Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Burlington Hawk Eye Newspaper Archive: June 1, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Burlington Hawk Eye

Location: Burlington, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - June 1, 1890, Burlington, Iowa                                Part ESTABLISHED sy E B THE BY CAPTAIN OHABLES SUNDAY JUNE Atrrnon OF DUXRAVKN THE COMHOELS JULKJOSS for The HawlcEyeJ CHAPTER SOON alter the captains return to hi ft a messenger was sent from Bayner requesting Clancy to come and see her a Sin was ushered up stairs to madamoK own much to Travers and that young lady was furthnr when Clancy nearly an hour lator to see that she had been weeping The house was in some most of the trunks being packed and in readiness for the and Miss Travere was enter taining two or three young officers and waiting for her sister to come down to The boyn were lachrymose over her prospective least they af fected to were variously sprawled about the parlor when Clancy and the inflamed con dition of licr ivfM and nose became ap parent to There was much chaff and when Bayner finally over tlie supposed affliction of the big Irish woman at the prospect of parting with her Miss Trav ors saw with singular sensations that both tlie captain and hor usually self re liant HinUr were annoyed and embar rassed by the topic and strove to change it but Fosters propensity for mimicry I and his ability to imitate Clancys combined brogue and sniffle proved too much for their Kate was in a royally bad temper by tlie time the youngHters left the and when Nollio would have made Homo laughing allusion to llu fun the young fellows had IKIMI having over hrr morning wlie was suddenly uinl tartly checked with Weve liad too much of that Just understand now that you have 110 time to if your packing is unfin Wo start tomorrow Kate I had no idea we were to go for two days yet Of course I can ready hut why did you not tell nie before I did not know least it was not this after the captain came back from There is nothing to prevent our uowthat ho has seen the Tliioii was not Kate for Billings told me yesterday and 1 told that tho colonel had said you start at aud you replied that the captain could not bo ready for sev eral at least now ho is and that ends Never mind what changed his was unsafe trifle with Nellie as Ifciyncr might have She saw that something had oc curred to make the captain eager to start ut once and then there was that imme diate wnriiiig for tlie secret talk up in Kates the evi dent mental disturbance of both fem inities on their respective reappearances mid the sudden announcement to While here could be no time to formal parting tliero were still sonic wo or three ladies in tlie garrison whom Nlir longed to see Injure saying adieu und then there was whom wronged bilterly JIK any one else hud wronged He wusout tliiit ilay for the first aud she longed to sen him and longed to ful lill the That she must do at the very If she could not see him slie must that ho iniKht iinve the note before they went All these thoughts were rushing through her lirain as she busied herself iDom her little stowing away dresises and dropping everything from time to timu to dart into lnr sisters room iu answer lo soino querulous Yet never did leave without a quick glaiice from her window up and down the For whom was slie looking It was just about dusk when she heard crying appa rently in the Kayner was with the aud Miss Travers started for tliu calling that she would go mid see what it Shu was down iu the hall before liayners impera tive and repealed calls brought her to a full What is it shi You come back here and hold know perfectly what it It is Kate and she wants You can do Too luadamv Tlie intervening doors were and in marched leading the poor little Irish who was sobbing Bayner came down the stairs with all bringing her burly son and heir in her Sho would have ordered Nell but what excuse could she give Aud Miss Tniv ers was already bending over the child and striving to still her heartbreaking What is it WheroV your father I dont know I came bare to tell the Shure hes dis an his hearts broke an mother says were all to go with the captain and he swears hvU kill himself before hell an I cant find Its almost dark Go back and tell your mother I want her Well fiud your she as the child shrank and front way And liitle Kate sped away into the shad ows across the dim level of the the sisters faced There was a fire in the joungers eve that Eayner would have escaped if it is to get Clancy away from the possibility of revealing what he knows that you have planned this sud den and I know said Miss You need not She seised a wrap from the hat rack and stepped to the Bay ner tjirew herself after where are you gofeig What will you do To if need to reaiiy mows anything wnen lies drunk that he cannot tell when hes I shall depart from Waldron a prin ciples and join the doctor in his pet scheme of getting him drunk In vino you And we ought to be about for it wont be long before his discharge and once away we should be in the There seems so little hope ma Even the colonel has called him up and questioned very but always when the old sergeant was It is when drunk that Clancys conscience pricks him to tell what he either knows or sus A quick footstep was heard on the the hall door and without knock or bursting impetu ously iu upon there suddenly ap peared Miss her eves dilated with excitement At sight of the group she stopped and colored to the very roots of her shining How glad I am to see Nellie exclaimed as all rose to reet An half dis aaught reply was her only She lad extended both hands to the elder lady but almost at finding herself in the presence of the very man she most wanted to she stood with downcast had not stepped not offered liis She raised her blue eyes for one quick and saw his pain thinned read anew the story of his liis his and realized Low she too had wronged him and that her very awkwardness and silence might tell him that shameful It more than she could I I had hoped to find re member that I had something to tell It was about You ought to see Im mire you for he must or about trouble and Ive just tliis minute heard that hes going away and you must find him Hayne indeed you Who can paint her as she stood yet determined AVlio can picture the wild emotion in his reflected in his face Ho stepped quickly to her side with the light leaping to his his hands extended as though to grasp hers but it was Waldron that spoke first Where is he going How with We go tomor and they go with My sister has some cannot fathom She wants them away from and Clancys discharge came He must see him she indicating Hayne by a nod of her pretty They say Clancy has run off and got away from liis He doesnt want to be They cannot find him now but perhaps Hayne try must Indeed we and quick about said the Kow is our I verily Let us get the doctor first then little Kate will best know where to look for get your And he liasU eued to the Hayne followed as though in a reached the looked made one quick step toward Miss Travers with outstretched then checked himself as His yearn ing eyes seemed fastened on her burning his lips quivered with the intensity of liis She raised her eyes and gave him one quick half half command lie seemed ineffectuallv struggling to thank One moment of without a word of any hesprang to the She carried his parting glance in her heart of hearts all night There was no mistaking what it CHAPTEK The morning report of the following day bliowed sonic items under the head of Alterations that involved several of the soldier characters of this Ex Sergeaut Clancy had been dropped from the column of present on daily duty w A bright fire was burning in Wal drana tsoey where he and his good iwife were seated in earnest It was just aftjr sunset when Hayne dropped In to pay his first visit after the fewdajrajnwhich he had been confined He was looking far more restless ttan of The Shim with more than major sJid taken up on that of absent without Hayne was also reported Pease and Lieut Billings Jrove into the garrison from town just the cavalry trumpets were sound ing first call for guard and the adjutant sent one of the musicians M give his compliments to Boyce uid ask him to mount the guard for as he had just returned end had important business with the The doctor and the adjutant together went into the colonels and for the first time on record the commanding officer was not at the desk in his office when the shoulder straps began to gather for the ion minutes after the usual time tne adjutant darted in and plunged with liis characteristic impetnosirv into the pile of passes and other papers stacked up by the sergeant major at his To all questions as to where he had been and what was the matter with the colonel he with more than usual asperity of asperity en gendered of some years of having to answer the host of questions propound ed by vacant minds at his own busiest hour of the the colonel would tell them all about it himself he had no time for a The evident man ner of suppressed was something few failed to and every man in the room felt certain that when the colonel came there would be a It was with somethinsr bordering on that the assemblage heard the words that intiafated to them that all might The colonel had come in very received the report of the officer of the relieved and fliflminsod the new officer of the day with the brief Usual then gUn oed quickly around the silent circle of bearded or boyish His eyes rested for an instant with some thing like shock and trouble upon cue witt almost blood less and yet foil of fierce deter face that hannted him long nation toga in some inex plicable way appeared to know that there was a new mystery over the and that the colonel held the E very man felt that Bfllings had given him the right to expect to be told all about it when the colonel Some looked reproachfully at u though to remind him of their expecta his old stand parried him witha gruff Thought you said the colonel had something to ten and went out with an air of injured and de frauded Bayner and seemed to be mak ing prepamtions to depart with the and some of connect ing him unerringly with the prevailing appeared to hold back and wait for him to precede them and so secure to themselves the satisfaction of knowing if it was a matter con nected with they had him along and nothing could take place without their hearing it These men were very however bnt Bnxton was one of Eayners eyes were fixed upon the colonel and searching for a and it little motion of the hand and a nod of the head that sig nified as Bustonand one or two of his stamp still dallied irreso the colonel turned somewhat sharp ly to them Was there any matter on which you wished to see as there was they had to Then Eayner was alone with the colonel for Billings quickly with a significant glance at his left tlie room and closed the gazing from her parlor saw that all the officers had come out except with a moan of misery she covered her face with her hands and sank upon the With cheeks as white as her sis with eyes full of trouble and per but Nellie Travers stepped quickly into the room and put a trembling white hand upon the others shoulder it is no time for so bitter an es trangement as I have done simply what our soldier father would have done had he been I am fully aware of what it must cost I knew when I did it that you would never again wel come me to your Once east you and 1 can go our ways I wont bur den you longer but is it not better that you should tell me in what way your husband or you can have been injured by what I have done Kayner impatiently shook away the I dont want to talk to was the blunt You have carried out your threat us thats What can you mean Do you want me to think that because Haynes innocence may be established your hus band was the guilty man Certainly your manner leads to ttat though his does by any dont want to I tell Youve had your vour Youll see soon enough the hideous web ot trouble youve entangled aoout my Dont you dare you dare now she rose with sudden he was lost the money But thats what all oth ers will If that were there would bo this difference between his trouble and Hnynes Capt Eayner would have wealth and friends to help him bear the cross Hayne has borne it five long years I pray God the truth has been brought to What fierce reply Eayner might have who knows but at that in stant a quick step was heard on the the door opened and Eayner entered xvith a The pallor had gone a light of half incredulous joy beamed from his he threw his cap upon the and his wife had risen and thrown her arms about his Have they found him was her breathless What has hap peiiod You look so Found him Yes and lie has told Told that he and Oower wore the They took it Gower Tie Jo you mian Is that what he confessed slip in wild wonder in almost stupefied releas liini from her arms and stepping in it was so fall of of almost of of Capt her ores searching his Xotliing else in the I dont understand it at Im all a tremble It clears Hayne It at least explains I was But could she have meant Rayner stood like one in a her eyes her lips quivering and with throbbing pulses and clasp ing looked eagerly from husband to as though beseeching some ex What did she mean What did she mean I say asked pressing his haiid to his forehead and gazing fixedly at his A moment longer she stood as though a long hidden were slowly forcing itself upon her with impulsive move ment she hurried through the dining threw open the kitchen and startled the domestics at their late break she called to the soldier ser vant who rose hastily from the go and tell Clancy I want her Do you understand Instant ly And Ryan seized his forage cap and It was perhaps ten minutes before he When he did so it was ap parent that Eayner had been crying and that Miss Travers was much The captain was pacing the room with nervous stride in mingled relief and All looked up expectant as the soldier He had the air of a man who knew he bore tidings of vivid and mysterious but he cmbed the excitement of his manner until it shone only through his snapping reported with professional gravity Clancyfs clean Gone where Nobody Shes just lit out with her trunk and best clothes some time last night Gone to her husband in mav beT Clancys all right he was last and hadnt time to get morn half drank before they lodged Lootensnt Hayne got They had him afore a justice of the peace early this I know all that What I want is What has become of ha I dont but the wo men in Sodsvflle they all say shes ran her money and I done so much after KateT Nellie Nellie forgive for I have been nearly mad with misery was Bsyners as she burst into a fresh paroxysm of That woman told me fearful There was a strange scene that day at Warrener towards two car riages drove out from town enter ing the east rolled over towards the guard The soldiers clustered about the barrack porches and stared at the In the livery hack from two sheriffs offi while cowering on the back his hat pulled down over his was poor old to whom clung faithful little In the rear the and a civilian whom some of the men had no difficulty in recognizing as the official charged with the of justice towards offenders against the Many of the soldiers strolled slowly np the in hopes of hearing all about the and what it from straggling members of the All knew it meant something more than a mere break on the part of Clancy all felt that it had some connection with the long continued mystery that hung about the name of it was being noised abroad that Clancy had and be tween two suns had fled for parts un Sh3 could be overhauled by tel egraph if she had left on either of the night freights or gone down towards Denver by the early morning passenger train it would be easy enough to cap ture her if she were said the garrison but what did it mean that Clancy was pursued by officers of the post and brought back under charge of officers of the lavr He had had trouble poor fellow The officer of the guard looked won ieringly at the carriages and their oc Ije saluted Waldron as he latter stepped briskly You will take charge of said the His dis harge will be recalled at least it will aot take effect You will be in terested in knowing that his voluntary onfession fully establishes Haynes innocence of the charges on which he was Grahams face turned all manner 3f He glanced at still seated in the was as calmly indifferent to him as ever he was gazing across the wide parade at the windows in officers Little Kates sobs as the soldiers were helping her father from the carriage suddenly recalled his wandering He sprang to the stepped quickly to the child and put his arms about tell her to come with Waldron will take loving care of and she shall come to see you every The guard house is no place for uer to follow Tell her and she will go with child And he bent tenderly over the iittle Thank I know yell be good to Go with the Shure Ill be happier he bent and kissed her wet She threw her arms around liis neck and clung to him in an agony of Gently they strove to disengage her clasping but she shrieked and and poor old Clancy broke There were sturdy soldiers standing by who turned their heads away to hide the unbidden and with a quiver ia his kind voice the Major interposed Let her stay awhile it will be better for Dont put Him in the prison Keep them by them selves for a We will come for her by and And before them he held forth his hand and Clancys a cordial Cheer Youve taken the right step at You are a free man even if you are a prisoner for the time Better this a thousand times than what you spoke a few kind words in a low and gave the old soldier his hand at Then the guard closed the and father and daughter were left As the groups around the guard house began to break up and move and tho reentering the drove over to headquar a rollicking Irishman called to the sergeant of the guard Does he know the ould womans sargent youd better tell Twill cheer But a few moments the news was imparted to the effect was electric and With one bound and a savage cry he sprang to the The sergeant threw himself upon him and strove to hold him but was no match for the frenzied Deaf to Kates entreaties and the ser geants he hurled him leaped through the shot like a deer past the loHing guardsmen on the turning went at the top of his speed down the hill towards Sudsville before man could lay hand on The sentry on Number Onecocked his rifle and looked inquiringly at the officer of the who came running out With a wild shriek little Kate threw herself upon the clasping his knees and imploring him not to The lieutenant and sergeantboth Nevermind Dont fire and with others of the guard rushed in pur suit old and feeble as he poor Clancy kept the never swerv never until he reached the doorway of his abandoned cot this he burst threw himself uponhis kneesby the and dragged to light a little wooden chest that stood by an open trap in the One look sufficed the mere fact that the trap was open and the box exposed was With a wild cry of despair and baffled he clinched his hands above his rose to his full and with a curse upon his white with glaring eyes and gasping turned upon his pur suers as they came running and hurled his fists at the foremost Letme follow I say Shes gone with it money Let me go he shrieked and then his eyesturned a a clutch at his plunging he fell upon his face at their feet Boor little Kate Theoldman wasun deed free at last I MUSCULAR BEAUTY Womans Right to Brains and Physical Teachers Fte of Hew Xork Workiag What to Women Womans an athletic teacher can be I Ute chicken I breasted woman with leaden eyes and a 1 willow wand figure can be transferred into a buxom jade of muscular beauty and dawnrea cneeics ror ninety A pair of three pound dumbbells are to be had for thirty towels of heavy Turkish crash cost the same sum On rising in the morning begin practice at With a dumbbell ia each hand lift the touch the shoulders with the and straighten the arms out smartly at right angles from she Do this smoothly and regularly ten Then touch the and lift the bells ten either side of the out from each shoulder ten times drop the bells at full length of the arm and draw them up to the armpits and vary these motions in the twenty or thirty different directions as ones own cleverness thus exercising every Begin with only two or three the first and increase them as the strength Finishing with the set a mark on the wall at a height of four or five standing on the left try to the mark witn the right toe ten doing the same afterwards with the The mark can be raised nearly a foot more as ones agility Then set hands on hips and jump up and down ten Xext spring into the warm one is ones self off with cold water and dry the skin with vigorous manipulation of the rough Try that for a and see whether health and beauty are not the con York What to Teach Toong A mother writes to me What shall I teach my daughters This one important and tremendous my that there is no happiness in this world for an idle It may be with it may be with it may be with foot but work she must or be wretched The lit tle girls of our families must be started with that The curse of our Ameri can society is that our young women are taught that the thou sandth thing in their life is to get some body to take care of Instead of the first lesson should be under they may take care of The simple fact is that a ma jority of them do have to take care of them and after through the false notions of their wasted the years in which they ought to have learned how successfully to maintain them It is inhuman and cruel for any father or mother who pass their daughters into womanhood having given them no facility for earning their We should teach daughters that work of any when is a credit and honor to It is a shame fora young belonging to a large to be inefficient when the father and mother toil their lives away for her It is a shame for a daughter to be idle while her mother toils at the wash It is as honorable to sweep make beds or trim hats as it is to twist a watch chain or embroider a Rev De Witt in Ladies Home letters to legs ctever people to mate them fools they If she is clever with her you are expected to breathe in an atmosphere of paint and artiststalk whenever you come near If she ia etewr about bringing up her she IB certain to make prigs or villains of and if she is clever about managing her you may be pretty sure that he deceives Call me call me can me anything you bnt dont call me Springfield Pretty Uttle Japanese In size the Japanesewoman is small com pared with those of America or Northern her average height being four and onehalf Her complexion is peculiar to all widen is especially true of the servants and outdoor bnt the upper and mote refined those not subjected to the scorching rays of sum mers sun or chafing effects of a spring are as fair as the average American Her beautiful dark kept glossy by the frequent dressing of the na tive her dark eyes not so obliquely set as paint taint the com plexion slightly and make her skin appear more opaque than that of a light blue eyed damsel of Her form is as nature intended it to not being pressed into unhealthy shapes by means used in more civilized The most that can be said against her form is that her limbs and feet are shapeless and Chicago Inter 13 CERTS PER POOR ROADS Good Highways are the Most Econ omical in Every The Relation of the State to Its Good Koads Have a favor able Effect Upon the Condi tions of the A Unique I recall a both convenient ami which had a chintz frill reaching to the matching the window cur tains and also the curtain concealing the shelves and books which filled in the space between the chimney and the end of the room and served for a The room was a small one and there was no space in it to accommodate an ordinary Between a window on one and a door ou another was a corner where was a place large enough for a stand long er and shallower than the regulation Into this comer a carpenter fitted a fitted to the walls oa two with one leg at the outer Another shelf was added six inches above for the valaace was and from its extra length a commodious washstund WHS ar A small towel rack was fastened to the door which opened just at hand and the equipment ivia Washing ton Jfew Tork Working Many columns have been written the working girls of Xew They have been described at one time as the most op pressed people upon the face of the submitting to every condition of and againthey have been described as the underpaid hirelings of cruel and all that sort of The average working girl in Xew York is very different from these She is a cheerful sort of who gets up works looks healthy and complains very lit Sometimes she seems a trifle and often she is I recall just now one instance of absolute cruelty on the part of her and that is in the case of a rich dry goods firm which compels her to stand during all the hours of the with a short respite at noon of thirty minutes for As an offset to this case I I properly mention rules of an extensive retail establishment np near Twentythird The salaries of the saleswomen in this place are very liberal and while all the girls are compelled to be on time in the morning there is no system of A mere reprimand usually serves all the ends In summer every saleswoman is allowed two weeks of vacation on full and during the dull season she may take as many more itkout But iu no case is she compelled to do an amount of work that is calculated to injure her health or to interfere with her enjoyment in the except on Balti more To Clean Ostrich A clever woman says I clean anil curl all my ostrich md think that the best milliner cannot do it much Iu a solution made good castile soap and soft water boiled and into foam the feathers are having some time before soaked them in clear After that process I put them ou a clean table and rub them carefully with a fine linen cloth or simply puss them through my hands a few times then I lay them be tween two linen beat them gently till they arc when I pull them apart and hold them aver a bed of red hot coal to This must be done very carefully and not too near the as the downy feathers are very easily A bit of sulphur thrown ou taecoal when white feathers are to be cleaned insures a pure This process seems but it is very simple and quickly New York Commercial Feminine Thrust and Seated in a street car near two sweet young who were rull of the beauti ful ingenuousness of the follow ing portion of their conversation reached me I have a frightful rip in my riding habit and forgot to have it Lend me yours will you With emphasis and the utmost But Im awfully afraid youll find it too tight I wear a twentyone you A slight but very impressive I I can get it to though I wear a It was clean cut as the stroke of a razor beautifully given anil beautifully Both faces preserved their calm and placid a new tnpicof conversation was started almost and I leaned back in my corner anil marveled at my own Boston IS its series of articles for the improve ment of country roads THE HAWK EYE has endeavored to point out some of the advantaged of good This week we desire to look at the ques tion negatively and consider the disad vantages of poor roads and point out how costly they are to the localities in which they are This wo can best do by quoting from an address by Henry of delivered be fore state board of health at its re cent annual meeting in In an address delivered before the state board at its recent annual meeting in says The Phila delphia Henry of made a powerful argu ment upon the advantages which both town and country derive from good suburban roads The rise in values of land ia those portions of Montgomery and Delaware counties lying near to the city of Phila soul is to a large extent due to the construction of good which hiive greatly enlarged the territory suitable for suburban Minions of dollars have thus been added to the of those In other of this state there are farms from eight to ten miles from any town or whose value is at a not be cause of any lack of good build ing or any other thing which makes a farm inherently but simply be cause of the inaccessibility through the poor If located near a good road those farms would at once become more One might as well live on an island as on a farm that is practically cut off from railroad and postoffice by bad roads during at least four months in the It is sometimes argued that the enor mous expansion of our railway system has led to a corresponding neglect of our ordinary roads that we are no longer dependent on wagons and horses for the transportation of freight and passengers from city to This assertion fur nishes no good reason for neglect of for it is an indisputable fact that 09 per of the freight that is trans ported by rail or water has to be hauled over a road or street to the railroad sta and the same is true of the freight after it reaches its All onr trade organizations in natural products must find their way over a highway before they can reach market and obtain their value and therefore good roads at all seasons of the year are a necessity for the greater prosperity of town and And I see no reason why the common road system should not in some degree at least re ceive the same kind of attention and concern which the development and im provement of the railway and steamship systems have The saving and cost of transportation which a good road makes over a poor one is much greater than most people and the cost often determines the question of profit or during the past marked ment in the value of adjacent already Thesame is tra Bay where them aw Macadam roads radiating try for several as has been truly Oie and arteries of tho through which now the agricul tural products and commercial snpptMsv which are the life blood of the Charles HIGHWAYS ANO THE Jutlgins All hosiery is to be judged by the fine ness of the and the closeness of the in the case of stockings es may be partly appreciated by as it the articles in the In ribbed stockings a deception is sometimes against which it is necessary to The spaces between the which to be formed by an inversion of the contains no stitch at but an open range of threads per vious to the weather and utterly destitute of As ribs of stockings exposed to sale are necessarily almost in contact the fault cannot be detected without intro during the hand and opening the whers it will be instantly and indeed will exactly resemble the flaw caused by a dropped stitch in a stocking in Goods Keep an Expense Every economical housekeeper will do her own keeping a which she takes to market and in which she has the marfcetman put down what she has quantity and she has seen the meat cut and weighed and has selected her Only those who have tried this way of marketing know how much money is saved by so If you have a good cellar you can afford to buy meat in large but it is not well to lay in a quantity of vegetables if your family is A bushel of potatoes is enough to buy at one time for a small a peck of onions or and butter in small quan Flour and sugar may be bought by the barrel if enough bread and sweet food as puddings and preserves warrant the use of mush or if the family is And always deal with a trustworthy butcher and Poor meats and vegetables are not worth eating they are not Food must be nour ishing it is not enough that the appetite should be satisfied quality is more than and it is better to pay ths butcher than the York TO BE face I Shee Clancys peaching If raaaOiar to and other kindred to 1 Koate 8t For Kansas Joseph and Iocs points on the take the which runs Pullman sleeping and chair can Burlington to making con necthm there the solid vvestibutod train direct to Atchtson and Kansas PoB i sleeping cara and free reelln The Fault of the Women are no doubt the worst offenders in this respect The great Injury done by corsets does not proceed from tight which is more or less a thing of the but from providing an artificial support to the Scarcely a sitting or does not drop into he with the inevitable result that her muscles become her sinews weaken and the cartilages of her spine She loses vigor and power of resist ance just where she needs them most With the entire disuse of the abdominal muscles tnere comts in Docn men ana wo men the ugly and perfectly unnecessary deposit of which is not only offensive to the eye but weakening to the Of comae even grow bulky and take on flesh as they though their ac tivity ButdManyanaererwe any except the barnyard with a paunch Man has been trained within the last century and a half to consider dirty hands a disgrace Obesity should bersnkad ArtWomen Smarter Than if From this place the writer went into the office of a man who has a school of type he instructs men and wo men to operate typewriters und assists them in fretting I asked him for the result of his He replied Women learn quicker than They are more ia demand than They give better as a I than Aud there is another thing I want to tell he A few years when women first began learning how to operate the typewriter and began getting a cry went up among men about cheap female In the last twelve months I have known of a number of cases En which men have not only to do this work for less than bnt have undertaken to get the places by means that were not I am not a womans rights man by any but it is my ob servation that the woman of today who ia put on her mettle surpasses her in with both being sunptythe mark of lazy Checkers Natural Method of Physical A Rrigbt Heres a typical complaint from a bright Snidihe BecuMlread a good became Igo to the 1 have individual opinions to what I and somebody called White Maple White maple furniture is the favorite for country and suburban A Boston tried almost in vain to get a counterpart to a pretty white in form like a brass and says she was distinctly snubbed for her wish in one of the best It isnt and antiques are said the courteous It is always hard est to be snubbed said this telling the and my only rsvengewas to find a lovely little white maple bedstead at last in a small shop on the sunny side of The man who sold it to me said he had sent a number of them out of I feel as though I discovered them They are prettier and cheaper than brass ones and just the thing for pretty country There is nothing more suitable for Ex Bogs Better Than The substitution of a central one covering the entire floor is the floor around the ing covered with parquet veneering or u the expense of this be too the whole floor may be painted with four good coats of dark oil and the joints of the boards having fiat been made se The carpet should be easily remov in order that it and the floor thoroughly cleansed at Bogs will he foondeven since they may taken up and shaken every neces Jn the less carpet the Good Chinese or Indi ttfngis strongly recommended as it does not retain the dust and other impurities which be come in the wooly texture ear petGood In the census of 1880 an attempt was made to get a fair estimate of the aver age cost of hauling grain from the farm to the railroad The estimates returned varied from 30 cents to for hauling 100 bushels one Bnt it appeared that the average cost of hauling100 bushels one mile was 60 cents at In most of the western wheat regions it was stated that if wheat has to be hauled more than eighteen or twenty miles to reach a railroad or water this land in ordinary eats up the profits of Accord ing to the estimates it costs the ordinary farmer more to carry each bushel of wheat a mile than it does the ordinary railroad to carry a This matter of hauling at a heavy ex pense has incited a great deal of atten tion in the western and some in teresting estimates have made by experts in a state whose topog raphy is generally and seem to be favorable to good These experts calculated that for twothirds of the year not more than onehalf can be hauled of what in the best season is considered a good This that a horse whose earnings would be a year on good roads can earn only on poor Professor Ely has estimated that poor roads cost the farmer on an average at least per horse a In Gilmores Practical Treatise on Streets and Improvements the following resulting from trials made with a dynamometer attached to a wagon moving at a glow pace upon a is given to show the force of trac tion iu pounds upon several different kinds of road surface in fair the weight of wagon and load being one ton of pounds On telford 46 On road covered with six Inches of broken stones laid on concrete 55 On road made with thick coating ot gravel laid on from 140 147 On common earth This shows that it requires three times as much force to pull a load over a common country road as one macadam and more than four times as much power as on a telford or one of broken stone on a concrete When it is remembered that through the greater part of the year the country roads are in poor some idea may be gained of the immense loss in horse power which they cause to the It is that when the roads are so improved that a farmer can get over fifteen miles of good road with no more trouble and expenditure of horse power than is required otpr ten miles of bad five miles hare been added to the territory tributary to the citys and that the advan tage mutual between town and Bnt in the face of these it seems that the solution of question must in a great measure be solved by long and constant agitation and labored effort to show bymathe demonstration that goodroada advantageous and Tins method of molding and educat ing public opinion to such needed reform seems inconsistent and But as long as people are so willing endure the great inconvenience and loss which they sustain from the mud road prospect for road reform is not and educating the people open this subject must Thu cnsahfe penrinoua method of road Baking and repairing from year to jeir tntfcoot particle of and eaa only be if plained at alLunon the Good Kowla a FmoraMe the ot Om In a paper read before the Economic Charles Si Butler said Of all the questions affecting the of our people there is none of greater im portance than a thorough system of scien tifically constructed highways over which they maypass to and frain their commercial and social relations with ona Hitherto ifrhas receired out little True there bean periods of awakening to the importance of the and in interest suffi cient was aroused in New England to a system of improved highway But on the whole little or no progress has been and we are today con structing and our roads un der the system introduced into this coun try from England in the early days of the consisting of elective town ship and district rood officers and labor remnant of the times of feudal when one of the tenures by which land was held was the obligation to make the road passable for the troops of the lord of the To the farmer the market means the nearest railway and when we reflect that in the stato of Jfew York there are only miles of against or more miles of road wo shall see what a limited num after lire reached by the former and the vast multitude that are of neces sity required to use the Do these facts indicate that railways nave superseded the necessity for good roads Between 1760 and 1773 England en acted no less than 452 laws for the im provement of her But out of this great mass of legislation came little and it was not until an act was finally ia placing the con struction and repair of the roada under control of the that anything like beneficent and results fol and before the close of the enabled England to so perfect her highways that commerce waa no longer repressed by difficulty of trans and a vast expansion of traffic was the immediate England is today crossed and recrossed by or more miles of Macadam and it is easy of demonstration that perhaps the repeal of her corn added so much to the intellectual aud material prosperity of her citizens during the past century as her enlightened policy of highway con struction and Never in the history of the United States were internal commerce and com munication so effectually ex cept by as during the past win Much of the time from November until May the roads were in an impassa ble Grain and produce in tho hands of the farmers in April should have been marketed long The country requiring to replenish his stock in order to maintain his was compelled to puy two or three profits to get the goods from the railway station to his because of the impassable condition of the With good roads all this would be changed and one of the strongest influ ences in the fluctuations of the market Prices would not be de pressed on account of a necessity for reaching the market at particular nor advanced because of the ina bility of the farmor to transport his products over the public bnt uniform prices atr the supply would be regulated by the de In looking through the assessors re port from 1877 to 1888 one is startled by the steadily decreasing value offarm property within New York while the report for 1889 says There contin ues to be a marked depreciation in the value of farm land in nearly every coun ty and the depression among the farmers with the prospect for im provement not Many assert that after paying expenses they cannot realize from their farms sufficient to paythe in terest on and consequently thousands of farmers are falling into the hands of the mortgagers Is it possible that the citizens of the state can longer look upon this condition of the farmers with complacency Is there no remedy tor this steadily de creasing value of the farm lands of the state I am credibly informed that the gar den counties about Philadelphiahave suffered a like depression in the value of agricultural except where vat ties have been held up by local improve ment the local improvement here re ferred to being the recently constructed turnpike along which lands have not only maintained their value but have actually Governor De Witt one of the most progressive and far seeing of att onr projector of the and for which he was actnaBypnt on trial for Ercqr judicious improvement inthe establish ment of roadsand bridges increases value of enhances the price of commodities and augments the pabHc while a connmttee of the honM of in the early part of the present in a report urging the advantages of good used thefol lowing language By the improvement of every branch of onr neraal and manufacturing tnitnnrrins would be materially article brought to market would mzmshed in and the nnmbep 4 horses would be so much reduced by tins and other retrenchments the ex pense of not less than a would be annually saved to the The expense of repairing the and tear upon horses and would be essentially dhnimshed thousands of the products cCi are now wasted in feeding mme would be devoted to the IB tfc and private advantages which wooMis salt front effecting that great improvement of f Tor   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication