Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 18, 1883 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette

Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Evening Gazette, The (Newspaper) - January 18, 1883, Cedar Rapids, Iowa                             LA.IDIBS, N. 0. Lawton Has received To-Day, by Express, 700 Pieces of Hamburg and Swiss Edgings! ALSO A FINE LINE OF IrisI Point Lace! These Goods are all New Styles anil Patterns. NEW YORK STORE WMesalB Mairafociiirers or FINE SHOES. Corner first St. and Second Aye., CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA. We Manufocture For tie Retail Trade Eiclraely, And Have NO SECOND-GRADE GOODS. Two- T-wo Gents' Furnishers, AKE SO-CALLED. Their new it comer SKCOND STKKKT AN1> SECOND A VKNU E of Already received, to ftrrlvo durlnR month oJ .Iinuary. Large Hue of READY-MADE CLOTHING, Hats, Caps, Neck-wear, Etc lor the celebrated WILSON ItRO.'S SillKTS. BemoLiber the "Nobbiest Store in in Calder's new block, just across from Posk'ffice. Mower Huston Deders in AH Kinds of Aud In Butter, Cheese and Flour. Onondaga Dairy Salt AND COMMON-SENSE ENGINE COMPANY, Grand Hotel Block, Ci-dur RaplilH, In. Sain.. FKEIG-HT TRANSFER attend to General aal CiU Express Business Promptly, imd all calls at any time. Office In Blitw' dniR store. Telephone ST. LUTZ BROS., Tbe Popular Marbta and Granite Dealern, A One Btook always on bane. Office and sbop op- posite pontoffloo, Harlem, Iowa. Call and eee thorn before buying. VOL. L--NO. 8. CEDAR EAPIDS, IOWA. THTIESBAY, JANUAEY 18, 1883. PRICE, 3 CENTS. SENATORS. Some Were Chosen and Some Were Not Cullom's Election Made Sure in Illinois. No Choice in Michigan, .Massachusetts, Nebraska and Minnesotiu 111., Jan. tha sonata vobtorday Governor Cullom TTUH nonuntited by Mr. Mason, of Cook, and m-uoinluil liy Mr. Tor- renco and Mr. Morriu. Ex-Govonior Palmer was nominated by Walker, and uecimded by Shaw and Morritt The voU) iu tho rionato stood: Cullom, 30; Paliuor, Senator Adtinis not voting. In the house, 3tr. Littler of nom- inated Governor Cullom, and Cowperthwait and McCartney seconded tho nomination. Yancoy noroinatod es-Govornor Ptilmer, and Linegar twconded it When namo waa called, ho eaid he about to commit what th'epaporrt had boen calling "political aui- but ho waM determined to RB ho be- lieved, in tho intercut of imblic policv. It waa contrary to bound pulilic policy lor ttm govor- uor of a dtatt- to tftep down into tho political coaspool to obtain another otlice, and, thoiiKh personally he h.-ul a high opinion uf Governor Cullom, he could not vote tor him. Hu did not vote. When Mr. Fnllor'8 name was called, lie siud he bound by the caticiw, and voted for Cullom. Mr. LnVrenee, who way one of the came to the and voted for Cullom. Mr. Parker explained that he had boen for Ogletiby, and predictiid that the peo- ple would indorse tho spirit of tho inedibility He voted for Cnlloin. Mr. Par- iah aaid he still indorsed tho iuoliKibility reso- lutions, but wart bound by the and voted for Cullom. ROOK followed suit. Kankin rofuwd to vote. Wood of Cook voted for Cullom. The Democrats present, except Crafts of Cook, who was kept home by sick- nesB. all voted for John M. Palmer. The vote in the house msulted: Cnllom Palmer which not being a majority, will necessitate a joint ballot to-day, when Cullora will elected Tlie Michigan ConteMt. LANsrxo, Mich., Jan houaoofthe legislature voted sepuratoly fur aoiiiitcryostor- day. Tlie result is a total'of for Ferry and SO for Byron (i. Stout, the resjiectivo liciin and Democratic OIUCIIH iioniiiii't-s. The number of votes required m eleei is ii7. There were twenty-two liupiiblii-au mcnibura who re- fused to vote for Tliouiiis W. Ferry. These twenty-two theii votes aiiinni; tho lirtuun other candidates, Mirnore. McMillan, Seth C. .MutTatt. Purry Hannali, Ed- win WilUitte, liovell (1- Horr, Julius C. Bur- rows, Bvron M. Ctltcheon, JolniS. Nifwberry. Cliarles'Upson, iii-nton llam-hett, Thoniaa M. Coolev til-hard Windsor, James F.Joy, B. Sto-rkbriihtt.'. There Iwing no c-lioico in either house, tho two bodies will meet in joint convention to- day and proceed talto u joint ballot. An Indlrinivr ICallot in Xebrnsku. LINCOLN, Jan. first ballot on Unnited Slates aenntor was taken yesterday. Of tho KK votes in both houses, Saiindei's re- J. Morton, Democratic candidate, US; Millanl, Thayur, HI; Jlai.dorson. f'oiinor.'K, ami the n-ai wero each from to four The ballot tkicides nothing, only that Sauudere has more strength than had been supposed Xo flinivo iu ST. Minn. .Tati sonnto yester- day gave William Windum, llvpubiicHii. voles: Wilson. Demo.'rut. H: JL H. Dunnel, 4: Uorilon E. Cole, -J; tlie rest sintering. Mr. Windom one vote of c-lcctinn. In tha house, -Mr. Windom received 47 voles, ITi less than was necessary Ui elect. Wilson reeeivetl iMjUunuel 0, and fiindrod rcat Mattering. A. H. Uartanit Wc-F.leeteil in Arkao LITTI.E lionK, Jan. senatorial elec- tion was held at noon in the genera; and resulied in Ihe re-election of Uniictl SeniHiu- jV- H. wlio re- every vo'e cast. threi, (fi'eon- buelicra. who voted for K. (iarlmid. The caucus of tho niembors on Monday nigh; JecM-'ii Hi teuilur the VoUM com- ro ex-t'oMgri-ssman H. Hoot, but lie urged thai ihi-y be given to .Senator Garland, which was done. Ko Choice in BOSTON, Jan. tin- legislature yester- day the first ballot for United Stales -vimtor stood as follows: uumber to a Hoar, Crapo, L'; lymg, li; Bow- emian number, nec- ossarj'to a choice, Hoar, 1LS; Crapo, 10; Long, i7; Bowcrnuui, 7'.': F. Aii.ims. Jr., 1; Kannoy, Itobinson, B. 1'. Butler, At- kiuson, 1. Colorado. DENVER, Col.. Jan. first regular ballot for United States senator was had by both houses of th't legislature yesterday after- noon, No choice Tho caucus last night of Republican mem- bers of tho legislature to nominate a United Suites senator again adjourned after tho ninth ballot, without making a choice. Following is the last ballot: Htltin, I'.i; Tabor, IS; Hnmill, ]2; Bowen, U', scntti-rmg, 1. It is just as hard to pnxlict the fin'il result now as at any time since the met. It is generally be- lieved a nomination will not bo mado within threo or four days. Virginia. WHEEUMO, Jan. Democratic legis- lature caucus last evening waa harmonious. All tho Democratic members in the city parti- cipated but one, John E. Kouna, congressman from tho Third district, waa nominated on the third ballot. Tho election takas place neit Tuesday. Kaunas. TOJEKA, Kan., Jan. Republicans of the legislature have decided to hold a caucus at 4 o'clock this afternoon for tho purpose of nominating a United Statoa sonator. There will be no opposition to Senator Plumb, who is in Washington attending to his duties. The Democrats havo not named their man yot, though Gen. C. W. Blair, of Fort Scott, been mentioned. Tennexmee HarriH. NASHVILLE, Temx, Jan. Hon. Ibham 0. Harris wan re-elected to tho Di 'tod States senate on tho first ballot Tho votes stood 17 in the senate, and 57 iu the house. Frye Chosen Again. AUGUSTA, Ma. Jan. W. P. Frye waa re-elected United Stated senator yesterday. A Bis Thlnz In Ecu. MONTEEAi, Jan. ice palaco will bo completed neit Saturday, and the city council has cloned Peel street for a week, to make a coasting surface a mile long down the Bide of tha mountain. (Shut Down and Burned Up.. CHICAOO, Jan. 17. The are which destroyed the nail mill, blu- ing house, pattern and general warehouses of the Calumet Iron and Steel-company, at Iron- dale Honday night, to thought to have been of incendiary origin. The action of tho com- p.inv in abutting down tho mill laat Saturday unti'l April 1.1, throwing MOO men ont of om- pluymeiit has ongeudored a good deal of bad 1'ei' :ig. The men claim that the company was making nuniov, uud thoro was no reason why work should be stopped. An immense quanti- tv of finished nails and a vast number of pat- terns were dcatroyed The mill was n. very large one, containing 1W machines. Estimated JOBS, f lUUjOOO, covered by insurance. THE SILENT MAtt. Gen. the Treaty With Mexico. WASHINGTON, Jan. In conversation with Col. Tom Oehiltree, who seems to havo the i'acnlty of inviting the confidence of almost everybody, Gen. Grant said that he felt confident congress would confirm tlie treaty which Komcro and he had drafted. Tliero is some feeling now, he d, agiiiust the treaty because its full bearing and meaning are not understood.' Tho sugar planters of Louisiana and tho pngar-rtfliiora have an idea that this treaty will injure our sugar inlorestn. "That idea is all said Grant; does not now produce one-tenth part of tho sugar she herself consumes, and could not produce enough for her own consumption in six years, tho titiii; thi.i trn.'ity ia to run. Thoro noed he no fear that sugar will bo imported into through Mexico. We can guard against anything of that kind, and, be- sides, not permitting sugar to enter her free of duty. And the crv htw been rai-ii'l to the euVct that liomc.ro and niy- continued lion. Grant, uare deeply iu- ten.'Slei! in railnvM' sclieulos in Mexico with J.iy Gould. Nothing could bo more absurd. Tlie interest.-" of fitly millions of people are of far more consequence to me than tho iu- o( any man or corporation. My bei-t judgment "was iu drafting this tre.ity, iiinl I sincerely believe that if it in con- tinued bv lioth countries this country will renhw gri'at benetits in lens tlun a yenr. It has been stated that wool to bo admitted ol ..ntv. Tiiis is a The !nV tin) n.liiiidsioii of sheepskins, lr.it it hardly probable the wool coming in that way will hurt our wool-growers to uiiv extent. The wonder to mi "Aid (icn. Grant, "that ihe .Mcxu-iiiis ever consented to negotiate any treuiv. It' the American people knew tho difn- aiitii'iin the w. iv of getting the Mexicans to consiMit tosiu-h "a treaty us wo havo drafted, they w-miii bo rc'idy with comniondab'ons of tliifworU ucconiplihlied rather thau with objec- tions Tin1 triKh is, this treaty, if it is i-aiilied, will bnoi.ly an entering wedge to tho tinal of tho commerce of Mexico. J'lnit comnierci' in now almost wholly ou- juvoil bv France and England. By itliclongn tons. never get it, hnwever, uni'ViM wn gn about it iu some such way an thin trusty provides. What we want ia a tUi'liuld in This treaty will give u  the m.irquis with the mint Julep in it since rim was pressed by the prince of Wales. Tho mi-.rqnis spent much of hia tinio in the state honso examining tho aonveniraof the confederate them the original copy of .Stonewall Jacknonfl last dis- patch, somo of hia tho ordinance of accession, iiml other refcs of the eonfe.'.eracy, in which lie took great interest, as ho did also in the portraits of the viceregal governors of Virgi-iia. Among the colored people tin: im- precsiou prevailed tint Queen Victoria was iu the citv, and they were much excited over it WISCONSIN. The Chairmen or tlie Principal Com- mit MADISON, Wis., Jan. Finch laat evening announced the committees of the as- pombly, the principal ehairmatifchips being as follows: Judiciary, li. J. JlcBride; waya and moans, W. P. Packard; education, M. A. Craig; railroads, J. A. Taylor; insurance, biinka, and h-inking, A. II, Pope; states affairs, Thomas Lynch: and collection of Texas, Louis Bruommer; militia, Thomas Cm-ley; pub- lic lands, Herman Naber; legislature expend- itures. W. J. -McCoy; claims, J- D. liuitrams; charitable iind pounl institutions, Oeorgii A. Abort The general opinion ia that tlie selec- tions have been unusually well made. A letter I'rom OorMey. WASHINGTON, Jan. Doruey baa written a letter resigning the oftico of secretary of tho Republican national committee. Ho says: "There was no act of miuo in respect to tho management of tho presidential cam- aa to ita general scope or to any of ita numberless wae not thoroughly known to our candidates for president and vice president, and by them and each of tfeem fully approved and after tho'election. In the very nature of tho circumstances I was forced to do many tilings upon my own responsibility. In that entire campaign nothing was done by mo that waa not moat heartily sanctioned by Cons. Garfiold and Arthur. Tho only regret on their part seemed to be that thoro was a limit to my physical endurance, and even this regret vanished when the result was mado known in November, 1SSO, when we all supposed a great victory had been achieved. Owing olwowhere, I havo boen unable to attend tho last two meetings of tho committee. BeaidosI have beau afflicted with a disease of the eyes' since last ifay, and for tho last throe months have been confined to my house, compelled to remain in a darkened room." Tlie Panama Jlobnery. PANAMA, traces have boon found of the misaing keg of gold. Tha railroad com- pany in whose safe it had been placed haa offered a reward of one-half for tho recovery of tho coin and half for the arrest of the thieves. Boar-Admiral Hughes, command- ing the Pacific atation, has reported tho loss to Washington, and asks that another bo shipped, an exchange on Panama ia 2 per cent The united Stitos government will loao noth- ing, aa tho express company had fully insured it againat loss, Tho railroad company mil be compelled to pay tho exproaa company. Two-Cent I'OMtnce and Font Mail. WASHUJQIOX, Jan. senate appro- priation committeo amended the postoffice ap- propriation bill, ao ihat it provides that 2-cent postage shall begin July 1, 1883. They strike out the house provision regarding tho compen- sation of subsidized railroads for carrying the mails; insert an appropriation of. S1S5.1AXI for necessary acd special on trunk linos, with a view to conti juing tlie fast mail service, and increase to the item for Bteamboat moil service, A Bloody Duel. ST. Louis, Jon. Brooklyn, Ma, Mike Vanderberg and Mat Woodlock eottlod a quar- rel by a duol with shotguns at twenty paceM. Tho former lost both eyes and received fatal injuries; tho latter was quite well perforated in the breast cheek and neck. The Bonded Period BUI Delayed. Jan. whisky men had made arrangements for Jtr. Bntterworth to call up the- bonded period bill in the house yesterday, but the arrangement failed. In tome way the bill had been placed first on tho calendar, in tho ulace of a largo number of Donate bills thut hid been passed long beforo Iho whisky bUl. The arrangement was that Sir. Butter-worth was to demand tho regular srder, which would be tho whisky bill and it would noed but a majority voto to obtain conaid- sraiion. Culbortson, however, called attcutipn to the fact that hifl bill relating to the jurisdic- tion of United States circuit courta had been mado a apoc-ial order for the day, and Butter- worth concluded not to make hifl call for tho regular order. AH ENGINEER'S OAEELESSNESS. It CauHCH a Collision Which BeflnltH In tlie Horrible Wounding of Him- welf und Five Comradex. CHICAGO, Jan. 17. A collision occurred at an early hour yoster- morning, at the 59th otreot station of tha Chicago, Bock Maud Pacific railroad, bet- ween tho "dummy" pascengor train of the lat- ter road, and a switch engine of the Lake Shore .t Michigan Southern, which resulted in fear- fully manning six persons. The paaaonger train, more familiarly known as tho "dummy" of tho Chicago, Rock Island it Pacific road, drawn by engine ISti, left Bine [aland at aud arrived on timo at Eugle- woodatG At tbis point nw itch engine of the Lake Shore i Michigan Southern was standing upon a aide track waiting for tbe Biuc Island train to pass. SfUir tho paasonger bad passed, the switch engine imt-ediatoly followed, upon tho same track, tho engineer, George Foster, throwing the throttle of tho engine wide open. The train had juat got started and had moved about throo blocks, when the switch en- gine struck tho last car with terrific force. The front part of the engine ran right under the high Miller platform, wrecking the engine, throwing tlio "cab" to tho ground and striking the lever, thereby reversing it and throwing the mon riding upon the engine to tho ground. The names of those men were" as follows: Gooru-r Foster, engineer; Honjumin Liu, lire- man: W. K. Culver, switchman; John Barry, John Ibivoy und James Kaiser, brakemon. Foaier'liad his right leg cut completely off above the knoo. Lux'a left leg wae severed entirely from his body. Culver had all the toes of his loft foot crushed and mangled most horribly. A large iron pierced Kaw'.-r's log, com- pletely fearing the calf into shreds. Hayes's right ankli- was crushed to a jelly. Barry was injured internally. poll the train were not in- jured. The paoaeagci-8 upon When the lover of the switch engine waa re- versed by striking the platform of the last car, engine immediately started back down tin- track at tlie rate of thirty. fiv..- miles per hour. An order wan telegraphed ahead, and the en- gineu r-id'i-tracked at Suulli Ciiicago. The duo cnrirely !o the unpardon- able tiog'igenco of the engineer of tne awiti-h engine, Tieorgo Foster, who was hi- engine at a speed of twenty-five miles an hour, with the train only threo blocks ahead of him. MAEET? Publication of a Report that He s.ulM.-u with the Charmior un Eng- NEW Jan. Truth publisher c etcry to the elTect that President Arthur has become smitten with tbe -Uias backville-Wear, tho daughter of the British Minister, who ia heir presumptive to hia brother, Lord Saekville, The paper discusses tne events in virn- of tho marriage, and com- ments. also, upon the personal charms of tin.- lady. -lliK.-" West is not yet of a-iys Truth, -but to bounty and all graces of person she adds dignity and prescience of ,-i much older woman. Miss Host's grand- father Lord do la Warr, a descend- ant of the Warrs of Kdward IIL'e timo. In the event of thofmarriage President Arthur will travel ubvuad at the end of hia term, and jierhapH permanently at Paris or Lon- don." After stilting that the and stripes and tlie union jack ure likely to entwine sen- sationally in a matrimonial way', Truth goes on to show that tbe president of the United States is British subject under British law, and if the president ever resided in England he would, by courtesy of court. precedence with ex-sovereigns, Miss is tlie d.inghter of a SuiinMi lady of good fiimiiy but reduced fortune, whom the British minister married while at tho British legation at .Madrid. Truth does not say when or where the marriage is likely to take place. IVter Wan Yottrf, Jan. 17. attention of the venerable philanthropist, Peter Cooper, having been called to a movement among down-town business men to erect a statue to Mr. Cooper at Aator place, he said: 4'Thc peoplo can do what they please after I am dead and gone, but it would eauso me great pain to havo a statue of myself erecteu during my lifetime. 1 prefer people elinnld devote their money and energy to the raising of liartholdi's otatue of Liberty En- lightening the World. I have" contributed SI, UK) toward that work, and am ready to make a further conu-ibution if ne-.-esaary. Jlr. Cooper will bo Ui years old on Feb. li An KxtraSension. WASIHSOTOS, Jan. Tho president has decided to call an extra session of congress im- mediately uftor the -Itli of March. It is under- stood that the occasion for this is not to pro- vide for tbe presidential succession, but to dis- pose of revenue questions that are ponding. .No one has any expectation that the internal rcvi-mn) and tariff bills now in congresa will Ixj jumm.-d by the 4th of March, and it ia repre- sented to the president that the agitation ot the tax qu-.-ation has so unsettled the manufactur- ing businorfs that it would be disastrous to leave everything in suspense till noxt winter. The Circus Horror. ST. PETEBSBUIIG, Jan. According to tho official report 2U8 persona, including many foreign travelers, lost their livca by tbo burn- ing of tho circus in Berditachcff. The circus had inner and outer walla, and the apacea be- tween were filled with straw. The governor of Kiof haa arrived at Berdit- scholT. The managers of the circus have arrested for having bad tho two, aide doora nailed up. There being no rooms large enough to bold the bodies of the dead, they have been placed in a field. When the nailed-up doors were opened nfty corpaee fell to the ground in a mass. Before a Hlfihcr Jndze. Mouxr YaaNOX, O. Jan 17. Itrs. Emma Still well, of murder confession notoriety, ifl no more, having died from consumption Satur- day, and was buried Sunday near tho village of Watcrford, which ia fourteen miles from hero and eight miles from tho nearest tele- graph station. Dp to the last moment of oou- Bciousnoss she reiterated her horrible confes- sion of crime, and could not be persuaded to vary her staUimonts or acknowledge that she had imposed upon the credulity of her friondd for tlie sake of notoriety. Tho acknowledg- ment of the crimes can not bo substantiated. Kicking AculnNt VsnderbUt's Sfeth- odM. CLEVELAND, is that a B. Payne and Stone, of this city, resignoi. from the of the Lake Shoro road because Vandorbilt forced the issue of about IXXJ in bonds to pay for tht. Nickel-Plato stock no purchased. BorHted Bodweioer Beer. ST. Louis, Jan. Conrad Co., manu- facturers of Budweiflor beer, have failed, with liabilities slightly ovor half a million. The principal creditor tho Anheaser Bnrwing company, It is believed tha assets will DO ucurlv half a million. The fiim did t buainesu of about yearly.. E. K. LARIMER, WHOLESALE DEALER IN Wagon Wood Material, Superior Barbed Fence Wire, Etc., Etc. VANDEKBILT TALKS, Bis Extensive Purchases of Pennsylvania Coal Lands. Se Says He and His Sons Will Spend from Twenty to Thirty Millions in Developing the Same. PHILADELPHIA, Jan. ia said Mr. Vanderbilt, to tho representative of Praaa ntwaiKvper, "that my sons and I havo made very heavy purchaser of coal Linda in Clearfield county, and we propose to upend a good deal of money, potitiibly twenty or thirty inilliouB in their development A railroad ia in course of construction from the Jowey shore, which is being pushed rapidly. I be- lieve there are four or fiva hundred men at work on it" Wallace is interested, he sir; ho and a number of other gentle- men." "There hoa bean Borne nurpriao expressed at Senator Wallaco'x connoc-'tion with a project inimical to the PetniHylvauia railroad's inter- eroHt. lie HUH always been considered a strong PennavlvMTiia limn." said Mr. Vatiderbilt, don't know that thin project in opposition to the Penn- sylvania ruiid at all. Our plan in to put money into thoHO lauds and tho railroad, and to carry the coal out, I think the: project will bo bouo- ficial to the public. 1 havo really never aeon Mr. Wallace but once, but I suppose, like other men. ho baa the right to make any investment be choonert. In any ovc-uc, iho new project contompUUM the currying of coal belonging to lirrtt. and coal afterward. We will attend to the public tirm." -Where Mill tho coal from the new region go toV "1 suppose it will be marketed in Troy, Albany and the and then: will, no doubt bo a de- mand for it throughout central Sew York and tho "How camo you to invest so largely in Penn- sylvania at thin tiniy''" "OL, well, i: if .111 old story. The truth in I did it to ivffuii limitless wuich was lout to the Now York by people coming into nur ti-rrilury. and Mr. Vanderbin.. ul1 more inrorewt than he had nreviouslv munifiiHted, -went into New Enylanil Tliu Xi-w York Central had i Una there, and were accommodating the public fully at a fair rate. Uut the other trunk lined thought they muat have a share of the rrnde, and they are sending thnir cars and freight there. Then tho Delaware, Laekawanna .t Western, which had butiii giving us tons annually, bnilt an f-xtctifiun to liiittalo, anil wo lost that ton- naci'. I determined to protecl myself. That ia how 1 came- to into me state of Pennsyl- vania. Tlii'ru trill liu n lino from Hsrrislmrg to PittNlniry, whk-li will be built well with light gra.le steel rails. The work will be the bout, but it will be The chi-apitit roAd i.) tlio state. It will be a link in a line to lialtimoro, Philadelphia and New York, and it will be equipped capable of doing a large busi- lU'Dn. It will bi: thirty or forty miles shorter than about the connection west of Pitta- yon know there is a road there. I won t but that I will havo 04 much tn Bay about Tlie control of that road ae any man." "Kill nil tbis is in opposition to the Pennsyl- vania at all I got nothing against the 1'eiinsyl vu nia. They are vnry nice people. S ruilruiul men fio t'onlir-h things, and llie running of a tr.'iu to '.'liiuicu for fifty arbiyty an hunr is one of things, If a.'iv money is made wiUi a train like that, it tin- railrmul work I know of. if every from New York was i-arriml, money would bo lost The of tho number of paHaeu- uerb New Ytul. tu Chicago prnve that SuppoB'j the train duos 11111 sixty in hour. I can do Anybody can do it, TraiiiH on tlie New York CcntniJ do it nearly every duv. but it m.irc money than ordi- nary" iHwidus it is iliingercma. The Pennsylvania is any other road: it muat bo ru'n on principles or iw holdura will lose money. anil .Mr. Van- Jftrbilt became "tlu-re are ringH iu oviTvthiny. -Ml ib-iiij: vailniadsaru aillicti'd with" rings. 1 expe.-i you Imve them ia big newspaper don't yon'r" DOINGS OF COHGEESS. The PoMlal Money Syntem Kcpnrteil---A .Ilillioii anil Half for a liibr.ir.r- SL.ST.TE. WAsiirxnTos. Jan. ITill from the pOHtnllu-e coinmitti'o, yesiei ilny reportedjfiwor- ablv tb.- li-iuse biii to modify the postal mouey ord-.-r sysfein. The ftfiiaK! then resumed consideration of the tariff bill, the rending question being an amendment offered by -Mr. Gorman, to make tho duly on bichromate of potash cenw per pound. A number of other Hincndments were offered and formally agreed to, after which the senate went into executive ses.'ioii HOL'SE. Joseph K. Taylor w.is sworn in ia represen- tative friiin the district of Ohio, to BUCCeod UpdeUTtttf, Mr. Carpuut'T of Iowa, submitt-1 the con- ference report on the aqrieulnral appropria- tion bill, agreed to. The total amount ap- is JJiri.'mi, whichin more than the si-vnle allowed. Mr. KVe i: Mil.- from the library connnit'.i'C. a biil for the erection of a library on any of tlie government re- selt.-creti by'a cost not to ,-ieeed i Pending the in of the federal court bill, M1'. Kelly, from W.IVH and meana reju'irfe'] Hie mriff "uill, which wta rcfe. lu tiie eoininiuei.' of tlie whole. The rill for the removal of from ststa to fed.-ml then yeas nays Tho naval appropriation bill re- ported. The house then went into committee of the whole, Mr. Kyun, of Kansiw, in llx chair, on the of the n'liion. The first bill on tho cal- endar was one uppr..pnatiiig to reim- burse MannanliiihuttH for txpenditurflo for const dcfeiiso ilnrinc: tho late" war. Af ter short discussion, Mr. JLiraKg, of Wuicouain, moved to report ilio bill back with i recom- tnat the eimcting clause bo stricken out Agreed '.15 to M Tho committee roso but no HCtion was taken on the report The CHICAOO, Jan. 2 wheat, bid January, February, 9I.OOJf@ March April, @1.07 May. Corn, bid January, Febm- ary, March, May. Oats, January, Feb- ruary, ;J7' .S'June. 'Lard, January, Februai-y, April, May, SaiSWiill.lS June, Short bid; June bid. 2 red, Wheat, on spot firm and a shade higher, at 9s :id for No. L's for No. Hpring, SB Id forwentom red winter; cargoea off coast, firm; cargoes to arrive, firm and fair demand. Corn (inlet and unchanged. 57s od.' Long clear aidoa, 43s 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication