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Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette: Tuesday, May 15, 1894 - Page 1

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   Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette, The (Newspaper) - May 15, 1894, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                             VOLUME 108 THEY FALL OUT. Jsckton, Chaiiman Blythe and Gib Pray Politically at Swords' not Agree on Appointments. BIyihe Wanted to Name tbo Whole Lot Pre-Eiection Pledges are Still Unfulfilled. Meeting of the State Jackson Get a Second Evetybody Sick of Him. At Des Moines. DES MOINES, May mooting of tho republican state central committee, which Is being held this afternoon to set the date of the next state convention and 10 transact other business relating to state political matters, has had effect of greatly Increasing tho interest in state- politics, which up to the present time has been shared in by few persons except the numerous can- didates for nomination for the vari- ous position to be filled this fall. Besides the committee, a large number of state politicians are hero antl the chances of the various candidates arc being dis- cussed. There seems to bo no doubt In tbe minds of those present but that the party Is sure to win in tho state this fall by a large majority and it Is believed that republicans will be returned to congress from all tho districts of the state ex- cept the second, and there are some who sanguine enough to believe that the OJBDAB RAPIDS, IOWA, TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1894. PRICE FIVE CENTS, y morn than additional members. The leading republicans here are thor- oughly Disgusted with Both Blythe and Jackson, and urn becoming quite solicitous to know whether Blythe Is again to be chairman of the committee. When the Martin bill was put through the senate, Ulytho was standing In tbe lobby and as the vote >was announced he made the remark that ho had spent the winter at the capital for two purposes; one was to secure tho election of Mr. Gear as United States senator, and the other was to see that the pledge of the party was redeemed, and now that he had secured both ho was ready to go home, and that ho was through with politics so far as he was concerned; that he did not propose to talfo the chairmanship again, but would leave the party free to choose whoever It desired. Several names have been mentioned In connection with tho chairmanship. One democratic nominee from that district can be beaten. A gentleman from the second says that la the event of Hayes nomination there will ba a split In the democratic party and that If Hayes Is sidetracked and some other democrat nominated, especially If li should be Senator Bills or some other man recently from the republican there will be enough democratic d'lssen- tlon to Insure republican success, but It Is not likely that very much money or of- fort will be wasted on the Second dis- trict. Tho Indications are that Lacy, Hepburn, Hagar, Hull, Cousins, Hender- son, Dolllver, and Perkins will all be re- nominated without opposition. The contest In the First district will be a lively one, with candidates from all of the counties except possibly Jefferson nod Louisa. In the Fourth district party precedent would indicate the nomination of Updergraff, but Tom has not been standing in with tho machine very well and it is reported that he used some very language In regard to Jackson's record last fall, which has had the effect of Irritating some of tho managers, and' it may be that ho will have trouble. The only probable candidate against him Is Chairman plythe, and he Is possibly a candidate only so far as feeling Is weighed. Blytbe seldom makes known his wishes politically very far ahead and or two of them arc warm personal friends ot Mr. Blythe, who would not take the position If ho wishes tho place again, al- thotigh of course they would be very much pleased to secure the honor In case Blythe should stop aside. They have been trying to tied out what the chair- man will do, and one or two of them have talked with him directly on the subject, and so far he has refused to commit him- self one way or tho other, and the Ren- oral feeling Is that ho will again be a candidate for tho chairmanship, unless ho concludes to run for congress In the Fourth district. A movement was sot on foot during thu senatorial fight last winter to defeat Elytho, and canvass to that end has been carefully made. A majority of the hold-over members arc understood to Im opposed to Biythe's election, and most of the districts that chooso this fall will nn- SOLD THE REPORTS. The Chicago Board of Trade Discusses the fraud Ptactictd in the Sale of "Ad- vcnce" Crop Reports. CHICAGO, May of the board of trade read with Interest tbe In- terview with Secretary of Agriculture Morton published yesterday morning, says the Tribune, touching the govern- ment monthly crop report. The secre- tary says that two former employes In the department who had charge cf the figures are now located In Chicago, and he has no doubttheyfurnlsh the advance figures. One-of the men Is named Thoman. These two men secured their In- formation from tte department's corres- pondents, and this the board understands to be the way tho report Is madjs 38 Degrees. N D., May was the hottest day of tho-season, th 'thermometer standing at 08 degrees a the afternoon. Rain Is needed to refr.cs the grain, .which looks well so far. Sheriffs To Meet. Sioux CITY, May Wll lam JJoyos has called the third annui convention of tbe Interstate Sheriff's ai soclatlon of Iowa, Nebraska, Mlnnesot and South Dakota to meet In this clt Juno 13 and 14. ho will certainly not go Into the fight with any chances of losing. The Tcmpeiarce Question Another matter that is attracting a good deal of attention Is what the .party will say at the next convention on the question of temperance. Tho feeling, against tho Martin law In tho counties without cities Is reported as intensely hostile. It Is not satisfactory to the pro- hibitionists and It certainly is not satis- factory to the liberal republicans and they am very numerous in tho counties having the smaller towns. So far only ono county, that of fjyon, has secured tho per cent and provided for the run- ning ot saloons legally. The prohibi- tionists have called a convention for June 'J7 and :J3, and the namos that are mentioned In connection with the con- vention, those who are mnntioned as hav- ing cast their political future with that party is somewhat startling to tho man- agers. The prohibitionists claim that they will poll an enormous vote this fall, times larger than that of last fall. doubted ly be In tho hands of tho friends ol some of the defeated candidates last winter, who would take a good deal of pleasure In seeing Mr. Blythe Jail. Still, as he Is recognized as an excellent politi- cal organizer, there may be no attempt made to change tho chairmanship this year, although the feeling throughout the state Is decidedly against tho retention of Mr. Blythe In that position. Chances for a Second Another matter that has been discussed a good daal around the hotels Is whether or not Jackson will bo a candidate for a second term. A member of the com- mittoo slid last night that his dis- trict was decidedly opposed to Jackson, and that while ihcy might not go Into any organized opposition to his renoral- natlon. yet tbc-rn was a general feellns that he. was too small a man to have that Office. They were disgusted with tho performance of Jackson In regard to Kelly's army, and were especially dissat- isfied with his appointments, which, with a single exception, have not boon satis- factory. He spoke especially of the appointment of oil commissioner, which ho said was scandal on tho policy of the governor, that he would take up a candidate who had not a single lino of recommenda- tions, not even from tho comniltteemen of his own district or his own representa- man's Information it is said was original- ly contracted for by half a dozen prom- inent brokoraga firms and speculators at the rate of a month. The per- ceotages arrived at wore practically the same aa those of the government's, but the figures were given out several days ahead of those from the department, and on tho first two occasions were profltabln to the little clique of speculators who used them. Outsiders soon caught on, and the result ij thus described by a broker: "Tho crowd know this half dozon commission roon and spec- ulators would havo the advance reports the third month, and thoy watched their operations about tho time the reports wero due and "tailed" on. The outcoino was tho Insiders did not got good prlcos, and 1 understand tho monthly price for tho advance report was then cut down from Sl.OCO to S500. Lately when the advance reports have been received they liavo somehow circulated pretty widely. It would ba hard, however, to get any one of the uien to admit that he bought tho reports, although the government Pensions. WASHINGTON, D. C., May A. Moore.Eidora; John W. Jeffrey, Kucl ford; .Tames H. Oead, Contervllle; God frey Miller, Burlington; William Clark Tho- August Ullrich, Keokuk; Jan Latlmor, Lisbon: Emilia Doborde, Coltim bus. Mtfct Water In Dakota. Sioux CITY, May gentleman who traveled In South Dakota says that the grand Jury was last week In session has no copyright on tho crop correspon- dence.' After The Assaulter. FKP.GUS FALLS, S. D., May Saturday a tramp criminally Mrs Joseph Ward of Wadena, during the absence of her husband. A reward of S300 was offered for his arrest, and descriptions of the man were sent throughout tho western part of the state. at Pierre tho two dajs he was there, ant It was next to impossible to get a drink of liquor In the town. But when the grand jury Is noi In session liquor Is sole openly In many places. Wife Unexpectedly, OSAOK, May man named Sheffar, residing southeast of O-ngo, was asked by his wife to drive to Floyd to purchase something needed about tho. licii'ia- Dur- ing his absence she borrowed S25T cashod a croam, check, boarded '--a train at Charles City and left for parts unknown, In Nebraska. because the men, who hold to their party as a matter of principle, generally voted with tho republicans, after having boon assured that the thirteenth piank meant a strengthening of tho prohibitory law, rather than Its repeal. The Appointments. So far as the state committee and thn governor Is concerned.a very unexuectert state of affairs has been developed, and It now looks as though lliytho and Pray had broken away from the governor, or that tho governor has broken away from thi.'rn. Long before tho inauguration took place, In fact before election, lilyth coiniiii'ncid Indicating to Jackson Ui  apparent that It can no longer bo con- cealed. Even during tho session of tho legislature, Blythe muttered a good deal of complaint, but it was not until the last few weeks that he has made known his feelings so openly as to direct public attention to the ill feeling that exists be- tween the two. In discussing tho quarrel between the chairman and tho governor, a member of tho cpmmltteo remarks that ho docs not see as Jackson has made any Im- provement by ignoring Ulytho's recom- mendations unlnss possibly It bo In tho caso of Judge Deemer as a menibor of the supreme court-, wboso nomination seems to give satisfaction, especially .to t.bo younger members of tho bar who woru anxious to see some now blood and energy Installed Into the supremo court, which they say is needed much lives, and pass by two candidates who i between them had thn recommendation of nearly every of the sU central committee, all tha members i congress and both of tho L'alted State senators. The only thing that was needed to d feat Jackson for a socond term Is a active candidate, but It Is doubtfi whether aay prominent republican wi bo willing to enter the list as a candidate as he would incur tho enmity of Jack son's friends to such an extent that would probably result In tho defeat i both candidates and a taking up of third man, and It would be hard to fin a prominent man who will thus sacrlflc his political Interests. Outside of tho naming of tho date tho state convention there Is Httlo fo tho committee to do, more than to dls cuss tho general political situation. Word was received that he had at- tempted to assault two school teachers, j Posses loft Wadena and .dew York Mills, I and Sheriff Billings took a large party from L-ero. The description of tho man corresponds with that of a man named Peter Battleson, who formerly lived at Aurdalfn, socoo time and escaped. ShoriiTEIlllrigs, who returned from tiie town of Armor, where Uattleson was Pelican Rapids and Harnesvllle, on tho Groat Northern, or Detroit and Lakn Park, on tho Northern Pacific. Battle- son Is a Norwegian, about 35 years old, with a red raoustache.curled at tho ends, and weighs about 155 Hn carries a Winchester and a revolver, also a sma.ll black satchel. Mr. Ward, whose wife ho assaulted, is In tbe pursuing party and will make short work of him IF he finds him. A reward of is offered for Object To Fast Driving. w.N, May 13-r-Thero Is a good aeHl of complaint already about fas; driving on North. First street since the paving began. A party who per- sisted In showing off the fleetnoss of his steed, disregarding danger signals and all other precautionary measures, had his buggy upset, a wheel or two assaulted j dished, his horse's leg badly skinned and 'also knocked a good-slzo.1, chunk of curbing out of place last evening. The citizens along the street are justly In- dignant at the reckless being Indulged In and are likely to take stops for Its suppression. Bars Out The Chmaman. IXDIAXAI-OLIS, Ind., May Ylm, tho wealty Indianapolis Chinaman who eloped two years ago to Chicago marrying Miss Addle Norton of Koberl Park Sunday school, where Pang at tended. Is In further trouble. With hi American bride atid baby ho went U China a year ago. In the meantime th law was passed against Chinamen. Pang Vim had announced his Intention of ro turning to this city to live, but had no registered. A letter was received yestnr day from bis wife by Maj. Carter, tho veteran United States secret servlcn officer, asking what her husband shoul do. He will arrive at Tacoma from Hongkong this week. Tho officials here aro In a ijuandary how to get Pang Ylm past the government oflicers at Tacoma. School Of Electricity. CHICAGO, May first class In tbe National School of Electricity was organized hist night at thr. People's In slltutn with forty members. It will moot next Monday evenlug for Instruction. Addresses wero mado liy Fal- lows, Prof. Jackson of tho University of Wisconsin, Prof. John P. Barrett, city alohtrlclan. and Dr. J. L. Uornsby. Tho latter, who Issocretary and gonoralraan- agorof thnnchool, outlined Its puruosos. Only so much of tho theory as is noces- sary will be mado part of the, courso. Technical terms will bo rejected. It Is thn intention to organize classes in all parts of tho country. Reeled It For A Saloon. MILWAUKEE, Wls., May Rev. 0. B. Thajur, pastor of the Delaware and Ottawa Presbyterian re- signed his charge at the meeting of tho Ullwatkoo yesterday. The lev. Thayer owned a building which ho onted for a saloon. lie pleaded Ignor- ance of tho intention of tho" tenant and when the matter was voted on by tho congregations a majority were In favor if retaining tho pastor. Thoro wero :ome votes against Mr. Thayer, however, and ho resigned. Local Laborers Preferred. WATKKLOO, May paving vhlch will bo rlono on Hie West .Sldn this oason will furnish work for a largo nraber of men, and local men will hit given tho preference. Already 36 per- ons havo mado application for jobs, but hero seems to bo a. scarcity ot teams hus far. Work will begin Thursday morning. Killed by Her Side. Cou.NCir, Bi.rrrs, May Kiil- ley and wlfo, whn had bnon visiting rela- tives in Council started for tliulr homo, several miles east of the city, Sun- day afternoon. In the. southern part of tbo city their horses took fright at a Wa- bash train and ran away, overturning tbo cart and throwing Mr. Kelley in Cor.fideiiC3 Man jailed. COUSCIL BLUFFS, May M. Allen, tho confidence nun picked by Officer Claar, was beforo Judge McGoe yester- day morning anil tbe result was that Allen will a term of thirty days In Jill, the charge attalnst hloi being va- grancy. Several motormnn and Officer McMillan of the. Union Pacific testified that Allen had been making tbe ac- quaintance of strangers at tho transfer and the police testified that when Alton was arrostod ho had a bogus check on his person. As he could give no explan- ation of his conduct or his business he was sent JOINT RATE CASE. The Iowa Supreme Court Decides in Celebrated Case.in Favor of the Rail road Companies. DES MOINES, May supreme court yesterday affirmed the Shelby dls trlct court IE tho joint rate case, finding for the plaintiff railroad companies ant knocking out tho commissioners. The commissioners held that the rate In question was an amendment to the original schedule of 1SS3 and tha: It was therefore unnecessary to give the ten days' notice pre scribed by law for new rates to to effec- tive, so no notice was given and the court sustains the railway companies In their contention that the rate In question known as the "joint rate" was never valid because the ten days' notice was not given, it being a new rate, and 'ore all collections under It. have been llegal. The Commissioners maintained that the law was merely an amendment and they were rot required by Jaw to give notice of amendments to make them effective, but the court held as above tated, settling tho much-contested case n favor of the railways. Finds. His Brother. CHKSTON, May few days arc D. B. Jones ws assigned a double room In a it. Joseph hotel. Soon after be retired here arrived on a lato train W. W. ones, of San Francisco, Cal., and us tho ouse was crowded ho was assigned the ame room. In the morning D. B. Jones ooked at the register to see who his ooinmatc for the night was, and was urprlsed to see tho Initials correspond those of a brother be had not seun or years. He sought him out and oundthatlt was his brother. They ivo remained inseparable over since. Violated The Fish Low. ESTnERViLLE, May Commls- onur JJulevan arrested Wm. Shears at plrlt Lake Saturday for spearing fish id shipping thuin to the southern part the state. He had positive evidence gainst him and Shear was convicted and ned SM. Commissioner Dalevan was en yesterday and states that there were wo others Interested with Shears but no mount of coaxing would Induce him to vo his partners away. Wants Sioux FALLS, S. D., May Lear, of this city, and Joplln, Mo., as been sued by Helen Kltzgerald of "Nob Chicago, for 0 damages. A dummy complaint has beon filed In Chicago, which alleges that on July 1, Loar violently assaulted and boat the plaintiff, from tho effects of which she suffered great pain and was foru, lougllme thereafter sick and sore. THE GOLDEI EAGLE One Price Clothing Honse. ALWAYS THE CHEAPEST. HSTE'VEIIR. 1200 Men's Fine Suits at 55c on the dollar. Bought for spot cash from Quthman, Ullman Silver man, Chicago. This firm started in business January 1st, and their entire stock was msde for this season's trade. We have divided this purchase in two lots. 00 Men's ill fool Consisting of Cassimeres, Worsteds, and Homecpuiis, worth anU Your choice Fins ill foul Jucludiiisr a lot of 
                            

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