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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Thursday, January 24, 1974 - Page 5

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 24, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                DEATHS NEWORUANO Thursday night will find rain in the north Pacific states, changing to snow inland ever the upper Roclies. Rain will be noted from eastern Texas along the Gulf coast into the Mostly fair elsewhere. The Weather High temperatures Wednesday, low tem- peratures overnlcihl and Inches ot preclpl- Anchoraqc n 2 L.Anieles Atlanta ..67 58 1.35 Miami ..7772 Bismarck 17 7 Mln'apolis 2615 Chicago ..3532 N.Orleans 80672.12 Denver ..3915 New York 5837 ouluth ....19 .02 Phoenix ..6714 Honolulu HI 71 .15 Seattle ...IBM .is Houston ..5! 46 .24 Wash'qlon 7247 Extended forecast Chance of rain or snow Saturday night. Partly cloudy Sunday and Mon day. Lows upper '20s lower 30s Saturday and in the 20s Sunday and Monday. Highs mid 30s to lower 40s. C. R. Weather High Wednesday .............35 Low overnight ...............28 Noon Thursday...............30 2 p.m...................... 27 Precipitation .None Total for Jan. 0.66 for Jan.........v- 1.51 Barometer, rising .........30.26 Humidity at noon..........78% Wind direction and velocity at At Gazette weather station at 2 p.m. WWW at 10 mph. Sun rises Friday, sur -.sets, Year Ago Today High, 42 'Jow, 22; rainfall, none. Traveler's Forecast Friday Weather, Hi-Lo .......Cloudy 34-12 47-33 "Cincinnati ........Fair 48-39 .....-----Fair 43-35 'Des Moines ........Fair 45-25 .........PtCldy 39-20 ......Fair 38-3J City ......Fair 38-30 ecntlv street SW; each fined 130 and costs. Robert Lewis, 810 Hover avenue SE; fined 125 and costs. Oscar Hicks, iftanchestcr; Barbara Houar, 90 Cherry Hill road NW; Wendell 7ould, Hiawatha; Leon Yandee, 604 H avenue NW; Carolyn Smith, 1407 Mt. Vernon road SE; James .larvas, 272 Boice NW; each fined and costs. Ray Allenstcin, Fort Worth, Texas; fined and costs. Driver's license violation Randal Williams, 1247 Hazel drive NE; lined and costs, lames Henderson, 1430 E ave- nue NE; fined and costs, jinda Siemcring, 2106 L streel iW; fined and costs. Righl-nf-way violation Ronald Clausen, Mason City; fined and costs. Dennis Blood, Lisbon; fined S10 and costs. Failure to use signal Ru- dolph Richter, 1815 Fifth ave- nue SE; fined and costs. Paul City Falls ..Cloudy 34-20 ..PtCldy 53-35 ..PtCldy 46-23 .Fair 44-18 Degree Days "Wednesday 43 TTotal to date Jan. 23, 1973 of normal year .56.56 "'Total normal, year U Coralville Lake J'Pool level Thursday -----680.92 Births St. Luke's Jan. 23 To the families o: David Albright, 1319 Thirty- sixth street SE, a son; John J -R c Ii e r, 412 Thirty-seventh street NE, a son; Richard Lar- son, 417 Twentieth street SE, a 1 daughter; Robert Swcnson, 70C 'Thirty-fifth street, Marion, a "''son; D. Duane Peyton, Marion a daughter; James DeWald 1475 Tenth street, Marion, a daughter. Jan. To Mr. and Mrs 1: Ralph Cnty, 3019 Elaine driv NW, a son. 1 Jan. 24 To Mr. and Mrs Donald Owens, Palo, a daugh- ter. Marriage Licenses Alice Bohlman and Allyn Heiserman, both of Manchester Marcla Dyal, Cedar Rapids, and Lewis Lee, Shellsburg. Marriages Dissolved Diane Donald. and Donald E. Steven Michael Mc- Ladonna Lcc Dolezal. Barbara Ann and Joseph Newton Win- nie. Annulments Elizabeth Jeanne and Edwin Kilhurn. Fires Cai p.m. Wednesday. tine at Mt. Vernon road Fifteenth street SE. p.m. Malfunction slarm a I Third street and Six- teenth avenue SE. p.m. Wednesday. Defec- tive washing machine motor a 1922 Washington nvcnue SE. p.m. Wednesday. Ovnr- hcnlcil italinniiiliflci' motor al 3202 CnrrhiRc drive SK. Magistrate's Court Slimline Theresa Kindle 79 Thirty-sixth nvcnue SW; Dornn Welch, 1735 D strco SW; Susan VmitiR. MB Thir- It. John's Lutheran. Martii Bros. Litana Mrs. Clara McNal- y, 72. Services Friday at 3 Marion Lutheran church under. Sehutto'.s. Harpers Ferry Charles R frown, 81. Services al at Schutte's, Postvillc Burial in Castalia. Mt. Vernon Ray Collins 71. Services Saturday at 2 a Methodist church, Mechanics ville. Friends may call iorner's after 1 Friday. Martclle Raymond Schley Services Saturday at dt Martelle United Methodis church. Friends may call a Goeltsch's after 11 Friday. Vinlon Louis E. Hoe, 64 Services at Friday a White-Phillips'. Burial in Nor way cemetery. St. Olaf Elmer H. Schmal feld, 78, Services Saturday a 11 at Witt's, where friends ma call after Thursday Burial in Zion Lutheran ceme tery, Clayton'Center. Traffic signal Paul Brainard, violation route three Marion; Irma Stecklein, 3112 Bever avenue SE; Robert Gal- lie, 721 Seventh avenue SE; each fined and costs. Vehicle control- violation Tarn'ara Chaplin, 78 Thirty- third 'avenue SW; fined and costs. Starting parked vehicle when unsafe Hpnald Harris 3315 Eastern avenue NE fined and costs. Turning left at intersection Adelaide Cass, .1810 A ave- nue NE; fined and costs. Faulty equipment Jimmj Phillips, 1453 -Second stree SE; Lee Roy Wullner, 4900 Eas road SW; each fined and costs. Reckless driving: Jame; Pitlik, 326 Twenty-third stree drive SE; fined and costs. iowa Deaths Elberon Joe Vilimek, 71 Services Saturday at a Hrabak's, Belle Plaine. Anamosa Mrs. Mary Ellen Lohr, 87. Services Monday at II at St. Patrick's church. Me Namara-DeWachter. Earlville Ray Bush, Services Saturday at 10 at St Joseph's Catholic church. Rosa ry at 8 Thursday and scriptun service at 8 Friday at Clifton's where friends may call after Thursday. Van Home Mattie'Olsor Manship, 94. Services Friday a 2 at Friends church, LeGrand Fcllmet's. Elkport Mrs. Minni< Jaster, 86. Witt's, Elkadcr. Melvin Johnson 87. Services Friday at a Merry Ellen Mottinger Merry Ellen Mottinger, 22, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Moltingcr, 2125 Balsam drive V, died Wednesday night in a spital at Victoria, British Co- mbia, Canada, where she had en visiting her sister. Victoria police said death was (.'.sinned due to an overdose ol A ruling by the British olumbia coroner awaits com- ction of a police inquest. A 20-year resident of Cedar apids, Miss Mottinger hac een a student at Jefferson high hool and Kirkwood Communi college and was a member ol r i n i t y United Methodist lurch. She was born .tune 8 951, al Dennison. in addition to her irents are two sisters, Laura irie of Victoria B.C., and Julie nn Mottinger, at home, and er grandfather, Ernst Reuw- aat of Woodbine. Services: Turner chapel west t a time to be announced, urial: Linwood cemetery. The amily suggests that friends nay, if they wish, make momo- ial contributions to Trinity Inited Methodist church. (Continued from Page 1.) is essential the committe present publicly its completec investigation. He said full coop eration will be given the hous committee conducting the im peachment inquiry. Sources told Press that the Associate previously u: published material expected be brought out during the hea irigs includes evidence that Mi chell, against the advice of ant trust chief Richard McLarei gave Banner the go-ahead fi the Dunes acquisition at a.irfee ing March McLaren, the sources sai was not aware that he had bee overruled until he received memorandum from then-Fl Director J. Edgar Hoover e pressing concern that Danne Hughes aide Robert Maheu an attorney Edward formerly connected with 11 participating the proposed Nevada venture. Hoover reportedly believed would reflect badly on the FB if former agents became volved in a major gamblir operation. In another Watergate-relat development, o u s' t e d Wh' House counsel John Dean is lis ed as a prime governme witness in the case again former presidential aide Dwig Chapin being prepared by sp cial prosecutor Leon Jaworski Police: Policy To Release Evidence Following Trial The Cedar llapids de- partment has filed an explana- tion for not following a court order to turn over to the elcrk of court's office money the de- partment had held as evidence in a criminal case. District Associate Judge Anlh-lfine in the case. called to his attention that the police department no longer had custody of the In the pre- vious order the judge sustained a motion by the county attorney and the defense, directing that The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Thurs., Jan. 24, 1974 (Continued from Page 1.) go overseas, where production costs are cheaper and the re- sult has been the oil companies have made their effort overseas and not in the Unittd Jackson said. ony Scolaro last Wednesday or- dered the county attorney and the police department to explain in writing why the order had not been followed. SE, Oct. 8. 'Ihc judge said it had been Walkway System Expanding; Price Increases. Too The case involves William I {he money be applied to pay a; Jackson said Wednesday that Exxon, (he nation's larg- est oil company, last fall cut Gaines, 25, and his connection j off supplies of certain Arab oil with an armed robbery at Don's products to U. S. military Conoco, 2846 Ml. Vernon road products forces. Jackson indicated that the) Originally Gaines may have come re. charged with robbery with ,0 jssucd by ,he ference on Wednesday the oil embargo against the U.S. and The Netherlands must be con- tinued. He called for "measures to be taken against those who may be breaking it." He warned that the Libyan government might add to the punishment of the U.S. for its support of Israel by accelerating its nationalization of oil produc- tion and marketing. Jalloud also threatened "very serious results" if the oil-con- suming nations form a bloc gravation after he was arrested several hours after the holdup. However, the grand jury indict- ed him on a charge of com- pounding a felony. He was con- Mrs. Russell Brantner Ethel Brantner, 75, Van- ouver, Wash., a former Cedar lapids resident, and widow of lussell Brantner, died Wednes- ay morning in Vancouver fol- owing a short illness. Born June, 14, 1898, she was a icauty operator, for 22 years in Cedar Rapids. Survivors include six sisters Mrs. James McDowell and Mrs Oval Reid, both of Ceda Rapids; Mrs. M.C. Reid, Van eouver; Mrs. Roy Fall and Mrs l Hawkins, both of Portland Ore., and Mrs. Fred Hallwyler Oswego, Ore., and a daughter Mrs. Harold Bangs, Portland. Services: 11 a.m. Friday a he Vancouver funeral chape 3urial: Skyline memorial, Port and. Memorial Services Nemccek, Mary M. Al Saints Catholic church at a.m. Friday by the Rev. Ed miind J. J3ecker. Burial: St John's cemetery. Hosary: Tur ner cast at p.m. Thursday oy Father Becker. Roth, Mildred E. a.m. Saturday, at Sacred Heart Catholic church, Pocahontas, by the Revs. Donald and Richarc Hies. Burial: Calvary cemetery Pocahontas. Friends may call at the Beatty-Beurle chapel im til 9 p.m. Thursday, where Rosary Will be recited at p.m. (Continued from Page 1.) month, but unless we soon enac reforms they will not know much their federal funds wi be until late the Whit House message said. If congress acts promptly o the request for a billio supplemental appropriation fo the current fiscal year, the Pres ident said, "those who run ou elementary and secondar schools as well as vocationa and adult education progran would for the first time how much federal money the would have before the schoo year begins, not several month after the year has begun." Illnesses Persist, Kraft Denies Contaminated Product in Iowa By Dale Kiictcr Kraft Food officials in Chica- go insisted Thursday that none of its macaroni and cheese din- ner suspected of being contami- nated with salmonella bacteria was distributed in Iowa. However, The Gazelle is con- tinuing to receive reports from individuals who became ill after consuming Ihc product. Dr. J. B. Sllne, vice-president n cbarge of Kraft's quality standards, told The Gazette two of the six lots originally suspect- id of being contaminated arc being regarded as "bad." Those lots carry the iden- tification Code 9-30-74C and 10-8- 74C. Considerable confusion has developed since both four-dozen and two-dozen lots with those numbers were packaged at Kraft's Champaign, 111., plant. Suspect I'ncks Only the four-dozen packs are suspect, according to Dr. Stinc. While some Kraft macaroni and cheese dinners (7 Vi-ounce size) with those numbers were dis- tributed in Iowa all were the two-dozen packs, according to Kraft. Some of the suspected product coded 9-30-74C was distributed in other slates, bul Dr. Stine said "we arc silting on every questionable box of 10-8-74C" product. Hence, he said, Kraft is not recalling any of the 10-8-74C two-dozen packs distributed, bul, because of Ihe confusion over 9-30-74C, is recalling all of lh.it lot. Federal Food and Drug Ad- ministration (FDA) officials-ap- p a r e n 11 y now concur with Kraft's findings. Good Information wouldn't have agreed with Kraft unless we have good information said Jerry Vincc, dircclor of Ihc FDA's compliance office in Kansas City. let our flowers speak for you FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 phone answered 24 hours every day. He said the FDA concurre with Kraft tests which showe four other lot numbers, 9-26-74C 9-29-74C, 10-6-74C and 10-7-74C to be clean. One Cedar Rapids residen said he became ill after eatin the product coded 10-7-74C. H said he became so ill that Mon day was the first day in years he missed going to his o fice because of sickness. He said his wife ate a sma amount of the proriucl, and d not become ill. In spile of Kraft's claim non of Ihe contaminated product gi into Iowa, some Cedar Rapic stores have pulled all of tl firm's macaroni and cheese dii ners of 'that size off of shelves. 3 generations of Florists to Serve you. mrnonuicriowER PIERSON S SHOP 1800 Ellis Blvd. NW FLOWERPHONE 366-1826 FLORIST Town and Country Shopping Centor 364-2146 Saudi Arabian government. He cited a Dec. 1 article in Business Week, which quoted a confidential wire sent from Exxon headquarters in New A plan was presented to the reaicr Downtown Cedar 'Rap- s Assn. last month to link ownlown businesses and park- ig ramps with a series of cov- red 'walkways oor level. at the second said the reason the state that the money should be paid on the fine, returned to rather than being the victim of the robbery is there was no evi- dence that the money came from the robbery. The crime of which Gaines The walkways, concrete convicted involved receiv- ing consideration for helping a felon after the robbery had been committed. In its answer Wednesday the police department said it has been the policy for years to release evidence to the rightful owner after a trial if it is not notified as to any other disposi- tion. Department officials said they believed the ?H5 found on Gaines was part of the some cash taken in the robbery, and therefore turned it over to the station owner after the trial. tinted plexiglass dome, would un down the center of alleys, uspended from the buildings on ach side. At the time the original pro- xisal was made, the cost was stimated at between mil- and million. The estimate is about million more than that now, Architect eLo Peiffer said, he- cause the size of the project has more than doubled. "The price per foot actually ias gone he said, "but people have gotten, so texcited ibout the jdea that a lot more jusinesses want to connect with t." The plan, still in its prelim- nary stages, calls for the walk- ways to be constructed at the expense of business men, then turned over to the city for oper- ation and maintenance. A hurdle now being consid- ered, Peiffer said, is how the cost of the project could be fair- y assessed to business men. H wouldn't be fair, he said, to charge the same assessment to justness men who stand to prof it from the walkways in unequa amounts. Peiffer, Architect Scott Olson and City Attorney Dave McGuire met informally with Mayor Don Canney Wednes- day to discuss the project. McGuire on the different sources of financing available. Besides the financing ques tion, several other problems re main. The possible cost to the city of maintaining and provid ing police protection is one o them. Others are whether the walk ways would hamper fire protec tion and what the cost of each connection would be to the indi vidual business man, over anc above the basic construction cost of the walkway. (Continued from Page 1.) Kreamer (R-Des the house subcommittee chairman. Norpel told the committee that Miller was a good lobbyist who had got a ?5 million capita appropriation for UNI more than either Iowa State or the University of Iowa received. Actually the board of regents presents a coordinated appro priations proposal to the legisla ture every two years that seeks to take into account propor- tional needs of each institution under its jurisdiction. In addition to the three state universities, the regents also have control over the Iowa Braille and Sight-Saving school at Vinton and the Iowa School for the Deaf at Council Bluffs. They said the county attorney notified them of the convictio: and sentence, but did not tel hem about a court order tha :he evidence should be held fo further orders. In a previous reply to th court order to show cause, th county attorney said the prol lem was the responsibility of th police department, because o ficials there turned over the ev dence without the authority consent or request of the state, (Continued from Page 1.) Watergate-related cases wh were allowed to plead guilty a single count in return fo cooperating with prosecutor Krogh asked he not be require to testify until after sentencing. Based on Conscience When pled guilty told Judge Gesell, "My plea tc day is based on conscience, want to avoid any possible sug gestion that I am seeking len ency through testifying." Krogh's agreement to pie; guilty to the civil rights charg resulted in the government dropping a two-count indictmen alleging he lied to a grand jury 'The sole basis for my de fense was to have been that acted in the interest of nationa he told Gesell. "I no1 feel that the sincerity of my mi tivation cannot justify what wa done and that I cannot in con science assert national securit as a defense." wire described a Nov. 4 meeting which American oil compa- es drilling for oil in Saudi rabia "were ordered to cut off upply of products derived from audi oil to U.S. forces stationed round the world." Retaliation According to Business Week, ic Exxon wire also said that audi Arabia had warned 'it ould retaliate against any reach in the cutoff. The retali- :ion would consist of extension the oil embargo already or- ercd against the U.S. to some oreign operations of the com- any. Exxon sent out the cutofl rder on Nov. 5, one day after ic meeting in Jiddah, Saudi which also involved rep esentalives of Standard Oil ol California, Mobil and Texaco be magazine said. The cutoff forced the U.S. to supply the Sixth fleet in the Mediterranean by a massive air and sea lift at a time when U.S. forces were on alert in response to the Middle East fighting, Business Week said. There was no indicatio whether the cutoff is still in e feet. Jackson said he has receive independent documentation tha the Business Week story w; "substantially correct." "Blatant Disloyalty" "This was pretty blatant, fl grant corporate disloyalty to tl United States of America Jackson said. "They had tl stocks, but they cut them t during the alert." Jackson ordered the seven i executives testifying before t subcommittee to produce I Monday documents he indicat would-prove whether Exxon w acting in response to Saudi Ar bian orders and whether ai other companies were involved None of the seven executive including representatives Exxon and the other companii doing business in Saudi Arabi had any immediate response Jackson's charges. In another djevelopmen Thursday, Mobil Oil Corp., nation's second largest oil con pany, said its 1973 profi showed a 47 percent gain ove 1972. The company said it earne ?842.8 million in the last yea compared with the year before. millio Arab Head Vow ______ To Keep Boycotf U.S. Files Rights TRIPOLI, Libya Suit tor Indians PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP) A federal court has been asked to order the reapportionment ,of an Arizona county because Navajo Indians allegedly don't receive their fair share of the vote. The justice department suit is the first attempt to protect the voting rights of the American Indian, R. Dennis Ickes, a de- p a r t m e n t attorney, said Wednesday. JOHN E. LAPES Convenient downtown location 308 3rd Ave. SE an Premier Abdessalam Jallou has vowed to fight Egyptia President Anwar Sadat's re ported proposal to ease th Arab oil boycott against th United States. He also threatened further n. tionalization of American oil in terests in his country. The premier told a news con ainst the oil-producing coun- es. He warned Japan and the est European nations not to lend the energy conference resident Nixon has called Feb. in Washington, Second Suit Is Filed in Car, Train Collision A second multi-hundred- ousand dollar lawsuit has :en filed in Cedar Rapids fed- al court in connection with a ar-train accidenl in Belle aine March Ramona M. Dvorak, a Cedar apids residenl, filed a petition arlier this week asking om the Chicago North Western ransportalion Co. for injuries le suffered in the accident. A Cedar Rapids federal court :ry awarded her July i, 1973, as executor of her hus- a n d s estale. Charles J. vorak was killed when a train ruck the Dvorak car at the rossing. The suil had originally asked Following the jury's erdict, Mrs. Dvorak's attorney sked for a new trial of the ase, claiming Ihe jury incor- eclly figured Dvorak's polen- ,al income when calculating the lamages. A conference of attorneys was leld on Judge Edward Mc- Manus' orders in Oclober, 1973. Mrs. Dvorak signed a satis- 'action of settlement Dec. 3, 1973, having accepted an oul-of- court settlement of unknown amount Notice of the settle- ment was filed with the court Jan. 3. The new suit claims Mrs. Dvorak suffered head, neck, back, rib, arm, leg and other in- juries in the accident, and has been permanently disabled, lost income and earning ability and incurred .past and future medi- cal expenses and pain and suf- fering as a result of the ac- cident. It claims the company suc- cessor to Chicago North West- ern Railway Co., was negligent by having inadequate warning signals at the crossing. Senate Votes Studded Tire Tax DES MOINES (AP) The Iowa senate Thursday changed bill to prohibit studded snow ires, to one which would place'a 130 annual tax on the tires. The senate then, delayed final action on the measure. The special tax was in- cluded in an amendment by Sen. H. E. Heying (D-West which was passed 27-21. A debate then ensued on vhether the bill should be re- urned to the ways and means committee because the amend- ment imposed a new tax. The senate recessed before a final decision was made. FIIESH FLOWEUS Prompt. Mtelivery PUCK'S I laOWKK SHOP 5008 Center Pt. Rd. N.E. 393-5565 John B. Turner Son Funeral Directors since 1888 Only one service...our best to all. Cost is entirely a matter of personal choice. 'Rimer's East 800 Second Ave. SE "Rimer's West 1221 l-irsi Ave. West' WANT AD DEADLINES (For Non-Confrocf Advertisers) for Sunday's Gazette A.M. SATURDAY For Monday's Gazette A.M. SATURDAY Tuos, thru Sat. P.M. day preceding publication Dial 398-8234 Want Ad Dept. Closes At 12 Noon Saturday "20 Calls... Sold Everything The Very First EARLY American llorol conch, matching manic single tird. fomolele 393.J23J. Betty Lekin of Hiawatha had quick, suc- cessful results from her inexpensive Ga- zette want ad. To Order Your Action-Ad DIAL 398-8234 8 to 5 Mon. thru Friday...'Til Noon Sat.   

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