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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 25, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Butz Urges Lift Queen Of Price Curbs Adds On Baling Wire Beaufy To Show WASHINGTON (AP) Ag- riculture Secretary Earl L. Hiitz has asked the Cost of Living Council to let the price of baling wire rise so thai manufacturers will be en- couraged to boost production in time for the 1974 haying season. Low Margin "At controlled price levels manufacturers' margins are so tow thai they are not pro- Butz said Ihis week in a statement. "The Cost of Living Council reports it has this siluation under current review." Baling wire and twine tics were In short supply last year, and experts say the crunch will be worse in 1974 unless domestic producers are en- couraged to turn out more. For many years nearly all the baling wire and Iwine has been imported. But Japan, once a major source of wire, lias curtailed production sharply and domestic manu- facturers have not filled the gap. About 90 percent of the na- tion's hay crop is baled. And about four-fifths of that is twine-tied, representing most- ly hay that is fed to livestock on farms and ranches whare it is produced. Distance Shipping But wire ties are needed for bales shipped long distances, and the short supply has created many problems and higher costs. Henderson Resigns Charolais Position HOUSTON J. Scott Hen- derson, executive secretary of the American-International Charolais Assn., for 13 years, has resigned that position, effective immediately, Howard L. Johnson, president has announced Henderson became the asso- ciation's first executive secre- tary in I960 when the organi- zation had less than members and less then Charolais in its herd book. The association today is the nation's fourth largest beef breed with members and nearly one million cattle in its herd books. Roy Birk, director of shows for the association, was named acting executive secre- tary pending selection of a permanent successor to Hen- derson, Johnson stated. A recent estimate by the Kconomic Research Service in the Department of Agriculture says costs of twine alone in 1974 are expected to double, from around per 40- pound bale of twine to as much as per unit. One reason lor the twine scarcity was a reduction In fiber crops because of the 1371-72 drought In many East Africa countries which pro- duce sisal and other fibers. Supplies from Mexico, Por- tugal and Brazil have not been able to keep pace with demand. Ranks Fourth Producer groups, including the American National Cattle- men's Assn., would like the Cost of Living Council to allow price exceptions .for wire so that manufacturers will have larger operating margins and begin production. Baled hay, in terms of farm value, was the fourth most valuable U.S. field crop last year. Department analysts say it was worth billion, up from billion in 1972. Only corn at billion, soybeans at billion and wheat at SB.5 billion were val- ued higher in 1973. By Gordon Jackson DESMOINES (UPI) -Vow- ing to protect Iowa's family farmers, a Tama county law- maker this week introduced sweeping legislation aimed at prohibiting giant corporations and conglomerates from en- gaging in agricultural produc- tion in Iowa. Rep. Emil Husak CD- said his bill, entitled "The Family Farm Act of would combat a grow- ing trend toward big business moving in and taking over ag- ricultural production from the small family farmer. Wide-Range Under the legislation, any individual or business entity with more than ?3 million in assets or with million or more in stocks in a farm- related business would be barred from engaging in farming or owning rural land in Iowa. The bill states that farm- related businesses cover a wide range of enterprises such as farm supply manufacturers and distributors, meat Iowa Holstein Breeders Recognize Achievements AMANA George B. Jen- sen of Exira will receive the Iowa Holstein Association's highest honor, the distin- guished service award, Friday evening in Amana. Gene Pitzen of Stacyville will be presented the out- standing young Holstein breeder award, according to James Tompkins of Marengo, state president. Sixteen Iowa herds will re- ceive recognition for complet- ing, a year of testing with pro- duction averages of at least 30 percent over the breed average in both pounds of milk and pounds of butterfat. The herds include: Ray Crock, jr., Tiplon; Lurken and Crump, Anamosa; Jack Han- sen, Hudson; Milton Sime, Scarville; Harold and Larry Finch, Norwalk; Jay Slater, Olin; Robert Hagcn, Waler- ville; Melvin Mattke, Sumncr; Marie Chester and Sons, Plainfield; Elmer L. Abele, Leland; Richard Reinhart, Cresco; Earl Zumbach, Ryan; Edgar Vcrmeer, Boydcn; Quass Brothers, Ossian; Mrs. A 1 v i n Voelker and Sons, Ryan; and Rex ICleckner, LeRoy, Minn. Fifteen cows qualify as the highest producing in each age grouping on Dairy Herd Im- provement Assn. lest. The owners include; Iowa Stale university, Ames; Qiinss Brothers, Ossian; JOB Sch- neider, Fort Madison; Karle Olle, Princeton; Tom McAI- pin, Villisca; Andrew and Gerald Knipper, Earlvllle; Cletus J. Meyer, Wmicoma; George Schneider, Forl Ma- dison; Dale Gcrlnch, Toledo; Allen Schanbiichcr, Alklns; Emll and Tom Ketelscn, Char- lotte; Hnmlotl Brothers, Ut- Milton Slims, Scar- ville. BUILD A NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT ANY PUN-ANY SIZE ANY STYU-ANY DESIGN ANYWHERE WE Will BUIID ANY PLAN OUT OF OUR CATAIOO OR ANY PLAN OF YOUR OWN. FREE ESTIMATES CHHRrWrFUIWUHEO 30 DAY DELIVERY GUARANTEED PRICE HIGHEST QUALITY fRll COLOR CATALOG Prlco LIH-Qwmri till TY BENNETT, RUIIDER R.R. ELY, IOWA PH. (146.4360 U.S. HOMES A girl who has been serving as the state's ambassador for pork, Iowa Pork Queen Kathy Deal, 19, will at- tend the state spring mar- ket hog show in Cedar Rapids Feb. 22 and 23. Kathy, a sophomore at Iowa State university in Ames, traveled to Dallas and Denver last summer to attend supermarket, conventions as an Iowa pork representative. The two-day event will be held at Hawkeye Downs and is sponsored by the Cedar Rapids Chamber of Commerce agriculture bureau. The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Frl., Jan. 25, H74 7 Shrinking Reserve Boosts Grain Import Possibilities WASHINGTON wheat ex- ports and a ban-bones reserve arc forcing the N'mm a'lminislrati'H? In consider impwiini: grain from Canada so Americans can have their daily bread. The agriculture department says that by July 1 the nation's wheat cupboard will be holding 182 million bushels, down from the 300 million bushel reserve that had been forecast (inly last .Septfciiilier. The latest prediction would put the nation's wheat reserves on July 1 at the lowest since M.8 million bushels were on hand in 1947. II would be less than half the million bushels held last summer. lint USDA officials say there is no danger of a bread shortage. After a nrw report on I he wheat situation. Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Carroll 0. lirunlhaver conceded (hat the supply Is being crimped more severely than expected. The drain from exports, now estimated at 1.2 billion bushels for the year ending June .'III, will put further pressure on wheat supplies, he said. Imports I'ossbilc Bnmthaver added that the smaller reserve, "increases the possibility of importing wheat' or flour" from Canada. He said President Nixon is likely to suspend quotas so that flour millers and bakers will have more grain if they choose to buy it. USDA officials lowered their wheat-reserve forecast because they said foreign buyers had Insisted upon larger orders than believed probable. Exports of 1.2 billion bushels now expected for 1S73-74 will exceed last year's record ofl.184 billion. Nixon has the authority to suspend wheat import quotas, pegged at bushels a year, but has requested a report on the situa- tion from the U. S. Tariff Commission. May Not Wait However, lirunthaver indicated .Nixon may not wail for the final commission report, due Feb. 15, and soon may order a suspension in the quota. Nixon has acted freely during the past year in boosting dairy import quotas whenever lie fell it was necessary to increase foreign milk products to help American consumers. Thus, many officials feel the President would not hesitate to act on wheat Imports if It was felt additional grain would forestall sharp rises In bread prices. Brunthaver said the United Stales has started negotiations with the Soviet Union and Japan to see if some current orders for U. S. wheat can be delayed until next summer's harvest. The Soviets already have agreed to post- pone delivery of 18.4 million bushels through private exporters. Russia originally was expected to buy about 125 million bushels of U. S. wheat this season, down sharply from the huge orders totaling more than 400 million in 1972-73. But other countries, including the Peoples Republic of China, have increased their im- ports of U. S. wheat greatly from last war Open packers and insurance and banking firms that serve farmers. Husak said the trend toward big-business farming is dan- gerous not only because it pushes the efficient family farmer out of production but also because it could put the food Industry in the hands of a .few individuals who would then control supermarket prices. "My idea is to keep the. giants from absorbing the food Husak said. "The trend has been that way." "I want to make sure that we have more control on who comes into our state and tries C-O-M-I-N-G FARM AUCTIONS As Previously Advertised In The Gazette Farm Eight cows completing Dairy Herd Improvement Registry test have compiled records exceeding pounds of butterfal.in 365 days or less. The owners are Maynard Meyer, Dows; Harold and Larry Finch, Norwalk; Rex Kleckner, LeRoy, Minn., and Earl Gerlach and Sons, St. Ansgar. Finches are owners of five of the eight pound but- terfat cows. Sixteen Holsteins have earned the All-Hawkeye award as top show animals in each major show class. The champions are owned by B. Allan Holsteins, Prairie- burg; Bernard Van Deest and John Webber, Waterloo; Danny Moon, Monona; Lloyd Kroneman, St. Ansgar; Mar- shall Norman, Rutland; James Thompson, Huxley; John Slater, Olin; Jay and Scott Slater, Olin; Roger Ger- lach, SI. Ansgar; Dale and Ar- thur Gerlach, Toledo; Erbic Steffens, Dccorah, and Elmer Paper, Stockton. Saturday. Jan. 26: Close out sale, a.m., cattle, misc., mach., Paul Miller, 2 mi. SW ot Windhom. Close out sale, noon, mach.. grain, tin. goods, Arley Schulte, 4 ml. SW of Welkins. Close out sale, a.m., cows, mnch., hh. goods. Clair Trimble, 1 mi. E ot Toddviile. Auction sale, noon, moch., misc., hh. goads, Albert Reid, IV; ml. N of Urbono. Auction, a.m., Charolois, mach., trucks, Horold Emlg, ml, 5E ot Marlon, close out sale, a.m.. moch.. cattle, hogs, Clctus Weber, 3 mi. 5E of Ryan. Saturday, Feb. 2: Close out li a.m., moch.. teed. cor. Leonard Cos- tello estate, 3 ml. E ot Cedar Raoids. to create a monopoly on our land and farm products. This is becoming a problem and a majority of lowans are con- cerned." Land Demand The Democratic lawmaker said with the current world- wide food shortages and soar- ing feed grain prices the de- mand for Iowa's rich farm- land is booming. He said big business apparently is in on attempts to buy large tracts of land around the state. Husak, a farmer, said indi- viduals and corporate en- terprises are offering high per acre prices for large chunks of land, trying to buy at least one section of land in each transaction. He said land- hungry buyers tell landown- ers, "You name your price and the money is there." Husak said the family farm- er is Iowa's primary agricul- ture producer, and said his bill would help protect the small operators who might be driven out of business by the monopolistic practices of con- glomerate farming operations A key provision of the bill would require all large non- farming businesses to dispose of their financial interests in Iowa agricultural production within five years after the leg- islation becomes law. Husak said his bill was pat- terned after a North Dakota law which has withstood sev- eral court tests over whether large businesses can be legal- ly barred from agricultural production in a state. jfouse. J WIG> FLAH1D SCOTCH'WH1SH mm n nan wims in NU ht 111 9 pm 9 to 5 Reduced! Women's 88 Group 1 Orig. lo NOW Group 2 Orig. to NOW Group 3 Orig. lo NOW 88 Group 1 Orig. lo NOW Group 2 Orig. SI 2 lo NOW Group 3 Otig. 16 to NOW Group 4 Orig. to NOW S2 15 Women's Sportswear Reduced Group 1 Orig. 3.50 to NOW Group 2 Orig. to NOW Group 3 Orig. to 12 NOW Group 4 Orig. to NOW 1 7 Reduced Shirts Orig. 1.98 to N0w99't.2'8 Comes in knits and woven shirts for boys. Long or short sleeve styles. Colors galore. Broken sizes. Slacks Reduced Orig. 9.98 to NOW 688to1088 Handsome polyester or po- blends for men. Comes in prints and solids, some Penn Prest, too. Men's Shirts Reduced Orig. to NOW Long or short woven dress shirts of polyester-cotton. Comes in prints and solids. Colors galore. Broken sizes. JCPenney We know what you're looking for. Charge it at JCPenney, 109-Socond St. SE, Cedar Rapids, Open 5 Nights A Week Monday thru Friday Saturday 9-5, Sunday 12-5   

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