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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 15, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                'Leveled for strip mining in 1974, this area was later restored by engineers from Disneyland' Editorial Page Tuesday, Jonwiry 15, 1974 Nixon's fax proposal LAST SPRING President Nixon proposed a drastic tightening of the income tax law which, had it been adopted by congress, would have caught the Chief Executive himself in a bit of a vise. But, fortunately for him and others with high incomes, congress has yet to act. The proposal would remove many loopholes from the so-called "minimum" income tax law now on the books. If and when those loopholes are removed, the President will be among the wealthier individuals required to pay more tax. To find out how much more the President would have paid for 1969-72, had the proposal been in effect that far back, the Wall Street Journal put some tax specialists to work. They applied the terms in the administration's proposal to income and deduc- tion figures the President released to the public recently. From this they calculated his taxes would have totaled or more for 1969-72 instead of the taxes he paid. Administration treasury of- ficials still want congress to adopt the proposal. But they are realis- tic enough to know aren't we all? that congress isn't about to pass such a tough law that it might affect the financial status of individuals frequently tapped by some of its members for cam- paign contributions. Super flop RESIGNING themselves lo the audience pull of CBS's Superbowl VIII telecast Sunday, competing networks and local af- filiates turned to throw-away programming. A local station's showing of "Beach Blanket Bin- go" was fairly representative. We may never know how much channel checking occurred at midgame, but one suspects that the adolescent spooning by Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello (in "Beach was more diverting than the Miami-Minnesota football fiasco. The Dolphins' drubbing of the Vikings thus provides a lesson tor TV planners: Never give up when another network has the Super- bowl. Even the Game of the Cen- tury can prove a clunker. There is a lesson, too, for every inveterate fan who spent the past two weeks ingesting each morsel of Superbowl pregame ballyhoo, then chased the kids and dog from the TV den Sunday: Don't get too keyed up; after all, this month is a mere extension of a year of sports Mets in the World Series, the Riggs-King tennis ms.- match and, locally, the Iowa foot- ball debacle. Admiration reconsidered TO SAY that someone is the most admired person in the world for Americans, it seems, is far from saying So-and-So is most people's man or woman of the year. The mini-ballot test we ran on this a while back produced a No. 1 hero, all right. (See summary below.) But when the top cat's name shows up in less than one in eight of- all the mentions for the public's top three most-admired persons anywhere, that hardly qualifies as far-reaching glory. If the same pattern holds for the national polls on this matter (where no one documents the roster with the exercise's meaning dims. Without some indication of the relative appeal of those who lead, a simple one-through-ten positioning of rank says little. Our main conclusion, therefore, is that most-admired polls in their customary form are all but worthless in significance. Nature needn't suffer Oil lode reachable? By Jack Anderson WASHINGTON With unconcealed excitement, the Federal Energy Office is investigating a revolutionary technique for extracting oil from shale at a cheap SI. 18 a barrel without massive ecological damage. Energy Chief Simon is talking privately of an all-out government effort, on the scale of the Manhattan Project which developed atomic energy, lo drain the mountains of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming of critically needed oil. An estimated 1.8 trillion barrels of oil, nearly three times Ihe world's present proven reserves, is locked in the shale rock formations of the Rockies. At Hie current rate of consumption, this would be enough to supply United Slates nil needs for HO years. The problem is separating the oil from the rock. Previous proposals called for extensive strip mining, which would devastate Ihe western scenery. The shale would be heated until the oil dripped out. But Ihe heal would also expand the rock, which would have to be discarded in huge, unsightly piles. New mountains of discarded shale literally would be creat- ed. But now Occidental Petroleum has developed a way lo extract the oil inside the mountains, without the massive strip mining and monstrous shale dumps. Even more promising, the Occidental process would reduce the cost from around to a barrel. The cost estimates were made by an independent Stanford research group, which studied Occidenlal'.s pilot project in Colorado. The final cost of delivering the oil lo suppliers, after all the pumping and piping has been figured in. would run between and a barrel. The Occidental method consists essen- tially of blasting a chamber inside the oil-bearing rock formation. Natural gas is then injected into the chamber and fired. This produces intense tempera- tures, which separates the oil from the rock. The oil seeps to the bottom of the formation, where it is pumped away. The expanding shale gradually fills up the chamber and the mountain is left virtually undisturbed except for the min- ing shaft required to gain entrance. Occidental's enterprising chairman. Dr. Armand Hammer, showed a movie of ihe new process the other day to Simon and his staff. Simon's experts then ques- tioned the Occidental technicians thoroughly. Highly impressed, Simon is now preparing to send his specialists to Colorado to study ilio Occidental opera- lion firsthand. A crash program, say this Occidental engineers, could relieve the U.S. oil shortage within three years. United Feotures Svndicoto Jaworski's hands tied? Grand jury rules pose ironic dilemma Two further judgments are that: (a) When men and women luminaries are considered jointly (as they were in the Gazette male heroes heavily predominate among both men and women, (b) Nearly all respondents volunteer their most-admired choices from the prominent or famous; very few here nominated the obscure, their personal acquaintances or rela- tives. Let these stray comments from the voters wrap it up: "I'm glad you're doing this. That other poll never seems real." "I think 'respect' would be a better word than 'admiration.' Americans have lost much hero- worship." "You ask, why so strong to governmental Did anything else happen in "Three top choices of the LEAST admired would have been easier." By Anthony Lewis BOSTON By his performance as the Watergate special prosecutor, Leon Jaworski has quieted early ques- tions about his ability to be independent from the President who appointed him. He has held together tho staff picked by Archibald Cox; he has pressed the inves- tigations; he has kept his distance and his freedom from the White House. All that must be acknowledged as preface to consideration of (lie important statement that Jaworski has just made. He said that lie could "see no way at the present time" to make material obtained from the White House available to the house judiciary committee for its im- peachment inquiry. There is no doubt of Jaworski's good faith in reaching that position. Ho had obtained presidential documents and tapes by asking on behalf of grand juries, he felt, and he was therefore bound by personal honor and the rules of grand jury secrecy not to disclose them elsewhere. Nevertheless, it must .be recognized that the view he indicates raises extremely serious problems for the im- peachment inquiry. Indeed, the unin- tended result just could be to immunize President Nixon from any effective re- tribution for wrongdoing. Consider the burden placed on the house committee's impeachment staff, headed by John Doar. The exceedingly skilled lawyers of the special prosecu- tor's office have worked for six months on all the threads of evidence, and they arc just about ready to ask the grand juries for major indictments. If Doar and his colleagues have lo start at ground zero now, they would face an enormous task in trying to collect the evidence afresh. There is a severe problem of time. Doar may well ask the President's lawyers to turn over relevant information voluntarily, but it is already indicated that the answer will be no. If Ihe house then grants needed sub- poena power, the Whito House lawyers will doubtless contest that, too. In the end the courts would almost certainly find thai the constitutional process of im- pcachmo.nl carries wilh it an overriding right lo information, but the litigation could take many months. Of course there is a mass of material available apart from what Ihc special prosecutor has gol from Ihc White House. And there are numerous possible grounds for impeachment lhal resl on published facts, for example Nixon's 1970 approval of a secret security plan authorizing Ihc use of illegal wirclaps and burglaries. But for sound political as well as legal reasons (he house committee will surely be intent on exploring the leads closest to the evidence linking him personally wilh Ihe crimes of Walergale and the cover-up. The committee will be looking for public support; and much of the public, for all its disbelief in Nixon, has indicated a reluctance to undertake impeachment without some showing of direct criminality. People's forum Suppose that Jaworski acquires, or already has, some evidence linking Ihe President to criminal acts. What docs he do with it if he does not refer it to Ihe house judiciary committee? He could present the evidence lo a grand jury and seek an indictmenl of Nixon. Many legal experts see no consti- tutional barrier to prosecution of a President, but Nixon and his lawyers na- turally disagree. Jaworski is said to have reached no firm conclusion yet. If he were not prepared to bring such a case, how would the facts ever come out? Would Ihe country have to wait for testimony in someone else's trial? When if ever would thai come? All this makes clear the serious nature of the dilemma that has arisen. It is an ironic silualion. Congress originally in- sisted on a special prosecutor for Water- gate because of the possibility lhal the President might be involved. Ycl the special prosecutor's work may now turn out inadvertently to have obstructed the process established by the Constitution to correct presidential wrongdoing. Another View Fortunately, the situation is not frozen. Jaworski has expressed the desire to cooperate with Ihe house inquiry as best ho can. And there is room for compromise and adjustment. For one thing, grand jury secrecy is not an absolute in our law. Judges can release the minutes of grand jury proceedings for a variety of reasons. Federal testimony is communicated to state prosecutors, defendants may have claims on it, and so forlli. The ethical and legal restraints that Jaworski feels apply to him as prosecutor would not be the same in relation to Judge John Sirica, and Jaworski could seek a ruling from him. The point is that judge and prosecutor and all concerned have obligations to a larger public interest, to congress, to the country, to the constitutional process of impeachment. It would be extraordinary if the fact that evidence had been before a grand jury stood in the way of an im- peachment proceeding. The public is likely to understand that, and to see in the dilemma another if unwitting cover- up. New York Times Service Interference Watergate scrappers admired, too Local poll puts Henry AS A COUNTERPOINT to the Gallup Poll's perennial rundown on the past year's most-admired men and women. The Gazette invited readers Jan. 6 to send a ballot on their own hero choices for '73. (See editorial above.) From nearly a hundred responses, with anybody in the world qualifying and with both sexes grouped together, this was the, result (percentages show rate of mention from the 1. Henry Kissinger............12 1. Richard Nixon............. 7 3. Harold Hughes...........4.6 4. Alexander Solzhcnilsyn.....4.2 5. John Sirica.............. 3.3 6. Billy Graham ............2.8 7. Sam Ervin...............2.5 (tie) Ralph Nader .........2.5 9. Golda Meir 1.6 (tie) Pat Nixon 1.6 (tie) Elliot 'Richardson 1.6 The Gallup listings (separately for men and women) had their top-tens running this way last year (first to tenth in Henry Kissinger, Billy Graham, Richard Nixon, Edward Kennedy, Gerald Ford, George Wallace, Ralph Nader, Henry Jackson, Pope Paul VI, Barry Goldwater. Golda Meir, Pat Nixon, Rose Kennedy, Shirley Chisholm, Indira Gandhi, Mamie Eisenhower, Lady Bird Johnson, Jacqueline Onassis, Queen Elizabeth II, Ethel Kennedy and Margaret Chase Smith The Gazette ballots, asking for each respondent's top three choices in order, came from men and women in identical numbers. One interesting sidelight was an al- most even split in frequency of mention for persons closely involved in the presidential controversy centering on Watergate. White House side (the President, Mrs. Nixon and Julie 10 percent. Prosecution side (Senator Ervin, Judge SirLeaj. Archibald Cox, Richardson and William 9 percent. Below the top dozen or so, choices were Henry Kissinger distinguished more for their variety than their frequency. Roughly grouped by specialty or otherwise, the most-ad- mired individuals for Eastern lowans who mailed in the form included: POLITICS ot PUBLIC AFFAIRS Warron Burger, Frank Church, Dick Clark, H. Denenberg, Thomas Eogleron, Gerald Ford, John Gardner, H. R. Gross, Hubert Humphrey, John Lindsay, Walter Mondole, Edmund Muskie, Robert Ray, Nelson William Simon Lowell Wcikrr INTERNATIONAL Androi Soktiarov, Hclvi Sipila, Kurt Woldheim. ENTERTAINMENT, show business, ihe arts Leonard Bernstein, Morion Brando. Dick Covolt. Alistalr Cooko, Osslo and Ruby Doe, Jano Fonda, Bob Hope, Tom Snydcr. JOURNALISM Jack Anderson, Erma Bom- beck, Art Buchwold, William F. Buckley, Nor- man Cousins, Harry Roasonor, Gordon Sinclair, Howard K. Smith, Barbara Walter, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward. WOMEN Roxanno Conlin, Mamie Eisenhower, Vivian Kelloms, Joan Kennedy, Martha Mitchell, Ayn Rond. MISCELLANEOUS Richard Armour, Caesar Chavez, Jacques Cotnteau, Barry Commoner, Lillian Dickion, Rex Humbord, Ted Kennedy, jr., James C. Milata, William A. Rooch, Robert Schuller, Jules Slein. SPORTS Henry Aaron, Billle Jean Kino, O. J. Simpson. LOCAL AREA Robert Armstrong, Goorgn Carlson, Hugh Gibson, Reid Motley, Eleanor Taylor, Sheets, Robert Wilson (Collins To the Editor: We must become concerned with our safety and security because the Iowa Electric pronouncements that the Duane Arnold Energy Center is a good neighbor do not jib with guidelines earlier set down by tho Atomic Energy Commission. In a 1962 report to the President on civilian nuclear power, a major policy statement, Ihe AEC declared: for safety reasons, prudence now dictates placing large reactors fairly far away from population centers." In April of 1862, the AEC formally adopted and published its guides lo reactor site selection. These guides were in effect when the DAEC was being planned and sited. However, the AEC did not then discourage building reactors closer to populated centers. It was interested in promoting nuclear energy, and being closer to Ihe delivery point would make nuclear energy production cheaper but not necessarily safer. In the Brookhavcn report of the AEC in 1957, it was hypothesized what would be the consequences of a major accident wilh a kilowatt reactor. The DAEC has kilowatts. In the projection the reactor was 30 miles fnirn a population center with more Mian people. The report estimated I hut there would be deaths, casualties and billion worth of property damage. Tile AEC has refused to issue an up- dated "Brookhavcn" based upon Ihe enlarged capacity of new plants. The DAEC is located within II miles of more than people. In llu1 Environmental Defense Fund newsletter for November, It staled thai Ihc AEC staff concluded Ihat plans should not continue to build n nuclear plan! II miles north of Philadelphia. II recommended moving It .15 miles south of Ihu ciiy. "I don't want to grow up and be a consumer." By what logical process does our government conclude that it is "belter" to risk destruction of a "small" midwest-' ern metropolitan area than a large city of more than one million? Testifying before the joint committee on atomic energy in the spring of Nunzio J. Palladino, chairman of Iho AEC's Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards for 1907, and Dr. David Okrent, the chairman for said: .The ACR5 boliqvos thot placing largo nuclear reactors close to population centers will require considerable further improvements in safely, ond Ihat NONE OF THE LARGE POWER REACTORS NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION IS CONSIDERED SUITABLE FOR LOCATION IN METROPOLI- TAN AREAS." (Emphasis mine.) We must speak up because Iowa Elec- Iric Is planning on expanding Its nuclear plant. There Is an Information meeting on nuclear energy (his Thursday (Jan. p.m., ill Ihe Cedar Rapids public library. Katherine A. Goldstein 418 Dunronlh drive NE To the Editor: Freedom is never secure. While our minds are on the energy crisis, there is another crisis on the horizon in this country. At this moment there rages a con- troversy between Hie welfare department of Texas and a church operated home in Corpus Christi. The Rev. Lester Roloff, a minister of over 40 years, has been denied the opportunity lo convert wayward boys and girls lo Christ. The state is invading the domain of the church and state. The attorney general of Texas has aligned himself with Ihe state welfare department in denying the Rev. Mr. Roloff certification, on highly dubious grounds. Have we forgotten Ihe First Amend- ment of the Constilution? "Congress shall make no law respecting the establish- ment of religion or the free exercise thereof." Texas claims Ihe homes are not properly staffed, Ihat diets arc improper, discipline is too rigid and that TV and other types of recreation arc not provid- ed. However, Ihis Christian man has taken alcoholics, drug addicts, runaways and the most profoundly disturbed, and brought them to themselves. They have been returned to society at no cost to the taxpayer or to those bcnefilecl. The crisis is between church and stale. The slate could not help many of Roloff's cases. The stale wants his homes operat- ed by "professionals" and to align ilself with "worldly" standards. Roloff refuses. The unconverted cnnnnl comprehend Jesus' methods. The unbeliever is earthy and Is not spiritually discerned. The "degreed" people rely on reformation through the manlpulullon of the mind and environment. The boni-agnln Christian moves by faith In Christ and believes In regeneration as opposed to rehabllllntion. Tune into KM KTOE al (I every evening for nil Iho fads. Klchnrd M. Walhico mi) 0 nvcmio NW   

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