rohn OWNKR MORTICIAN Phono 364-6627 600 First Ave. NW JOHN E. LAPES flowers Since 1909 Convenlonf downtown location 308 Third Avenue 5.E. 365-0511 only finvnt in Tin' I'nniilii'K WV Han' .S HAXTKR MKMOKIAI, CHAPELS MAltlON: ,177-15118 11 blocks nnrlh of Library MT. VUI1NON: nllS-Rlillli Illock west (if Pusl Office Services Monday for Isabel Hartl, Brandon BRANDON- Isabel.Alic Hard, 82, of Brandon, widow o Albert Hartl, died Friday in a Cedar Rapids hospital followinj a short illness. She was born Mar. 18, 1891, a ily, and was married to Alberl corge Hartl in Cedar Rapids She was a member of St. John's Catholic church in Indepen- e'hce. Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Joseph A. Kopecky of Marion, three grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and one brother, Gilbert Hovorka Ely. Services will be 10 a.m. Mon- day at St. Joseph's Catholic church, Marion, by the Rev. Justin Kane. There will be a Ro- sary at 7 p.m. Sunday at Baxter memorial chapel, where friends may call beginning at a.m. Sunday. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery. Woman Arrested for Drinking on Highway A Cedar Rapids woman was arrested Saturday on a warrant from Jasper county charging her with using or consuming liquor on a highway. Patricia Tinstman, 30, of 521 Eighth avenue SE, posted bond on the charge and was released. Donald Lee Duncan Donald Lee Duncan, 69, of 393 emorial drive SE, died Satur- ay following a long illness. He ad been vice-president of edar Rapids Transfer and ioragc and retired in 1973 after 4 years with the company. He was horn May 29, 1904, at olumbus City and had been a edar Rapids resident for 50 :ars. He was married to Viola Gcchow on May 28, 1939, at :anwood. He was a member of the Cen- Park United Presbyterian lurch, the Elks club, Cedar apids Rotary club, and the edar Rapids Chamber of Com- icrce. Surviving are his wife; one on, Dr. David J. Duncan of ocalello, Idaho, and two grand- lildren. Services will be 2 p.m. Mon- ay at the Cedar Memorial hapel of Memories with the lev. Allen S. VanCleve of the entral Park United .Presby- erian church officiating. 3uriah Cedar Memorial. Friends may call at the funer- 1 home after 3 p.m. Sunday md at the chapel from 9 a.m. Monday to p.m. Friends, if hey wish, may contribute to the Central Park United Presby- erian church memorial fund. Memorial Services Kcdics, Fred F. will be p.m. Monday at Trinity Lutheran church by the Rev. Richard Osing and the Rev. Richard Thompson. Burial: Cedar Memorial ceme- tery. Friends may call at Turner west until 9 p.m. Sun- day and at the church from 10 a.m. to p.m. Monday. The casket wilt not be opened after :he service. Macy, Bessie Graveside services a.m. Monday at STew Providence by the Rev. jloyd McDonald. Friends may :alt at Turner west until 9 p.m. Junday. Chapman, Fred loon Monday at Turner east by Dr. John P. Woods. Burial: e d a r memorial cemetery, 'riends may call at Turner east ntil a.m. Monday. The asket will not be opened after he service. Mottinger, Merry Ellen 3 p.m. Monday by the lev. Ernest Larson at Turner hapel west. Burial: Linwood emetery. Friends may call at 'urner west after 1 p.m. Sun- ay and until p.m. Mon- ay. The casket will not be pened after the service. Thomas, Roy Albert 'urner chapel west' at .m. Monday. Burial: Dunkard emetery. Friends may call at 'urner west. [he OMmr laptJus ferfic Established In 1883 by The Gazette .o. and published dally and Sunday at 500 Third Ave. SE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52406. Second Class Postage paid at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Subscription rales by carrier 85 cents a week. By mall: Night edition and Sunday o Issues S2.2S a month, a 'car: Afternoon editions and Sunday 7 ssues a month, 525 a year. Olner states and U.S. territories WO a year. mall subscriptions accepted In areas laving Gazette carrier service. The Associated Press Is entitled exclu- sively to the use for republlcatlan at all the local news printed In this newspa- per as well as all AP news dispatches. Comforting, Warm, Dignified... Feeling words, words that families served by the CEDAR MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME have used In describe candlelit services in the Old English Chnpel of Memories. fedarjtjworiat FUNERAL HOME (innrlm, HowrShop Ave. NE 3934000'   

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