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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1974 - Page 8

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Rapids Gazelle: Tiles.. Jan. 15 1974 Jail Experts Linn Facility the Worst By Dale Kueter Violence in jails, says a na- tional report, is related to the condition of jail facilities. All but three of 19 prisoners surveyed by The Gazetie said the Linn county jail is the worst they have ever been in. Two of the 19 had not been in jail before. One prisoner Third o; n Series said the Linn jail was better than another he had been in. "Any jail is better than the Linn county said one prisoner who has spent 10 of his 30 years behind bars. "There couldn't be any worse or dirtier (jails) than this one. I haven't had a change of shirts or pants since I have been said a 52- year-old inmate who had logged eight days in the Linn jail. "I've spent time in a Flori- da said another, "and it was 100 percent better." The jail was new, he said, and had recreational facilities. No Good Words No one loathes the Linn county jail more than its resi- dents. Unquestionably, there are few prisoners anywhere who are happy with their state in life, and few with the propensity to say anything good about their domicile. However, a lengthy study of county jails across the country, made by Penal Di- gest International j based in Iowa City, said data collected indicated "there is a recogniz- able correlation between the quality of jail facilities and the extent of violence and ho- mosexual rape." Who are the occupants of the Linn county jail? They are nearly all male. Their median age is 24. Ten of the 19 returning surveys have been graduated from high school, and four have some college. Twelve were employed at the time of their arrest; Eight are married. Six said other members of their family have been in trouble with the law, and in two instances one of the parents has served time in jail. was the median age when inmates first locked horns with the law. Fifteen of the 19. said they first got into trouble with the law prior to age 20. Who To Blame? Following are comments provided by the prisoners re- sponding to the survey: "The first time I got into trouble it was my fault, but the blame goes to society (in the other cases) for not giving me a chance to prove myself. "I got into trouble for run- ning with the wrong group, plus a factor of wanting more t L1M CO. JAIL things such as TV-stereo and such extra things in life." "I was in the wrong place at the wrong lime" said one. ad- ding he was not at fault for his situation. "Nothing to was the reason for another's troubles. "It was my own fault." "It was my own fault, and I couldn't do anything else." "Pot and presiding judge. I wouldn't be here except the judge was definitely against long hair. I don't think pot should be illegal." "Parental problems." "Depression and drinking." "Blind in one eye. Not many job opportunities." "Drugs." "Lady perjured herself on the stand." "Alcohol and drugs." "Alcohol, parental prob- lems." Two others simply attribut- ed their plight to "my and another said, "stupidity." Number Admitted In 1972, the Linn county jail admitted male adult prisoners; 284 female adults; 98 juvenile males; and 34 ju- venile females. Figures for 1973 are not yet available. In all categories but juvenile male, the number of individuals incarcerated in recent years has been, rising slowly. The length of stay has been decreasing. Most are in the jail a very short period of time. They are released either on bond; their own recognizance (no bond or to the custody of community court services. The same disproportion of male and female imprison- ments exists on a statewide level. In 1972, there were adult males placed in county jails in Iowa; only adult females; juvenile males; and 812 juvenile females. Larry Nelson, project coor- dinator for community court services in the Sixth judicial district, said there is discrimi- nation against males regard- ing arrest and release proce- dures. Easier for Women "There tends to be an easier process for the release of said Nelson. "The courts tend to release them on bond much quicker than men. "If the same facts were true for a man and woman who had been arrested, the woman would have the easier bonding procedure. And a law enforce- _. ment officer is more likely to. Denied by Grcmf oner demonstrates good be- havior after a certain period of incarceration. Most in law enforcement, including Sheriff Grant, be- lieve work release has worked well. There has been some criticism of this program, but it has not been nearly as con- troversial as pre-trial release and some other release proce- dures. (These will be re- viewed in a later article.) Sheriff Grant said less than five percent of those inmates placed on work release fail to return to the jail. Most are re- arrested later, he said. However, county Supervisor William Martin, an attorney, said he asked and obtained work release privileges on four prisoner-clients, and all four escaped and have never returned. The Neighbors By George Clark arrest a male for intoxication than a female." Nelson and others also point out that women commit fewer crimes than men. "Their ac- tions are more restricted by social pressures thai, he said. But, Nelson continued, if the women's lib demand to have women treated equally in all regards were carried out, "this would result in more stringent treatment of women in connection with the law." Linn county -Sheriff.Walter Grant said most women who are arrested are charged with forgery, bad checks or drunk driving. "Females just don't go out and commit burgla- he said. In 1972, adult males spent days in the Linn county jail, for an average time of in- carceration of 4.64 days. In the same year, females were held a total of 460 days, for an average length of stay of 1.C2 days.v Census: 36 On a recent day, the jail roll included 15 persons, including one woman, awaiting trial or some other disposition of their cases; two federal prisoners; and 19 persons serving sen- tences upon conviction. Presently, there are 62 others awaiting court disposi- tion of their cases who are released and under the super- vision of community court services; 110 who the court has released on their own re- cognizance. The latter group is not under community court services supervision. Seven of those serving time were on the work release pro- gram. They leave the jail in the morning, are to proceed directly to their job, and re- turn after work. Sheriff Grant said one per: son, who is awaiting trial on a charge of attempted murder, is a "sDecial" case. The court ordered that he be given work release privileges. At the same time, a juvenile was being held in Linn county jail also awaiting trial on a charge of driving while his license was under suspension. He spent a total of five days in jail before being released. "Are Inequities" Nelson said there are un- doubtedly some inequities in who is allowed pre-trial re- lease and who isn't. On the same recent day, in- mates were serving time on the following charges: Burgla- ry; forgery; larceny (two) various drug charges assault breaking and entering lascivious acts with a child re- ceiving stolen property; traf- fic charges and fail- ure to appear. Work release is ordinarily determined by the sheriff in consultation with the chief jailer. It is granted if a pris- Sheriff Grant denied this. "I certainly would know if that many failed to return. Bill Martin doesn't know what he's talking about." Grant said the county does not pursue those work release prisoners who leave the state. He said by agreement with County Atty. William Faches, "we don't bother with them if they leave the state. "We will pick them up in the state of Iowa. But it is too costly to extradite them from another Grant said. "If we did bring them back the punishment meted out would not be worth it. The in- dividual could be charged with escape, but most likely he would get a 30-day sus- pended sentence for contempt of court." Wednesday: The inside story on the Linn county jail, as prisoners see it, as flic sheriff sees it. photo by Duane Crock There is not much to do in the Linn county jail. Nearly all reading material is pornography. The reading center {upper right) is empty. So, there are playing cards, walking and smoking cigarets. These trusties in the bullpen area of the jail are to keep the jaii clsan. Trusties also help with the laundry. Other prisoners are housed in the more confining c ellblocks to the right and upper left. Underwriters To Hear Dr. Herbst Dr. Arnold Herbst, senior minister at St. Paul's United Methodist church, will speak to members of the Cedar Rapids Dr. Arnold Herbst Assn. of Life Underwriters Fri- day at noon at the Longbranch. His topic will be "A Minister Looks at Life Before coming to St. Paul's in 1967, Dr. Herbst served churches in four cities in South Dakota. He is on the board of trustees of Dakota Wesleyan university, Cornell college at Mt. Vernon, St. Luke's Methodist hospital, Hillcrest Services to Children and Youth and is chairman of the board of trustees of Meth- Wick Manor. Dr. Herbst and his family live at 2122 Country Club parkway SE. Paper Panic Ends TOKYO (UPI) A Japanese airline stewardess back home with a suitcase full of toilet paper looked unhappy when told that the toilet paper panic is over, a Tokyo International air- port customs inspector said. "It's one of those things which happens these he said. Customs officials said quite a number of Japanese tourists are returning loaded down with toi- let paper, laundry detergent and sugar, all of which have been short in recent days. By Associated Press "The last thing I remember is seeing flying glass and flying Pricilla Heidner says of the derailment of Amtrak's crack Texas Chief passenger train. The Texas Chief left the tracks near Ardmore, Okla., Monday, resulting in injuries to 45 persons. That was one of three train accidents around the country. At McGregor, Texas, two tank cars carrying petrochemicals derailed and exploded, but no injuries were reported. In Penn- sylvania, four tank cars carry- ing compressed chlorine over- turned and ruptured in a sparse- ly populated area near White Haven. There were no reported injuries. ironi Chicago to 115 passengers moving through 115 Passengers The Texas Chief, southbound Houston with aboard, was an industrial area on the northeastern out- skirls of Ardmore when it de- railed at 55 miles per hour. Several persons were pinned inside derailed cars for a time before being rescued by work- men with pry bars. Two of the cars, including the dining car, turned on their sides. The dining car caught fire. "Everyone and everything was going said the 1972 campaign, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch said Monday.. The Post-Dispatch said a con- fidential document prepared under the supervision of former White House aide Frederic V. Malek and dated March 17, 1972, outlined proposals for increas- ing political responses of federal agencies and rechanneling cer- Mrs. Heidner of Austin, Texas, who was in the diner. "My first thought was: 'This is the end.' "I just hung said Sam- uel H. Treadway, 74, of Okla- homa City. "The car started jumping. I was on the right side of the train, and the car began tilting to the left, so to keep from being thrown across the car I just hung on to my seat." Of the 45 persons injured, 29 received emergency treatment and were released. Sixteen were hospitalized, including Mrs. Don Summers of Arlington, Texas, who suffered a broken back. "Atom Bomb" It locked like an atom bomb had said John M. Gardner, a McGregor resident, of the blast, at the Texas com- munity. Police evacuated scores of oerscns from a 22-block area as firemen fought a fire that fol- lowed (he explosion. The Santa Fe railway said five tank cars among 12 cars that derailed were carrying vinyl chloride, chlorine gas, napiha and other combustibles. M- Two of the derailed tank cars Nixon and for returning sub- and bumed_ poenaed malarial to a Philadel-j witnesses said one car in the phia labor union whose business 23-car train was leaking naptha agent was a Republican sup- porter in a key position to influ- ence blue collar votes. The newspaper said the two documents were addressed to H. R. Haldeman, former White S. Agencies for Nixon Drive ST. LOUIS (AP) A secretjper vision represented a plan to gear the power of nearly progress report. The second every major federal department memo allegedly claimed credit toward President Nixon's getting a million grant election was drawn up and ap-ifor migrant workers switched to parently implemented during a group more favorable to tain federal grants for political'House chief of staff. The news- purposes. i paper added the documents are The eight-page memo also in-iin the possession of the senate eluded detailed instruction on (Watergate committee. i low to keep the plan secret andi----------------------i low to shield the White Housej 20 YEARS AGO Secretary! 'rom responsibility if the Commerce Weeks said he became known, the newspaper; would not permit an exporter to reported. jbiiy surplus bulter at prices The Post-Dispatch said a sec- j considerably under those paid ond memo dated June 7, by American housewives and and prepared under Malek's su-jthcn send :t to Russia. Trains as the train neared the Mc- Gregor depot and the cars de- railed when the crew attempted an emergency stop. The four tank, cars carrying compressed chlorine were among 10 cars in a Lehigh Val- ley railroad 67-car freight train that left the tracks near White Haven. State police advised residents within a half-mile of the acci- dent to evacuate their homes through Monday night because, of chlorine fumes. "A whiff of this stuff doesn't kill you, but a big dose said state police Sgt. John Hos- king. LAFF-A-DAY "I always thought tennis was a non-contact game." "It looks as pretty as snow. Right, Mommy? right, Uh, VISIT The Office of Dr. C. R. 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