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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 16, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Weather- Partly cloudy through Thursday. Lows to- night uroutid 30. jHild Thursday, highs in the 40s. VOLUME 92-NUMBK.K7 CITY FINAL 10 CENTS CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, JANUAKY 1C, 1974 ASSOCIATED PRESS, UPI, NEW YORK TIMES Critics Charge Oil Firms Juggle Policy WASHINGTON (AP) Pctro- 1 e u m industry critics told congress Wednesday that the lack of reliable energy data has allowed Die major oil companies "lo manipulate government face its greatest pressure to impose gasoline rationing this summer as gasoline rises sharply. Decorah Man Nabbed after Police Chase DECORAH Winncshiek dcp- usiigc :UiiCEi Dccorah and Crcsco lice combined efforts early! Sawhill, deputy director of during a high speed! 'cdcral 'ny Offlcc' said: chase to stop the fleeing vehicle. WATERGATE COUNSEL James St. White -House-Watergate'atTOrneyr talks with newsmen as he leaves federal court in Washington after testimony by experts that the gap in a vape was caused by "erasing and re-recording." Gazciie Leased Wires WASHINGTON U. S. Dis- trict Judge John J. Sirica said Wednesday he intends to decide whether to recommend that the case of the obliterated Water- gate tape be presented to a grand jury. Sirica made the announce- ment in open court shortly after a secret service agent contra- dicted some of the testimony Rose Mary President Nixon's secretary, gave in No- vember at a hearing called to determine what caused an minute gap in a subpoenaed Watergate tape. The agent, Louis Sims, head of the technical security division of the secret service, said he had purchased a Uher 5000 tape recorder with a foot pedal last Oct. 1 for use by Miss Woods. Times Conflict Sims said lie delivered the machine to Stephen Bull at about p.m. Miss Woods testified that she! had used the machine for aboutj hours that day before she accidentally pushed the wrong button when interrupted while listening to a tape. She said she told the Pres- ident what happened about p.m., only 45 minutes after Sims said Wednesday that he left Sirica made his comment after technical experts told after Miss Woods' that a single accidental Charles Rhyne, objected could not have caused the questioning by an assistant gap in the sub- cial prosecutor about tape. Sims was aware last October that Miss Woods had Blocked eight tapes to Key the experts were Fla., on Oct. by objections from Sims said he had not House lawyers from spe- After Rhyne objected, whether there was any judge said he wanted to the tape could have been the answer because he will accidentally. to decide "whether or nol White House Watergate j going lo recommend to the James St. Clair objected cial prosecutor that he times when Asst. Water- seriously consider Prosecutor Richard Ben- this case to a grand sought to find out "Let's proceed with the the experts believed the he said and added, was "an accident or an in- make that decision in Judge John Sirica Sims' testimony came thc St. Clair, who has just 1 S0 7o Payments taken' over Nixon's Watergate defense. The Harvard professoi said that he objected because Ben-Veniste's question was hypo thetical. "No Idea" After Ben-Veniste rephrased the question several times lo refer specifically to Rcse Mary Woods. Nixon's private secre- tary, Thomas Stockman, one of the six experts, replied: "I have no idea when this occurred or who was responsib'e." Stockham and Dr. Richard Bolf, chairman of the panel and former instructor at Ihe uni- versity of Illinois testified lhat the and Uher MIT, 5000 recorder that Miss Woods was using made distinctive "signa- tures" on the tape each time it began to recording. Stockham Bull's office after delivering thc WASHINGTON (AP) record or stopped testified that Ihe only way lo create such a signa- luro was by pushing either the I stop, start, test forward or re- wind button, and lha': any one of ac'icns wcu'd cause supplemental payments will lecord button ID pop up. treasury department is ready to jbc given instructions on how begin a program of paying gov-ilhev can liavc tho treasury ernment benefit checks direct electronic deposits into a; The recipient recipient's bank account. for he program .begins in March thc approximately 3.5 mil-: machine. Sims also testified (hat the microphones installed for the White House taping system are still in place and that the wires connecting them with the recording equipment were not cut until some lime after the recorders were removed. Today's Index Comics ...................13C CoiirlhoiiSc................3A Crossword ................13C Daily Record Denths.....................3A Editorial Features Farm Financial 01) Miirlnn (ID Mnvles 4C Snclcly HH-121! Spurts ..................lli-ID (ilntc ...................1C-3C Television .................51) Wnnj Ads .............HD-III) j lion recipients of the now fcder- !al supplemental security income have to open the bank account himself. 'Ihe program will be voluntary for both recipients and banks, and cheeks slill will be mailed lo those who want them mailed. and'aged5 n "Everybody" But treasury officials envision1 long run, everybody ils expansion in about a year Mosso said in an approximately 25 million social I interview. "People will get their security recipients and in I wo checks cashed years lo persons receiving banks will bi crans benefits and civil 'incs they now have on pushed first of every month." In addition to making the pay- ments system more convenient for recipients, the government's Their report appeared lo elim- inalc thc possibility lhat Miss Woods, could have inadvertently erased a segment of the tape of a June 20, 1972, conversation be- tween Ihe President and his aide II. R. Haldemaii. Haldemati's nolc-s indicated that the obliterated segment in- cluded all discussion of Ihe Wa- tcrgatn breakin, which had oc- cu'Tcd three days earlier. accurate, relevant information Seeks To Force Better Mileage WASHINGTON (UPI) Russell Train, administrator of the Environmental Protec- tion Agency, said Wednesday thai he would- seek legislation to force Detroit to start build- ing cars that use less gaso- line. The plan still is being devel- oped, he said. It might involve taxes to discourage production of heavy or high-horsepower cars, and perhaps a require- ment that (he average ear get 13M; miles a gallon by 1977. 'rom these in government who must make Wash- ngton lawyer Martin Lobel told a house subcommittee. Lobel's claim was disputed in a prepared statement by W. T. Slick, a. senior vice- president for Exxon, who said that "contrary to public opin- ion, oil companies, including Exxon, have for many years provided to various govern- mental agencies substantial operating and financial data." Slick added that Exxon "would welcome a government- sponsored system for collecting and publishing timely petroleum data." Lobel, a former aide to Sen. WilliHm Proxmire said that the top five oil companies had enjoyed a 48 percent jump in profits during the first nine months of 1973 over the sam.3 period a year before. Existing Stocks Another industry critic, Chris- topher Rand, presented figures from the American Petroleum Institute which he said showed that the current gasoline short- age could easily be made up from existing stocks. Rand also argued that the companies could not justify higher prices in terms of creased cosls since refineries pay only four cents a gallon for domestically produced oil. "We must have no price increases, [n fact, I'd like to see a rollback in gasoline Rand said. However, former White House adviser David Freeman, also .estifying before the subcommit- tee, disputed Rand's figures laying they only covered the reduction costs and did not :ontain expenses for exploration ind development of new oil sources. But elsewhere in Washing- ton, a federal energy official, John Sawhill, said Wednesday that the government would He said the chances arc 50-50 jthat the nation will be required I to undergo gasoline rationing 'for the first war II. time since World! Slat Closings (ration likely would abandon other programs to conserve gas- oline, such as closing service stations on Sunday. The gasoline rationing propos- al would require as many as employes to operate, in- cluding local boards to handle appeals. Sawhill said that the current shortfall gasoline is estimated at 1.2 million barrels a day and continues to improve. But he corah was being held in the Winneshick county jail Wednes- day on charges of speeding 100 miles an hour in a CO mile an hour zone, reckless driving, fail- ure to stop for an emergency vehicle, no Iowa driver's license and two stop sign violations. Decorah police first attempt- ed to slop the vehicle in the city ROME (AP) Police arrest- ed Ihree men today and charged them with the kidnaping of J. Paul Getty III. A fourth man was sought. One source said the police also recovered a cache of bank- notes that probably were part of (Photos on Picture Page) when it sped off at a high rate cf speed. Traveling on highway 9 to- ward Cresco, Winneshiek depu- ties joined the pursuit. Cresco police were notified and set up a road block. Collins reportedly drove around the road block. At one time during the chase, deputies had cars on either side to be drawn into the "Ccing Vehide antl were whether that shortage, if it con-jbelJ1S rammed. A third squad tinued into the spring and sum- car also was damaged in the mcr would be large enough to 'orce the government to ration gasoline. said that if rationing (Continued Page 3, Col. 4) chase. Collins was apprehended west of Cresco on highway 9 when his car reportedly went out of con- trol. Ihe millicn ransom paid for the release of the 17-year-old grandson of American oil bil- ionaire J. Paul Getty. All Natives The police said they arrested one man in Rome and two in Calabria, at the southern tip of he Italian peninsula. The three and the man still at large are all natives of Calabria, the po- lice said. A few more people were ar- rested during the manhunt when weapons or drugs were fsimd in their possession, but the police said they were not HEW Will Set Rules WASHINGTON (AP) New federal regulations designed to improve the health and safety of nearly 1 million patients in 800 nursing homes will be pub- lished Thursday by the depart- ment of health, education and welfare. For the first lion's homes and time, the na- skilled nursing intermediate care facilities will be required to pass similar inspection and certification processes to qual- ify for federal Medicaid and Medicare funds. In response to intense pres- sure from groups of elderly and congressmen, HEW plans to propose n e w minimum care rules governing medical and nursing services. Fayc G. Abdellah, assistant surgeon general and director of HEW's Office of Nursing Home Affairs, said in an in- terview that the regulations underwent "a major over- haul" after first being pro- posed last July 1. Press, shews that .or 59 percent failed to meet fire-safe- ty requirements when checked between last June and Septem- ber. The survey also found that: were certified with waiv- ers for six to 12 months, but 450 had incomplete or no justi- fication for the waivers. were required to have automatic sprinkler fire protec- tion because of their type of construction, but had none. States certified most of the 306 which were found upon in- spection not to have met the Life Safety Code, the National Fire Protection Assn's. 1967 standards adcpted by the gov- ernment. There was no Life Safety Code survey in files for 634 skil- led nursing homes. "The data indicates that there are serious administrative prob- lems in the survey and certifica- tion concluded the re- port prepared by Dr. Abdellah's office for HEW Secretary Wein- berger. The government spends more Although intermediate care than S2 billion a year, or about Iwo-thirds cf the nursing home industry's total income, for Ihe facilities, which provide a level of medical service above that of a boarding house but below that care of aged, disabled, and poor j of a skilled nursing home, were not included in the survey, Dr. people in nursing homes. An unpublished HEW survey of skilled nursing homes, made available to the Associated Abdellah said that their com- pliance with fire-safety require- ments is "a lot worse.'" believed to be involved in the Getty case. The man arrested in Rome was Domenico Barbino, 27, an orderly in the city's Polyclinic hospital of the Sacred Heart. Police said these arrested in Calabria were Vincenzo Mam- moliti, 43, and Antonio Man- cuso, 35. Mammoliti was arrest- ed among the olive groves of he Gioia Tauro plain at dawn, jolice said. Mancuso was picked up in the village of Cicala. One of Getty's ears was cut off during his captivity and was mailed to a Rome newspaper as evidence that the. kidnapers meant business. There was speculation that Barbino pcr- 'orrned the operation. Other Crimes The police said Mammoliti vas wanted for other crimes committed by the Calabrian un- derworld but had escaped arrest "or a long time.. Some of Mammoliti's rela- ives were arrested on suspicion of being involved in the 1968 kid- naping of a wealthy Calabrian a n downer, but they were cleared. Young Getty disappeared in Rome on the night of July 10 and was found south of Salerno on Dec. 15 after his family paid he ransom. He and his mother are now in Austria and were not ivailable for comment Wednes- day on the arrests. Hundreds of policemen combed the mountains and valleys of the Calabria area through the night. Dozens of homes were searched in one of the biggest manhunts in the area in recent years. Police did not say if the man- mnt was connected with infor- nation given by a man who elephoned the Rome newspa- )cr, 11 Messaggero, last month ind claimed lo be a member of Hands Required NEW YORK (AP) getting it (thc It's oral energy chief William Simon llc kitlnaP SanS who felt he was f several fuel-hungry mystery lo inc." for investigation, Pablo said. too little. -lirl-ncs sav mvsterious tele-! F.' C. Wiser, president of I Airline officials said the offers! II Messaggcro said the man inf h'oh-nrifwl fnni wm-n nor. named a Rone-based Malia lig- phone callers have been offer-pans World Airlines, said ure as the ringleader. The news- ing lo sell them millions had telephoned his 'involved "bonded" not I'1'1'1'8'1 "lc to police. People will get their Miss Woods had testified of liviation fuel at hcavi-jlast weekend to offer TWA from imported oil that Passcd u ted in time and thought she might have caused Iy 4g subject to federal price con-l 1C A Pan American Airways ex- lhrne limo, ,hn Bonded fuel is bronchi K, rclircmenls. Eventual Goal Eventually, perhaps in two years, the government hopes to do away with all paper checks by making electronic bank de- posits of all federal paymcnls, major purpose is lo help case the burden of paper checks, which arc flooding the nation's system. including the federal payroll. Total check tuingc now comes Officials say the direct deposit! to about 20 billion items a year, 80 program, which has been con- of which 7iiO million are Irca- 01) jloinplalcd for some lime, been speeded up because ofj liislond of mailing checks, dc- check-cjishing difficulties en- posits are recorded on magnetic countered by persons receiving payments under the supplemcn- Inl security income program. David Mosso, deputy fiscal socrcliiry of Ihe Iruasury, said Iliat in March persona receiving tape, which is forwarded lo commercial banks or regional collection centers lo Iw proc- essed Into individual ammnl.s willioiil n check ever being wril- the record button and possibly inadvertently kept (Continued Page 3, Col. 3) TVo Run Out of Gas and Luck NORWOOD, Mass. (AP) Robert Jones and Joseph Roth of Norwood ran out of gas nn U.S. I. But they spoiled a gasoline station up the road. Congratu- lating themselves on their luck, ihcy pushed (heir car lo the wailing pumps Tuesday. (Million owner George Gaclini greeted them with the news Hint he, loo, was out of gas. cculivc said Tuesday the airline since early December had re- ceived two dozen offers of more than 30 million gallons of jet fuel al prices up to 300 percent higher than current contracted rates. "I've never heard of any of these said Robert Pablo, i'an Am's director of fuel purchasing. He said Ihe phone calls had come from as fay away as Tokyo and London and even from a pay telephone booth in Denver. price. Percy Wood, a group vice- president of United Air Lines, said Uniled also had received fuel offers. "It looks like there are tramp dealers buying up oil and trying to sell Wood said. it r.t high into this country duty-freofor use only on international flights. Domestic long-haul airlines under the federal fuel allocation program have been allotted 95 percent of the fuel Ihcy con- sumed in 1972. But Ihe alloca- tion program [Iocs not apply lo bonded fuel. "I've medical "Mystery" had people profession, from the the legal prof e s s i o n Pablo said. "Frankly, I don't know where Pablo said callers contacting Pan Am are asked to identity themselves and submit a firm offer in writing, but usually "we hear from them any other Kissinger Says JERUSALEM (AP) Secre- tary of State Kissinger flew back to Egypt Wednesday, re- porting that differences between the Israelis and Egyptians over plans lo separate their armies Domestic jet fuel currently is on the front "have been selling for 13 to 16 cents a narrowed." while bonded fuel is selling for! Hi lo 24 cents a gallon. Simon Investigation Identities of several would-be have been turned over lo the office of fed- Pan Am officials said regular j suppliers were warning they I would soon run out of fuel in several cilies: Wednesday in Portland, Ore.; Sunday in Seat- lie, Wash.; Monday in Miami; Jan. 23, Chicago; and Jan. 211, i Los Angeles. I Chuckle Once Ihcrc was n lady who complained to he" husband thai ever since they got their wiilcrbetl they've been drift- ing apart. -convrwni   

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