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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 12, 1974 - Page 6

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 12, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar RapMs Gazelle: Jan. 12. Five Die in Pusher's Try To Kill Witnesses EPA Drops Bid For Surcharge OnCitv DOVER, Del. (AP) A shoot- ing spree that left five persons dead and three wounded was triggered by an accused heroin dealer who was trying to sys- tematically kill witnesses who could have testified against him in a drug ease, a Delaware state official said Friday. Authorities said the gunman killed two possible witnesses and a woman Thursday, then killed his girl friend. Three per- sons were wounded before the gunman apparently shot himsell in the head, police said. The head wound was fatal. High Speed Chase The shooting spree and a high speed chase ranged across the state. Police identified the dead sus- pect as Ronald W. Hoffecker, 30, Dover. Deputy Delaware Atty. Gen. Joseph Hurley called the murder spree a "systematic killing of witnesses." Hoffecker was arrested Dec. 19 on charges of selling heroin. He was to appear in court Fri- Nixon Plans To Urge System of Work Incentives WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- dent Nixon intends to send con- gress this year a proposed pro- gram providing incentives to encourage the poor to work, say administration officials. The proposal, still being worked on by administration planners, may tie welfare to the tax sysem in some modified form of a guaranteed annual in- come for those earning below a certain level. Roy Ash, director of the Of- fice of Management and Budg- et, said the administration "has got to deal with this issue that has been so divisive in the relationship between work and welfare." The Nixon administration 're- portedly has decided against including welfare reform in its fiscal 1975 federal budget, but President Nixon is expected to deal with the subject extensive- ly in his Slate of the Union message. In an interview, 'Ash would give no details on the adminis- tration proposal. But he said the government should try to find new language for welfare re- of such phrases as negative income tax and family assistance. "I think we 'should declare some of our past language ob- he said. "People al- ready have their ininds made up because of it. Let's start with a clean slate." WASHINGTON (AP) Pro- posals to place a surcharge on parking in several cities were day for a probation violation Cropped Thursday by the En- hearing which could have ended Ivironmcntal Protection Agency. :n bis being sent (o prison for I And. EPA Administrator Rus- revocation of his probation for a E- Train llls also delaying the implcmenta- Hurley said two of the dead a11 rotations re- had been scheduled to be wit- nesses against Hoffecker in an upcoming drug care, and that only hours before the killings Hoffecker had purchased a box of handgun ammunition. "He knew everybody he said slate police spokes- man Angelo T. Citro. The Opened Fire shootings began when Hoffecker went to the Dover home of Glen Chemielewski. Po- lice said Hoffecker opened fire, injuring Chemielewski and kill- ing John Pappas, 29, of Del., and Shirley F. llag- gerty, 34, of Dover. Police said he drove to an- other Dover home where he took Mrs. Richard Katcher, 25, as a hostage, and then drove south to Camden, Del., where he killed Mark Lovelace, 21. Lovelace and Pappas had been scheduled to appear as witnesses against Hoffecker, Hurley said. Hoffecker's car was spotted jy state police near Middle- town, and he was pursued by police until his car skidded out of control and into a field. Delaware state trooper Billy Reep was shot in the shoulder during the chase and was wounded slightly. Police said Mrs. Katcher told them Hoffecker had shot her and Barbara Johnson, 19. The Johnson woman, found in the car used by Hoffecker, was :dentified by police as Hof- 'ecker's girl friend. But they said they did not know when she joined Hoffecker in the incident. Mrs. Katcher was listed in 'air condition. review of nc until Jan. Most had been live in August or November i 973. Various forms of parking sur- ?ha'-ges had been announced by EPA as a means of discouraging commuting by auto. However, legislation now before congress would have forbidden the sur- :harges and Train said the in- clusion of the ban was viewed as firm congressional guidance Marines Reprimand Leader Of Band for Outside Jobs The surcharges had been planned for Los Angeles. San ?ranciseo. San Diego, Sacra- mento and the San .loaquin val- iey in California, Boston, New- ark, N. J., and the Washington, D. C. area. A hearing in Harpham's case ivas held Jan. S in Quantico, Va., before Lt. Gen. Robert P. Keller, commanding general of Stennis Plans To Run For Re-election in '76 JACKSON, Miss. (UPI) Senator John C. Stennis (D- Miss.) who was wounded by robbers in Washington last year, Thursday said he will be a candidate for re-election in 1976. SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) The Reagan administration has postponed plans to close 122- year-old San Quentin prison and mild two new maximum securi- y prisons, State Finance Direc- ,or Verne Orr says. Instead of phasing out San Quentin, Goy. Reagan's. 1974-75 state budget provides S2.5 mil- ion to renovate one wing of the aging institution. Orr said the reason for the change in plans is the upsurge in state prison populations since 1972. Inmate population, which reached a low of just under 18 months ago, is expect- ed to average this year and climb to during fiscal 1974-75. San Quentin is expected to ab- sorb most of that growth, in- creasing from inmates to Orr said tougher parole stan- dards are the main .reason for the increase. Prison officials Recall Is Urged WASHINGTON (UPI) The government Friday urged Gen- oral Motors to recall GO.OOO 1959- 960 Cadillacs for a steering de- ect which it said could cause a driver to lose control of his car. James Gregory, head of the Vational Highway Traffic Safe- y Administration, asked GM to lotify owners of the Cadillacs mmediately about the defect. Under law, the agency cannot jrder GM to recall the cars. iregory-urged it to correct the defect at no cost to the owners. The defect is centered in the 'itman arm. The steering arm s a critical component which :onnects the Cadillac's steering haft to the steering linkage. If t fails, the driver loses control. According to 'the safety agen- :y, the defect is caused by al fatigue that can be induced rom "repetitive stresses" in- in turns and parking ma- leuvers. It said its investigation show- ed that steering arms "have ailed frequently and without earning, causing complete teering loss and thus creating in unreasonablei risk of acci- lents, injuries, and deaths to [rivers and passengers." said prison gang activities have caused a reassessment of pro grams, buildings and policies. ROME Three explo- sions in quick succession early Friday heavily damaged three buildings in downtown Rome housing offices of companies owned by International Tele- phone Telegraph Co., police reported. Leaflets found on the scene said: "ITT has organized the coup d'etat in Chile and it is made up by Fascist and reac- tionary elements." A fourth explosion in a suburb slightly damaged a truck be- longing to a small telephone line maintenance firm. Five other bombs exploded Friday in Barcelona, Spain; Tu- rin, Italy, and Zurich, Switzer- land. They were apparently thrown by extremists protesting the sentencing of a Barcelona student radical to death. One person was injured in those bombings. Damage was slight. Rome police said the three bombs there were thrown short- ly after midnight from a pass- ing car, possibly the same one in all three attacks. The targets were within six milos of each other. No injuries were reported bill damage was estimated at him drcds of thousands of dollars. The worst damage, however, was done to the ground-floor of- fices of Ceca, a small Italian dala-proccssing firm with no tics to ITT. Ceca Is in the same building as ITT-ownccl Face St.indnrd Spa, a manufacturer ices if electronic and telecommuni cation equipment. The first blast wrecked Ceca'; eased computer and other equipment, tore down a nine yard-long internal wall and shattered windows in ncarty buildings. The second bomb wrecked lb mtrance to a building housing Intercontinentalc Assicurazion Spa, an ITT-owned insurance firm. The third exploded on thi roof of a storeroom of ITT's Si ette Spa, a telephone-installing company. WASHINGTON' (AP) The marine corps has reprimanded Lt. Col. Dale C. llarpham. lead- er of the famed marine band, for allegedly accepting money for appearances ;LS a guest con- ductor for civilian bands. llarpham voluntarily returned iii pay and allowances, including travel pay. lie received during the time he made the at appearances, the marine corps said. This was before a hearing was held. After the hearing, discipli- nary action was imposed, in- cluding forfeiture of in pay, the marine corps dis- closed Thursday night after press inquiries. Tiie marine corps would not say how much llarpham re- ceived for the guest appcar- the marine corps development and education command there. Keller issued a letter of rep- rimand, its contents not made public, iind ordered Ilarphum to forfeit a month for two months front his monthly base pay of Major Jack McNamara of the marine corps public information office at the Pentagon said the alleged offenses for which pim- iliment was imposed on Har- liam involved improper travel laims and ''unauthorized re- eipt of monies in the form ol onorarin, which he accepted from civilian sources) for ap- earing as a guest conductor" on marine corps dutj Iatus. In keeping with marine regu- ilions, McNamara said Ilar- ham has 15 days in which to ppeal the decision "on the asis that it was either unjust or isproportionate to the offenses Open Meeting Law Opinion Given Regents DBS M01NES state board of regents may meet pri- vately to discuss with state at- torneys matters involving law- suits or negotiating positions, the attorney general's office said Friday. And when the board only wants to work out a negotiating position, reports later given to the government can be secret if their release would give compet- itors an advantage and serve no public good. Therefore, a closed session may be held to discuss develop- ments of such negotiating posi- tions, iwrote Asst. Atty. Gen. Elizabeth Nolan in her opinion. The attorney general's office holds that such instances meet the law's requirement of "ex- ceptional reason so compelling as to override the general pub- lic policy in favor of public the opinion said. But the opinion said final ac- tion taken by the board must be recorded in the minutes of the meeting. R. Wayne Richey, executive secretary of the regents, asked for the opinion. Former Aide to Dean Quits Post on Nixon Legal Staff SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (AP) Fred J. Fielding, former hief assistant to John Dean, is e s i g n i n g as deputy White House counsel and returning to he private practice of law. Sources at the Western White louse confirmed 34-year-old 'ielding's imminent department but denied a report that Bruce Kehrli, a protege of H. R. Hal- deman, also planned to resign soon. Kehrli, staff secretary, made an unannounced flight lere recently to join the presi- dential party. Both Fielding and Kehrli testified at the trial of the Wa- tergate burglars and both were witnesses to the opening of the White House safe of E. Howard Hunt two days after the 1972 hreakin at Democrat- ic national committee head- quarters. Kehrli also was the second witness before the sen- ate Watergate committee last May. There has been no suggestion that either man was connected any wrongdoing. Dean, fired as White House counsel last April 30, testified Fielding acted as an innocent messenger in carrying in cash from the Committee for the Pie- election o fthe President to Hal- deman, who ostensibly kept il for a time to finance "polling' activities. A source close to Fielding said the deputy counsel, who joined the White House staf irivate practice for some time mt delayed resigning lest any me conclude it was related to he Watergate scandal. A White House spokesman said Fielding has been doing much of the work of the coun sel's office since Dean's de parture and that Nixon aide vere reluctant to see him leave Another source said he was sur irised Fielding had remained s ong.in view of his close associa ion with Dean, who publicly ac cused President Nixon of havini lad knowledge of the Watergati coverup. Pre-Retirement A four-week course on pre-re tirement planning begi meeting Jan. 22 at Washingtoi ligh school. Dr. Donald Typer, Mt. Ver non, a specialist in retircmen banning, will serve as instruc :or. Topics to be covered in elude biological and psj chological aspects of aging housing, leisure time activities social security and Medicar and estate and budget planning. a sourcc sald- The class will meet on four successive Tuesdays from to 9 p.m. Tuition is per per- son or per couple. Interested persons may pro- register by calling the Office of Retirement Education and Other Opportunities at Kirkwood Com If he does not appeal, the case oes to the commandant, Gen .obert P. Cushman, for fina' eview. At this point, no decision has een made as to whether Har- ham will continue as director f the band, McNamara said Director Maj. Jack T (line, has been acting as direc or in Harpham's absence. Hit-Run Victim's Dad Hits Girl in Double Tragedy MIAMI (AP) Ravmom iuth was driving home to see lis 4-year-old son who just hat teen seriously injured by a hit un. driver. On the way, Ruth's car strucl md killed a 13-year-old girl wlice said. Police gave the following ac ountof the tragedy: Ruth's son, John, was playinj lear his home Thursday when a 'ehicle hit him and the drive ped away. Police searched th area and arrested the owner o damaged car, Ron K. McMa ian, and charged him in the in "ident. When Buth found out abou lis son, he left work for home nit his car struck 13-year-olc Ann Berstein, who wa a bicycle home frorr ichool. She died almost instant y. No charges were filed agains Ruth. His son, who suffered a mnctured liver and interna ileeding, was in serious condi ion in the intensive care unit o Springs General hospital. Expect Nixon To Name Silberman No. 2 in Justice WASHINGTON (AP) Laurence Silberman, a Was] ington attorney and forme labor undersecretary, has bee selected by President Nixon be deputy attorney general, a( ministration sources say. Silberman would fill the d partment's No. 2 position, v cant since.the resignation las Oct. 20 of William Ruckelshaus. Silberman played a signif cant role in the labor dcpar ment refusal to supervise th controversial United Workers election in 1969. A White House source said he expects Nixon to nominate Sil- berman by Jan. 21 when! congress returns from its winter; recess. Atty. Gen. William Saxbe andj White House officials agreed on Television Listings Rapid. 2_WMT-TY. Rapid. Wal.rloo City Oltumwi Rsek liUnd Davenport la Rockelter Dei Moiim Dubuqu> Saturday Night :00 Welk J-Acllon News Wcaiher. Spts. 12-Folk Gullor XVelk WelK a-Movlc- "Blindfold" 8- Lawrence Weik 10-News. Weather. Sporls. 13-Nisvs. Weather, Sots. 40-Roller Games Sauares Luck of Animals at Sea Iowa Family 2-AII In Family Emergency Family Classics Family It) Family S-AII In Family tO-Emeroencv >3-Emeroencv Family "Sons of Kalie Elder" 12-Movie- "Sllotillv Hpnqrable" Movit-- ol Kalle Elder" 8-M'A'VH 40-Saturday "Sons of Katie Cider" 2-MarvTvler Moore 7-NBC Saturday "The WavWesP Tyler Moore 6-NBC Saturday Movle- "The Wav West" 8-Marv Tyler Moore 10-NBC Saturday "The Way West" 13-NBC Saturday Movie- "TheWay Weil" Newliarl 4-Bob Hcwhaf t B-Bob Ncvvhart Burnett 12-Centurv Theater 4-Carol Burnett fi-Carol Burnett News News Way 3-ABC News 4-News. Weather, Spts. fl-News, Weather, Spts. Weolber, Sots. t-Movle- "Don't Forget lo Wipe Ihe Blood OH" 2-Movle- "Deserl Detour" Weather Sots. Prisoner "Secrel Ceremony" 4-UFO 6-10 O'Clotk Edition "Ulyises" 10-News. weather, sots. JO-MovIe ?-Movle- "Deslructors" "List of Adrian Messenger" 10-Komlk Klassix Holmes 4-Outer Limits >-WIde World of Entertainment 2-Evll Touch (Continued from Page 3.) Bth st. NW. Mary A. White. S.S. :45. Scrv. 10. Cedar Hills Community Re- ormcd "4980 Gordon ave. SW. Leon Aalberts. S.S. Scrv. 11. "Help lor the Dis- Eve. "The Ite- :ipe Calls for Mustard and Cedar Hills Evangelical Free West Post rd. and Midway Ir. NW. Thomas E. Shatter. SS Serv. Eve. 7. Wed. 7. Cedar Rapids Bible 3412 Oakland rd. NE. S.S. 11. Serv. 11. Eve. 7. Wed. Cedar Kapids Friends Mcet- ns a.m. Contact Berle Miller. Cedar Valley Bible Church 3636 Cottage Grove ave. SE. Reagan Benedict. Thomas V. Fogle. Dwight L. Taylor. S.S. Serv. Eve. 6. Central Church of Christ 1500 1st ave. NW. Penney F. Nichols. S.S. Serv. Eve. C. Wed. 7. Christian and Missionary Al- 42nd st. NE. David B. Hustad. S.S. Serv. Eve. 7. Wed. 7. Peace Christian Reformed 6600 C ave. NE. Eail D. Dy- keraa. S.S. Serv. 'Five Loaves 'and Two ive. "Thy Will Be Church of the Brethren 1200 Second ave. SE. Dr. Wayne A. Shireman. S.S. Serv. Ministry of Deliverance 2nd st. SW. H. G. Kurth. F. R. Davidson. S.S. Serv. Eve. 7. Church of God Prophecy 3211 Edgcwood rd. SW. Michael Boots. S.S. 10. Serv. 11. Eve. Tues. Miller. S.S. Serv. Church of God 1101 Oak- land rd. NE. A. R. Moslander. S.S. Serv. Eve. 6. Eastview Church of Old Marion rd. NE, Lawrence W. Merritt. S.S. Serv. Eve. 7. Wed eve. 7. Ellis Park Church of God 726 L ave. NW. John Little, S.S. Serv. Eve. 6. First Church of Christ, icientist 1242 2nd ave. SE. S.S., sen'. Wed. eve. First 25th st. NE. James F. Lange. Dean Ford.- S.S Serv. First Open Hibie 1911 E NW. Neal B. Gail. S.S. Serv. Eve. First Pentecostal Church 800 Center Point rd. NE. James O. McCoy. S.S. Serv Tues., Thurs. Eve. 7. Foursquare Gospel 609 1st re SW. Lee Griftis. S.S. Serv. Eve. 7. Wed. p.m. Fri. p.m. Eve. John Mathews Family Concert. Grace D ave. NE. Gilbert Gilgan. E.S. Serv. Eve. 7. Wed. 5th ave SW. A. J. Stokes. S.S. Serv. Eve. 7. Thurs. Islamic 1st ave SW. S.S., serv. prayer, 12. Friday prayer ]2. Meth-Wick Chapel 1224 13th st. NW. Donald Artman, Serv. 'J. New Apostolic Wilson ave. SW. S.S. Serv 10. Eve. 5 p.m. Wed. eve. 8. N e w Jerusalem Church of God in 9th ave. SE H. Bassett. S.S. Serv. 12 Eve. 8. Peoples Unitarian 600 3rd ave. SE. Walter E. Kellison S.S. 10. Serv. 11. "Steps to Ethical Forum 10 'The Energy Tom Moss. Salvation Army 1123 3rc st. SE. Eugene A'driey. S.S :45. Serv. 11. Eve. 7. Seventh-Day st. and Edgewood rd. NE. Sieg- fried Hoeske. S.S. Sorv. 11 Seventh Day Church of Goi (Meridan) 3336 Prairie dr NE. W. T. McMickin. S c h o o Sat. 10. Serv. Temple Judah 3221 Lind- say lane SE. Serv. 8 p.m. Ex- cept 1st Fri. of month, serv p.m. Unity 2nd avp SE. Mabel K. Swanson. Serv 11. "Following the All-Iowa Fair Planning More Free Attractions Efforts are under way lo increase Hit' number of free per- formances, including high acts, lo be presented on (lie grounds during (he 1974 All-Iowa fair, Manager Charles Decker report- ii lu llio fair board Thursday flernoon. hope lo develop ii selied- le of these special perform- nces so a person can go to the air and figure he really has ad his money's worth even if c never goes to the graml- Decker said. The 1971 fair, June 28 through July 7, also will have free grandstand shows. Kair officials have hcen meeting with entrepreneurs in prelimi- nary meetings on grandstand attractions. "It is our goal not only lo .ave a variety of free acts on he grounds, but also to sched- ile them in various spots iroiind the Decker old the board. "The project, if t can be worked out, will en- ible us to have some kind of pecial event going on every lour or so." Emphasis also will be on high icts which can be seen from many parts, of the grounds. There's no question but that ve'll have more free acts on the grounds than ever Decker assured the board. Decker and committees of the board also have been meeting vith auto race promoters to line ip a series of racing events for he 1974 fair. Leo Peiffer, president of the board, announced appointment of chairmen to head the fair's six major committees. George Clifford will head the pecial events and grandstand committee which will work on the expanded "free act" proj- ect. Jerry Bretey will head the auto racing committee. Jim Shaft and his agriculture committee will meet later this month in an effort to complete arrangements for scheduling and judging of the livestock events. Other committee chairmen are Ed Bock, finance; Ted Paul- son, maintenance and improve- ments, and 0. J. Elsenbast, legal. Redemption Missionary Bap- tist 1014 10th ave. SE. Har- Classified Ads work if you don't believe it... then try one [or yourself. SUNDAY BUFFET Take it easy on Sunday and join us for dinner after church. children's portions SERVING FROM from a Philadelphia law firm inimunity college, 398-5535. OREO 1970, had wanted to return to s sponsoring the program. SPECIAL MOVIE! Four brothers with one aim-to redeem their legacy (rom swindlers. PM SATURDAY FRUIT 'MARKET All FANCY APPIES POUND 29'.. 5 Ibs. Broth's Choc. Covered PEANUTS.........69< Ib. Jonathan Apples bu. 5.99 rial-ex Ira The Very Geti Grade EXTRA FANCY DELICIOUS APPLES..............bu. 6.99 Red or White No. 1 POTATOES... 100 6.50 lOLb. Bag.....; Wo promise you tha iwoofojt oranges you ever alo or your money back. GRANGES or RED GBAPfFRUir 18 Lb. Bag DALE'S Fruit Market Onon 9 to 6 cvorv day Conlor Poinl Road NE SPREAD 90 Twixt Town Rood NE 377-6386 Coupons Must Be Presented With Incoming Order Sweaters Trousers the selection of Silberman after Saxbe s first choice, an colleague, fell out of the run- No Matter What The Label Says- Everything Dry Cleans Better 9 Expert Alterations and Mending Phone 364-0213 for F-A-S-T APPLIANCE SERVICE Expires J 2 Piece Suits 2 Piece Dresses Special Price Good At These locations 4 LOCATIONS Marion 708 7th Ave. 3835 Center Point Rd.Nt 3rd St. SE HOURS: Open 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily HOURS: Mon. Ihru Fri, 7 a.m, lo 8 p.m. at, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. HOURS: Open 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Sal. 7 p.m. 28041st Ave. N.E. HOURS: Mon. thru.Fri! 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.. Sal. 8 a.m. lo 6 p.m. I Hour Sorvlco Dally Including 3 p.m   

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