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Cedar Rapids Gazette: Tuesday, January 1, 1974 - Page 75

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   Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - January 1, 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                 2 Daring Passes Help Notre Dame Topple Alabama  Limited time only!—we reduce selected Florsheim Shoes from our regular stock. Wide selection but not all sizes in all styles. Two pairs ere a good investment!  MEN'S SHOES STREET FLOOR  LEAKING RADIATORS  AND HEATERS  made like NEW again  IbIA >*o«,  COMPLETE SERVICE  By Hers* Iud Nissensnn    out    wit Ii the national rocognl-  NEW OHI.MANS (AH) — Has hon that some other teams Notre Dame returner] to the top .had.” of the college football world by the margin of point?  The national champion will i missed extra be announced Timor day when The Associated Press releases  “Certainly!” said Coach Ara its final poll. The margin  Statistics  Notre l)«m« Airth.itll*  Parseghian. “What was tho final score?”  It was 24-23, Notre Dame over Alabama in a super Sugar     I lr»t downs    VO    VI      Rushes yards    59 752    52 IVO      Poising yards    lev    127      Return yard*    ll    A      Raise*    7 12 0    IO IS I      Punt*    5 36    6 46      Fumbles lost    4 3    5-2      Penalties yard*    5 45    3 32      SCORE    B Y QUART I RS          noire Dame    A 8    7 3 24      Alabama    0 IO    7 6 23     d o g , stormed back and and on two daring long passes marched from their own IO- in ihe closing minutes.  The first from Tom end Dave  NL)  Airt  INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS  Bullock I run (kick failed)  Bowl Monday night, and it put during the regular  victory was decider! when Bill Davis, for three years an outstanding placekieker and sue-] merit pass (rom Clements) cessful on 51 of 53 extra points  Bllhnqslev 6 run iD.n/is kick)  MD Hunter 93 kickoff return (Dem  yard line to the Alabama two.  Bob Thomas, who missed the extra point alter Notre Darned first touchdown in the opening fought two period, kicked a 19-yard field Alabama lf goal with 4:2() remaining for the deciding points.  the storied South Bend, Ind.,  booted the conversion  gridiron citadel in the driver’s  ,0  the right of the goal posts seat to capture its first national | f°ll°wi n g a razzle-dazzle touch-championship  down  ^at l )ul:  Alabama on top 23-21 with 9:39 left.  college football since 1960.  “We missed an extra point, too,” Parseghian noted, “but we went for two points the next time we scored and we won the game. In my opinion, we’ve won the national championship and we won it without starting  Trick Play  'Hie trick play, which Notre Dame pulled itself against Todd Southern California sever years ago, featured a handoff from quarterback Richard Irish,  Airt PG Davis 39 Ala Jackson 6 run (Davis kick) ............ i NO Pennlck 12 run (Thomas kick)  S£ ason,    Ald    Todd 25 pass (rom    Stock (kick  attempt    '‘‘nu 1  '    FC, Thomas 19  A—85,161  INDIVIDUAL LEADERS  I RUSHING Notre Dame, Clements 15-74, Best 12 45, Pennlck 9 28, Bullock 19-79, I Hunter 4 26; Alabama, Jac kson 11 cs?, Btl linqsley 7-54, Spivey ll 44, Todd 3 32,  I RECEIVING    Notre Dame, Dem  I merle    3-59, Casper 3-75, Weber I 35;    Ala  b ima,    Pooh 2 78, Todd I 25,    Jackson    2 22,  Shrtrpless 2 27.  PASSING Notre Dame, Clements 7-  Long Return  They also won it on freshman often Al Hunter’s record 93 yard kickoff return just 13 seconds after Alabama had taken a 7-6 j lead in the second period;  Erie Penick’s 12-yard scoring  gallup on toe first play after an altilik W i; 25 A %r2 2TN ae    M2 ''’I    Alabama fumble in    the third  quarter; on a supreme effort st I odd    to halfback    Mike Stock    by a fired-up defense    that held    bee s    only    reception    “Maybe    i  al aud a    return pass    to I odd.    the Crimson I ide s    awesome    wasn’t    a    win-or-lose    ploy    but    i   fr  But the third ranked Fighting rushing attack to 190 yards a one-touchdown under-, under its per-game  176  Happy Celebration for Townsend  Whooping and shouting, Notre Dame's Willie Townsend showed his elation Monday night at New Orleans as he hugged a fa,*, seconds after the Irish had toppled No. 1 rated Alabama, 24-23, in tho Sugar Cowl.  LSI) Seeks 4th Bowl Scalp  By Md Shearer  MIAMI (AP) - Sixth-ranked Penn State, an unbeaten power hoping to sway some national championship votes, tangler with one of the country’s top bowl giant killers, Louisiana State, Tuesday night in the Orange Bowl football game.  The Nittany Lions, led byj Hcisman Trophy winner John Cappelletti, thundered past ll straight foes with relative ease and enters this New Year’s Eve extravaganza as a one touchdown favorite.  However. LSU has polished off three unbeaten bowl teams during the reign of jovial  winter temperatures. The game will be televised (NBG) beginning at EST.  “They are as good nationally sive line blocking as 8 p.m., j seen.” he said. “They have leverage and weight and to go “We have a tough job in front with it, they are getting that team  evenly  of us,’’ said McClendon, who execution you have to have, has a 6-3 bowl record in a doz- They come off that line of  at offen- victories over Kansas in i’ve ever|and Missouri in 1970, counters with praise for LSC.  “I.SU is a very fine football he said. “They played with Alabama but made  was a 30-yard lob Clements to tight Casper, who out-defenders at the setting up Thomas’ winning field goal. The second was a 35-yardor on third down from Clements to tight end Robin Weber Notre Dame used two tight ends— which took the Irish from the ominous shadow of their goal line to the 38 with a half minute eft and enabled them to run  on  out, the clock.  “That won the game,” Parseghian said of the last-minute pass, Clements’ seventh completion in 12 attempts and Welt it  was either make a first down average—  or  p Un t from our own end zone.  If we’d had to punt, even with a good kick all they’d have needed was one first down to  1  be in field goal range and we’d have been in trouble.  “It was a tackle-trap pass off (a fake run. I called it; darn right I called it. I liked the per-, cent ages and Tommy laid it right in there. The pass to Casper also was a good risk play,  , even though it was third-and-one.”  Alabama’s Bear Bryant, who [suffered one of his toughest defeats and who hasn’t won in his ! last seven bowl trips, con-i curred.  It Hurt  “The play that won the game [was the last pass,” he said.  J “We had them in a hole. They I were gonna punt and we were j I gonna win the game. If I werej a betting man, I’d have bet anything we were gonna win.” !  Notre Dame threw a bunch of; defensive alignments at Ala-jbama’s heralded Wishbone attack, which included great running and passing wrinkles installed by the innovative [Bryant. In the first half, the Irish alternated four, five and six defenders up front.  After the intermission, they also showed a seven-man line and often turned to the famed “mirror” defense with which they ended Texas’ 30-game winning streak in the Cotton Bowl three years ago, with several defenders lining up opposite their offensive counterparts.  “We used seven or eight defenses in the first half because we weren’t sure what we’d be able to do,” Parseghian said. “We thought if we were able,to do well in the first quarter we’d get better after that. And we held them to zero yardage in the first quarter but it turned 1969 out the other way and we only did a sporadic job after that. But we were able to break up their possession aspect in the second half.”  “Aw,” said Bryant, “they  Sled !VpgB«S*S  #4?7 1*us Srhruiivr  In his be  (Gus Schrader is on vacation, absence, some quest columns v/:l written by sports personalities from around Eastern Iowa. Today's column is by George Wine, sports information director at the University of Iowa.)  UPI Telephoto  Hi There Sports Fans’  By George Wine  A QUESTION frequently put to me is: “What are the men who cover tile Hawk-eyes really like?” Just the other day a fellow inquired: “Say, what’s Gus what’s-his-narnc like, anyway?” So when Gus asked me to write a piece while he is vacationing in Texas, I decided to tell it like it is about some of the newsmen you are most familiar* with in the Cedar Eapids-Iowa City area.  Bob Brooks of KCRG was born to radio, or maybe radio was born to Brooks. It’s difficult to tell which came first. Bob's first wolds were not “ma ma’’ or “da da”.  They were, “iii there sports fans, this is Bob Brooks.”  Bob is famous around the Big Ten for his consumption of iced tea. He tops off a JBbMp seven-course meal with six or eight glasses, and tops flj) JR that off with a piece of Pfk £?.% >f black-bottom pie. Bob likes george wine to eat, which he lias done in some of the hest restaurants in the world. He can say “iced tea” in 12 different languages. If you make an appointment with Bob, be late. He will. Bob once crossed up everyone by showing up on time to a cocktail party and the hostess passed out from shock. Bob tried to revive her by re-creating the fourth quarter of the IPf>2 Iowa-Ohio Slate football game and giving her mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Neither worked.  OOO  Hon (hinder should be nicknamed Straight  Arrow. He is taller than Wilt Chamberlain and skinnier than Glenn Vidnovic. He grew up around Buffalo, N Y., and earned spending money by washing second-story windows without the benefit of a stepladder. A bright youngster, Hon realized there was more to life than watching water spill over Niagara Falls and headed west, lie became a professional skier but fell down one day. It looked like the Eiffel Tower collapsing He opened a restaurant in Chicago called Hon of Japan, fooling the clientele bv playing an Oriental trombone. Hon put himself through Northwestern by working on a .section gang One day he noticed ti was time for lunch. “Bet's take a break!” he cried, thus introducing a commercial lead-in that is familiar to listeners of VV MT radio.  Gene Claussen is the smartest sportscaster  I know because he owns his own station, KXIC in Iowa City. His favorite expression is “jeepers creepers” but. fortunately for his listeners, he has never said that on the air. Gene’s beautiful baritone voice has a certain soothing quality, which probably explains why Dick Schultz once fell asleep during an interview. Gene has been in radio all his life, but lately he has been doing some television commercials for Hart Schaffner and Marx. One commercial shows Gene and a horse out in the middle of a pasture. Gene sells the horse a double-knit blazer and two pairs of matching trousers.  OOO Al Grady has been sports editor of the lov/a City Press Citizen so long he can remember when Irl Tubbs was the Hawkeye football coach. A bachelor, Al was once engaged to be married until his fiancee accused him of loving football more than he loved her. “That may be true,” admitted Al, “but I love you more than I love basketball.” Al! the* other newsmen admire Al because of the penetrating questions he asks during a press conference. He once asked Ralph Miller a question that lasted 37 minutes and Ralph killed time by smoking two packs of cigarets. Al knows the words to every Big Ten fight song and delights in watching football halftime shows. He doesn’t cover the game, he reviews the bamls Al lives just a stone s throw (although he never throws stones) from Kinnick Stadium with his gentle dog, Patches. They are both housebroken.  OOO Now we come to Red or Gus or Punchy  or whatever we are calling The Gazette sports editor today. I used to read his column when I was growing up in North English (the literacy rate is high in North English). Gus is also from a small town, St. Ansgar. At age 14 he won a hog-calling contest and his friends urged him to go into radio, but Gus knew where the money was and became a newspaper man. One thing I’ve never been able to figure out about Gus: he always says “we” when he means “I.” I got to where I could understand what he was talking about until the time he filed this dispatch from the Olympics: “We took our wife to dinner at a quaint German restaurant.” Gus is regarded in Cedar Rapids as a bridge expert but the Big Ten Skywriters recognize him for what he is: a hustler.  OOO The newsmen who cover the Hawkeyes are  a good bunch of guys. They are honest and hard working and have a sometimes outrageous sense of humor, which is why I can poke a little fun at them (I think). Newsmen on the Iowa beat are among the best in the business and I lr>pe this has given you an insight into those in the Cedar Rapids-Iowa City area. <PS to Gus: Say, this is easy. Wanna swap jobs?)  West Liberty State Grid Job to Leo Miller  May Fold Macon in Southern Hockey Loop  CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —    Greensboro voted against it at a  Gerald Pinkerton, owner of the    meeting of the board of gover-  WEST LIBERTY. VV.    Va. (AP)    Macon Whoopes in the Southern    nors in Charlotte Monday. The  — Leo Miller    chief    recruiter    Hockey League, says he may    other clubs in the league are  and offensive ’    coordinator for    >»•* to fold the french se.    Charlotte and Roanoke Valley.  Ile said so Monday after re- Suncoast folded two weeks  en seasons and record of 97-31-5.  an  overall i scrimmage and they gaged.”  Cappelletti, a 6-foot  a couple of mistakes that cost  did "'<  show  «    West    Liberty    State    College's    ^     that    the    |cag ' ue    rc(ust . d   stay en- them the game.”  Like Alabama, MSU relied on senior, j depth, with eight backs rushing  slashed through opposing lines  for morc than 1C0 yards- The   hadn’t seen  whipped us. They showed us big tight ends who just took the ball away from us.  “I don’t know if one point  for 1,522 yards this year and had  lcadcr was Brad David a pun j “I don t know if a career total of 2,639 in 22 Ashing 205-pound junior tailback should ^ decide the  athletic directors and coaches Monday that punitive action ,    ,    .     4 .. will be taken if any further out-  ( harles    McClendon—shutting k rea |( S 0 f violence occur at con-  out Texas 13-0 in the 1963 Cotton Bowl, and beating Arkansas 14-7 in the 1966 Cotton Bowl and  Warning Over Cage Fighting  R™?ne^ comm^«ioner ~of he 1 3 Carry -  Ho scorcd 29  *««<*-, rt^hiig     ;     «"     wa V' l *> r     a*;    ' V> had   Bib Skv tTference warned  d °" ns  ~  17 ,his soason     in    173    attempts.     cha ™*     10    k «*    extra    point.  . ji ?    5    " ar  L  cd     “I    don’t    see    where    I    have    to    Mike    Milev    k    the    Tieer    mini*.     to °-     Notre    Dame    has    a     K reat   games with a 5.1  lishing yard average  who  set  K F    »    TU    ..    •    pui uiig null    int iv- tifm  Th!!'    Vi!!!/!  footba ll  pr °g ram     th e     P asl    scvcn     his request    that it    relinquish    Pick    Green  has    been    named    head    the $25,000    expansion fee the    NEW HAVEN, Conn.    (AP)    —  first-year club had to    put up to     Budy     Green,    Yale’s    leading  I c r, 44, succeeds his    „     llnanimml!i     rusher,    was    elected    this    week  national former high  years, coach. M i  ___________   a    unanimous  school coach and  vo{e was necessary  to do this captain of the Eli’s 1974 football  i school single season championship, but I like the boss. Bob Roe, 65. who retired, but that Winston-Salem and team, a spokesman said.  , Mike Milev is the Tiger quar put on a good show to prove terback. Nicknamed “Miracle * eam und  ^ ra ant ^ his staff did anything,” said Cappelletti, Mike,” he passed for 978 yards  an  excellent job preparing for  Wyoming 20-13 in the 1968 Sug- | rou jjj e   ference games.  Roning’s warning came in a letter to  ar Bowl.  The Bayou Bengals rolled past their first nine opponents before dropping a 21-7 Thanksgiving decision to too-ranked Alabama in the Southeastern  loge games last week.  “Any conch permitting or advocating any unduly rough play conducive to fighting during the game will be reprimanded,” Honing said. He also warned  who delivered a tearful accept-     all d  ad ded    another 269 on the  anet* speech at    the Heisman    ground  Awards banquet    earlier this     T j u ,     Tiger  offensive line is  American Tyler foot-IO 233-pound while McClendon’s  coaches following  ,n ,n '"- “/"K    headed by AIM  wo liaise Slate Col-  a younger b '' olhcr  '' hn l,as ,<,U ' Lafauci, a 5-fix  kemia.  us, but I wouldn’t mind playing them again tomorrow. In fact. I’d like to.”  Parseghian    wasn’t having  any of that.  "We beat    an undefeated  Won’f Hurt  “One night isn’t going to takt away what I’ve done the last American     o     _______ ________ two yeans,” he said. “If I have  Conference championship game  } j lat  "pj ayens  precipitating a a bad game, that won’t mean I  trophy.”  g u a r d  trademark, a tough defense, is team, the top-ranked team in headed by linebacker Warren the country and we’re number Capone, a second unit AII- one." he said. “You botella  we’re number one  and then saw its image tarnished five days later when Tu-lane upset the Tigers 14-0 for the first time in 15 years  A Sellout  A sellout crowd of 76 (HK) expected to jam into the auge Bowl arena in this tourist mecca thai thrives on 75-degret  fight will he suspended.  Idaho State was forced to forfeit a game to Boise State Saturday after a brawl broke out.  Boise forward George Wilson, who was involved in a scuffle with Virginia * )r 'i players Friday  I didn’t deserve the  The All-American back isn’t the only exceptional player in Coach Joe Paterno’s arsenal.! Leading the way in the offensive line, praised by I Commonwealth McClendon, is guard Mark night and with Markovich, a 245-pounder with  ISH center Dan Spinder Satur second team All-American ere-day night, received a warning dent tats, and 260-pound t ackle  Dandridge and Big O  Missing for Bue^s  MILWAUKEE (AP) - The Milwaukee Bucks will probably j 0 f be without two .starters Wednesday night when they meet flit* Detroit Pistons in a National Basketball Association rematch at Detroit.  Bucks’ Coach Larry Costello said Monday that Bob Dandridge, who injured an ankle in Sunday’s 98 91 loss to Detrot, would “definitely mins tilt* game in Detroit, and I'm not sure he'll Im* back for Thursday night’s game here against Kansas City Omaha ”  Also absent will he guard Oscar Robertson, who has missed the bvt four games with a back ailment and is not exacted to return before Saturday.  from Honing.  “Filins of tile  game showed Wilson did not start that fight,” Honing said. “There are no films available the Saturday night fight. However, a number of tend to point suspicion son.”  Charles Getty, a third unit All-Fridav nigh! American  Tem Shuman gives the Nittany Lions a solid aerial threat also. He connected on 83 of IPR | parses for 1.375 yards and 13 re|>orts touchdowns. Paterno, who has at WH- had six bowl teams in eight I years and holds Orange Bowl  if'  Roy McLean  30 Mm. Ire* Customer Poi king ol Men (mull Parking Romp  t Ktlunvely  INSURANCE  Since I? 38  McLEAN-BASSIM  INSURANT AGI NCT 316 MNB BUILDING 365-91 51  418 E Ave. NW  • Make a date with Clayt  • Estimates Gladly given.  364-7189   

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