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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1974 - Page 9

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                Plans Outlined for Creatinq C-R- Community School r i i Enrollment Set ai 23, 289 By Judy Uaubcmnlcr Plans for dividing llic Cedar Rapids Community school dis- trict into four director dis- tricts were presented to the school board Monday nighl for members' study before the Jan. 28 board meeting. A written report from John Liittschwager, a University of Iowa professor of industrial and management engineering, showed six alternate plans using school district precincts as their basis. He will be present at the board's Jan. 28 meeting. The board, at its Nov. 19 meeting, approved a director district plan featuring four director districts and three at- large directors. All Voters All voters in the district will be allowed to vote for all the board members. The four dis- tricts are residency require- ments for board candidates only. The plan must still be ap- proved by school district voters, but the school board has not set a date for the elec- tion. In his report, Liittschwager noted criteria used for deter- mining the districts included Jequalily of population, con- tiguity and compactness of the districis formed. Using these criteria, Liittschwager said one plan, Plan B, is superior to the others from a technical view- point. One District Under that plan, one district would consist entirely of west- side precincts, and the other would include precincts from both sides of the river. District 1 would include the east-side precincts: All Saints school, Monroe Erskine, Grant Jane Boyd Community House, Immaculate Concep- tion scliool, Johnson and Squaw Creek school and Grant and Hayes west-side pre- eintls. District 2 would include the following (all west-side) pre- cincts: Wilson, Van Buren, Hoover, Coolidge, Cleveland, Lincoln, Riverside Round- house, Roosevelt, Ellis YMCA, and Town Hall in Covington. District 3 District 3 would include west-side precincts Taft, Ma- dison, Harrison and Kennedy, which is halt on each side of the river. Pierce, Nixon, Hia- watha city hall, Palo school, and city hall in Robins are the east-side precincts. District 4 would include east-side precincts Polk, Gar- field, Arthur, Franklin, Wash- ington, Coe college, Harding school, and Kenwood school, plus city hall precinct which is partially on the west side. Under this plan, district 2 has the smallest population with persons and dis- trict 4 has the largest with Hoard Member Ed Beatly told The Gazelle Tuesday morning, "Liittschwager has done a gwd job laying it out population-wise. There's no more than about a two per- cent deviation population-wise on any of the plans." Hadn't Studied Plan Beatty had not had lime to study the report thoroughly enough to comment on the merits of any of the six plans Liiltfichwager offered. Lauree Gerber, a west-side resident and board member, said she is "most anxious to hear input from citizens. I'm not so interested in expressing my opinion as in knowing whether the plan is going to he satisfactory to the people who are most concerned about districting." At first she was somewhat surprised that none of the six Liittschwager plans followed quadrant lines, but realized "there are fewer people west of the river, so numerically it just couldn't be." There arc students at- tending classes in (he Cedar Hapids Community school dis- trict, according to an enroll- ment report released Monday nighl. Tlic figure is down 154 from enrollment in September, but is about 130 above the number expected by Dr. George Ross, director of research and eval- uation for the district. He pre- dicted Breakdown of enrollment shows students in ele- mentary schools, in jun- ior high, in senior high and 53G in special education classes. Also counted [or budgeting purposes arc 76 students on a shared-time basis, six others from Cedar Rapids Com- munily school district attend- ing other school districis and 76 involved with shared time at Kirkwood Community col- lege. A total of 154 students from oilier districts pay tuition to attend Cedar Rapids Commu- nity schools. These students are subtracted from the total since they arc not counted for budgeting purposes. Budget Ceiling The January enrollment re- port is used to determine the budget ceiling for 1974-75. School districts with declining enrollments arc allowed to use the previous January's enroll- ment figures for budgeting purposes, rather than next September's figures. Last September's enroll- ment in Hie district was students, compared with last year's The Collar Rapids Gazette: Tucs., Jan. IS 1974 Product Safety Hearings Set on Pans, Chain Saw WASHINGTON (UPI) The Consumer Product Safety Com- mission has ordered hearings on whether 4 million electric frying for 24 hours Tuesday and pans and gasoline-pO-jmutcrs relyjng on cars wered chain saws are in and British Engineers Strike; New Threat from Miners LONDON (AP) Most of Bri- tain's engineers struck wildcat railroad walkout last Thursday that stranded several had ample frying pans were iden- ous. The tified as Presto brand 15-inch size, model Nos. FP15AD and FP15HD. The chain saws are jers and other warning Tuesday. The threat of an extension of The traffic congestion miners' slowdown came less severe than expected Michael McGahey, the i cities. Staff Reduction Policy Receives First Reading A policy allowing the school district to place teachers on staff reduction leave was given first reading by the Cedar Rapids Community school district Monday night although the policy may con- flict with the slate's continu- ing contract law. An opinion by school district attorney Richard Nazette was distributed to board members for their study before the poli- cy is finally adopted. Nazette's opinion stated placing a teacher on staff re- duction leave "constitutes a termination of the contract and unless the statutory pro- cedure for termination is followed, in our opinion, the court might well hold the teacher has been denied due Walking in Dark, Students Advised process ohaw." To Use Armband m Tcrminalion Children walking to school in early morning darkness be- cause of Daylight Saving time 'should wear some type of re- flective armband, Cedar Rapids Community schoc! board President Norman Lipsky suggested Monday night. Lipsky said the armband 'would make the children more visible to drivers. The school district has not changed its starting time be- 'cause the change "would create a sizable problem for oiir many families where both mother and father work, and have to 'arrange for super- "vision and care for their ele- s -mentary school age Asst. Supt. William Kamstad said. Elementary schools do not y-begin classes until 9 a.m. in district, while rural dis- tricts typically begin both see- So n.dary and elementary 3 classes at 8 a.m. because all U children ride the same buses. jlj Starting time for junior Shigiis is a.m. and for se- ynior highs a.m. in the HC e d a r Rapids Community school district Called p To Trial of Two Show Crashers !J NEW YORK (UPI) CBS innchorman Walter Cronkite has ;been served with a subpoena to Appear at the Feb. 19 trial of "two gay activists who crashed a telecast of Cronkite's night- network news program last !jnonlh. I't A CBS spokesman confirmed ;Monday lhat Cronkilc had re- the subpoena, but de- fined' further comment on the ;casc. 'j The Iwo defendants, Mark ,'gcgal, 23, and Harry Langhorne, ;8G, both of Philadelphia and .jbolh members of the "Gay are charged with trcs- passing. They interrupted the Evening News Dec. 11 lo whnt they said was anti- bias in the nel- programming. A startled fronkile ad-libbed some re- marks before the protesters Ifrere wrestled out of camera ifange. ________ Teachers may not be ter- minated without due process of giving the teacher notice of reasons for termination, a fair oppor- tunity to refute the motives at a hearing before an impartial body and a chance to present witnesses and confront ad- verse -witnesses. If any teachers are placed on staff reduction leave, the impartial hearing procedure should be followed, Nazette suggested. The policy slates teachers may be placed on staff reduc- tion leave in inverse order of their original contract dales, but exceplions lo the seniority list may be made when the district's affirmative action program for minority employ- ment would be adversely af- fected. Requested Vote ..Teachers in the dislrict ear- lier requested a vote oh the policy and approved it by a 833 to 224 vote. Teachers op- posing the policy had claimed the affirmative action pro- gram clause was too vague. district policies on the role of the professional teacher and on student insur- ance were adopted by the board with one board member dissenting on each policy. The policy on the role of Ihe teacher stales he or she should be aware of district goals, building policy and de- partment guidelines. Teachers should also carry out plans for the students' ed- ucational growth and keep abreast of current develop- ments in education. Moore Objected Board M e in b c r Ronald Moore objected to the policy because it does not state the teacher serves under the di- rection of the principal and has the duty to cooperate with other teachers. Similar statements are con- tained in other job descrip- tions, such as Ihe one for prin- cipals, Moore said. Staff members said the policy is not intended as a job description for the teachers, but is meant to outline the teacher's responsibilities to students. The policy on student insur- ance was adopted by the board on a 6-1 vote, with Rob- ert Barber dissenting. Add Paragraph Moore asked that a para- graph be added to letters sent to parents offering the cover- age noting the coverage being purchased may duplicate other policies already held by the family. "Who are you asked Barber. "Those who un- derstand their coverage aren't going to buy it. For those who don't have a policy, it's the cheapest thing around and they're going to grab on to it." The policy stales insurance programs may be offered to students on a voluntary basis and that school district per- sonnel should not be involved in clerical work connected with it. Forihfe Finest DALE'S FRUIT 'MARKET Alt FANCY APPLES POUND 29'.. 5 Ibs. If 1.25 Brach'i Choc, Covered PEANUTS.........694 Ib. Jonathan Applet bu. 5.99 Very Bail Grade EXTRA FANCY DELICIOUS 6.99 Rod or Whlto No. 1 POTATOES... 100 6.50 10 Lb, Bag...... .89' Wo promlio you the swaolosl oranrjai you nvor ala or your monoy back. ORANGIS or RID CBAPIIBUII 18 Lb. Bag DALE'S Fruit Market. Open 9 lo A evory day Cnnlnr Polnl Rood NE Heat Wave Looms for Sky lab's NewChamps I A A i i..Luiii.jti vu tngi U. S. Chess Master, firemen stayed off the SPACE CENTER, Houston AP) Skylab 3's astronauts, lie new world champions of pace flight, Tuesday began our (lays without darkness in unlight that could cause heat liscomfort. Like many energy-conscious larthlings, they turned off some ights, but for different reasons. They want to cool the station. Longest-Flying Gerald P. Carr, William R. 'ogue and Edward G. Gibson on Monday night became history's ongest-flying space travelers as hey broke the single mission of 59 days, 11 hours, 9 minutes, which had been set by he Skylab 2 crew. The astronauts soared on to- ward their goal of 84 days. They return to earth Feb. .8. They might begin to fee] somewhat uncomfortable Tues day as temperatures climb in side their orbiting station be cause of the high angle of the sun in relation to the spacecraft. "They'll see no darkness, only daylight, until said flight director Charles Lewis. For most of the mission, the astronauts have whirled through either a sunset or a sunrise every 46 minutes as they orbitec the globe. Fewer Nights But for several days, the sun has been moving into a position where they have seen fewe nights. The position, called high beta angle by mission con trol, will bathe the station in direct sunlight until Saturday Then normal day-night cycle; will begin to return. The most noticeable effect hai been a temperature rise insidi the station from 71 to 79 de grees. "This thermal situation i going to Lewis toll newsmen. "We expect the tern craturc to rise to somewhere etween 80 and 85 degrees." Lewis said that, in the nexi ew days, some earth resources urveys might be canceled be- ause these require maneuver; iiat expose more vulnerable reas of the orbiting craft to olar heat. A week ago, the astronauts ihut off about half the lights in he station, turning certain ones an only when needed, to kee] he heat down. Despite higher temperature ,he spacemen planned a ful workload Tuesday, with empha sis on medical experiments Iiat they have been in spac ionger than any human beings. Spassky Play to Tie SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) Former world champion Spassky of the Soviet Won and American champion Robert Byrne have played to a 4-move draw in Iheir first ame in the quarterfinals of much'comrnuto Vorld Chess Championships. fjc a'nd reduccd the vita, coa, Brennan Doubts Nixon To Renew Price Controls PITTSBURGH (AP) U.S Labor Secretary Peter Brennar says he does not expect Pre ident Nixon to renew wage an price controls in April. Brennan also predicted tha unemployment will rise abov the 5 percent mark this year a the energy crisis continues tighten the economy. In Pittsburgh on a stopove after, attending a Wheelin, Pittsburgh Steel Corp. event Wheeling, W. Va., Brennan als said reports that; he intends i resign from the Nixon cabim are false. He told newsmen that th labor department was studyin means to reduce the impact energy crisis layoffs, includin training programs and comp terized job relocation services. Rev. Kricger Dies JACKSON, Mich. (AP) Th Rev. Dr. W. Harry Krieger, 5 vice-president of the Luthera Church-Missouri Synod, die Sunday. vice-president of the ....._ _ union, after Heath e McCulloeh No. 14 "Minnas'they did last week when accept a peace propos- rail stoppage from the Trades Union In both cases, the commissionimassive traffic jams. .Congress, aid, there is a difference ofj All passenger train service: The TUC proposed that the pinion as to how serious the] was halted, but some freight i government meet the miners' roblcm is and the panel has; trains kept running. demands for pay increases in eided to turn the matters over some areas. Some commuters Scottish apparently were staying an administrative law judge; i decide. It said people might receive ectric shocks from the pans id the saws may leak gasoline, o injuries have been reported Coal Threat Coal miners threatened either product. escalate their slowdown. Prime Minister Edward Heath, in a wage row with the miners, came under more pressure from Ilis Conservative party to call a excess of the anti-inflation ceil- i ing. In return, the TUC pledged to that other unions would not try j general election. Soms Ice r.tivc engi- THE WEEKLY QUIZ IS PART OF THIS NEWSPAPER'S SCHOOL PROGRAM (10 points for Mch qimtion answered correctly) 1 President Nixon rejected the (CHOOSE ONE: Senate Watergate committee's, Wa- tergate Special Prosecutor's) subpenas for about 500 tapes and documents, call- ing them "an unconstitutional usurpation of power." The coasts of the U.S. experienced un- usually high tides due to an unusual align- ment of the Earth, sun, and a-moon b Venus c-Comet Kohoutek 3 Attorney General Saxbe urged citizens to report gasoline price gouging to their local (CHOOSE ONE: Commerce Depart- ment, Internal Revenue Service) offices. 4 An unprecedented peacetime army alert, spurred by fears of Arab terrorism, was called at Heathrow Airport in a-London b-Tel Aviv c-Dublin 5 Soviet officials were veiy (CHOOSE ONE: pleased with, critical of) Alexander Solzhenitsyn's new book, "The Gulag Archipelago." newsname (10 poinli It you cin Identify piucm In the newt) I continued as prime minister of my coun- try although my Labor Party lost seats in re- cent parliamentary elections. In our paifin we alluded to ler- rilori.il compromise as the price of pcacn, Who rnarchwords (or Mth correct mitcti) 1 censure a-oflicial population count b-biin or alter certain books, movies, etc. c-happcn .it the same time (10 poinli If you answer thlt question, correctly) As his wife watched, former Ohio Senator William Saxbe was sworn In as President Nixon's fourth attorney general in 5 years. Who were the other three? 2.....census (2 polnti for each question answered corrtclly) 1 Alter winning the Sugar Bowl, 7 was named the nation's top college football team in the final Associ- ated Press poll of sports writers. a-Alabama b-Notre Darnc c-Ohio State 2 Brooms and stones are used as equipment in the sport of (CHOOSE ONE: curling, 3 was chosen to play in the NDA's All-Star game lor a iccord 14lh time hit was forced to wiihdraw be- cause of an injury. a-Jerry WeM I) John lljvlicek i: piot Walker 4 Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn said professional Uir-uball would not cancel night Raines, but would save finely in other ways. True or False' 5 The 1974 professional golf tour began with the (CHOOSE ONE: Bing Crosby, Gob Hope) Open. 3.....cede 4.....coincide d criticize sh.it ply 0-ytald or roundtable Fnmlly dltcuitlon (no icon) What do you Itiiiili o( the Administration's standby gasoline nilioninft plan? YOUR SCOHE: 0110 100 poinli TOP SCOREI81 lo 90 poinli 71 In 80 poinli Good. 61 to 70 riolnW 114.74 VEC. Inc.. Mxllion. Wlicomln treatment of the a precedent. But lo use the miners as Heath and his aides indicated they didn't believe the TUC could hold the other workers in line. Braves Cracked ice for Rescue PITTSBURGH (UPI) Lying on cracked ice, police Sgt. George Ault Monday successful- ly rescued a 71-year-old fisher- The match goes to the first; Jayer to win three games, or tie player who is ahead at the nd of 16 games. If there is a tie n games won after 16 games, a 3oin loss will decide Ihe winner. The Byrne-Spassky contest is ine of four scheduled this week n the elimination to name a challenger who will play the current world title holder, Bobby Fischer of the U.S., in 1975. job Tuesday because of the re- fusal of the national rail board to resume negotiations on their demand for pay increases above the ceilings set by Heath's anti- inflation program. The railmen had been on a slowdown for five weeks lhat man who had fallen through thin ice on nearby North Park lake. Police said the ice beneath Ault gave way as he stretched out to aid James Goodyear, 71, of Cadogan, who was spotted clinging to the edge of a large hole in the ice in 14 feet of water. Another fisherman and a park supervisor held Ault's feet on solid ice as he pulled Goodyear lo safely. Goodyear was treated for ex- posure at a hospital. shipments to the electric power plants. They suspended the slowdown last Friday in a futile attempt to get the wage talks going again. Ample Warning The day-long rail strike added to the troubles of workers, busi- n e s s .and industry already plagued by power shortages, the three-day week and slow deli- very of materials. But unlike a ANSWERS ON REVERSE PAGE Trust is an essential and cherished bond between parent and child, man and woman, people and their institutions. We've worked hard to earn and keep the trust of our members for 90 years. They trust in us and the fraternal, insur- ance and financial security we provide for their families. That's what we're all about. One of fhe nation's leading fraternal life insurance societies HOME OFFICE ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 61201 MERTON H. KRUMREI, FIC Diifricl Representoriva 216 Windsor Dr. NE Cedar Rapids, Iowa   

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