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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 4, 1974 - Page 3

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                JNEWOWUANO MIAMI UN 1I1AIN AIR MOW Friday night will find snow falling across most of the Rocky mountain region, chang- ing to rain over the southwest corner of the nation. Elsewhere, clear to partly cloudy skies. Steinbeck: Meet with Policemen Constructive Safely Commissioner James Steinbeck said his meeting Fri-; day morning with members of he polite department was providing an op- portunity for an exchange of views concerning salaries and working conditions. Members of the police patrol division held the closed-door meeting at 64 Sixteenth avenue SW, and invited Steinbeck to join them after the meeting was in progress. Many members of the police force have voiced displeasure with a 6.5 percent salary in- crease for 1974. Some have been writing state, rather than city, citations as a protest, thus deny- ing income to the city. DEATHS Protest Against Fund Transfer to Airport Is Filed A protest of the Cedar Rapids transfer of million to the airport construction fund, was filed with Linn County Auditor Merle Kopel Friday. Tlio Cedar Kapids Gazette: Fri., Jan. 4, 1011 thought it was a constructive! addition, a hearing on Steinbeck said. 'he matter by the state board of I appeals was asked. Baird King, a member of Tax- aycrs Asking for Explanations, did the protest, including a pe- lion signed by 290 persons, was i 1 e d with Kopel because The Weather High temperatures Thursday, low tern-jpn peratures overnight and inches at preci- .pitation: Anchorage 72 4 L. Angeles .52 44 .05 Atlanta ...5550.74 Miami ...7672.07 Bismarck ..10.21 Min'apolis 6 -5 Chicago ...74 11 N. Orleans .49 43 .43 Denver ....13-17 New York .3828.7' Duluth 2 -7 Phoenix ....5839 Honolulu ..BO 69 Seattle ....3426 Houston ...37 30.01 Washington 3831.43 Extended forecast, Chance of snow Sunday and Monday. Clearing Tuesday. Colder Mon- ,day and Tuesday. Highs in leens or low 20s Sunday lower- ing to 5 to 15 Tuesday. Lows .zero to 15 above Sunday lower- ing to 10 below to 5 above Tues- day. C. R. Weather ;High Thursday ...............18 Low overnight.................2 .Noon Friday .................13 t.tp.m. Friday ................10 ..Precipitation ..............None .Total for Jan...............0.02 Normal for Jan.............1.51 Barometer, falling.........30.32 .Humidity at noon ..........61% Wind direction and velocity at 1805 O avenue NW; lined and costs. Mary Amrahr, 1037 i avenue SE; Nick Sladler, 1257 Sixteenth avenue SW; John Sima, Center Point; Barbara Schaldecker, 1005 Dover street NE; Albert Sturtz, 1332 Ninth street NW; each fined and costs. Striking unattended vehicle Richard Walsh, 3337 Oakland road NE; tined and costs. Improper passing: George Martin, 1822 Mt. Vernon road SE; lined ?20 and costs. Traffic signal violation Joan Intlekoffer, 1726 D avenue NE; Stanley Moore, Monona; each fined ?15 and costs. Right-of-way violation Kimberly Koss, 2131 Richard drive NE; lined and costs. William Grafton, 1003 Eleventh street NW; fined and costs. Driver's license violation- weather station at 2 p.m. SW at 12 mph. Sun rises Saturday, sun sets, Year Ago Today High, 16; low, 2; rainfall, .85. Degree Days Thursday .'.................60 'Total to dale Through Jan. 3, 1973 Percent of normal year .41.77 Total normal year Coraiville Lake Pool level Friday ........678.87 Traveler's Forecast Saturday 1- Weather Hi-Lo Bismarck .......PtCldy 5-10B i Chicago ........Cloudy 23-14 Cincinnati-......PtCldy 37-29 Cleveland .......PtCldy 33-25 Des Moines -Cloudy 19-6 John Lamb, 3420 Oakland road NE; fined and costs. Registration violation Donna Behm. 1137 Sixth street NW; fined and costs. Excessive smoke' Steve Kupc, Ely; fined and costs. Faulty equipment Dennis Achenbach, Hiawatha; Richard Carter, 1411 Seventh avenue SE; each fined and costs. Termitting unauthorized per- son to drive Kerry Joslin, Central costs. fined and petroit Indianapolis .Cloudy 29-16 ....Cloudy 32-22 Kansas City.......Snow 25-17 Milwaukee .....Cloudy 23-18 Mpls.-St. Paul ....PtCldy 16-0 Okla. City ..Fair 42-24 Omaha .........PtCldy 16-2B 'Sioux Falls.......Snow 15-2B Births Mercy Jan. 3 To Mr. and Mrs. 'Taul Sullivan, 3703 Sue lane >IW, a daughter. Births St. Luke's Jan. 3 To the families of "Delvin Morris, 102 Oak street, ,-Hiawatha, a son; Gary La Kose, 1641 Thirty-fourth street SE, a son; Andre w Tjelmcland, 1415V4 First Avenue E, a son; i Woodrow rettil, 900 F avenue NW, a daughter; John' Dupres, 5020 Lcuisa street NE, a daugh- ter, Charles Rainwater, 322 Forty-fourth street NE, a son. Out of Town Births At- Bast Greenwich. R.I. 'Navy ST and Mrs. AV. L. Chari- par, a son Dec. 29. Charipar is 'the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. -Charipar, 420 Thirty-ninth street NE. Marriage Licenses Catherine Ogden and Edward ferunsling, jr., both of Cedar Rapids. Kathryn Wyatt, Marion, and Charles Moon, Cedar Rapids. Fires 3-54 p.m. Thursday. Heater In dog house at 320B Pebble flrive SW. 3-10 a.m. Friday. Overheat- ed furnace at 1030 Eighteenth iowa Deaths Tipton Mary Ann (Mae) Services Saturday at 2 at Dye's. Burial in Spring- dale cemetery. Oelwcin Henry Muller 33. Services Saturday at 2 al St. Mary's Episcopal church Brant's. Clutier Mrs. "William Kre- zek, 73. Services at Monday at Immaculate Con- ception church. Rosary at Sunday at Mason-Hand's, Tama. What Cheer Herbert O Hall, 57, Waterloo. Services Saturday at 1 at Hardin's. Burial in Sixteen cemetery. Independence E d w a r c Budzine, 80. Services Saturday at at While's. Burial in Liltlelon cemelery. Manchester Mrs. Augusta C. Allenstein, 75. Services Mon- day at at First Lutheran church. Friends may call at Shclly's after 7 Saturday. Vinton Everett R. Mahew, 67. White-Phillips. Ely Edward .1. Kent, 65. Services at 9 Saturday al Turner chapel east in -Cedar Rapids. The casket will not be opened at any time. Atkins Elmer H. Keiper, 67. Services Monday at at St. Stephen's Lutheran church. Friends may call at Turner west until 9 p.m. Sunday and at the church from 10 a.m. to p.m. Monday. The casket will not be opened after the service. Sigourncy Michael Len- aghan, 17. Services Saturday at 10, St. John's Catholic church, Earlham. Burial al 3 in Sig- Pilots (Continued from Page 1.) the office ordered the diversion. Training of undergraduate pilots has been stretched out to save fuel. Pentagon Request The Pentagon announced it lad asked the White House and :he energy office to boost the military fuel allotment slightly .0 permit more regular air crew training and to "do something about the guard and the reserve stand down." The National Guard Assn. wired President Nixon saying 'further standdowns will seriously impair the national guard's ability to carry out its assigned national defense mis- ions." Major Gen. Henry McMillan, adjutant general of Florida anc association president, told Nixon "continued grounding leads to rapid deterioration of aircraf and especially of sensitive anc complex weapons systems." McMillan wrote Schlesinger and energy chief William Simon "vigorously protesting" the re strictions, which he said would adversely affect flying safety and increase risks of loss of lift and property later. Melvin B. Halladay Melvin B. Halladay, 64, for- merly of Cedar Rapids, died Wednesday at Indio, Calif., where he had been a resident the last five years. Born Jan. 29, 1909, in Musca- tine, he moved to Cedar Rapids in 1929. He and the former Mar- garet McQuade were married in uly, 1954, in Missouri. Surviving in addition to his ife are three sons, Melvin, jr., enver, Colo.; Ronald and Er- both of Cedar Rapids; a aughter, Patricia Kapsalakas, edar Rapids; two step- liidren, Gene McQuade and Udy Lytle, both of California; brothers, Frank, Carol nd Edward, all of Cedar apids, three sisters, Delia What's in Store "A lot of the things we talked about are what's in store for the future, and it gave them a chance to air some grievances. "It was an opportunity for them to ask some questions and expect to get some answers." Steinbeck said most of those present accept the fact they (won't get larger salary in- arc not happy about it. He said less time was spent discussing the pay levels than in discussing why the city cannot pay more. lorak and Larry Walshire. (pointed out some deputies may not get any raises at all until Courthouse Dog Licenses Are Available At Courthouse Both city and county dog li censes for 1974 can be picked up at the auditor's office in tb Linn county courthouse. City Treasurer Bill Heine and County Auditor Merle Kope said allowing Cedar Rapids resi dents to pick up city licenses a the courtliouse will eliminat the necessity for them to go t both city hall and the cour ouse to pick up the dog 1 :cnses. Kopel said an expected ship nent of licensing forms is lat o actual licenses will be maile o those who have applied fo hem as soon as the forms ar rive. ourney. Kcota Mrs. Clarence Allen, 63. Services Saturday at 1. Powell's. Monticcllo Matilda Ehler, S5. Goettsch's. Monliccllo Bradley Lux, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Terry E. Lux. Graveside ser- vices Saturday cemelery al al Oakwood Street SW. a.m. Friday. Needless call at 4801 ,1 street SW. Magistrate's Court Speeding Thomas Drcsler, 4843 Montclair drive NW; fined and costs. Donald Gnlcwnod, Ml. Vernon road SIC; Ronald Ohiiger, 204 Twelfth slrcel. SK; Roberta Banks, Park place NE- Yvonne 1312 Burclt avcniio NW; Dnvid lliir- clpi-scn Aiiiiinosii; fiich fined niifl c'isls. Mlll'k Terrorists (Continued from Page 1.) don said they were part of plot to kill or kidnap the Moroc- can ambassador, A b d e 11 a h Chorfi. Some newspapers said U.S authorities tipped off the British after the arms were spotted by an X-ray inspection of tiie girl's luggage at the Los Angeles air port. They said the security men did not move in on her then because her bag went into the baggage compartment anc therefore there was no risk of a hijacking attempt. Third street NW, withdrew he ilea of guilty to a charge 'orging a check on July 2 1972. Eads said the case was di missed because Mrs. Eidsmo las been in no further trouble. Want (o soil something big? Something small? Want Ads wil sell them all. Dial BROSH CHAPEL "llfnileil In I'ulillr. Semite." About Our I'rc-nrraiiRCHl Services Cwlnr Haplds Solon Charge Against Woman Droppec A charge of forgery against Cedar Rapids woman was di missed in Linn county distrii court Thursday by Judge Wi iam Eads. Kathcrine Eidsmoc, 14 Road Reports The following numbers may be called for up-to-date high- way conditions: Cedar Unpids. (319) 368-1881 Cedar Falls.... (319) 266-7575 203-4880 "DCS 288-1047 Maqiiokata...... (319) 852-2434 Storm 732-1563 wart, Oregon, Wilma liner and Bcrnice Mercer, both f Cedar Rapids, and several randchildren. Services and burial will be at Vestminster Memorial chapel, Vestminster, Calif., Saturday at a.m. Louis J. Kula Louis J. Kula, 70, of 525 Thir- teth street SE, died Friday fol- owing a short illness. He was born July 4, 1903, at 'rairieburg, but resided in ledar Rapids most of his life 'or many years, Mr. Kula jperated a lankwagon. Survivors include his wife, the ormer Libbie Nechville, to whom he was married June 14 940; a sister, Katherine Cook o Cedar Hapids; three brothers Jdward of Phoenix, William o Cedar Rapids and Adolph o 'etaluma, Calif. Services: Monday at a Brosh chapel by the Rev. A.T Washington of Des Moines Burial in Czech National ceme ery. Friends may call at the chapel Sunday. Mrs. John S. Beving Patricia L. Beving, 61, of 919 Sixth street SE, and.a resident of Cedar Rapids for 25 years, died Thursday in a Cedar Rapids hospital. Born June 15, 1912, at Lisbon, she was married ;o John S. Beving in June, 1951. Surviving in addition to her husband, are a son, Donald Marion; a stepson, John Beving, Cedar Rapids; three grandchildren and three great- ;randchildren. Services: p.m. Saturday at the Murdoch chapel, Marion by the Rev. Gilbert Gilgan. Burial: Oak Shade cemelery, Marion. Friends may call at Murdoch chapel. Explained Limitations The safety commissioner said 10 explained the budget limita- tons and federal wage guidc- incs. He said the officers arc ap- larently not considering a "blue lu" but may continue to write tate tickets. say there is no conver ation whatsoever as far as con altering a 'blue he said. "There was some feeling o mutual agreement at that meet ng that they will continue vrite the state tickets on an in dividual, voluntary basis." No Commitments Steinbeck said he made no commitments to the group ex cept to look into some of thi suggestions and grievances t1 see what can be done. He said the suggestions in eluded setting up a quarter master system, so policeme could drawV'uniforms and equip ment instead of getting vouch ers to buy the equipment. Another suggestion was t 5rant incentive pay for workin [he night shift, and allow patro men to work during one of thei days off, with pay, to help solv a manpower shortage durin vacation periods. Smaller Vehicles Many of the patrolmen also suggested the city buy smaller vehicles, with smaller engines, he said. The group which met Friday morning is a patrolman's com- mittee appointed by Detective Darwin Ammeter, president of he Police Protective Assn. Steinbeck about a bird of the patrol division was at the meeting. Ammeter, who did not attend he.meeting, said a statement vill probably be made later by he patrolmen. Deputies Air Complaints Over Scheduling Raises Dissatisfaction of Linn county] sheriff's deputies over granting! pay raises on the anniversary dates of employment instead of immediately was aired Friday percent pay raises as submitted by Sheriff Walter Grant. March Decision .She pointed out the decision to morning at a meeting of to anniversary dates as board of supervisors. Members of the civil service commission said the two dif j the time for granting raises was imade last March. The super- visors at that time asked for being used as anniversary dates. Some deputies are being given raises based on the anniversary cquires that procedure. Kopel told The Gazette he will onsult with the county attorney n what action he should take 1th the petition. Presenting the petition to! lopel were King, Richard j CUIIIIIIISMUII me iwu uu- t. ferent dates are apparently chourthouse.e vv 3 ployes on the change and re- ceived only positive comments, ishe said. Extra raises were given to deputies in November who oth- erwise would not have received laptcr 24 of the code of Iowa I date of employment, while others are being given raises on a raise until next November, the basis of the date of their last raise, Commis-'Mrs- Oxley said- sioner Dennis R. Flatley said. Some Deputies Commissioner Juan Sheriff Grant complained that j starting rate for unskilled men ion the road crew is a Cortez month, while trained starting Council Vote The citv council voted unani- mously Dec. 26 to amend the 974 budget to transfer over million to the airport construc- ion fund. The fund was nearly SI mil- ion in the red because of land lurchases made in 1972 in antic- pation of federal compensatory unds. The transfers of funds moved half million dollars from the airport operations fund and from the liquor fund to :he airport construction fund. Unnecessary The petition filed with Kopel said the transfer of funds was 'unnecessary, unreasonable and not in the interest of the public welfare" and did not comply with requirements of state law :or budget changes The funds would be used for 'unneeded, unwanted and un- wise expansion of the municipal airport without a public referen- it said. The petition claims a referendum is sary since a bond issue to alte viate the deficit in the airport construction fund was defeated by referendum in 1972. The petition suggested the money in the liquor fund should be used for a detoxification center and the money in the air- port operations fund should be saved for future repairs to air- ccive raises this month. deputies receive only ?576. Chief Deputy Dennis Blome November, while others will re- said the department might lose He suggested using revenue delayed until their anniversary sharing funds to give raises im- dates. mediately to those whose versary dates fall after June. Jean Oxley, chairman of the ward of supervisors, said, "The only way we can give these arge raises is to go to anniver- sary dates." The deputies will receive 9.6 jsome deputies if their raises are Memorial Services Stoddard. Roy vices were held at Turner cha- pel cast at noon Friday by Hie Rev. John Shew. Burial was an Oak Hill cemetery. Thorpe, Raymond Miller- Turner cliapol west at a.m. Saturday. Burial: Linwood cemetery. Friends may call at Turner 'west until 10 a.m. Sat- urday. Remains, Mary Louise -Tur- ner chapel cast at p.m. Saturday by the Rev. Glenn High. Burial: Cedar Memorial cemetery- Friends may call at Turner cast after 9 a.m. Satur- day. Taylor, Helen Turner chapel cast a 3 p.m. Saturday by the Very Rev. Canon D. A. There will be a cre- mation committal. Friends may call at Turner cast until p.m. Saturday. rolitis, p.m. Sat- urday at the Beatly-Beurlc chapel. The Rev. Alexander George. Burial: Cedar Memor- ial. Ilosincr, lilmcr ..ere held at a.m. Friday at the Bcally-Bcurle chapel by Hie Rev. John Little. Burial was in Oak Hill cemetery. The People Who Do More with Flowers For You 1 800 EMU Blvd. NW FLOWERPHONE 366-1 826 JOHN E. LAPES flowers for all occasions port facilities so general obliga- tion bonds would not have to be issued, as was done in 1973. Better Spent The ?1 million would be better spent on projects such as a civic center or expansion of the pub- lic library, the petition stated. According to King, stale law requires that Kopel forward a copy of the protest and a copy of the budget to the state board of appeals. The state board has the au- thority to set a date for a hear- ing and to designate a deputy to hold the hearing. Work Session on Legislation Set A work session on legislative proposals supported by the Boards of supervisors in the 14 counties in the sixth district will be held al 10 a.m. Wednesday in Anamosa. Purpose of the meeting, ac- cording to Jean Oxley, chair- man of the Linn county board of supervisors, is to propose legis- lation to the 1974 legislature. Areas to be discussed include the department of transpor- tation, specifications for low volume roads, foster care and costs.of the unified court sys- tem. Mrs. Oxley said the counties vant to "speak with one voice' o the legislature on these mat- ers. One member of the board o! supervisors from the following counties is invited: Clayton Slack Hawk, Buchanan, Dela ware, Dubuque, Benton, Linn Jones, Jackson, Iowa, Johnson Cedar, Clinton and Scott. USSR Executes 2 For Fruit Fraud MOSCOW (UPI) Two Sovi- et citizens who left the fruit out of the fruit juice they manufac- ,ured have been executed for raud, the newspaper Babinski Rabochi said. The newspaper, copies of] which reached Moscow Wednes- day from the southern republic of Azerbaidzhan, said the men executed were the director and the accountant of a juice facto- Thcy were accused of selling a mixture of water, citric acid and sugar, and pocketing their budget for the purchase of fruit. The men, identified as Tejmur Akhmedov and Zaman Khaki- mov, kept up their fraud for two years, the newspaper said. The report said their appeal against their sentences was rejected and they were shot by a firing squad. Child Injured In C. R. Crash A year-and-a-half-old infant was treated Friday at St. Luke's hospital for cuts and bruises to the head after his mother's car struck a stalled car. Police said Linda Schaeffer. 2924 Woodland drive SW, was traveling west when a north bound vehicle stalled in the in tersection of Sixteenth avenue and M street SW at a.m. The driver of the stalled car Patricia L. Buehler, 1218 IV street SW, was unhurt. No charges were filed. Want ads will help you (ind lost items, use them for quick results! Dial 398-8234. Blast- (Continued-from Page 1.) ed while they were still ponder ng the problem. Quick Police Work "We saw this vapor hat seeped from the Bates said. "We were deciding whether to take the truck in or go in on foot to shut off the valve of the tanker truck when the gas exploded. It was like an earthquake. Quick work by police was cre- dited with preventing serious in- juries or deaths. Officials said about 20 to 30 families had been awakened and evacuated before the blast. ,It knocked out all power and utilities in the area and police immediately sealed off six square blocks around the gas company. A sheet metal shop and an auto body shop were destroyec and several other businesses suffered heavy damage. Iowa Coal (Continued from Page 1.) operations from the efforts now employed in the giant coal-producing states such as Kentucky and Pennsylvania. He said Iowa coal lies in "lens-shaped arid not in the rich, thick seams of coal producing states. Strip Mining He said this means removal of Iowa coal would call for devel- opment of smaller companies strip mining instead of deep mines as is required elsewhere. Ray emphasized it was not the wish of the state to com- pete with private enterprise in extracting coal from the soil. ''Instead, we hope that hrough the leadership and ef- orts of state government we can revive this lagging in- dustry." The area where state officials believe coal pockets exist, and n which the state mine would eventually be located, encom- passes all counties south and ivest of a meandering line. The line runs through these counties: Monona, Ida, Sac, C a 1 h o u n Pocaliontas, Hum- boldt, Webster, Hamilton, Har- din, Grundy, Marshall, Jasper, Poweshiek, Keokuk, Mahaska, Jefferson, Henry, Lee, and Van Buren. Mines Clustered Iowa's existing coal mines are clustered in Marion, Ma- haska, Lucas, Monroe, and Wa- pello counties southeast of Des Moines. A timetable worked up by, ;tate officials calls for advance planning to begin this month. The process of site selection and acquisition of the needed 600 acres, through loading rail- road cars with coal would ex- tend through December, 1976. Plans call for using the coal n production of steam heat and electricity at the Iowa State univesrity coal-fired generating plant. One problem in use of Iowa coal as it is mined is its 5 to 6 percent sulfur content, which has an adverse effect on the en- vironment when burned to gen- erate electric power. But officials believe washing processes and extended re- search will yield1 a coal that can be burned and will not ex- ceed sulfur emission limits. Feed the Birds j Useful items sell quickly with a low cost want ad. Dial 398- 8234. flowers can say everything. O FLORIST and GIFT SHOP 364-8139 PHONE ANSWERED 24 HOURS EVERY DAY When you need John B. Turner Son Funeral Directors HOO Second Avenue i-.asi rj2l Fiisi Avenue Leading Funeral Directors Recommend WILBERT Brand Name Burial Vaults. In making recommendalions to a client, a funeral director, like any other professional member of the community, places his reputation on the line. It is no wonder, then, that more funeral directors throughout the country offer and recommend the WIL- BERT line of quality burial vaults to assure their clients enduring protection and su- perior quality. the mail iimf in burial ROLAND WILBERT VAULT CO., INC. .Send for Booklet "Pilch livery ftmllyShould Know" (I'oslilvcly no s.ilts contact will he made) 1210 Blnlrs Kerry Marlon, Iowa 52302   

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