Cedar Rapids Gazette, January 27, 1974, Page 2

Cedar Rapids Gazette

January 27, 1974

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Sunday, January 27, 1974

Pages available: 244

Previous edition: Saturday, January 26, 1974

Next edition: Monday, January 28, 1974

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About Cedar Rapids GazetteAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Pages available: 3,725,507

Years available: 1932 - 2016

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.14+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : Cedar Rapids Gazette, January 27, 1974

All text in the Cedar Rapids Gazette January 27, 1974, Page 2.

Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 27, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa legit™E BIRTHS I Minto. How Hip)] ll Should Ile (In Section A) Iona I1 Ii Indus Arr Changing (In Section B) Section A Weather — Mostly cloudy aud cooler Sunday, high in the low 30’s. Partly cloudy Monday w i t Ii high in the .'id's. VOLUME 92 NUM BKK 18 MM * CUDAK RAPIDS, IOWA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1974 CITY FINAL 35 CENTS ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NKW YOUK TIMES Nixon Fund Charge Is Discounted By John Crewdson New York Times Service WASHINGTON No evidence to substantiate widely publicized rumors of the existence of a “secret trust fund” belonging to President Nixon bas been found thus far by investigators for the senate Watergate committee, according to knowledgeable sources. One source confirmed that, although the committee’s staff spent much of last fall tracing the rumors to a Florida bank executive, it eventually concluded that ‘‘there was just nothing there.” The committee's conclusion was supported bv a month-long investigation by the New York Times into reports that a $1 million investment fund, made up of illegal corporate contributions, was being held for the President in the Key Biscayne bank headed by Charles “Bebe” Rebozo, Nixon’s close friend. Bragging The rumor began to spread sometime last year, apparently! after Franklin Deboer, then the head of the hank’s trust department, told a female acquaintance that he managed private “portfolios” for Nixon, Rebozo and Robert Abplanalp, the aerosol millionaire who is also a close friend of the President. Deboer, then a vice-president of the Key Biscayne Bank and Trust Co., who later resigned under government pressure, acknowledged in November that he earlier told the woman he earned a “substantial salary outside of the bank” for administering the three investment portfolios But he insisted. “Everything I said to (her) was an absolute fabrication. Don't ask me why I UPI Telephoto said it. Verifies Statement Fronf-Line Farewell An Israeli and an Egyptian soldier bid farewell to each other at Kilometer 101 on the cease-fire line, as Israeli forces begin to pull back from frontline positions. New Vitamin C. Colds Data The woman, who asked to remain anonymous, verified in a subsequent interview that Deboer told her last year that “I happen to work for Mr. Rebozo. Mr. Abplanalp arni Mr Nixon.” and talked of managing their portfolios. In an Oct. 28 news conference,! Nixon sharply denied reports of such a trust fund carried by the American Broadcasting Com pany and other news organizations. which he accused of knowing that the reports “were untrue” when they were published and broadcast Nixon's denial was reinforced by a statement of his personal finances, released by the White House last month It showed that he held no stock and that his only major investment, except for Florida and California real estate holdings, was $250,000 in savings certificates on deposit in Rebozo’s bank There were these other Watergate* developments: A President may he impeached and removed from office1 for an offense1 that need not be a violation of criminal law Nine persons were1 arrested on the Linn county according to a study released controlled substances charges in i)on<] «.a(.h Saturday by the Ne w York City a    raid    by the Cedar    Rapids Bar Assn. At the heart of the Metro Narcotics squad    about matter is the determination by 8    45 p m    Saturday, congress that the* office holder    Seven    adults and two    juve- in question has demonstrated by rules were arrested at I8;i5 Mains aet ions that he is unfit to'dison street NE and large quan- ATLANTA (UPI) — A world person to person, expert on vitamin deficiency    Dosage? and nutrition gave powerful sup-    “it    Us    hard    to    give    a    figure    of port Saturday to the theory that    the    amount    of    vitamin    C    to large doses of vitamin C prevent colds. Dr. Ceoffre'y Bourne, editor of the World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of seven books on nutrition, said a growing accumulation of scientific evidence backs the conclusion that daily consumption of vitamin C prevents colds or lessens the symptoms. Bourne, who thus gave support to the controversial theory advanced in 1970 bv Nobel prize of Medicine and the World News, Bourne Lowest U.S. Station Birth Rate In History Surveys Hint Shortage Worst Yet By Associated Press    supplies were fair or low. The The end of the month brought Automobile Legal Aswi. predict- j another round of Ions lines, Ii- ed luh,s "<*k™ds «as? Inc •. j ,    .    .    .    , crunch won r he “the worst mited sales and early closings at gasoline stations around the! divers on the Massachusetts! nation on Saturday.    turnpike during the evenirfg "Ifs the worst that I havf! ru!,h1 lTr ***** lined “P 30 se™ in tho past 12 months,” and 411 deep al open stations. history combined with!said Avery Upchurch, executive The (Connecticut Motor Club Secret Oil Anti Trust Break Told Gazette Leased Wires WASHINGTON - The ad it) United Press International The lowest birth rate in the nation’; other factors in 1973 to drop U. director of the North Carolina said it didn t expect many sta- ministration secretly gave the S population growth to its slow- ^erv*ce s,ati°n Assn.    i    tionss    to    be    open    for    more    than    oil    industry    broad anti trust ex- I est pace since before i w ar 11. The World!    An Associated Press survey    half a da^ T,h(‘re secnT to„be    eruptions beginning in 1970 so it showed that although the situa-    more statlons closing earlier, a    could form a solid front against lion varied widely from area to    sP°kcsman said-    Arab threats to nationalize the population    edged    up    a    area jn somfl piaces ft was    In the West, Wyoming of-    companies, according to senate scant 0.8    percent    to    stand    at|more SPV(.rP than during the    Ticials said supplies were gener-testimony made public Satur- 210.740.000 as of Jan. I, from ^(>w Year’s holiday when aer- ally sufficient. A check by the day. 209.123.000 a year earlier, ac- vjce stations ran out of gasoline California auto club showed 32 James Akins, former head of cording to Census Bureau fig* and dimply shut down until the percent of the stations planned the state department office of ures released Saturday.    npw shipments arrived. Stations to stay open on Sunday, com- fuejs an(j energy, told a senate The rise, which includes seemed to be running out sooner pored to 26 percent in the last subcommittee last October the Chicago Closings births, immigrants and return this month iof servicemen from overseas! while taking out deaths and emigrants. was the lowest annual ^ a dozen Chicago gats Ma-' increase since 1938.    lions usually open until 9 p.m. And, records show, it is bare- ou Fridays., eight wore closed ly half the rate of increase the *)V P m> Three of the four country saw in the so-called remaining stations were limit I “baby boom” of 1947 to 1961 in* sa‘es and ,th<> f?artl? had a line of cars four blocks long week of December. exemptions were made on grounds of “national interest” based on fears the Arabs would take over American-owned firms. The testimony was made pub--    I    lie    by    Sen.    Frank    Church    (D- I \U i j4*ri Own ldab°L chairman of the sub- Truckers To Vote on End committee on multinational cor- when it averaged 1.6 to 1.8 per-1 l,n? .Ul ,rar® l)locks ,on^i YOUNGSTOWN Ohio (API — orations. Church will launch an cent annually.    ‘T'Twl'i,'l^h^Marv Independent .truckers in ohio investigation Wednesday on A spokesman hr the Mary- ^,1^ Slmday <m o(fer whether U.S. oil company influ- Closer to ZPG land Independent Retail Service I Projections by the National ■L. ..    ~    D    Aoc.„    -tA    Claimed at ending a violence-1ence over foreign policy has led National    station    Dealers    Assn. Raid on y marr(,d three-day shutdown, ai to current oil price and supply based    on    hard    figures for the    <n th<‘    Baltimore arf>a    would    t^o^e/camc    * Meanwhile. Vice-president first IO months of    im show that    Rafter    scattered shootings and    Ford said he supported "some percent    of the    stations    would-0,h,'r    ads of violence were re-    reasonable rollback rn domes- Inn hv SuhtfHu*, mph*    ported    in    several    areas    in    Ohio    tic oil prices. He said that after run out by Saturday night    ^    Pennsy|van|a    ita|king with federa, cnergy czar Continental Oil Co. said    all    (;Porj,P Kynn president of the    William    Simon,    he concluded comoanv-operatcd s t a t i o    n s    ^kron-based Council of Inde-    that domestic oil    prices could be would be closed Saturday    as    perKjent Truckers, declined to    cut. But    he said he could not release details of the proposal    offer any    specific    figures. which he said came from offi- J    No    Concessions dais in Washington, but he said Aking testified that the gov-the offer is also aimed at end-! ernmen{ extracted no conces-mg another shutdown threat- sjfflns from (he 0|, mdust jn re. < n' d for  .....  of    January.    He    !|urn for thc anti.trust protec. ; the birth rate for all of last year was 15 for every 1,000 people, the lowest in the nation’s his 1 tory. While complete figures are not available, the small population growth and the low birth rate brought the country doser to ZPG • zero population growth. The slowdown in population growth in 1973 was not unexpected by officials who point to a rate of below one percent well as Sunday this weekend to try to stretch out allocations until new supplies arrive Feb. I. The company operates stations in Minnesota, Wisconsin. Iowa, Illinois. Indiana and North Dakota. >aid a meeting would be held James Rawlings, a spokes- tion, and was shut out of the in- nod.in in Barberton    dustry-Arab negotiations intend- since 1970. The birth rate hit a man for Murphy Oil Co., said The shutdown, called to Pr0~ cd to avoid nationalization, low of 17.5 per I.(HK) in 1968 rose about half the firm's 300 Spur test soaring fuel prices, low Lk,sujte ^e government-ap-slightly over the next two years stations in Minnesot"    ,i~u-    —1    I and Michigan aln and then fell back again. But this period had at om i time been expected to see sharp lh'1 rest will be able to jumps in population because of open until new supplies arrive iota, Wisconsin speed limit; and freight rates. vcd oj| s0|i(larjlyi the mm. .ady are out of I has been confined mostly to    sj    .    an'    agreement gas anil expressed doubts that Ohio and has kept hundreds of^™c    Organuation of Petro- slav trucks drivers off the roads. |(.um E x p* f,, n g t(KlntrR.s One truck driver was shot in (OPEC) on Valentine’s day, j 1971, for a five-year production program which would have Journal Medical said. The journal reported a study take.” he said, “but I would conducted by a group of doctors think that a figure of around a at lovn boarding school, an half a gram, or SOO milligrams, clementan school tor Navajo (taken on a daily basis! would children at Steamboat. Ariz be sufficient for most people.” he said. He fsaid many scientists now believe that persons exposed to colds, and particularly those in a cold climate, have an increased requirement for vitamin C. The latest evidence backing the conclusion that vitamin C prevents colds or reduces and winner Dr. Linus Hauling, said shortens the severity of the the cold preventive effects of symptoms appeared this month taking Vitamin C varies from in tin* prestigious New England Cedar Rapids Police Nab 9 in Drug Raid on each sub- ('out I nile in the office m ques lion," the study said Former While House ehief “plumber” Ugli Krogh has re vealed tin* existence of a foot-thick study detailing the work of a Pentagon spy ring established to steal secrets from thc White House, thc Chicago Tribune re ported In a reference to Defense Sec (Continued Page 3, < ’n! 2* titles of substances believed to Ronald Im* mariju ana and cocaine were avenue confiscated. Charged with two counts each of possession of controlled substances with intent to deliver were Michael Hemmingson, 24, Gary Holub. 23, and Mania Charged with two counts of possession of controlled stances were Bradley Gray, 19, of Center Point; Pisa Mahoney 19. of 2033 Shorewood drive NE; Kratzer, 25, of 805 I Marion, and Robert Bowers. 25. of Center Point They are being held in the Linn county jail on $2,500 bond A 11 year old girl and 15 year old boy aho arrested at tin1 Madison street address The study involved 641 children and was conducted over a 14-week period last year. Fewer Sick Days It showed that although there was no difference in thc number of respiratory episodes between the vitamin (’-treated group and those not in the study, those given vitamin C had fewer days of sickness “Significantly, more children on vitamin C had no sick days observed in th*1 periodic survey. And in addition, treated children with higher blood ascorbic acid levels had fewer symptomatic days noted than those with lower levels ” The other study, Bourne said, involved a group of 56 Canadian soldiers rn maneuvers in the Arctic The study showed that taking vitamin C cut the incidence of colds from 24 to lh percent. In addition to the reduced number of colds, the duration of .symptoms such as headache, general fatigue, nausea and ifth fever lasted only half as long as usual. There were a few areas where    the leg Friday night in Youngs- gasoline was available but i town and other shootings were th. ro wore no customers be-    reported in other areas There br,mRht"lho"oi'KC mom'berTan cause motorists have become    were also reports of rock throw-    .    *ln    hj.j- usodto the weekend shortages. Jinn at moving trucks.    Akins    said    that    agreement The problem    is people just    sheriffs deputies r e p o r t e d    was wc|i on    ils wav t() breaking aren I traveling    said Andy An-    three bullets struck a milk truck    down whcn    the itctober war donjon. an attendant al a st a hon ()n interstate 75 near Kootstown bri)kt. jn ,hc Mid-East. Ile in ( ullage (.rove, ti is I hey re ln northern Portage county ear- sajd in hjs view the fundamcn-afraid to come    un here from    |v Saturday, and another truck    u, ri,ason w ,he rapld|y ris. Chicago.fur aweekendtrip    was reported hit twice by bul-    Lg demand    for oi, jn tha West Die New Orleans branch of lets as it traveled along Inter-    . the steady increase in thc number of women of child bear (Continued Page 3. Col l.i Tornado Kills Baby, 20 Hurt In Southeast By Th* Associated Press Tornadoes touched down in three southeastern states Satur- 1^** American Automobile Assn.|state 271 in day night, killing a nine-month- sa,d >t cheeked 28 stations and County. old baby in eastern Alabama,]found only two were limiting A Union Carbide truck was reinjuring 29 persons and causing purchases.    ported    forced off Interstate 77 damage in scattered areas, of    Northeast Hard Hit    south    of Akron by a car lull of finals said    I    men,    who then smashed its The nine-month-old uniden-i    partic    headlights, cut its air hoses and ularlv    hard    hit    loog    the driver’s keys, police The    American    Automobile    said.    There were reports of Assn,    in    Massachusetts    said    similar incidents in other areas. . and Japan, combined with a northern Summit gpQwjpg understanding by tile Arabs that they provided an irreplaceable resource Justification Church said the agreement (Continued Page 3, Col 2) 1973 Camp Budget Closed, Balance Carried Forward (HIO were Dudley, IU.    who    all    listed    1835    charged with    two counts each    of Madison street    NE    as    tlu'ir    possession of controlled sub address    stances and    were released    to The three    are    being held in    their parents. loiluil's t Illicit Ic It doesn’t matter who won or lost — the most important tiling is who got tin* contract to do the shaving cream com-menial*    iiu.vr.uht titled baby was killed and three persons were injured in a tor nado that touched down in rural, eastern Alabama. Two mobile homes were reported dc stroyed at Pot Ash. where the death occurred. In Columbus, Miss., a twister destroyed several trailers in a mobile home park and injured The books are closed for members, bv staffing changes 18 persons, none seriously. Camp Good Health for 1973.    and other efficiencies. The com-; Another tornado    hit a    mobile    Budgeted    for    the 1973 opera- mittee also voted an expression home park just    south    of La    turn was a    figure of $17,671 67 ,of appreciation to all of    tin1 faycttc, La . and flattened one Contributions from Gazette .sub- many donors to Camp Good home. Its owner was hospital- 8 c r i b e r s and readers, the Health I zed A policeman said the camps only source of revenue, Their generosity made it |>os-smashed trailer “was right in totaled $I5,65;> 79 as of Saturday, siblc for 165 young people to altho middle of 30 or 40 other leaving lite fund $2,015 88 short tend the camp, which is situated trailers and none    of the    others    of budget.    on old highway 30 east of    its were wrecked “    However,    an    audit of the junction wit Ii highway 13 Charlie Brown of Woodland, year’s operation, with all bills in    ls operated by the Ala , said the twister which ap- and paid, revealed that 1973 ex ( hildren s Home of Cedar parently hit Pot Ash passed peases totaled oui) $14.693 51, Rapids. It provides a summer over Ins house and sounded like leaving a balance in contribu vamping experience to children! “a jet plane when it breaks the lions of $%2 28. sound barrier.” He sail! metal As a result, the    Camp Good    to attend    a    camp and wood paneling were drop- Health committee    voted unum-    Previously    reported {Mil out of the funnel cloud into mously Thursdav that expenses Ins front yard    be declared satisfied and the The New Orleans area had 1973 budget closed two to five inches of rain in 24 The balance will    be applied to hours aud authorities said some the 1974 budget, which is now Hooding resulted as several being prepared by the commit bayous rose above the west tee The savings were realized,' bank of the Mississippi river a c c o r ii i ii g lo committee who would not otherwise be able $15,195.31 lo ('.imp (iotid ll' ,lith from I lo* Gazette Co. employes land Moon noms In ut c to o r \ of It .tv ll .I |t ii I* I from Im family    2 i (Continued un Page 2A, ( bl 99 95 *5.00 OO Today s Index section a tat* N(WI    I .J,I D*«fh»    * City Hall Not#*    i Editorial*    a Report Card    ll Accent On Youth    ti SECTION B Iowa New*    1*11 N Frank Ny*'* Political Note* I Yow and Iowa    V T elev mon Tab)# Food    * Marion    Id Rued.nq    UIS Movie*    I a-lf Record Review*    lr Farm    ll It SECT ION C Social    I I# Around th# Town    I Naw Book*    T Travel    It SECTION O Sport*    IE Outdoor Iowa    I Financial    St* Niw York Stock*    to Want Ad*    ti II C rot* word    IS "J Parade Metaline    I lf Comic*    t-l ;

RealCheck