Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Burlington Hawk Eye Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Burlington Hawk Eye

Location: Burlington, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - September 14, 1890, Burlington, Iowa                                ifSffES fer Plea for gestJor Brain The Wdflzcns are arranging lor Sunday observcnco meet cloQiicnt and acceptable in this city a few weeks ago second discourse on n is llopcd to iollOW Up with other work In that M puWic senti standard regarding the flie moral and the economic he as a day ol lological very few ineu For toilers lfc e has done more tiisii otner now ihisfewbat hesays jrrance It eems to me un observance of Sun taken ueep root both in the SLis aad Ihe habits of the im my countrymen If to many of them a necessity jl autl Chllstian others defend it with equal Thowork ISrijs is extremely jealous of and ednot merely to its avowed tat to whatever might in to that result as far as dr ive to exercise nearly at the SJjiabonons public career of nearly hseven I attribute in great cause the prolongation of preservation of the fac may still Asre jsihe the question is still jjimportant it is the proper ques injar Church pubhshes again a of religious The includes the statistics of the j Catholic the figures for a denomination being given at shows an aggregate com membership of Fitter The Meth the Baptists icuextwitli and the Pres s with the Lutherans lenest with The Congre tslead the the r of these bodies having nts against for the which includes the Reformed il with teMomed churches formerly known KDntch and German respectively have ilotal membership of There members of Christian Union in the German Evan Bcal 60 Swcdenborgians in the Salvation Then there are Uni irims aad statistics are no doubt as trust Ttorthjasanythat can be ibsdnte correctness can by no means be Wtchssfed for A little subtrac fim shows a total of ahout lonmnmcantsinEvangehcal Christen United The census littnnis thnsfar indicate a total popula lion of so that a little Iyax than onefifth of the population is JRtodedontheTollsof our Evangelical As infants are not included Bthc chnrch it will readily be n that more thaa one in five of the mt population must be enrolled BH the communicant Unless the illtas lost its savor and the light is Samed by mists of worldliriess or other Bil such a mass of salt ought to isep tlw nation in a very salutary and the whole nation should fcaglowwith practical hohness hut the then lent oy tne Curlinjr for merly lieutenent and aia good Eerriceinfliebays and inlets of New A railway car however a much pleasanter place to hold and at tend service in than a little schooner1 riding uneasily in a rough and as injhe case of the dragging her anchors in the mid dle of the second Thentilization in preaching the gospel of the flying wheel the winged wheel in the emblem used by the Vanderbilt company re minds us of Pauls words when ne bids the Thessalouians pray that the of God may have free course CH R1ST1AN Statistics of the Movement Jn the United States arid The statistics of the Christian Endeavor societies show a large growth during It has been found that societies exist in every state and territory in the unionandin every English speaking land in the In all there are so cieties with a gain of societies and members in eleven This is by far the largest gain ever recorded in the same length of and equals the entire membership of Ihe society during the first seven New York leads the so cieties Pennsylvania follows with818 then comes Massachusetts with Illi nois with Ohio with Iowa with Connecticut with Naw Jersey and Michigan with The society is making gratifying prog ress in the Kentucky and Florida having the largest In the British provinces are 413 So far as can be ascertained an average of about seven from each society have joined the evangelical churches during the or a total of number equal to about twothirds of all the asso ciate members at the beginning of the The Swedish SHssionary The annual convention of the Swedish Fatherland Mission society was recently held in the Blasieholm Stock Two hundred and fortyfive cler ical and 210 lay delegates were present The branch societies during the increased from 107 to Eighteen travelingmissionaries and 137 colporteurs are Seven hundred and sixty two thousand copies of the Bible and other devotional books were and somewhat more than that number sold and Since its organization Hie society has published copies of The net profits of the publishing house for the year are Thirtyfive missionaries are laboring in Eastern Africa and 33 in The expenditures for foreign missions were The bal ance remaining in the foreign mission treasury is The home fund shows a balance of WARDING OFMSEASK Premonitions of the Return of La Some Point About Semonabla Clothing Harper of for lleautiful 1nrlslan T HE CABLE brinpts us premonitions of la It is more to bo dreaded than Asiatic for the latter can be quarantined but the former leaps over all barriers and penetrates to the innermost parts of tho Already there are Some symptoms of the grips return in Uur linpton and There is no new but some who suffered from its insidious attack last winter show symptoms of We do not say to cause but to suggest care in diet and Eat healthy food and plenty of it and wateh tho changing temperature incident to the Especially do the aged and tho young need tho authority fails to manifest its saline liTOteristics and the light is often dull ti exclusive of Roman Ca and Uni number and there But these are not M a number of college and sem IS secretaries of mission and also a large num nnsetfled ministers being counted Xew York Stanley on the African Henry Stanley has recently borne telling testimony to the success of mis sions in Equatorial Writing to Livingstones he said I take this powerful body of native Christians in the heart of prefer ex ile for the sake of their faith to serving a monarch indifferent or hostile to their more substantial evidence of the work than any number of imposing structures clustered and called a mission would These na tive Africans have endured the most deadly The stake and the the cord and the the sharp knife and the rifle have all been tried to cause them to reject the teach ings they have Stanch in firm in their they have held together stoutly and res Tile Konrcglan Three of the Norwegian num bering 250 900 congregations and have agreed to A great jubilee meeting was held in to ratify the accomplished The joint synod is divided into nineteen A united with five professors and an endowment fund of is located in upon the care of little children is timely EDITOR HAWKEVE I am of ten sur prised at the seeming indifference or the real callousness of many mothers regard ing the illness of their Within a year the question has been asked of three different How is your little one who has been the reply has been substantially the same in each case ho is pretty but it is nothing He will get over The repetition of this phrase has struck home and has awakened thought Will the child get over it Is it hot doubtful whether the young stomach which has been so badly disordered that the little patient has had to lie in bed for days will ever entirely be what it would have been without this illness Do not the severe attacks of bronchitis and pneu monia which afflict so many chil dren leave an abiding mark belrind them Is not the case very much like that of the cracked or mended bowl It may serve a good many purposes but it can never be so nor so use ful as it was before it was The fact is that parents expect their children to be ilL They are astonished if a year passes without more or less se rious invalidisui among It is probable that some indisposition in an ordinary family of four or five persons or more is inevitable but if there be n wise mother in charge this illness ought seldom to be serious enough to keep the patient in Utterprostration usual ly argues a long course of improper liv ing It has too long remained unrecognized that the human body is a and that its normal method of activity is in a regular Children should eat as nearly as possible the same sort of food not necessarily the same ar ticles but about the same proportion of nitrogenous and other ev ery day at regular and never at other They should go to bed and get up at the same hours the ventilation of their sleeping the regulation of their bath clothing and all the physical opera tions which maintain health should be arranged with as accurate method as is always avoiding the cast iron There is no need of much nor hard illness in an ordinary and unjust as the assertion may souud there is bad management in the house hold where it is To tell the the the ignorance or the weak indulgence of mothers is at the bottom of threefourths of the ill health mortality that is so shocking ly prevalent among Thesa mothers become used to sickness in their hardened to its ami they really do come to think that it is a small He will get over The chances are ten to one that he does not get over but that he feels it more or less to the day of his which is hastened because of KATE DPSON CI English and Frenclfand some few Americans there is a fancy for short stockings and certainly do look particularly for little but it is not a safefashionto t this variable andj children should not belallowed toLwear shortstockings after 4 years of those who like there are this son pretty little which half is in dark narrow with the other half flesh The newest is in tartan plaids to match the new plaid goods now so to my mind and that of many mothers no stocking is so refined in appearance the black These are now shown in very thick and close weave in plain aid fancy with the knees and heels quadrupled in A pretty little gown for a girl of 8 10 was of pale blue and white striped with a small simulated guimpe of A cute little Spanish jacket was made of emerald green velvet to go with it a ribbon sash bow was worn A jolly little boys outing suit consists of red and black tartan plaid made on the and a walking coat of drab and black plaid with a polo cap of the This kilt amt is for boya from 3 to His pretty sister has a bine and green TTwith fine lines of blackf Senators and Representatives Tired frOut andjAnxioustoJio Wif A Curious Story Extant In Washington J Sitting Geuerol WUcoi r TlilnkB lie Was Once a Cadet at West 1 5 Correspondence of The Govern f of will bo home in aweelr or ten days that is provided the tariff is passed by that He cannot leave until that important measure is disposed of as he is a member of tho ways and means committee and not unlikely will also be a member of the house conference committee to fix up an agreement between the two houses on that Congress is nearlng its It is hard to get a quorum and there are fears that several important measures which it was hoped would get through at this session will The members eager to get are not only worn the extraordinarily prolonged but sbino of themhave politiealfences to gitoa engagements wiiicir haveJbadJwitKthe tf oops with It was with great tyjthat I restrained my people fromat tackingtanddestroying and have been several aUthe in in 6uri I the chiefs that we conld gain by astyon were but that if we permit to your people follow you hither for of finding and that wtienifthe come we shall reap i This argument has yon will be permitted to finish youV exploration If other white men come into this valley theymust Jake their CajiffPaige asked McLain if he had re strained his peoplebecausehe knew that he in the and McLain answered that he Several days forethis he had recognized Paige as an old classmate by the aid of his field of the few instruments of civ ilization which he and one which had helped him amazingly in ac quiring renown and influence among McLain refused to tell Paige the he was known among the further inquiry nnntarning himgalf os f VifTKr NeeessarjrPrelimfnary to the of Mail to 0 The New Syfttem of Naming Coantry Thor r oujehfares RDI NtnnberIn ters NEW CHILDRENS white ana and around the waist and tied in the back in a full bow is a ruby velvet The little dress is cut princess shape on the and all the skirt fullness conies from shirrings brought down from the Among the new things which I know would interest the ladies is a new cloak just brought to this country from It is of dead fine black corkscrew and is nearly reaching the bottom of tho In front it is cut circular and in the back it is shirred in at the and it is lined throughout with squirrel and around the bottom on the inside is a fringe of silky moufflon The large rolling collar is also of that glistening white Inside there is a OLIVE A BEAUTIFUL YOUNG oney for Mission Ihrnng the recent Bible conference at band extraceut was which rag wonderful work for s at home and The It is estimated that Warein all lands Protestant BSJical One cent a from each one of that tost would amount in a single jar to the enormous sum of L possibly The Emollmcnt The enrollment plan is a movement among the Episcopalians of this country to raise for domestic and from 200000 contributors of 5 It was the project of and The Churchman of this city is now pressing Under the original impulse the fund carried up to Churches in There are in the city of Washington 194 Of these 179 are Protest ant and 15 are Roman The Methodist Episcopal has 51 Methodist Episcopal 3 Methodist Protest C in all 28 of which are The Baptists have 11 white and 35 color ed Protestant 22 white and 3 colored 16 white and 1 colored Roman 14 white and 1 The Lutherans have 11 and the rest are divided among nine different on I and I say that the extracenta may be made the greatest mis financially that the world is practica prodigious We I ten m K at ae Congrega Center an we hope Jiope rjafcT Sr One of similar com Tiis plan of giving an extra lyfor missions was formally our missionary concert in and ways of saving the nut of one cent a day were for it svas not usual missionary persons adopted the plan at smce then seventythree others tte taa OurllSmem in a equally between home and a CUurcU Wea a church on wheels has i iii the Caucasus as well own and only wild west ve IJnrper of millions Tor M NEW styles for childrens dresses grow more and more letting the brightness of their sweet young beauty shine nndimmed by an overshadowing mass of fuss and The big sister puts on her first long It is tan colored Australian made in the plainest also the and garnished onlywith self covered Her pretty brown hair is brought low on the back of her neck and tied in a catogan No Heaven and the thoughtless tread yon Isles of Light With wayward feet uncleansed of earthly Imprint upon their shores deep paths of Jiaui Who thus would enter there if so ho And dimness cast oer nil their mountains With mists of sorrow nil each smUing And ivrap within its clouds the angel tnun That wanders in their vales of pure Twere better far the soul of man should As taught the Saviour of the ancient Through transmigration Jorunnumhercd Besprinkling all its path nith scalding Than thus within the pure celestial home That soul should enter ere its anguish Eaton to Ehnira system are at many S t0 attend rdisions services holidays they have am giveuthem fortiiis Trat ao The difficulty is Jg a large eight railway This car will Txs Mo sanctuary and oe an appropriate altar and rations for seventy worship with all the ap lor preaching and i n different parts of The bishop of New a topsail i him by Bishop EdeUj overa German Belisious The religious statistics of Germany show including members of the Reformed and United churches Roman Catholics other in cluding the Meth odists and other independent churches and Of the independent Christians are of whom are members of Baptist GENERAL CHURCH The great revival which has taken place in connection with the Tnrco American mission at in has resulted in the addition of 534 new members to the Medical missionary work is very suc cessful in Japan is conceded to be the most prom ising of all missionary Jrish Presbyterians are this year cele the juhilee of their general as English Methodists propose a general scheme for celebrating in a befitting manner the centenary of the John which took place in Lon don in It is reported that there are Jap anese in of whom have been missionaries their own land orf tomtSrStatesi THE THREE no no and yet neat and fresh and pretty it And how happy she as she takes the bill to her overbuidened to be able to tell 1 made it all my own only She Remains Faithful to of Her Warrior Special Correspondence well knovvn Pa risian dame du grand monde is the Dnch esse de the only daughter of Duke Sosthenedela RochefoucanldBi saccia by his first a Princess Yc lande de proverbial for her When De la Rochefou cauld married the youngDue de Lnynes she was still in her and the united ages of both man and wife scarcely fig ured lip thirtyeight The union was a happy but of short The duke was killed at the of in the FrancoGerman and the unfortunate wife was made a widow at She vowed never to exchange the name she bore for another and has kept her the family country is an abiding monnment of the love she bears to the memory of the young and accomplished hero who fell on the field fighting for his countrys Not a thing has been changed in the old resir dence every bit of accu mulated art treasures and heirlooms of still to be seen just as he left it when he started at the head of the Mobile troops of whom he commanded faithful as she is to her widow the duchess is by no means of a somber turn of mind She spends the winter at the autumn at the spring in and the summer at or in Sho owns a fine hotel in close proximity to her fathers sumptuous mansion in the Rue de and the receptions she gives there during her two months stay in the gay capital are eagerly The entertainments given by the duchess at Cannes are the talkof the Riviera for weeks before and after the as in are ths flower of the aristocracy and of ten times the theatrical which are the great attraction at her charming only take place before a parterre of Although frail and delicate in appear with dark hair and expressive blue the Duchesse de Luynes is activs in her and makes the most of hei She rises dresses neatly and superintends the education of hei organizes trips and excursions for their hunts and trav els with as much zest as any English Not three years ago she went all over Algeria with ComtessePatocka and de But her chief delight is in She was one of a bevy of aristocratic pupils of among whom were de Comtesse de de now Comtesse de One of her best friends is the Maiqnise dHervey de in art Louise s constant attendant at the masters stu The dnchesse herself puts the signa ture Yolande to all look The president is In partial retirement at Cresson and recuperating from tho strain of public There Is comparatively little of general interest in Washington just In the absence of more practical topics society falls back upon war reminiscen ces and tho discussion of men and events of the Some one started tho cu rious suggestion that Sitting the famous Sioux is an excadet of West Point military academy General of tells an In teresting story bearing on this disputed General it is well to say Dy way ot was one of the Drayest generals of the Confederate He fonghtdesperately against overwhelming and being beaten has been one of those who accepted defeat gracefully and He was also a soldier in the Mexican and the night after the battle of Cerro Gordo enjoyed a most novel He slept in a horse stall with two other young one of them being Robert Edward and the other Lee and the fates had destined to meet twenty years later at Appomat slept under one blanket and with their heads together under the same Like his bedfellows of that memorable night Wilcor was a graduate of West He just left the academy and taken his com One of myclassmates at West says Gen was a young man named Thomas McLain He came from and was admitted to West Point in the year McLain was one of the most peculiar men I ever There seemed to be something wild and solitary in his He was full of strange and none of his class mates was able to understand what manner of man he He was studi and got along nicely in his but had few His only bad habit was Two or three times he was disciplined for intoxication Mc Lain was a dark black eyed young with a great shock of coarse His resemblance to a buffalo was so striking that all the cadets called him Bison By that name he was known as long as he remained at West which was not a great for his habit of sneaking liquor quarters and drinking more thereof than was good for him finally caused his The Mexi can war broke out soon and we heard that Bison McLain had started for the scene of conflict But at Gal veston he became involved in a quarrel with a planter and killed and to es cape justice fled to New Mexico and This was the last I heard of Bison McLain for many continued but a short time ago I met an old friend of Capt of the Confederate Paige was at West Point the same time I and of course knew McLain It was a startling story he had to tell story which 1 might not have been inclined to believe but for my acquaintance with the Paige had been in the tions about what had been going on in the world of civilization As suddenly and mysteriously as he had Mc Lain then gave the signal to his follow and the visitors rose and filed out of the camp into the Capt Paige was unable to leam much more about our old classmate at West continued He made inquiries in various but conld only ascertain that there was a white chief among the a great Jivar chief on whom the native chieftains relied for leadership in their struggles with the One of the scouts attached to the exploring expedi tion reported that he had engaged one of McLains followers in such conversation as his small knowledge of Apache would permit the night of the strange and had learned that McLain was known among the Mojaves as Chief White At least the scout thought it wasWhite BulL1 He knew that it was but he was not so certain of the C 11 WEEKS ago we published jl an article on system vogue parts of thocountry to name country roads and number the farm houses similar to the street and number system in We suggested the adaptability ot1 the system for DOS Moincs county and proposed to continue the hoping to awaken a special Interest in not only at home but wherever THE as we believe the system Is fore and a necessary one of the country delivery of mail Else where In this issue we chronicle the extension of the daily mall service to the ways to the whole Theordinary whfteHn general sense in farmers highway hVw and rides whenever he goes abroad f his own immediati towns of Kingston Huron this and V I y JLb i K him the most and bjrhnu of all the public iuatitutio WOMANS WORLD IN PARAGHAPP r showed me a Her half grown sister wears a pretty Irilted skirt in myrtle green with tan colored and her brothers which she has slyly and a little fourinhand of tan colored satin plain but very effective little goXvn for a girl at that difficult age ot transi tion when nothing looks well Her hair is tied only in the leaving the ends to flow free in a loose mass of Curls in the There was a yard and some scraps left of sisters and this was made into a cunning Gretchen guimpe for little 8 The waist at the top is fin ished with a little neat emhroideryin cross done by the deft big and a bit of ribbon tied at the shoulders forma sleeves enough over the white surah Just a little bit of goods and a very little and you have as pretty a picture as eyes conld and a little frock quite dressy enough for any occasion and plain enough for A flexible but warm all wool flannel shirt is worn next the with long Then a Little Beauty waist to which the drawers and a pet which also buttons on to are all that are required the Thus the child has full and free play for all nest her body allows tier THEODORE The Demands of To be wrapped up in to disregard all and to show an indiffer ence amounting to contempt for the opinions and the esteem of is certainly selfish and Yet to live without any special to bask only in the smile of the and to wither at its is equally egotistical and Both imply that unmixed self love which is wholly occupied in searching for its own happi though in different When men and women come to be thoroughly interested in something outside of they forget about their own special and accept either privacy or according to the degree in which either can be made subservient to the subject in r There is no other care for the selfcon sciousness which makes one person shy andfeserved and another vain and boast ful which makes one person scorn and ignore his fellow men and another live only in the light of attention and True culture demands suffi cient privacy to and sufficient to do alllthe good that isr and combines them in his own person secures of avalcame andajhappy tv government service out andwas a member of the surveying and scientific party sent to explore the Gila river and its The route finally carried the expedition into the country of the Mojave the worst Indians in the and at that time violently Hence all possible precautions against surprise were taken by the com mander of the Travel was exclusively by and at night tho boats were tied to the shore in the safest places that could bo No Indians had been but the prudent com mander did hot for that reason relax his the surprise and consternation which my friend Paige and his comrades must have felt when one night a band of fifty un walked quietly into the midst of the camp and sat down around the Their intentions were evidently peace and beyond feeling to see that their revolvers were in ready for instant the white men made no demonstra At the head of the evi dently their leader and was one shaggy fellow who did not sit but who fixed his gaze on Capt Paige most Paige looked at him for some time but the chief was the first to How are Paige he You dont know do yon I certainly do replied Paige in I knew you at West contin That was in In 1367 there was a pitched battle between the Mojaves and a detachment of troops in the Gila river The troops were defeat and defeated because of the masterly tactics displayed by the The officers were surprised and astounded at the familiarity with the art of war dis played by their and were at a loss to account for it till they heard rumors that the Mojave war or was an excadet at West Point military This engagement was de scribed in a recent number of The Cent ury and in that article the one of the officers who was in the pays high to the mili tary skill displayed by his unknown an This is all I know positively of the career of Bison Wilcox went But I have reasons for be lieving that he left the southwestern country and moved into the The Mojave Apaches have been pretty broken and if McLain had con tinued to reside with them he would have been Had he met with death in the tribe some traditions of the taking off of such a unique and noted would be likely to exist among his fellows or in the annals of fron What more natural tnan that Mc perceiving the gradual encroach ment of the whites on the Arizona coun and discovering the miserable char acter of the Indians among whom he had cast his and perhaps tiring of the family ties which he had should leek to better his condition and enlarge his influence by seeking alliance with the nobler Indians of the the Black Hills and the Big war like Sioux That is just what McLain in my I firmly believe thai Bison expelled from West a fugitive from was chief of the Mojave migrated to the Sioux country and became the famous Sitting We have no photographs of Sitting as he has always refused to sit before i that to be bad unlucky but such sketches as we have of him show a strik ing resemblance between his head and face and the head and face which at West Point led us to nickname their owner It is said Sitting Bull is a medicine chief and not a war chief at but how erroneous this is must appear from consideration of his great campaigns in the hist fifteen Were Ouster alive he would not say Sit ting Bull was a medicine Ouster to his cost that Sitting Bull knew the art of Crook learned the same There lias always been a mystery about Sitting and 1 believe if it conld be cleared up he would be found to be none other than my old friend Mc of the tells me in his opinion Sitting Bull is a white and familiar both French and My friend CoL of this has written a little book to show that Sitting Bull was a white educated by the Jesuits in That would account for his knowledge of English and but it would not account for his familiarity with the art of war as taught at West familiarity which has enabled him to anticipate precisely what his the United States would do at any particular Wilcox is one of the most promi nent citizens of He was upon President Harrison a few days ago for appointment to the vacant commissionership of the District of He is nearly related to exAttorney General A little romance in Wilcoxs life is worth He and the late George were as young men fast Both loved the same ia that section throush the personal efforts of Congressmau Why should not every village in Des Molnes county have a dally mail as soon as the popuU tion has Increased a little have the mail delivered at the farm houses by mounted letter carriers In sparsely settled communities this might bu at first semiweekly and ac cording to but in the more thickly populated rural communities render a daily But if tho matter were left to TJIE HAWKEYE to decide it would inake it a condition precedent to a delivery service that every county or township thus served must first build and maintain good It would not be just or rea sonable to ask the general government to Incur the expense of a country delivery of mail and require the carriers to strug gle along over miry and rough That it will even ia a purely economic sense is shown by Isaac Potter ia his address to the New York State Roads Improvement in which he says that it has been shown by the experience of other and to a limited de gree rntnose portions or our own coun try where good roads have been con that a properly constructed road is not only conducive to the satisfaction and convenience of all who use but that from a purely eco nomic standpoint it is vastly cheaper than the miserable dirt roads to which we have long been In many of the countries of and notably in Italy and the German the public road is looked upon as the most most needed and the most to be cared for of all public The people of those countries have ascertained by re peated and by long use of a splendid system of that one horse working upon a good road is suffi cient to do the work for which two and in some cases were formerly To illustrate more it is found by repeated careful experiments that an ordinary wagon with wagon load of one gross when drawn upon a level requires an exertion of different degrees of horizontal force as follows FORCE nxqUIRED TO Ilgbt In Xltjt Copyright by American Press There is n shocking amount of 1 lacing the long you see agrrjj who looks like a wooden s the willowj curve t at the waist goner shee her conldnot getitivi out sliding oft unable waist thougbjher and clumsy and move her arms curves from the you may it down that girl has a twentyfour waist squeezed mto an eighteen Steele the most mous exponent of DelsarteinthisconnS who himself sawand knew master in will not allow his girts pupils to wear corsets at all if he canv help A friend tells me It was owingj to his influence that Mary leffej them The Ladies Health Protective of New has foimulateda3 great truth in a few as foUowsjjj A great deal has been written and about hi bnt a more serious demicy because one that is always is known by the simple Saxon name 3 of The ladies of this have shown what the united effort women can They have York city of slaughter they have resolved not to rest tin streets of New York become as dean as those of One measure they ued the chief I am Bison Do you remember me Paige stepped forward to shake hands with his old but a word from the latter spoken in French caused him to for reasons of his did not want his followers to know that he and Paige had once been at Paiges McLain told his On fleeing from Galveston to escape the consequences of his crime he had gone alone into the wild regions of New Mexico and made friends with the Indians and been elected a mi nor chief in the tribe of He declared that he had forever renounced civilization and would live and die an The more thoroughly to iden tify himself with the wild people with whom his lot hadbeen cast he adopted of in so faras it was and married a Mojave wo T 1 have the confidence of vthese In he to speaking inT French in order to make sure that none even an inkling what think me young Magnanimously Wil coxstepped and left the way clear to a union between his friend and the woman he Mcdellan did marry and McClellan and Wilcox were warm friends as long as On best asphalt On well rolled with stone founda On a common earth From an inspection of this table it will be that the horizontal force or pull required to move the loaded wagon over the common earth road is about four and onehalf times the force requir ed to move the same load over the well finished macadam It is therefore easy to conclude that an immense sav ing of labor and horses would re sult the general adoption of roads of this and by pursuing the inquiry a little further it may be seen that the annual loss to our state in main tainingour system of social commercial coTimunication by the use of as bad a of dirt roads as was ever endured by a civilized people is almost incalcula They day when this condition of affairs might have been excused has gone Our roads are constructed and maintained in very much the same manner as in colonial when the state was poor in lands and poor in and internal communication so limited as to make the building of the better system of roads if not In the last annual report of the United States commissioners of agriculture 18SS the present need of better roads throughout the country is set forth in language so timely and so emphatic that the writer has deemed it proper to quote briefly from the words of the The commissioner says The common roads of the country are the veins and arteries through which flow the agricultural productions and the commercial which are the Ufa blood of the those great ducts of travel and transportation the railroads of the While our railway has be come the mostperfect in the the common roads of the United States have been neglected and are inferior to those of any other civilized country in the They are deficient in every neces sary qualification that Is an attribute to a good in in shape and most of in want of These deficiencies have resulted not only from an ignorance of true principles of road but also from the varied systems of road build ing in force in the several states of the due to defective The principle upon which the several states have based their road legisla tion is known as the road system of personal service and which is unsound as a unjust in its wasteful in its practice and unsatisfactory in its It is a relic feudalism borrowed from the statute labor1 of and its evil results are today apparent in the neglected and ill conditioned common roads of the coun to compass is the of garbage by a process already in soct cessful operation in smaller cities The women have investigated the methods of disposing of cleaning up business is a field of 1 in which the most conservative woman J wfll not feel that she is out of i One of the brightest girls this country is Miss Nelly of Ohio State at is a regular first wire operator of Associated and receives ii the same money that is paid first wire She is the only graph womaa in the country holding such a placeAt half past 5 every afterf noon Miss Erily takes her seat upstairs Jpcrnal In front of her is f a close beside her is the nafly clicking fursi of the AssociJ ated As fast as the receiving strument Miss Eelly copies messages on the typewriter in the s of neat copy for the Fast must for words a nig come over that At 230 this 1 remarkable girl rises from her writers beside the telegraph instrn8 Her work is She draws g a sigh of relief and goes alone and She has never missed a aneT3 The State Journal praises her the Mshest new society of women has started called the What this odd name means may per haps be guessed vvithout possessing mind reading It is an 1 rated and Lucy AnSJ of Fort is of the board of One of its Jects is to provide permanent ters at Wabhrngton for theNationalWcH man Ground wHThB J bought and suitable buildings WALTER The Plalu Extract from a students letter to his father written after a visit to va pawn DEAK FATHER I am glad to be able to say that ac present I fairly live on ed My so to are meat and drink to I am going to tell yon howfastsound It moves Johnny Thats funnyMy him ten It is a question of vast importance to the welfare of this nation that these ar teries of agricultural and commercial life should attention and effort that their importance and that an effort shouldbe made to remedy the defects now and es tablish a system that could be made uni form and efficient in all the states of tho 5i the improvement of these common branch of our manufacturing indus tries would be Every article brought to market be diminished in number of horses as a would by theseTihd improvements mfllionsbfjdonars would bejtniraally The building will also be used assembling of an conventions composed of women or called to their The structure will take of the universal im its ing an art gallery iu which the works c women wiH be a reading and public Everything pertaining to a first class j club house wfll eventually be introJ among other luxuries baths and a bowling The stock of Wimodanghsis of the que name is shrres of This year the Harvard Amies ates twelve young tha largestJS class in its r A notable boot is that whole souled has written about It is about the book that has been written from neither the missionary tr the mummified point of neither with the India of today The horrors of 1 caste system and of child widowh Lady used her best efibrtaij against during the years her Through her own exertions s raised funds and founded the Lady I ferin association for supplying phy of their own sex to the suffering v of whom no ever allowed to Branches oft association are now in every partc This was Lady Dufferms tinctive as it was the glory of 1 husband that he ended the bloody despot ism of King Thebaw in I mingled freely vriflr all cl of native high and ai gives a rare insight into the hidden of that country of which Professdr Mnller writes The future i of India depends on the 6 the Her ladyship boot was first written in the journal to be sent home to and is in that cnarming andgrace style of conversational EnglishTinwh English women excel all the rest of the world JJ1 s A woman of any thing that is becoming the only truaruleof Grundv The SomervflIecInbittJ fiond of mem Grant truest friend and has women to nalistsclerks andj selvesXhesi It is a mistake to suppose tnatv Part of hermissioiiisttojp ventedsomeihinRw It isr an j v   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication