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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Wednesday, January 9, 1974 - Page 2

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 9, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                2A Thc Ccclar ltaP'ds Gasettf: Jan. 9, 197-1 Planners Okay Rezoning, Reject Annexation Idea The city planning commission voted Tuesday to approve a pre- liminary plat of Sylvan lane first addition, after prolonged debate on whether the sub- division should be annexed to the city. The land is located about 350 feet east of the city limits, near the end of Indian Hill road SE. The plat had been approved earlier by Linn county, but re- quired approval from the because it is within two miles of the city limits. A committee report recom- mended against approval be- cause developer Jerome Pad- zcnsky plans to install individ- ual wells and septic tanks for houses built in the sub- division. The city engineering department recommended, because the area is very close to city services, that Pad- zensky petition for annexation and connect to city facilities. Several residents of the area appeared at the meeting to pro- test annexation. Padzensky said he is also opposed. Million Conservation Funds Sought DBS MOINES The Iowa conservation commission Tuesday, voted to ask the 1974 legislature for more than 512.5 million for capital improve- ments and for. million in supplemental operating appro- priations for the next two years. Among the capital improve- ments, ihe commission, asked for million' to develop a state resort complex on Lake Hath- bun near Centerville. The plan for the state resort on Lake Rathbun was developed about two years ago in a re- port to the Iowa development commission by the Midwest Re- search Institute of Kansas City, Mo. McGregor Area In addition to Lake Rathbun, the institute said the McGregor area on the Mississippi river in northeast Iowa and the Missouri river area around Council Bluffs would be worthy of de- velopment as tourist centers. Commission officials said Gov. Robert D. Ray supported the Lake Rathbun resort area plan and would include it.in his mes- sage to.the legislature. The commission also voted to ask the lawmakers for: million for the Open Spaces program. j million for construe-j tion of a new state fish hatch- ery at the Rathbun dam. million for the Pleas- ant Creek Lake project which would provide emergency cool- ing water for the Duane Arnold nuclear power plant under con- struction near Palo. million for the Brushy Creek state recreation area near Fort Dodge. million for the Volga -river slate recreation area near Fayette. million for the Big Creek state recreation area north of Des Moines. In addition, the commission asked for an additional 330 in operating funds for 1974, and requested million in similar funds for 1975. Com- missioners said they needed the extra funds because of in- creased operating costs. -White Papers- (Continued from Page 1.) term upward trend in milk prices. i Didn't Know of Gift He said he plans to have lots) Kor the first lime, the White of at least one acre in the said Nixon had no know! but if forced to from Associated billion and to restrict acquisi-i "The IKS might decide not to; A lions for 10 years. [issue any ruling on the U It treated ITT's San Piegojdcduction, but rather leave this' PHce pledge as an entirely the congressional commit- and unrelated matter, saying; the story said. "The President was of any commitment by 1'IT to! WASHINGTON (AP) The' Cost of Living Council an- Tells On Restaurant Inspections make a contribution at ihe! time he took action on the anti-j fifgc water and sewer facilities jnc delivered to entirely in April of 1971 Milk trust case. In fact, the Pros-1 idi'iit's- anti-truss actions look: would have to create smaller j President's attorney, Herbert lots to recoup his investment. Kalmbach. After discussion, the planning! However, it acknowledged commission rejected, 6-5. a mo-jthat Charles Colson, former lion to deny approval of IhchYhite House special plat. The commission then voted unanimously to approve it. sub- wrote a memo to Nixon in 1970 that AMP! had pledged mil ject to conditions imposed for his 1972 campaign. It the county and to a contributed that an extension of a proposed! tne "white paper' street be made to ensure future sought to separate Nixon's deci sion from contributions, it said access through the subdivision. In other business the commis- sion: Recommended approval of a request by Gladys Ferguson to rczonc, R-2 to R-T, property at 2923, 2923Vi, 2925 and 2927 C ave- nue NE; Kecommcndcd denial of a re- quest by Louis G. Kellner to rezonc. R-4 to M-l, property at 1601 E avenue NE; Recommended approval of a request by the Seventh Day Ad- ventist cliurch to rezonc. K-2 to R-3G, property at F avenue and Seminole avenue NW; Recommended denial of a re- quest by Dan and Lillian Sch- witters to rezone, R-l to M-l, property at highway 30 and Wiley boulevard SW; Recommended approval of a request by Robert C. Wilkcs to rezone, R-3 to R-4, property at 330 Twenty-ninth Street drive SE: Recommended approval of a request by Zinser Investments, Ltd., to rezone, R-2 to B-l, prop- erty at Sixth street and Twenty- seventh avenue SW; Approved, the final, revised plat of Kirkwood acres first ad- iition and street, easement and right-of-way vacations to Day Co., Sharwood Development Co. and the Oak Hill neighborhood development program; Re-elected officers for 1974. paper for him on his 1971 meet' ing with dairymen which "brief- lv noted that the dairy lobby like organized labor had rte cided to spend political money" and that longtime Nixon politi- cal associate Murray Chotiner was involved. The other two dairy coopcra- (Continued from Page 1.) He's going to gut it out one way or another like a distance runner." Some say Nixon's July bout with what was diagnosed as viral pneumonia hit him harder than most people know. Alert Linked to Missile Thefts BRUSSELS (AP) Several small ground-to-air missiles have been stolen in recent weeks from European military depots, .Belgian governm e n t sources said Wednesday. They said the disappearance of the missiles touched off the alert that went into effect at European airports several days ago. I The sources indicated that! some have been recovered. The missing missiles resemble World war II bazookas. They .can be fired from the shoulder 'at flying or grounded planes, the sources said. Nixon Relaxes With Drives For Pleasure SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (AP) President Nixon has been taking unannounced pleasure drives around the countryside during his stay in California. The edged White Nixon House acknowl- toak his second drive in as many days Tuesday but only after news reporters saw secret service agents rac- ing through San Clemente in two siren-saunding police cars and inquired if the President had been in an auto accident. Deputy Press Secretary Ger- ald Warren at first denied agents were passengers in the California highway patrol ve- hicles. Later he corrected him- self but said no emergency was involved. This led to speculation Nixon j might have set out in a hurry, I leaving some of his bodyguard to scramble in pursuit. Warren had disclosed earlier Tuesday that Nixon and his house guest C. G. "Bebc" Re- bozo, took a long unannounced drive Monday. Again Warren did so only in response to a re- not to proceed." lives Mid and involved were America Dairymen, Inc., Dairy Men, Inc. "Telling Truth, But.. After the White House state- ment was released, John But- terbrodt, president of AMPI, told newsmen in Chicago: "Nixon is telling the truth. Basically we had congress ready to propose and support a bill to raise the price support to 85 percent." But Butterbrodt said although Nixon has answered the ques- tion of the price support issue, he has still not answered why an anti-trust suit was filed against AMPI in January, 1972, after AMPI stopped contribu- tions lo the Nixon campaign. "We changed management in January, 1972, and felt we were not going to contribute to any presidential campaign so we stopped and were immediately hit with a Butterbrodt said. ITT Intervention The eight-page ITT statement said there was no relation be- tween an out-of-court settlement of an anti-trust case against the corporation and ITT's payment of as part of a pledge, to help underwrite a GOP conven- tion in San Diego. The case, brought in 1969. challenged ITT acquisitions of the Grinnell Corp., the Hartford Fire Insurance Co. and Canteen Corp. Colson, in a 'March 30, 1972, memo to H. R. Haldeman, then chief of the White House staff, suggested thai a 1971 memo from Ehrlichman to Mitchell might "directly involve the President" in the controversy that has surrounded the ITT set- tlement. In rebuttal, the White House pictured Ehrlichman as having prompted Nixon's intervention in the matter bv arguing, at a meeting on April 19, 1971, that appealing a decision against Ihe government in the Grinnell case would violate Nixon's conviction that anti-trust cases should not be based on attacking bigness for its own sake. The White House said Nixon several weeks before the ITTi pledge was even made." nounced Wednesday it was ap- i proving previously delayed price increases for the tire in- 'duslry averaging about 3.3 per- AVOldS "Wf cum-nl prices. II also announced it will hold MARSHALLTQWN (AI'l -public hearings Jan. 22 on an- iTIie Baptist Central Iowa Chris- Bother round of proposed price tire manufacliir- The settlement was agreed Academy has hired a cor- increases by in principle on July 31. 1971. ers. White House noted the nounccment was followed by one-day drop of 11 percent in the mon stock. tified teacher avoided court and apparently action to send IRS Says Story On Nixon Ruling Not Authorized WASHINGTON (AP) The Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday that a published re- port it is about to rule President Nixon underpaid his federal come income from tax an "does not authorized source.' The Knight Newspaper Ser vice said Tuesday night that a special IRS task force pared to report that is pre- Nixon should have paid capital gains, taxes on the sale of part of his San Clemente, Calif., estate to his friends C. G. 'Bebe' Rebozo and Robert Abplanalp." IRS announced last week that a new audit of the President's tax returns was underway. The Knight story said an ad- verse ruling on the San Cle- mente property "cost the First Family about in back taxes, plus interest at six percent a year." Deputy Director James W. McLane said the incrcsscs are for costs incurred by the tire manufacturers up to Sept. day. The increases wore approved The Rev. Glenn Jaspers, prin-j for Armstrong Rubber Co., students to stale-approved market price of ITT com- schools, officials said Wednes- cipal, said Mary Schendel, a former Marshalltnwn teacher who is certified to loach stu- dents through grade eight, will begin work Monday. Mrs. Schendel is a member of Fellowship Baptist church, sponsor of the school, official? said. The academy, which has 32 full-time students, applied in Pecember for an exemption from state school standards that insist certified teachers be on the (acuity, and that the curric- ulum meets state requirements. School officials cited exemp- tions granted to Iowa Amish schools as a precedent for their own effort. The school was founded in September by the local congre- gation to.provide what officials called educa- tion." Richard Ploeger, superin- tendent of the Mar.shall-Po- weshiek Joint County School System, said the hiring of Mrs. Schendel, would probably end questions about the school's fu- ture. "The IRS has not yet decided j Mrs. Schendel joins Lavonne what position to take in regard to another Nixon tax con- troversy: His deduction of from his taxable in- the gift of vice- presidential papers to the gov- the story continued. Friesen, another certified teach- er, and two teacher-aides on the faculty. Officials said having both cer- tified teachers on duty would mean all students would bo taught by certified instructors. Cooper, Dunlop Tire Rubber Corp., Firestone Tiro Rubber Co., General Tire Rubber, Goodrich, Goodyosr Tire Rubber Co., and Unircyal, Inc. The increases tan he made effective .Ian. 15 and the conn- By Rauily Minkoff division that would give Ihe de- Apartment "a better view of all jtlio restaurants in the stale." "The bill was up for consider- DES MOIN1CS (UP1) Agriculture Secretary Kobcrti1 las, yea, bu, the In .aciuues across flf addition, Lounsberry called, the legislature to pass a wc are pushing currently in committee that, 'for Ihe legislation, which also when the would give Ills eieparimem when llf..sla'" begins nuxt Monday. llary regulations for operation shloil rnvay from n rating classification for restaurants in Iowa sniilar to procedures in other states. "When you start giving an 'A' rating for restaurants that meet fails to meet state regulations. some os. "If any one restaurant having promoting more than 40 demerits is report- fac( jn they meet ed, 1 want to know about it im- clean he said. of restaurants. Issue Demerits Louusberry said inspectors: are viewing restaurants and is-; suing demerits if the facility Lounsberry said. "That's nut the idea. We arc occur, we tell the to Rjvc consumer the oil said H will notify each com- ww wu lllv oanv of he cxac amoun ,m immndi--, jOwneii to clean it up immun for Ins money. ___ Lounsberry said a concern If Ihe restaurant failed lo has bccn among pubijc. orice increases. I U liiu luaiuuintu No ObieCTIOnS, meet the standards A I -j. i warning, Lounsberry Mid AdODTS I the facility's license ca Lounsberry Mid no after the in various navjng restaurant 1111 inspection program under the Rovicorl Riirlrtia-rilalten awav ilflcr ;1 ser'QS of auspices of the agriculture de- UUUUU partment would leave their The city council adopted, with "The threat of a loss of li- "wiihciU any'hing to opposition a revised 1974 cense and closing down of a res- do." taurant is pretty strict and thus' "However, I just foci our de- far people have been very coop- being a statewide has Ilio manpower and budget Wednesday. The budget was changed from 12 to 18 months at the request of In only one instance has the ji ill UlllV "in, IKIJ the stale, which asked for the actually had change in order to prepare for n; rcstaurant chse down bccallsc transition to a July 1-June 30 fiscal year in 1975. To arrive at figures for the extended budget, the city coun-: "That was in Otlumwa, and, cil added 50 percent to all being closed for 10 days.! i .1.. L llin i-no) cmi'iint an civPfMPIlt i ;the late and facilities to handle i these inspections the best way I Lounsberry said. of a failure to meet sanitary standards. urcs in the one-year adopted earlier. Waterbed "Killed" SEATTLE A robber woke Craig Sperling, 25, slole ?7 from his wallet and then fired a bullet into the victim's waterbed, police reported, budget''he restaurant did an excellent job of cleaning up their cs- itablishment and they reo- he said. Pending -Jaw Under the pending legislation, Lounsberry said quarterly in- spections would be made by members of the food'inspection GAZETTE TELEPHONE NUMBERS For Hiws, Spoils, Bookl-opping, Gtimol In- lormnlion ond Ollidl Hoi tillid Below toll ..........................39B-B21I tittulolion-lubitriplion Depl......398-8333 Mon. Ihru Sot. 8 o.m. lo 7 p.m. Sundays Until I! Noon Holidays I) a.m.lo 7 p.m. WintUi......................398-8234 Mon. thiu Sol. 8 o.m. loSp.m. DisployAdwIiiing..............398-1222 8 lo 5 p.m- "expressed irritation with the failure" of Richard McLaren, then assistant attorney general for anti-trust, "to follow his poli- cy." It said Nixon telephoned Deputy Ally. Gen. Richard Kleindienst "and ordered lhalj Ihe appeal not be filed." Resignation Threat i The statement said that two! days later Nixon withdrew order after Mitchell reasoned! with him that Griswold, "as a personal matter had pre- pared his brief for appeal and would resign were the appeal porter's inquiry at a news brief- j ing. Other sources reported that Nixon took at least three unan- nounced drives earlier in his California stay, which began Dec. The While House said an ap- peal was filed, but a subsequent settlement resulted in "the larg- est single devcstiturc in cor- porate with ITT re- quired to dispose of subsidiaries! I with annual sales of about j Expert 3-DAY Service on Watch Jewelry Repair Speclollzlno In Diamond Remounting antj Diamond Appraisals 31 2 THIRD AVENUE SE Cedar Rapids Jaycees present Jack Anderson Syndicated Washington Columnist speaking on "Washington: What January 10th, p.m. Kennedy High School Auditorium TICKETS: Available from Armstrong's, Younkers and the Jayccc Office 'Open to the BECKER'S-PEOPLES FURM1TURE Thursday 9 a.m. to B pj Pretty Styles Pretty Colors p Everybody always needs chairs, and Becker's-Peoples Fur- niture is where you'll find scores of styles to choose from to give your home a fresh new look of comfort. Big chairs, petite chairs, spacious lounge chairs, accent chairs, swiv- el-rockers, recliner chairs. You'll find just what you want now at Becker's Peoples Furniture in downtown Cedar Rapids. Special groupings at Whatever style chair it's waiting for you now! You'll find many styles, and colors, types for every room decor and money-saving prices, too. Come to Becker's Peoples Furniture now and choose the chairs just right for your home. Medi- terranean style. Colonial style, Spanish Style, modern style, Provincial and Spanish Styles to choose from. Phone 366-2436 or 362-3919 215 First Ave.SE Easy Terms PEOPLES FURNITURE   

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