Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Burlington Hawk Eye: Sunday, August 17, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - August 17, 1890, Burlington, Iowa                                rCTCt HrfMSSHlSiiBii THE tKAJJUTC ESTABLISHED IN THE MISSION Notes of ihe Work in the ByWays and Dark BJontof the Chinese JIuvo No Beligion uddliistsVastncBsof Field the Flowery King Religious i of has esti 5 justed that the Buddhists of the Chinese i instead of numberingr three or E four hundred do not exceed R teventyfive TJJ North in answer to the ques What proportion of the people are Buddhists1 replies that there are com f jaratively aside from die who would call themselves by that they even knew what was The great mass all by self designation African work the Boman church in Ger j have no religion except has occasion seems to When are in distress they go to aCbn jndan or Buddhist or a Tauist whichever may be or most fe strongly just as men try t a variety of nostrums for bodily ail The most common resort in Kevery day life is to the god of or 3 to who control the orthe influences of good There is io greater sham in our day than the as that the masses of the people in a country like China or SiainorCey 31e proportions of devil worship and worship are probably greater for everywhere TnoSern Buddhism is in a state of decline and Arthur Mitchell writes China is a field wliich I never Ijefore iialf It is amazing it al Whole numbers of there are yet within the oldest cities of from to pop in which there is not one Chris I tun missionary or laborer of any p or in which there is to be found only one native lonely and Ream Hang Chow to one of the longest I traveled in much less than tweutyf our hours in a little XT tteam by continuous I If was absolutely awe struck and 1 even on that short past tity after great and one of which was a walled city of without one missionary of any i Christian denomination and i without so much a native Christian J helper or teacher of any What I makes the condition of things more op s pressive and burdensome to ones heartis tho fact that this is oneof the most ac I cessible regions on the face of the jf The strong position Italy now occupies at on the Bed its military its alliance with King its rising colony at all inspire the that Abyssinia and tbe Galla coun try may be speedily opened up to the The past labors of the Jjjnce 1830 in these regions are well E Isenberg were EvJimong its faithful These I gradually driven out through Jf religions intrigue and the violence of pEng There how valuable such as those gin the Tigre and Galla tongues last the laborious work of JErapt There are still also fragments missions among the in the Shoa and there is the Swedish mission at which so generously It is that Itussia also is to establish a consulate and to send a It is 1o be hoped that evangelical missions mil not be slow to avail themselves of this open at fK A Great p The Broadus recently related incident during a Sabbath i school talk in Detroit Tor many years an old man used to j sweep the street crossings near the houses K of parliament gratuitous i Ono day he was Upon inquiry hewas found by a missionaryill in a lit Co attic chamber barely furnished with cot and Yon are lonely the missionary said Has amone called upon you he several persons rave Gladstone for He called and read to Gladstone called And what old he read He sat on that stool there and read the Bible to position The great est statesman in the world sitting on a stool in an attic reading the word of God TO ai street sweeper Great men losenono m tueir greatness by kindness to Gods A Kcjrl The John missionary at the New where he has so successfully some time the recipient from a Young Mens uinsnan association of a small donation Mr Ins Lately a letter was re ceived by the donors from in Wuch he stated he had left his now TJinsbanized field to visit Australia to the funds necessary to send mis sonants to the cannibals yet on His letter so stirred Tip the members of the association that M eight days they sent Paton Howard his scheme of planting inission anes on every island of the New Hebri J his thus is to be Col Thcmsulvis Into of the high caste Hindoos of e themselves into trou 03 of whom was Emma tte tbe weU re dita wbo will be as a recent visitor to this The priests have brought the 1 to trial and pro sentence against For a simple meal with yCse Hindoos must in some do oti Suiircniu the highest Directly to in sorrow of complete salva 6 and satisfied with ao at in aT al in the Ported to be as follows China has one ordained missionary to each of population one to each 000 000 one to each India one to each one to each ouu one to each one to each Nearly all the missionaries in Africa are around tiie In Central Africa and the Soudan there is as yet only one mission ary to each RELIGIOUS There are 334 Congregational churches in a totalmembership of The average salary of the set tled pastors is It is stated that there are 459 Sunday schools in with an attendance of The Methodists lead with 00 schools and Dr Charles Ray Palmer hasbeen elect ed by the Congregational general ference of Connecticut as delegate to the International Council to be held in Lon don next According to the action of the general conference of the Methodist Episcopal the lay members are next fall to vote on the question whether women shall be eligible as lay delegates to the electo ral and general conferences of the The joint committee of the Methodist Sew Connection and the Methodist Free Churches of England has issued a report which declares in substance that the nnion of the two bodies is not only de sirable but The report will be presented to the annual assembly of each of the It is thought that it will result in their Notwithstanding tho decision of the supreme court of Wisconsin that the reading of the Bible in the public schools of that state is the school board at Egerton has continued to use the Bible in its opening The result has been the issue of a man damus commanding the board to cause the teachers to cease the The Sing Sing Baptist church will cele brate its one hundredth anniversary on 12 of the present Great prep arations are being made to observe in a fitting manner the completed century of its Among other important con siderations is the effort topay off the balance of the amounting to the church having a laudable ambition to commence the second cen tury of its existence free from debt SOMEBODYS Tlic TVliolo Line and at Ono Voice for an Enemy As we were falling back upon Malvern in the Peninsular the rear guard fighting back the Confederate ad our brigade was wheeled to the left and another to tbe right to cover the nar row highway and give the wounded and stragglers an opportunity to close Across the which were broken and advanced the enemys skir followed by a double line of bat We checked them with a but they reformed and charged with a I could see their faces very plainly under the and as they rushed forward I noticed that tbe man directly in front of me was not a but a stripling of a He didnt look to be more than 15 years and his face was white and I had a dead rest with my mus and this boy coming straight upon Had he been a man I should have killed 1 could have hit him with my eyes When I saw that it was a boy I could not fire upon I covered him but his scared face turned my gun let them come charging up until some of the more impetuous were almost over and then there was an awful crash of a great billow of thousand cries and The name of death bad licked up their I was looking for the boy as the smoke He musket in looking about him as if Every man had gone down for ten feet either side of As our cheers burst forth the boy faced around with tbo remainder of the line and retreat ed to I rejoiced over his and I hoped that if another charge was made he would not be with Half an hour aud now we were tho rear brigade holding tho nar row roai We saw the enemy massing for another and again we made ready to receive As they came forward I saw tbe same white faced this time a little to my Dont shoot that boy I called to the men beyond The third man on the left was in lino with tho lie looked up at mo with a sardonic and then he rested his mus ket and covered the to kill bun when the word came to An enemy was an enemy to him whether boy or He was there to I held my breath as tho double lino again A little and they fired a and then They sought our were following us to had no And yet as I fired into the knowing that my bullet must find a hu man I was consoled by the reflec tion that I was not shooting at tho somebodys boy If ho was killed it would be by the man on my and ho must answer lor Tho enemy not budge They couldnt touch our and a citrge in front was simply Our volleys broke their decimated threw them into and they were breast ed back I sprang to my feet and looked for tbo The powder smoko swirled dove lifted floated away among the tree and my heart bounded as I saw Somebodys Boy He stood with two tlie remnant perhaps of his whole Just as I got a glimpse of himthe three turned to obey the call to and I swung my cap and Our whole line was the others because they had once more repulsed tho and I because Somebodys Boy bad again And when I looked along our lino to tho wondering how the man with tbegrim faco and heart had missed his I saw him lying dead on the ground stone A bullet had struck him fair in the Free OCR SECRET Items Gathered From Lodge Room i and Castle AjncrlcaB Female Free of Yorks Secret So of Lodge The portrait herewith given is that ot Jane probably tho only female JVecmason in the United Statesl She lives at S3 Walnut arid the following is her own story of i how she became a Mason My earls life was spent in Stew county of in the north of When 17 years old I married John A young man named Will iam Robinson who MRSJAXE lived with us was to take hii degrees on n certain night The lodge room tookflre before the meeting and was My husband was master of tbe jsked me if there was any objection to using a large ball in our which was an old manor I gave assent and with a womans cu riosity hid myself in an adjoining wherelcould and did see the ceremonies aud heard the The next day I ban tered my husband upon the aud he uerirlyfell in a You will have to joiu the If this thing leaks out I will be charged as a The next meeting I was taken and I was a Since then my hus band and his associates have been gathered to the great lodge I may have for gotten the password aud but I still remember inv something About tho late CImrlcs The late Charles as a Ma held the dignities of master ol Kane grand master of the state lodge the state of and afterward of the national lodge of Knights He re tired from this last office shortly before his He was a member of Jerusalem chapter was past high priest and past commander of Coeur de Lion com and an honorary thirtythird de gree member of both the northern and southern jurisdictions of the Scottish Rite Masons of the United His last words were au inquiry about the health of a sick Stephen Girard lodgo of Phila held a stated meeting recently at which out of fourteen living past masters nine were present Since the union the ancient and mod ern grand lodges of Massachusetts in 1792 there have been only eleven recording grand An English clergyman has been visiting the Druses on Mount and has been admitted to their closest As a result be has discovered that Masonic signs and practices are common among and hence he believes that their an cestors took part in the building of King Solomons This is interesting if In a lodge minute of June it is stated that a Cryer was hauled over the and that tbe members agreed that he should not at anytime have any vote in auy or anything for it was thought tho said Cryerbehiived extremely and absolutely broke through the laws in re fusing to pay one bottle of wine for enter ing into the holy state of A Royal Arch to be worked in tbe French has been warranted iu The Lodge of Antiquity is the oldest in having been founded in 1752 with a traveling warrant obtained from the grand lodge of Ireland by Masons in the old Fortyninth regiment When lodges meet regularly in London it is computed that 230 Masonic meetings are held during the The reports that during the half year to March warrants for six new Mark lodges and three new Ark Mariner lodges were grant At the same date the total number of registered Mark Masons under tho Mark grand lodge was and the uumber of Ark Mariners was Grautl lodge has invested funds to the amount of The new United grand lodge of in adopting its constitution de fined pure ancient Masonry to consist of the cutem the fellow the master the mark master Ma son and the supreme order ot the Holy lloysl The introduction of the royal arch de gree into Ireland has been credited to Law rence Dcrmott and there docs not appear to lie anything of sufficient consequence to gainsay As to the exact date of its introduction opinion is less certain but tbo evidence is ample to show that tho higher degrees were conferred until a comparatively recent date under a lodgo warrant Hcmy grand secretary of the grand and grand high priest of the grand chapter of who has been since 1883 the editor of The Masonic Home bade adieu to its columns in the issue of June Grant lias been n hard au able and his sayings are widely relief during tho of Indiana now have an membership of r s Brother Peter of Beaver wyck New York has been a member of the for fiftytwo and during that tune has sat as a represen tative In the Grand lodgo over twentyfive so says Tho Lodge The surplus funds of the subordinate lodges in New Hampshire amount to more than This sum docs not include The largest lodgo in Ohio has 467 mem the smallest Fifty lodges in tho state of Missouri havo Assets averaging moro than fifty dollars per and of this number seven arc in the city of St New Hampshire now has seventyeight lodges with a total membership of a gain of 157 during is an average of 130 to each Connecticut now has Odd a net gaiu of 701 during There are but 70 making the average mem bership over 170 to each During 1SS9 the grand master of Ohio personally instituted nine subordinate eighteen lodges and dedicat ed fourteen halls OF Texas Built tho Hrst blatters of An exchange says Texas built the first Knights pf Pythias hall in the and named tho first lodge for the Texas will shortly build a castle hall at Fort The knights of talk of erecting a Pythian temple with appropri ate castle The wondrous growth of the order in Iowa is shown by tho fact that in 1875 there was a membership of and in 18S9 a membership ot nearly In 1875 the grand lodge was iu debt some and in 18S9 the grand lodgo was out of debt and in the The total membership of the order in Indiana is nearly The membership of the order in Nebraska is about in good Governor Joe of is an en thusiastic Knight of British Columbia has four subordinate The chancellor commander of Cheyenne weighs a pound for every day of the 305 s There is a lodge in Philadelphia namcU Fourth of Secret Societies In Jfeir There is published in New York a jour nal called The Club and Associa It gives tho addresses of tho various lodges of the secret societies with the names and addresses of their There are nearly lodges of about fifty different orders besides three or four times as many nonsecret or Tho Masons are credited with 132 English 21 2 3 23 Royal Arch 9 com manderies Knights 4 temples Scottish 3 royal and select masters subordinate 1 temple Mystic C chapters order of tho Eastern Star The has 54 En glish SI 2 4 Bohe 1 1 2S encampments Patriarchs 17 Rebecca degree lodges Tho American Legion of Honor has 01 English lodges and 29 Ger man Chosen 30 11 2 49 Knights of 42 21 uniformed 2 Knights of 24 German Knights and Ladies of 17 English Ancient Order of United 37 13 3 Royal 27 United 81 Iron 19 Good S Knights and Ladies of the Golden 20 Red 19 Legion of 23 Various Jewish 107 Select 5 Good 15 Sons of There are other societies represented to have small memberships which are in other parts of the country very by the interesting Why should a soci ety have a large membership in one localitv and bo practically unknown in another even though both fields have received at tention from tho organizers HOW TO BUY FRESH Juliet Corson Gives Some Details At Thig Time of Tear fluctuations iu 1rlces are likely to be Only Therefore Do No Large a wo Goad Pompano a student of human nature am much interested in your Ttfisg I see in her face the shadow of a great the weight of a dark it be remorse Pongee only an ordinary haps it is a tight Maga Hills Why is Pryer so persistent in overhauling every ones character1 Here You be lias none of his Advice to WJnslowg Soothing Syrup should al ways be used for children It soothes the softens the allays all cureswind and Is the best remedy for cents a All Ingenious Plan for Securing General A lodge in Kansas adopted a new plan for securing Folders are printed which give the officers of the some of the most important statistics and advantages of the One page is de voted to a pithy appeal to a brother to do his duty in working for new but the most striking feature is the page which gives the of one hundred persons who are eligible to but who do not belong to the The grand lodge of Slichigan has passed the aud one assessment now pays eight The throughout the United States made liberal responses to tho relief call made by tbe Dakotas for seed Grand Recorder of lowaj says that the loyal grand lodge of Iowa has passed the A net gain of members is the rec ord of the last ten of The cost of management for the last including cost of annual was only about and the individual cost to the members was at the rate of per being equal to eleven assess ments of SI themedical director of the reports having ex amined applications during the year and approving of of The av erage age of admitted was being a reduction of the average compared with 1SSS of The rate of mortality forthe past year was per being less by 1 per than is tbe very low death rate of the pa rent the Knights of tho Golden At the second annual convention of the grand castle of the Knights of tho Golden Eaglo Ontario the main subject dis cussed was a proposed scheme of life in surance in connection with the institution is a benevolent having membership of over in tho United founded in Baltimore in but did not attain to much promi nence until Its stronghold is the state of having in the city Philadelphia alone In Canada tbe order has been only ono year in but is already one of the most powerful anil progressive societies in the Ottawa is the birthplace of the Canadian branch of the A Healthy Growth Jn Mat ter of The grand secretarys report to tho grand lodge of Ohio says there are 090 an increase of 6membership an in crease of The lodge were paid for relief paid for expenses cash on hand und iKnmber of Rebekah lodges a gain of with a membership of a gain of with cash assets The average membership of the lodges of Pennsylvania is The grand lodge of Tesas now holds forth in the city of Massachusetts has he largest number of boys enrolled is about the The average membership lodges of Ohio has increased from 65 in 1SSO to SO Xaomi of of has a membership roll comprising 553 members ill good f A blind man cannot become a Indiana now has 3C3 lodges with a mem Iron An showing oflhe workings of this order was placed recently upon the desks of the members of the Massachusetts The number of sick and disability claims paid since 1 was and the total number paid since tbo organization is The amount benefits paid sinco the organization is The total assets of the order are Tho first branch instituted in Philadelphia since which time there have been sixty more added to the last instituted last There are over members in the Sous of The fiftieth anniversary of the order was duly celebrated by a large number of the German citizens of St Paul and Minneap The first lodge of Hermannsoehne organized in Paul was the Washington which began its existence Since then tho order has grown rapidly in the city in state in until now Minneso4a leads all the in point of It is a benevolent order similar to the in its The summer being weH on tho way there now can be any more than a temporary lack of fresh As long as the intense heat lasts it is not wise to purchase moro largely than the needs of the family To buy a quantity of any kind of food because it is tempo rarily cheap is not good policy if there is the least danger that any of it will spoil before it can be Usually food is cheap for one of these two reasons Either there is an over sup ply or glut of the because of abundant or because the product has been held back for a rise in in which case it is not marketed until it is in danger if there is abundance probably the prices will not be advanced and one need not be forced to purchase more than is re quired if the articles offered at a low rate have already been kept aslpngas they are likely to be properly to buy more than can be used at once would simply be throwing away the pur chase The first principle in economy would be for nothing is cheap for which we have not an immediate These conditions aside it is either local market rules or accidental circum stances that make any unusual variation in The accidents are storms se vere enough to disturb local traffic or interruption of railway or steamboat transportation facilities they are no likely to be more than temporary hin to be overcome by doing with out the article in question until it is again within ones range of or buying only the quantity absolutely nec essary for tho In many of the smaller cities where there are surrounding market gardens the buyer has greatly the advantage of purchasers in the largo where all the supplies pass through the hands of middlemen or commission The market days occur regularly several times the products offered for Bale are well there is but little variation of prices and the fullest opportunity ofsatisfying every inclina tion of the palate at reasonable expense is Of course all supplies are in the best condition early in the day and the best choice is then offered as the time passes and the fanner or his representa tive is anxious to close up business a de cline in prices may be which indi cates only this state of uEairs and leaves the buyer to decide as to the condition of the wares for Sometimes will bo bought up by some local peddler who trusts to tho coming of late purchasers to dispose of in the day under any circumstances implies unusual care in for almost any food is impaired by exposure to sun and air during the heat of the Buying fromstreet usually has this drawback either from care lessness or ignorance they fail to shelter their loads from sun and and if vegetables or fruit of a delicate or the still more perishablo meats or fish are in question tho buyer should be very The stock from which their wares is recruited is generally that left in tho hands of the large dealers at close of the market and either already spoiled or upon the verge of In these days of refrigeration this is more than ever the Food of any land which has once been kept in the atmosphere of a refrigerator car or a cold room will spoil with the great est rapidity directly it is exposed a higher temperature even that which has been temporarily kept in the family ice box is apt to taint in the kitchen if it remains there any length of To return to the street when they have the of an over stocked and come into a new they are apt to give scant thinking theywill not strike the same customer the second The honest wagon dealer usually has his fixed route aud regular custom generally in some suburb where local stores are He regularly brings them a choice of fresh and depends upon fair dealing to keep their custom under such circumstances fruit and vegetables are really notably if they are brought directly from some local market If a wet cloth is kept over the load it will remain fresh from xthe effects Many housekeepers are puzzled to know how to keep the most perishable of the summer If all imperfect or decayed portions are and the fruits placed either in the icb not or in a draft of cool or damp they will keep over night Damp ness and warmth will surely spoil me inner xne ntM or tne picture is done iu bronze paints oncar tridge paper and fastened with ribbons in tho middle space between the smaller Then tha whole is gilded with the best bronze The shells and ribbons may bo modeled in plaster or putty and then Cork mosaic makes very pretty frames when other materials are not at hand and a variety The cork should be broken up into small rough pieces and glued to a plain wooden the interstices filled with grated cork and tho whole covered with a coat of good All sorts and sizes of plain flat frames are covered with chamois which comes in various delicate shades now and is used for a great variety of deco Oval mirror frames covered with chamois and decorated with Chi nese which are curious little round brass coins with square holes in tho are exceedingly A couplet or sentiment may be painted in gold or bronze along one PEARLS IK i Formation of the Precious the Shell N Colored glass beadssnch as the Indians use in their make very ap propriate decoration for the chamois leather If the Indian patterns can be all the The crinkled Japanese crepe or calico makes pretty covering for frames of cer tain lands of It comes in dif ferent always blue and threeeighths of a yard and costs twentyfive cents a is a pretty stork pattern which mfeht be used for a seashore or Churchs the frame carrying out the design of ths Plain frames of oak or aiiy light wood showing the grain well fere var nished and finished along both octer and inner edge with a border of half inch manilla rope covered with a coat of gold or silver The chamois leather frames would also look well with a rope A sailors knot in one with fringed out ends for would add somewhat to the One of the handsomest frames had the half of a horned clam shell on each These which are found on the Pacific are larger than the ordinary clam and are covered with dozens of scraggy are found in a great va riety of from pure white to the deep red and orange some begin with white and shade to the red or while others have the dark the colors gradually fading until the edges are a pale pink or Smaller shells and starfish may be used with the rope and fish net Ivorine in a great variety of coloring is used for with heavy modeled moldings on the any thing and almost everything is used for frame coverings and LAURA United Of the twentyfive deaths on the last as sessment call one was in one in Xew one in two in Pennsylvania and twenty in Kew Order of During the month of April was paid out in and the funds of the ordcrxshcw a large i of There lias been an increase of 50 percent in the membership in as shown by the loss semiannual As a general liniment for sprains and bruises or for lame iJeep seated or muscular Chamber lains Pain Balm is For sale by all t i f t berehip of gain of during s V 1SSO sum of ICtSl Wai paid for The stems maybe removed if they are to be used but care must be taken not to bruise Cherries and plums which have been in the ice box for sev eral hours will show pretty bloom in atmosphere of thedining When berries are sound the best way to keep them is to spread them upon a dry so thatthe air can touch them all and place them in a cool cur rent of Experience is the best teacher in the treatment of be cause that raised in different localities Is of different tbe firmest ing better than the watery Too great care cannot be exercised iu the selection and treatment of fresh fruit while it is natures finest it also is one of the most It should be eaten plentifully when ripe and but avoided like poison if de J0IJET Ella Wheeler Wilcox at The days have gone let us hope never to when a poet was ex pected to be careless or untidy but knowing that fact well I had still an agreeable surprise when the door opened for me to Ella Wheeler rWilcoxs A dainty little vision of a pretty figure in a white cashmere and satin trimmed with swans down and a soft pink with open angel sleeves that revealed dimpled round arms more perfect than a because in addi tion to their beauty they were of caressing And the face mobile and with beautiful classic delicate coloring and crowned by bronzo gold Afew handsome a delicate and a small flower pin at her and little white Mil slippers on her arched That is how Ella Wheeler the representative American looks when in but when she talks it is impossible to chase the pretty little dimples and expressions that flash over her mobile but the prevailing look is that of deep and abiding tender ness and an earnest Happily married to an adoring hus band whom she proudly proclaims the handsomest man in the it is no wonder that she bubbles over with hap piness and or that she has made of her home a perfect little paradise of or that her very fullness of joy causes to look about her for weak Life of the Where th ISivalven Thrive Pearls liable Decay Fads About the To picture the sedate and matter o fact oyster as rising to the surf ace of the ocean to drink in the dew of heaven ma well ba regarded as a stretch of theim agination worthy of the most fanciful weaver of Yet such was stated by early writers to be the origin of the that which is deemei worthy to brow of royalty which adorns fair which is th deKght of the treasure hunter and whic in all ages lias been the symbol of beauty purity and This pretty ho is brushec away by the stern realitiesiof sober f aci The keen eye of science Ting discoveret that the birth of a pearl is anything bu a poetical It is due to an acci and to one of those provisions o nature by which every living creatur resists for foreign attack and seeks to protect itself from The oyster pearl springs into existence in two dif ferent The first is by the intro duction into the animal of a foreign sub In some unguarded moment the oyster may permit a minute grain o sand to slip into its domicile and lodge between the flesh and the The oyster is powerless to expel the intrud ing which immediately be comes a source of There is but one The anima begins to cover the grain of sand with a coat of followed by a layer of calcareous matter called This is identical with tha beautiful lining of the which re flects all the colors of the rainbow as well as the most delicate and subtle Sacra is constantly exuded from the body of the the the the snail and other nrnmftlc o the mollusk and forms their outer hard or thick or ac cording to the protection demanded by their Around the intrud ing grain of sand which has been men tioned accumulate alternate layers ol membrane and nacre until a pearl is THE MOST VALUED These are not the valuable gems of in the first they preserve tho form ol the grain of and hence are irregu lar in and in the second they frequently adhere to the shell anil consequently present one rough The perfect pearl is found loose in the interior of the and has its beginning in an animal The oyster annu ally produces a number of as sooa as they develop into diminutive are thrown out of the an egg proves abortive and remains It is almosl microscopic in and is inclosed in a tiny This capsule now becomes to all intents and purposes a foreign sub BEAUTIFUL BIRCH It Eo Used In Artlstte Frames for Copyright by American Press Birch which is a favorite ma terial for decorative purposes of all is especially suited to the framing of certain Along the outer edge of a plain pine frame is put a two inch beading covered the delicately marked bark inside of are glued pieces of so as to entirely cover the frame This makes an admir able surrounding for an autumn forest A unique frame holding a study in oil is made by covering the plain wire frame with soft the sticky side Over this are laid strips of which must be pressed hard against the plaster and thoroughly rubbed so that no spot may be left When this is done the burlap is torn leav ing the impression of the coarse threads plainly visible tho piaster Two clam shells aro fastened with loops on each of uppercofc teach V IT and sad ones to help and Her closest friends know how much she does and how many she and what a precious privilege it is for her to do for a Ono Thins Girls Can One thing the girls can do if the board ing house keepers draw the line against They can rent neat little flats and go to keeping house in the aesthetic way that women understand so Womeii are learning the first lesson of to associate together out and that is a great There is scarcely n friendship in life so true and tender as between two women who have roughed it in the world together for several Iowas Girl Iowa now has a fair girl public Helen Louise For four years she has been assistant court reporter at Cedar and in the difficult field of tech nical lawreporting she has won so hon orable a place that the judge commends her work to Three thousand patents have been granted to women since the establish ment of the United States patent Some of these are of considerable impor The hollow brick for flues and partition walls is the invention of a wo The Xew You have heard your friends and neighbors talking about You may yourself bo one of tho many who know from personal experience just how good athing it If ever tried you are o its cause the wonderful that when once given a Now Discovery after a in the If you have never used it and should be afflicted with a cold Liing or Chest secnre ajbottlo once fair i guaranteed But it has certain powers to those of the present one of which is that of manuf throwing out and gathering around itself The nacre completely envelops and the germ of the animal is soon incased in a beautiful usually spherical in f but sometimes pear This is the true The most famous pearl fisheries in the world are near the coasts of Java and Sumatra and in the Persian although pearls in limited quantities are obtained in the streams of various HOW THE DIVERS Before the divers begin their work there are blessings and magic spells from priests aud sorcerers to drive away the sharks and bring good These in cantations are of course roundly paid The boats start out late at 30 that operations may bflgin at day The divers have small instru ments for compressing the nostrils and beeswax to stop the apertures intheir Each one holds a block of stone between his feet to Leaping the boat and plunging be neath the the divers reach the where they run about swiftly and JUI their bags with oysters as quick ly as When one is ready to rise he gives a signal and is drawn back to his boat by a Divers cannot remain in the water over a minute on the while two minutes taxes the most A very few who have stayed under four or five minutes have won great reputations for their extraordinary The occupation is injurious to the as it requires a tremendous amount of Divers are short subject to various diseases and have been known to expire suddenly upon reaching the surface of the One peculiarity of pearls is un like other precious they are liable to Occasionally a valuable pearl changes seems to be attacked with a deadly disease and crumbles into Such is reputed to have been the fate of the most magnificent specimen ever Passing through successive hands it anally became theproperty of aRus sian merchant and found a possessor who knew its immense value and prized it He kept it carefully in a secluded room of his magnificent man apart from all other his treas It was the wonder and admira tion of his favored friends who were permitted to look at The merchant finally became involved in a political conspiracy and fled to taking his one great treasure with He kept it hidden for a but at Jast consent ed to show it to some distinguished lov ers of precious when he opened the jcaskei he fell back in dismay and staggered though stricken vdth The gem had begunto change A fatal disease had attacked It was soon worthless heap of whits powder and the once wealthy merchant was a Ilnners in tlio Eiffel One of the freaks of fashion in Paris is give dinners Eiffel Saturday the Prince and Princess Kadzi vill entertained there the Duo andDuch esae de the Comte and Comtesse de and the Prince and Princess de Comte de See bach and A lift was hiredfoi the evening for theexclusive use of tha party and with flowers and elegant Four powdered valets were in attendance at the en The table was prof usely deco rated with carnations and no otherfiow A chimney has been designed for RoyaljSmelting works of Saxony Ger byJHerr Heneickey that isto 4GO an diameter course of ittTfeet to the topof where tho giantehimneywiH standfast an exampleot engineering skdt take briefer to this pendicnlar and its ISM mated at about C WASTED WORK Unintelligent Expenditure of i v Money TTot at All CnuSi f An article in The Boston i tionalist saysr The season is at hand wfllneedtobe madeon the There hasbeen provement in direction dnrmVthej past twenty years in the older but3 there is room for Comparatively few fully realize the advantageToE good If the farmers who have to nseg the highways a good deal could be 3 to understand the great gain in hay hard roads free from mud in winter z spring over which they could haul loads at anyseason of the year they cerjS tainly would be more ready totax themS selves for this object i A very loose way looking after i roads prevails in many i or highway SOTS whoare not at an fitted for thVpo4i The money putinto of such men is not economically expendWr In some where there are many miles of roads and the appropria tion little more is done than to plow out the gutters and pick stones in the and then leave aH until another when the process In some cases the loam thrown in from the sides of the only to make the traveling worse every time it a The great faultwith theroadsinconnI try towns is that they have not beenf built In many cases even the loam has not been taken and in some cases no gravel hasbeencarted roads in the nature of the ever be good until they are made It costs a good deal to make a road prop but in many cases it is more profifc abloin the long run to hava it so In some towns it is difficult to get good gravel or stone for road but where there is plenty of good material there can be no excuse for nothavmg good In making a road all should be taken ont to a depth of a foot and a half or two after which there should a foot or more of quite large stone put in over the whole of the dug out with drains of stone to carry off water then finer stone to within two or three inches of the height and that may be covered with fine crushed stone or the best of Such a road win last a great years and be in good condition at all seasons of the Such roads are pensive in the but will requirefew The sooner the pie come to appreciate and learn tobnild good roads the Those who have traveled in the older countries come home full of the praises of the So money is better spent and none witt go further to give a town a good reputa tion than that which is used in construct ing and maintaining good Good 13atl Good roads save horseflesh andvemV cles bad roads wear out roads are the exception in country and bad roads the In the winter and early spring portions of our country are almost inaccessible owingto the muddy and dangerous condition pf the According to the recent exami nation of the matter it was estimated that a load which one horse can drawon levol iron rails will require on level asphalt road one and twothirds horses on bad Belgian three and oneeighth horses on good stone thirteen on ordinary twenty horses on forty The wear and tear on horses and vehicles wilLthns be seen to be great on poor The iinestion comes to every and in fact every one who lives in Sie rural Good roads should be obtained by all and there is no better way than to have the matter dis cussed at the farmers Enough money and labor are annually spent on he highways of most of our states to produce good bui the result does lot yet show that gcod judgment reen exercised in expending the abor and This to be ie most important question for o Another question to decide Before spring is whether certain jeds should be surface dramedorunder Some roads can be greatly improved by shortening or cutting off curves and A great deal of unnecessary wear to horses and vehicles would thus be saved by air endingto the roads in Road Improvement The desire for good roads is a mark ot advancing and the desire is extending over the entire In one state it is estimated that farm1 ITS lose on bay alone owing bad roads interfering with marketing the If the system of road making were pursued with economy and gTHTI in ten years the cost of transportation over roads would be reduced more than Improvement of the highwavs ncrease the value of land the value of arms on and near a newly macada mized road increased per rhile the cost was less than per With an intelligent plan and purpose he cost of macadamizingji short ion of the main roads of a town would not be as great as the cost if maintainingthe extra teams which ad roads compel farmers and a Hand HijrUxvay Charles of tne Ihode IslandDomestic Industry hns expresses himself As to the er of highway I s greatest importance tothe3 rosperity of our agricultural lies that some change be At present in some parts pf tate therels gradual shrinkage ia tl alue of our farming n my to tha want of b ughway x Perhaps you ant hing to your and er what ails the rarning you are taking t the step ecve Tonia and in Electric vill find tha exact remedyiforirestoring ollpw greatjfervejjlonii odd digestionjs andfthttiii nd Kidneys resume healthyactioKjgXi   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication