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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 4, 1974 - Page 2

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Publication: Cedar Rapids Gazette

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 4, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                The Cedar Rapids Gazette: Fri., Jan. 4, 1974 Forces Hike in Shipping Rates Argentine Terrorists Grab American Pepsi Cola Exec BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) Kidnapers struck for, the second time in the new year; Friday and seized an Anglo-Ar-j armed men in two cars blocked the pain of Roberts' vehicle near his suburban home in Martinez, about 10 miles north of the capital. gentine executive of Pepsi Colai xhcy forced Kobcrts into one as he was driving to work, po-j of the cars and the other was lice sources said. The victim was identified as Douglas Gordon Roberts, about 42, who is general administra- tive officer and a director of the Argentine subsidiary of Pepsi. Pepsi Cola declined to con- firm the kidnaping but company sources said Roberts did not come to work Friday, indicating found abandoned with about 25 rounds of ammunition in- side. Police, as has been usual in such cases, said officially (hey had no information on a kidnap- Increasing fuel costs have caused another increase in ship- ping costs. Dick Petska, Chamber of C o in mere e transportation bureau manager, reported in- creases of: 1.5 percent by the Middlewest Motor Freight bureau and the East Central Motor Freight bureau, both effective last Tues- day. .7 percent by all railroads, ef- fective Thursday. 5 percent by all trucking firms in Iowa, effective Dec. 24. Roberts would be the second j ice kidnap victim of the new year he had been expected but Argentina. On Wednesday h night, presumed terrorists notshowup' seized Jose Ludvig, the 61-year- The police sources said four old Yugoslav-born general man- lager of the Schconik paper plant Alabama Man Is Accused of Robbery in C. R. An Alabama man has been charged with robbery following a holdup Thursday of a 63-year- old man in a downtown bar. Charged is Jessie Jones, 34, Dothan, Ala. The victim, Wilbur Bowers, 1029 Third avenue SE, told po- lice he was knocked down in the rest, room of the Taft Tap, 403 Second avenue SE, by a man who took his wallet containing Police arrested Jones at the Holiday Inn, 2501 Williams bou- levard SW, after detectives dis- covered a man fitting the sus- pect's description had tele- phoned for a cab from a down- town bar. Jones was being held- in the Linn county jail Friday in lieu of bond. Bowers, victim I in suburban Hurlingham. of the rob- bery, had cashed a pension check earlier in the day, police said. Police recovered of the original amount when they ar- rested Jones two hours after the holdup. Add Bostonian To President's Lawyer Battery SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (AP) A Boston lawyer, James St. Clair, has joined President Nix- on's growing legal staff and is slated to become "a senior, partner" handling key phases of the Watergate defense, White House sources say. There were reports St. Clair would replace J. Fred Buzhardt as Nixon's top Watergate legal adviser. But the sources said late Thursday that they could not confirm this and that they had no indication Buzhardt was leaving the staff. One aide.said that because of the growing complexity and scope of the Watergate inves- tigations. including the house judiciary committee impeach- ment probe the White House legal staff was being bolstered with such additions as St. Clair. This official said he expected the White House counsel's office would operate much like a large law firm, with several senior partners assigned lo major aspects of the defense. St. Clair, 53, is a member of the Boston law firm of Hale and Dorr. He has taught trial prac- tice for. the last 15 years at Har- vard law school, where he re- ceived his degree in 1947. By Second Success Mountaineers On Grand Teton GRAND TETON PARK, Wyo. (UPI) Mountaineers from the Paul Petzoldt Grand Teton ex- pedition trekked down the 760-foot m o u n I a i n Friday, buoyed by two successful as- saults this year on the frigid, wind-swept summit. Climbers from the 65-year-old Petzoldt's expedition reached the summit for the second time in as many days Thursday, and with them was probably the first woman lo make a success- ful winter climb of the Grand Telon. Four made il Wednes- day, and seven more made il Thursday. "As we know, Helen Higby is the first woman ever to climb the Grand Telon in the said Haven Holsapple in a crackling radio message re- ceived at Grand Teton national park headquarters in Moose, Wyo. tyrs. Higby, 25, is from Lander, Wyo. This year's expedition was the fourth that ended in suc- cesses in the nine years of the Petzoldt winter climbs. Pepsi has been threatened fre- quently during the last year and was on the verge of pulling its entire operation out of Argen- tina. A company official who has since left Argentina and has not been replaced, said recently that Pepsi expected its losses for 1973 would total about million. He said projections for 1974 were for a million deficit. The losses, he said, came be- cause of a price freeze imposed by the government since last June. The Pepsi official said the company might sell out its oper- ations here if there was a kid- naping of an executive and a high ransom was paid. Meanwhile, kidnapers con- tinued to hold two Americans, a Dane, and a Frenchman, the highest number of foreigners held by kidnapers at one time in the last year, when 29 foreign- ers were seized. Youth Is Being Questioned in Store Robbery A youth about 17 years old held his hand in his pocket as if he had a gun and robbed a clerk of Thursday at the Dows Dairy store, 1055 Third avenue SE. Police are questioning a 17 year old who was surrendered to authorities by his parents at police request after a witness identified him. The money has not been reco- vered, police said. The clerk, Delores J. Patter- son, told police the robber never displayed a gun when he held up the store at p.m. Oil Firm Dumps Fuel in Cellar SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine (AP) Union Oil Co. dumped 250 gallons of heating fuel on the cellar floor of a vacant house here and blamed it on a computer error and the theft of an oil tank. Officials said thieves, ap- parently made off with the oil tank, furnace, heating ducts and some of the house's plumbing Wednesday. 'Our computer failed to note that delivery was to be said a company spokesman of the errant deli- very on Thursday. "We'll have to absorb the loss, obviously." The old farm house was slated for demolition days. within a few Private Golf Course Cleared by Army: GAO WASHINGTON (AP) Sena- tor William Proxmire (D-Wis.) said Thursday the Genera! Ac- counting Office has confirmed that U.S. army troops and equipment were used to clear land for a private golf course near Bar Muenster West Ger- many. Proxmire said he had infor- mation from other sources lhat an army captain received the equivalent of in German currency from the German land owner for designing the course and obtaining the services of! the 12th engineering battalion of the 8th infantry division. Proxmire said 500 to 600 sol- diers spent five days in Janu-j ary, 1972, clearing the forest land and that the operation in- volved 137 army vehicles, in- cluding a road grader, bull- dozer and a 20-ton crane. The r a i 1 r o a d and motor freight increases come in light of a December Interstate Com- merce Commission ruling that carriers could increase rates on a ten-day notice rather than 30 days' notice if a profit increase is not involved. Fuel costs were cited as the reason for those increases, Pets- ka said. The truck shipping increase was actually delayed from simi- lar increases in August in other states, he reported. Got Objections At that time, the Iowa com- merce commission had received objections questioning justifica- tion for the raise by intra-state carriers. The commission's go-ahead was not given until December following further investigation. Petska said fuel costs are to blame for this increase, also, as cliesel fuel prices climb. JOHN I. DONNELLY Executives Assn. Installs Officers John L. Donnelly, 2327 C ave- nue NE, was installed as pres- ident of the Cedar Rapids Exec- utives Assn. during a breakfast meeting Thursday at the Roose- velt hotel. He succeeds Wilmer L. Koss who becomes ex-officio director. Peter Aldershof conducted the installation. Other new officers are: James J5. Crumrine, first vice- president; Ed C. Ruriin, secre- tary; Wilmer L. Koss, treasur- er; A. E. Morehouse, Ralph Wasik and Kenneth King, direc- tors. Women's Labor Hiawatha Delays Truck Ban; To Talk with C.R., County Action on n petition askingiginccr: Clinton Moyer, city at- Shirley Wilson of local 1362, International Brotherhood Electrical Workers, has been elected president of the Hawk' eye Labor Council, AKL-ClOJniglu. Miscellaneous Women's auxilia- ry. Doris Ann 1362, was Elsie Cummings. eration of Grain iviuiers i road IRA Threatens To-Kill British Administrator BELFAST (AP) Security >rt nt'iivu vn i IM i r that truck traffic be banned on torney; Bob Konchar and Mike men lightened their guard I-ri- oflBlairs Kerry road In (new day around Francis Pym, Bri- delayed for a month by the asisislant city attorneys; Matt tain's administrator in Northern city council Thursday'shecls. civil defense represent- Ireland, after Ihe Irish Republi- alive, and Jerry Seifricd. mayor can Army threatened lo Kill Council members deferred ac-Vo-tcmporc to serve in tion in order lo discuss Ihe! event the mayor is absent. i The IRA's 1-omiomlerry on- problem with Cedar Rapids and! Mayor Dale Guthridge alsoigade said it sentenced Pym secretary, and Bernice Bellj peli'lion presented to chairman and Carl Andcr-i army denied anyone was arrest- Hotel, Restaurant Employes andi sjgned by H0 >ed in the city that day --------J----------'.....--------- who live 200 feet ofj utilities and sanitation: Jack, .Pym, who succeeded William ICC Disallows General Phone Rate Increase DES.MOINES (AP) General Telephone Co. of Grinnell was ordered by the Iowa commerce commission Friday to refund to its customers. nearly 53 million it has collected under a rate increase since 1972. The commission in a 2-1 deci- sion disallowed the entire rate increase which it said was "unreasonable and unjust." The company had posted a bond to assure the refund of any portion of the increase which the commission did not allow. The commission said the com- pany collected a total of in excess revenues be- tween Aug. 9, 1972, and Dec. 31, 1973. It ordered refund of that amount, together with. 6 percent interest. The decision held General Telephone affiliates have rea- lized in excess profits been made. on sales of equipment and sup- plies to the company. It ordered that amount segre- gated into an "adjustment ac- count" to be amortized over a period of 15 years as a non- operating charge. Atkins Services Set For Elmer Keiper, 67 ATKINS Elmer H. Keiper, 67, a lifelong resident of Atkins and vicinity, died in a Cedar Rapids hospital Friday, follow- ing a long illness. He was born Aug. 25, 1906 in Benton counly and was married to Frances Schueler on Nov. 16, 1926 at Atkins. She died in 1968. Mr. Keiper was an employe of the Quaker Oats Co. for many years and in later years was an upholsterer at Atkins. Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Arthur Rinderknecht of Atkins; Mrs. Joe Sucliffe of Quincy, 111.; a son Tomothy Keiper of Atkins; four grand- children and one great-grand- child; a brother, Henry; four sisters, Mrs. Alma Koehn, Mrs. Hulda Koehn, Mrs. Hattie Dye and Mrs. P. J. McGivern all of Atkins. Services Monday at at St. Stephen's Lutheran church at Atkins. Burial: St. Stephen's Lu- theran cemetery. Friends may call al Turner west until 9 p.m. Sunday and at the church from 10 a.m. lo p.m Monday. The casket will not be opened after the service. Bartenders local 497, treasurer. Diane Bailey of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Workers local 110, named to the executive board. Trustees are Pat Marshall, IBEW 1362, and Marcella Sim- mons, Amalgamated Meat Cut- ters Butcher Workmen P-3., Committee will be named at the! More 1 rucks Feb. 7 meeting at Peoples bunk Blairs Ferry road in Hiawatha, j vVynck, chairman, and It asked that the council Jerry ;Whitclaw as the British govern- ment's representative in North- Time Considers Reviving Life As a Monthly NEW YORK (UPI) Time Inc., spurred by the success of a special issue of Life honoring the 25th anniversary of the state of Israel and a hardcover re- view, "The Best of is con- sidering plans to revive the magazine as a monthly. At a special staff reception Thursday night honoring the up- coming publication "Life Spe- cial Report, the Year in Pic- Medley Donovan, editor- in-chief, indicated there was a lively interest in bringing back the magazine, whose last week- ly issue appeared on the stands Dec. 29, 1972. However, Donald Wilson, vice-president for public affairs, cautioned Friday that a report that time had already commit- ted itself to reissuing Life was "We just haven't made up our mind Wilson said. He said Donovan had told the staff that there was a possibility of a Life revival, "perhaps in but that no definite plans had yet Action Transferred to Federal Court A suit originally filed in state court by Dubuque Pack- ing Co. has been transferred to Cedar Rapids federal court. The packing company filed the suit Dec. 5 in Dubuque county district court against In- gersoll -Rand Co., Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey. Dubuque packing claims an ammonia compressor purchased Oct: 28, 1971, at a cost of was not adequate for the pur- pose for which it was warrant- ed. An additional is sought for shipping, attempted repair, installation, business interruption and other expenses. Ingersoll-Rand filed for the transfer, on the grounds more than is sought and the controversy is between citizens of different states. At the reception, Donovan said the magazine, if it were revived, would probably appear as a monthly with a bigger page and a higher price in order to ease somewhat the need for ad- vertising revenue. The new Life would concentrate more on edu- cational and cultural material than on hard news, he said. Services Set for Edward Kent of Ely ELY Edward J. Kent, 65, of Ely, was found dead at his home Wednesday. He was born in No- vember of 1907. There are no immediate survivors. Services be in Turner chapel east at 9 a.m. Saturday by the Rev. Howard Mace of the Federated church in Lisbon. Burial will be in the Ml. Vernon cemetery. The casket be opened at any time. not Feed the Birds Law and Order Tilt For Spanish Cabinet MADRID (AP) A new team took over the Spanish govern- ment Friday with most signs dicating the swing back to the right was being accelerated and law and order would be empha- sized. More than half of the 19- member cabinet named Thurs- day by Premier Carlos Arias Navarro are closely allied with the Movement, Spain's only legal political party and the suc- cessor to the blue-shirtcd Fa ilange that supported Generalis- simo Francisco Franco after the Civil war. It asKCfl mat me council was all truck traffic on Blairs Ferry! Public Safety: Martin Briins.'crn Ireland on Dec. 2, was tne I road except those trucks mak-j chairman and Wyrick. j first British ing deliveries in Ihe area or streets: for death by name by having terminals within Ilia-land VamlerLinden. jthe IRA ,n the four and a IM walha (lateral: Anderson, of communal warfaie in and Brims. The number of trucks using, Bus Service Norlhernreland. m m Blairs Ferry has been increas-1 Councilman VanderLimlen; UTOp ing recently, according to cityiwill look into the feasibility ofj Fjrpmen's Strike Clerk Joan Biederman. (operating a bus from Hiawathaj c The property owners along to Collins Radio Co. to help city! NEW YORK (AP) Neglect BlairsFerry road were conserve gasoline. ,of duty charges against for paving the road, which was Many Hiawatha who went on strike for not designed for heavy truck work at Collins Radio Co. 5% hours last election day will traffic, she added. The council also agreed to be dropped for the sake of umjy In other business, the counciljhire Dec, Gosling and Co. ofjin Ihe department, Commis- approved the following re-ap-Cedar Rapids to conduct the sioner John O'Hagan says. He dislike for "the dis- sension, animosity, loss of dis- cipline and respect" that fol- lowed the strike over a new con- tract. pointments for the coming year: audit of the city's books for 1973 Joan Biederman, city clerk; I at an estimated cost of lo Marie Bell, city treasurer; Verne Wheeler, water trustee; Archie Conklin, city en-! GAZETTE WANT ADS PAY Agree To Resume Viet ROW Swap SAIGON (AP) The South Vietnamese government and the Viet Cong agreed in principle Friday to resume the exchange of civilian and military prison- ers before the Tet celebration of the lunar new year on Jan. 23. The decision was reached at a meeting of the joint military commission in Saigon. Spokes- men said meetings would con- tinue to work out details of the exchange, including the number to be traded. The two sides agreed earlier this year to an exchange in which Saigon was to free civilians and 33 military men for 252 civilians and 410 govern- ment .soldiers held by the Viet Cong. The exchange was sus- pended in a dispute after only a few hundred were released by both sides in July. Gasoline Truck Hijacked in NYC NEW YORK (AP) The driver of a truck carrying gallons of gasoline was kid- naped and his truck hijacked, police reported. According to police, the driver, William Weber, was making deliveries Thursday night to gasoline stations in the Bronx when a man jumped in front of the truck, forcing him to the side of the road. The assailant pulled a gun, police said, then ordered Weber out of the' truck and blindfolded him. Police said he was then forced into a car and driven around the area for hours before being dumped from the car un- harmed. Police said initial efforts lo locate the truck were fruitless. For Better Health Jaundice Is Nof a Disease, But Symptom of a Disorder By Dr. S. L. Andelman "What kind of disease is jaun- a reader writes. "In the last several weeks, my skin has taken on a yellow tinge and my doctor says it is jaundice. What can I Actually jaundice is not a dis ease but a symptom of other disorders. Most often it is sociated with disorders of the liver or gallbladder. Chances are our reader's doctor is treat- Dr. S.L. Andelman ing her for the cause of her jaundice, without telling her what that cause is. A person is said to have jaun-' dice when the skin and white of the eyes turn yellow. The color may range from bright lemon yellow to dark olive green. Itch- ing may also occur, especially in cases of long duration. This is due to retention of bile salts. Bile Bile, which is greenish-yellow in color, is produced chiefly by the liver, spleen and the bone marrow. It is removed from the blood by the liver and dis- charged into the bile ducts; much of it is temporarily stored and concentrated in the gall- bladder. Excess production of bile, or any damage to the liver or bile ducts which affects the normal excretion of bile pigments, may result in a jaundiced appear- ance. Jaundice may be the most noticeable symptom in hepati- tis, a virus infection of the liver. Mononucleosis, another virus in- fection, may also affect the liver and cause a jaundiced ap- pearance. In addition, tumors, or infections of cause. If jaundice occurs, a doc- ,or should always be consulted promptly for diagnosis and reatment. Don't confuse jaundice with carotenemia, a condition in which the skin appears yellow gallstones, the ob- 30 YEARS AGO Czech Foreign Minister Jan Masaryk predicted Hitler would not live long enough to be tried as a war criminal; he'd either be taken care of by the military or com- mit suicide. Brighten Someone's Day With Flowers 20 YEARS AGO Polk' County Attorney Clyde E. Her-i ring, 38, Des Moines, announced' his candidacy for the Democra- j tic nomination for governor of I Iowa. PECK .....53.50 PECK HEAPING FULL PECK... Gift lello wrapptdl o CMery BBV. FiuDtllwylotilrutHMpilol DALE'S FRUIT MARKET Daisies 00 Springy arrangement of daisies, mums, sweetheart roses and footed container. SK95 w and up from the Garden Center: Fresh garden seeds, soil, pots, and heating cables Cosh 'n Carry Special Sweetheart Roses doz. "We send flowers anywhere" 393-5565 soog CENTER PT. RD. NE ducts or gallbladder may struct the bile ducts, causing jaundice. Various disorders or diseases that destroy red blood cells may also cause the skin lo turn yel- low, as in different forms of anemia. Malaria, pneumonia and chemical poisoning may also cause jaundice. Symptom Since jaundice is a symptom of other disorders, treatment is directed toward the underlying as a result of eating too many foods containing carotenes, ;or yellow pigments. Such foods include carrots, squash, pumpkins, oranges, egg yolks and sweet potatoes as well as green leafy vegetables. You can easily distinguish caro- tenemia from jaundice becau'se the eyes don't lurn yellow and. there is no itching. ..Dr. Andelman welcomes let- ters outlining problems he may discuss in future columns. He regrets, however, he cannot per- sonally answer mail. Write to him in care of The Gazette. WIN AT BRIDGE By Oswald James Jacoby Another modern play develop- ment Is the lead through declar- er of a card just higher than one in dummy. No one has named this play as yet so we are going to call it the "Bracket" play as you place the dummy's card in brackets. East wins lhc first trick with his king of hearts. He looks over dummy and sees that his side will need two club tricks to beat four spades. A club lead is clearly indicated. .Twenty-five years ago East would lead the The bidding has been: 4 West North Kasl Soulh Pass 2 Pass Pass Pass 4T Pass You, Soulh. Iraki: What do you do? A Pass. You should delighted with I his con I rat I. TODAY'S QUESTION Instead of bidding four hearts your partner lias jumped to four spades over your two spades. What do you do now? AQJ82 WEST T J9742 f 9765 SOUTH A J 10 9 7 2 EAST 4 53 t A K10 8 6 K4 Q1082 103 A ,16 Both vulnerable West North 2T' Pass Pass East IT Pass Pass South Opening lead-2t he Answer Sunday deuce. Soulh would play his six spot. West would win with the king but that would be the only club trick the defense could take. Most players would make I hat same deuce lead today, but the good players would lead the 10 spot and bracket dummy's nine. After this play there is no way for declarer lo avoid the loss of two club tricks. His best play." is In cover with the jack but West wins with the king and leads Ihe suit back. Now, East's queen-eight sur- round dummy's nine and since the diamond finesse is going'to lose South's contract is doomed. KIWANIS CLUB Cedar Rapids Announces The Exciting Golden Check Gift Certificate Advertised on KHAK Radio. Program Sponsored By A Group of Over 30 Area Merchants! Your Number May Be Called to Receive OVER For Only 14" In Meals Entertainment A real Budget ilreloher! STAY CLOSt TO YOUR PHONES Spentored fay fhe following merchants: 150 Call 365-3872 ximco. SHU COIINUI HUH IIAMIUICUS lOnDICKIWIOOlOfUUSK (OUKtll KIKHIH SlitOIH 'N OIMIN OOHim IMHOUtMARnmiNGOrilAIIOK _______ JOf'SOIHtH ott's i ICG cm snor cutiK Jtwim UHtll UKIS iioYosnsiu CHIPS VllUCt INK mtAUIAHt SAMIOS wauaum HAH FASHIONS COAST10 COAST SMS lADIOSHAtK SIOKS nuitiis rimiu AAMCOHANSMISSlim BMU77FUI COLOR PORTRAITS OLIN MILLS Cxlor   

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