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   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - May 16, 1890, Burlington, Iowa                                THE FRIDAY ESTABLISHED PRICE 15 CERTS PER WEHL Under numerous acts of con tnird of the crop of cane is required an WERE FORCED TO TO BOLD SENATE SILVER TEL Senator Teller Continues Hie Ar gument on the Two tlwt the Price Silver Kurt Vv and Treannry In in May senate to day agreed to a resolution calling on the commissioners of the Districtof Columbia for information as to employment and payment of laborers on public works in the and whether they arc re quired to work more than eight hours Other business of a routine nature hav ing been tint senate resumed the consideration of Urn silver bill and Teller continued his lie said there were iwo features of bill which should be amended if the bill was to perform the two things which its friends proposed to accomplish by that was to raise the price of silver and to give to the country an increased circu It was absolutely necessary that the treasury notes provided for in the bill should have the highest possible money He did not deny that the pas sage of the bill wojild put the price of silver Its introduction had had that Why Jtarausc it was to the people abroad that if the United States government consumed tho en tire silver product of tlm coun onethird uf the worlds There would be a demand for silver that could not be Jt might put the price up to lie did know eqacily what par would Ilu supposed that per would be called par in the United II would be less in Great Britain and In If it put the price oneeighth of one per cent above the purchase of the government un der the bill would cease and the great interests arrayed against silver would obtain their This was no vain It was borne nit uy the There was a party not in tint United States but all over the that held tincredits of the world that look lull fruin all quarters levied trilnitcon all enterprises and was arrayed against silver as For seventeen years iluit parly had held the whole civilized had its seat in but it had its influences It had uiUlwi onethird to the ma larial debt of this United Slates by legis lation and had added an equal amount to municipal anrt individual Those people Imil enriched themselves at the expense of the Colossal for tunes had been built up in the United States and Europe witliln seventeen which had no parallel in the history of the And did anybody believe these people were now ready to surrender their vantage ami adopt a financial system that would relieve the taxridden debtors of this country and he world and put thorn back on tin plane where they were in 873 The energies of these people were beyond They could put silver at aud above par when they wanted and If they could thereby destroy silver as a money metal and when the United States government could not buy silver under tlie pendmii bill they would conic and say told you silver would nol do you have to go to iho only suitable Those people would do anything within range of legislative or com mercial transactions to accomplish their and iiuy bill that contained a provision which would allow sucb a stale uf affairs was unl a perfect The bill Is a half way It afforded no re lief except in making a special market for silver In excess of he present demand of Iwo millions a If it Was proposed to restore it would have tn be given its full money There were at least nine men in the world calling for silver as against one fnr While he himself was a if there was In be only one money standard he would welcome a siver basis in the in terest of the race and of the people of this The question now before the seiialc is a ijucsliou whether the con tinued dropping of prices was to con to the enslavement of the destruction of enterprise aud tUo special destruction of the debtor greatest and most numerous class in this and all oilier There is in this a majority of men who believe there i a righteous and just de mand for free coinage of They may be ivtavdcd by the four we will not he able io enact the free coinage bill into a My duty is when 1 ex ercise my judgment here as God has given me power TO SIM my not as the executive or anybody else may see 1 propose to do my and 1 believe if any senator will do tin same ihiiiR we will luive a five coinage act which will re live the suffering and bring in creased opportunities uud not to the farmer but to every class of men deserving pood will Of the legis lative Cuke addressed the senate In favor of free and unlimited coinage of lie declared the persistatit de fiance of tlir popular will by the execu tive department of t lie government for the past seventeen years was one of the most remarkable facts in the history of a free representative The bill reported from the finance committee discriminates against silver in leaving to the secretary of the treasury the right to determine how much of the sil ver purchased should be coined in to and as the secretary already held there too much silver coined It was sure that with that discre tion vested in him not another dollar would be That provision of the bill was neither more or less than a pro vision to convert the treasury of the United Stales into a warehouse for silver to be hold ns a commodity on which the government should advance money the of the bill would prove the sever est blow to silver since its demonetiza tion in The silver bill went over till tomorrow and after an executive session the senate people for yearsptbe majority had de termined upon the measure and was im patient with Be protested against the resolution as unwise and violent to parliamentary pro McEnley denied that the resolu tion had any purpose to stifle It was intended to concentrate debate on the paragraphs and provisions of the The resolution was not to deny to the minority freedom of debate but to deny to it the right to delay public business by dilatory and abstruse The house had been given thirtyfive hours general debate and fifteen hours under the five minute debate and it was to be given five days Did the gentleman from Georgia remember that in the forty fourth congress but one day was given to the consideration of the tariff in the fortyfifth six cdays and in the forty eighth nine McMlIlin asked what would bc comu of the amendment offered in the committee of the whole and not disposed of at noon will After further debate the resolutions ware 129 to Sawyer and Yodcr were appointed conferrees on senate dependent pension The house then went into committee of the whole on the tariff The read ing of the bill consumed the remainder of the and at its conclusion the com mittee rose and the house took a The house at Its evening session passed 3H9 private pension bills and ai ad TO EEV1SB OB KOT TO THE TABUT The MoMure to Reported to the llouae Next May McKin of from the committee on rules reported a resolution providing that hereafter the house shall meet at eleven that after the of the journal aud disposal of conference re ports the house shall go into committee of the whole on the tariff bill the bill shall be read commencing with paragraph ill and shall be open to amendment on any part of the bill fol lowing paragraph and that on atnoon thebill with ponding amondmonts shall be reported to the criticised the majority of the committee on rules sharp ly for reporting tuts After the code Jiad Adopted and all strakite thrown over in the consideration of the bill In committee it powdAo sot aside rule governing die It seemed the iwlicy of the whenever matter was of magnitude and care Iifl consideration jOite rate should be and become General Amemblj of the Presbyterian Church at May The question of the proposed Westmin ster which has agitated prcsby teriaus for some has attached groat importance to the general assembly of the presbyterian church of the United which assembled here at 11 oclock this The attendance is unusually large aud includes the most distinguished divines and laymeu in the The opening soriuou was deliv ered by the William president of the Lake Forest His subject was The Privileges and Consequent Obligations of the Presbyterian Hfc dwelt at some but in an indirect ou of but treated it in a conservative Among other things said The special privilege of thtIresby tearian church is strong aud scriptural the few objectionable the alleged incor rect interpretation of scripture and the questionable philosophy two or paragraphs in our they are a marvel of skill and dialectic They have justly classed among the specimens extent of clear thought and cogent They were pre pared in troublous times for the purpose of uniting in one church all the Chris tians of Britain and Kvcry paragraph was heated in the iires of con troversy ami forged into bars of gold not only by the best theologians of the but by ablest statesmen also of both houses of He also said The shorter catechism has been pronounced by many who Lave had no sympathy with tlie doctrines the best eumpciid of scriptural truths this world has ever It is understood that nearly twothirds of IMS Presbyterians favor the re but how and when vhe question will come formally before the assembly cannot yet be 5ith the re visionists anil autirevisiouists arc repre sented by their ablest The matter will lirst come up in the form of a report from the committee appointed two years ago to report on constitutional methods of This committee comprises of TTnitcd States supiouio court of Cincinnati Judge Philadelphia and This com mittee was not appointed to consider the is sue of revision or but simply to work upon the line of the manner in which revision be accomplished in 1 he event of a majority of the presby teries declaring in its as well as to prepare i set of rules for the use and guidance of the general assembly in dis cussing the As the outcome of several ntuitings the committee has pre pared an elaborate but the secre says that not oven an ouiline can be made public until it has formally presented 10 the as lie that it will prove entirely Even 1f twothirds of assembly favor it may be a long time before any change can be Many of the best ecclesiastical lawyers say that the general assembly of 3S80 had no con stitutional right to tell the presbyteries to vote upon question of revision at and that an for revision must have been made to tingeneral as sembly by at least twothirds of all the presbyteries in the country before it had the rightful prerogative of any thing in the This constitutional objection will be warmly pressed by such churchmen ns President Francis of Prince ton and George of both of whom think that the general assembly of 1SS9 went be yond its bounds when it brought for ward this This discussion of the procedure of last years assembly will precede the real on a re vision so that a final vote will not probably be taken on matwr be fore the closing days of the a vote is taken at TEE FIBS A Largo Flouring Mill in MUmrnota May Fire started in the fire room of the Winona Mill companys immense flouring mill about one this and the entire in cluding the elevator aud surround ing bindings was Every effort was made to prevent spread of the fire to tho manufacturing interests cast The flames leaped hundreds of feet into the while the heat tras al most The total loss on prop erty is estimated at insured for There were about bush els of wheat in tho elevator and barrels of flour in tho The com pany employed about one hundred The mill had a capacity of barrels and was about the finest supplied build ing of its kind in tho The toial toss was Tke The pleasant effect and the perfect safety with which ladlfis may use tho li quid fruit Syrup of under all conditions make it their favorite rcm It is pleasing to iho eye aarf to the jet effectual in acting on the liver and May wile and daughter of Stan ley of Clark were found dead in bed this They were accidentally suffocated by which escaped during thenSght from tive Fresideiit Hall is out of Medical promptly proved of no GEAR ON An Able Argument for the Abolition of the Sugar A Complete History of the Tariff on Beaioiu Why the Home Canaot IfMt the Xeetb of the the the On May the bouse being in com mittee of the and having under con sideration the bill reduce the revenue and equalize duties on to whom had been delegated the duty to present the views ol the committee of ways and means on the sugar addressed the epeakinir as follows CHAJBMAX I was glad to hear the remarks of the gentleman from Texas Mills on this I admire his frankness and courage in that he declared boldly for free on Tfais side of the have always that the democratic party was in favor of free We this belief on the resolutions which that party declared in national convention in that they congratulated the country noble impulse given to the cause of free trade by the repeal of the tariff of and the enactment of the tariff of The democratic party has always de nied that they favored free xfe arc now assured by their chosen leader that in common with his make the open declaration for free The first Xapoleon Scratch a Eus sian and you find a Tartar when you scratch a democratic tariff reformer or a demo crat who wants a tariff for revenue you find a free trader the policy declared by if put into will produce the fame that it did when his party the tariff legislation of which re sulted iu financial disaster to the coun try and drove his party from And again the same results will follow as did when that party came into power in 1845 with false promise on its lips that it would retain on the statute books the tar iff of a promise which it violated by enacting the tariff of which again brought financial ruin and a wrecking of tho manufacturing interests of the United States and again that party from Tho policy Iu the bill under discussion and the Mills bill was fully discussed two years not only in this chamber but before the American and the American people gave their deliberate judgment by no uncertain sound on the relative merits of free trade and protec The popular judgment was ex pressed by the election of a republican president republican majority in this Mills said in this connection that Cleveland had a popular majority of votes in the election of 18SS that is we all know that the majority was acquired by a system of suppression of votes which is practiced in sonic of the southern The suppression of votes iu the south is a vital On its proper solution rosts iho the very per petuity of our in that every black or democrat or repub shall have the right to cast his vote in pface and to have that vote honestly ami I trust this system of south mi suppression will be put an end to by proper legislation this session shall let me say in iny deliberate judgment that if we shall not apply the proper remedy in this re gard wo shall bo recreant to our duty to our this bill lias been framed in harmony with the verdict of tho peo ple in 1SSSThe committee on ways aud means has held no secret the doors of the comniltteiiroom have not been closed to the It has heard for nearly tlfUen day and the the the tliK the and the The man who labor by the thousand and the one who cm ploys but two or throe have had the same patient hear ing and This bill has been draughted in tho broad sunlight of pub lic A distinguished senator once said in on the tariff bill then pend ing iu tlmt American sys tem should work alike in all parts of our It lias bwu the earnest desire of the majority of the way and means committee to this bill in harmony with tho sentiment I have It is the only bill in my judgment which has over been presented to congress which proposes atliorougliand careful revision of all other Xot only the in of I laborer auu but also those of the farmer have been carefully looked after aud protected in so far as the tariff can protect an agricul tural Gentlemen on the other side of tho chamber say that ihe tariff on wheat and corn is a delusion and is of no benefit to t he agricultural if it were not for rate of protection given to the farmers we would be flooded with the wheat of l he lied river of the as we today by Canadian which would be brought into direct com petition with the Minnesota and Iowa AVe are today at the danger line of importation of wheat and corn from the groat grain fields of the Argen tine the only country under the sun which has climatic conditions re sembling our owii closely and whose pro ductions today the wheat and corn grower of the The gentleman from Texas said in re gard to this bill that if it shall pass we shall hear from thefarmers of the north west and be rebuked by them for our ac I shall take pleasure in having these gentlemen from Texas Mills and from Tennessee who are solicitous aboutmy political come to thenorthwest and talk their free trade doctrine to our Wo ask and challenge the fullest dis cussion on this the farmers of the northwest and this coun try are a reading and intelligent in a contest before the people be tween free trade and protection the re sult will be as it always has Free trade cohorts will go down before the protectionphalanx as grain goes downbeforo sickle no democratic political Gabriel can be found who can blow his trumpet lond enough to resurrect the which indorses that pernicious on the republican I do not propose to discuss the sched as we shall all have ample oppor tunity to do so in view of tho fact that the on ways and means has made recommendation in regard to the sugar duties which changes the policy of the government has been in opera tion for a I briefly to call the attention of the house and country to he htstery of these duties and their operation on the people and what will be the result to our people if this bill shall be enacted into The second act of tiro first which was enacted July imposed a duty of one cent a pound on raw and cent and a half on clayed which is partially and five cents a pound on loaf or fully The ob ject of this act was undoubtedly of two fold character lie duty on raw sugar KM purely a revenue ai that tine there was not a pound of cane or any titan maple produced Ji the Untted States Thedntr oil refinedsugar jras it is f or the porpoK of establishing fee refin ing business in the United States as an industry biorder to employment to the MeeiattMSOI the infaaireiwbUc aider to to by combinations and trusts levied toll on tho people by Increasing tho prices of re fined sugar to an amount which is to be gauged only by their This it really seems to to have been the true result of the Itut I have dis Under the acts of 1S701S7the duty was placed on 7 up to 10 at cents on 10 to 3 cents 13 to cents Hi to cents and above 0 at 4 rents per When this tariff act of 1SS3 was enacted it was found under the classification of former acts the refiners could and did import vast quantities of darkcolored sugar of great well adapted for refining which came in under the Dutch standard of color and at much lower rates than lighter colored It is and not that these sugars wfrc discolored on the plantation where they were manufac and were thus imported by the refiuera for tho purpose of defrauding the government of For the purpose of putting a stop to these fraudulent importations tho polari to test for was adopted and the tariff was framed on the basis of both saccharine strength and color of the thus combining both polariscopo and tho Dutch standard for this pur The act of 1SS3 placed a duty ou sugar ranging from cents per pound ou raw adding four onc hundredths of cent per pound for each degree of strength on sugar above 13 up to 16 at above 10 up to 20 at three and all above 20 at four cents per So much for the schedules of tariff rates which we have had on our statute books for a I wish to call the atten tion of the committee for a few minutes to the history of the cultivation of the sugar cane in this country its native homo is in Asia and it flourishes and gives its best returns in tropical and sab tropical It is in latitudes where the mercury averages seven tyflve to seventyseven degrees Fahrenheit that the cane grows in its greatest luxuriance and yields its best and most profitable re turns to the such a climate as Cuba and the West India where the cane was introduced in 151S and where it has been and is as yet a profit able Many have thought while not in digenous in the United it was of that character of plants like many others that have been transplanted to this would become domes ticated and flourish and produce as well as it does in its native country this is not true of tho sugar cane in America it was introduced into the territory of Louisiana in 1731 by the French and since that time has been in cultiva tion with precarQus sometimes with a fair degree5bf but more frequently with slight returns to the grower Tho history of its cultivation in Lonisi ana during a hundred and forty years proves clearly to my mind that with us jt is in a large degree by nature of the cli mate of an or at least partially for it is only occasionally that the grower of the cane in that state is rewarded by a full or what is called a full crap in that Bear in mind that what is called a full crop in Louisiana is not much more than half a crop in those countries where the climate conditions favor the growth of the cane and where it gives its Tour attention is called to the fact that sugarcane is propagated from cuts called as the plant rarely ripens its seed in the most favorable lo So says the most noted author on sugargrowing in the United Frofesmr of Colombia In the tropfcs one planting of cane Jasts tento twenty giving a good imally for seed and and is the northern part a larger share of the crop is required for this This fact alone Justifies fairly the conclusion that gree sugar cane is to a large de an exotic In the United Another reason is that climate is not warm from 1797 to the made two and onehalf cents on raw and nine cents per pound on loaf and All this was to the purchase of Louisiana or When Jefferson purchased Louis iana in congress at presumably in the interests of the duties on raw sugar to two and oneJ as is shownby thereports of General half cents per pound and kept the duty on loaf and refined at nine The duty remained at these rates until the war with Great Britain in Un der the financial necessities of the gov ernment resulting from that the duty was advanced in 1314 to five cents per pound on raw and to six cents pur pound on and to eighteen cents on loaf and These rates re mained in operation until the enactment of the tariff act of April 1S1G under that actthc duty was made cents on raw twelve cents on loaf or ten cents on aud four cents on white clayed or These rates were maintained substantially as quoted until the act of when they were reduced to 2a cents ou cents per pound on and the1 acts of subsequent congresses practically maintained those rates until August By tlie act of that date the duty on raw sugar was kept at cents per pound the same as it bad been for ten but the duty on refined was re duced to G cents all grades which were refined or advanced the raw Under the provisions of the act of known in our political history as the Walker the duty was placed on sugars of allkiuds at 30 per cent ad by by act of 1S57 it was reduced to 24 per centad Among the many ills perpetrated on the people by the democratic party by the enactment of the AValker bill which brought financial disaster to the the fact should bfi credited to the democratic majority in congress that the first aud only time in the history of our country it gave choap shngar to our for under that act good adapted both for culinary and table was retailed throughout the west at 5 and C cents per In 1SC1 the civil war was and under the pressing and imperative necessities of the government to raise money to arm and equip our armies which had been Into the field all duties were Sugar was placed in the tariff act of 1S61 at the rate of Jf of a cent per pound on not above No and on the higher grades the rate was made 3K cents per By the acts of 1862 and 1863 the duty was raised to cents ou 3J and 4 cents on the higher The acts of 1SG4 up to 1SG9 placed tho rates on raw at 3 cents and maintained the rates on refined at 3 and 4 In the act of for the first time in our we Cud that congress applied tho Dutch which relates to color and it should be borne in miud that IE and all below this arc black and only lit for The Dutch standard was adopted pre sumably to make our descriptive classi fication correspond with the standard of the commercial but the result of that act and all subsequent legislation on sugar has been to absolutely pro hibit the importation of what is known to the trade us grocers which is adapted to both culinary and table and be used by far the largest proportion of our people if they had the From the passage of that act to this day hardly n hogshead of grocers sugar has been im ported into this and in addition it has resulted in placing the sugar trade of the United States iu the hands of a few who in recent year have of the signal which I will read WAR TGTOJf January i to your lavor of the 18flj 1 begleave to Inform mean unmmi temperature for the northern Portion of Louisiana is degrees for the southern 09 degrees mean for the K3 Very Chief Signal JOHS House of It will also be readily seen that the mean temperature of San Domingo acd Uayti is the natural climate for as is shown by the following letter in regard to that climate SIGNAL January GEAR The mean annual tem perature of Cuba varies from To degrees in some localities to and possibly 79 In other localities the averages for Havti and San Domingo are not so well but may be safely put at fljrures rangins from 76 to 79 and possibly acoordins to lo In and a more convincing is the fact that the grinding and boiling season begins in Louisiana iu No vember and lasts only seventy to seventy five wliltc iu Cuba it begins in Oc tober and lasts four to live Another proof bearing on the question will be found by roferco to Bou ehereans who have published reports for many years on the cli matic effects on the sugarcane and its production in I may I think without fear of that these reports are considered by the cane growers of that state absolutely accurate and Let me call attention of the com mittee to the quotations I have made from these reports iu regard to the climate of Louisiana Season of ISfisSS The crop wan scercly hurt by the wet and frost in Novem Season oMSfi970 Crop hnrt from af fecting standing camhincc larjjc quantities of It should be boruo iu mind thatwet weather makes the cane a small quantity of which is generally of inferior quality and a large per cent of Season of Bad weather cane small and green when cut for mill severe frost in grinding season bad anil unfavora Season of 18B273 The intensely cold er of 187172 caused the seed cane to rot in the winrow and Freezing weather outhr 15th and Kith of November proved n death blow to the crop and almost ruined many a Season of Killing frosts 28th and 29th of Season lS747n November 1 and S dry ing which proved death blow to tUc cane loss estimated at Season Good Season 1S76T7 Freeze November Decem ber and 4 crop badly injured both as to quantity and qualify of both sugar and molas loss estimated at Season 18777S Frosts half of crop Season 187879 The weather reports indicate that this was a fairly rood Season planters jubilant over prospects of good crop and good prospect this month wuri over shadowed by the coming event In the last hours of the sreat gale which ushered in Sep tember from the effects of this storm it was expected the crop would fall perhaps 23 per Year closed with more favorable prospects anil favorable results than was sup posed after tho great Season 1S8081 Frost and rain in November many houses stopped Season ISSlS Frost November and the cane in some sections or the sugar district was frozen to the Very few planters did the majority not making Season Good Season 18S3K4 Good Season IdMK Too much rain and too Season 1883HU Bad weather at the begin ning of the grinding season the cane many localities was too green to make until yield of sugar In West ladies tberattoouaaie ptentodabout mice every seven about tho middle of wlicn u decideil chauge for tbe better took Season ISSSST Had on aceount of frosts in January and rainy spells from May to Au Season Cane injured hv and Season ISTSSi Report not but the crop was what Is called a jfood I in favor of protec I believe in protecting the pro ducts of our and also our so that our peoplemay have the benefit of our own home market in preference to giving it to people in other I favor protection ou each and every article that we can produce in this country iu amounts sufficient for our own so as to give employment to our own labor in order that they may live in the comfort that they are accustomed and I am frank to say that if we could produce a large portion of the sugar we use 1 should earnestly desire to foster it hy a fair pro tection I believe it to be an im for I for one am after a careful investigation of the that the American people must look to other sources thait Louisiana for their supply of I say for outside of that state the canesugar pro duct of the United States Is less than half of 1 per of the sugar raised in this That canesugar should not come with iu the list of protected articles is clearly shown by the statistics show ing the production and imports for tweu tyone It shows that in twenty one years they have only produced about 10 per of what we It also proves conclusively to my mind that tbe duty on sugar is not a protect ive but that it is a purely duty to the extent of 90 per cent of every dollar collected from the sir this duty in the place of being protective is a bastard revenue duty which has crept in under the whig of protection and has held a place in our tariff schedules to which it is not entitled by reason of the fact that wft can only produce 10 per cent of our and that all probabilily of producing sugar equal to our annual increased consumption is an impossibility for the canegrowers of this country to I consider the production of sugarcane in the United States to be an experiment as yet and after nearly ninety years how much do yon suppose this ex periment has cost the American people These carefully made year by year from 1700 to 18S9 with the excep of for which year there are no the amount be ing estimated from the books of the treasury showing that there has been paid in duties the immense sum of Of this amount per cent is a revenue and consequently a direct The duty on raw sugar has ranged all these years on an ad valorem basis from 24 per the lowest rate in to per cent in High as these duties are on raw they are exceed ed on which have ranged vari ously from per cent in 1323 to 24 per cent in 1S57 and per cent in all of which arc the highest rates of duty in our tariff schedules ever not even excepting those in time of This large amount of duty Is as direct a tax on every and child in the county as if it had been imposed by act of I do not that there U a civilized on the outside of this nation ex cept in times of war or under great and pressing necessities of who would submit to this excessive taxation an article which is absolutely indis not only for their daily use but also for their I that U has been admitted to for the reason that probably attention has not been called to this gross imposition nntn within short time from east to bom north to the imperaOTe de mand la made for tree which as es A Strange and Sad Case in Scott A Crnel Wrons Done an Innocent Girl aud Companion under aMUappre Supreme Court Special to The HawtEyeJ 5fay of tlie mpstinteresting cases ever reported has Just come tolight in this The person in whom the interest centers is the daughter of a wealthy German farmer living about five from this as the daughter of well todo aud likely to inherit no small portion of their means at her mar was well known and widely but her favor was shown to young tiustav a neighbor and a worthy young fellow who was fully deserving of tier IUIng wont on smoothly for some at last noted cir cumstances which led her to become suspicious of the good name of her daugh She charged the girl with having sustained relations of an improper char asterwith bnt thtr imputation was indignantly It was renewed azaiu and though the girl continued to protest her her parents were forced by overwhelming evidence to believe that she had been By way of sewing matter at rest the advice of a physician of this city was confirmed their worst not withstand ins the tearful de nials of Ou the return to tho home Miss Wiese was told that she must marry friend She im plored that he not compelled to do but her parents were inex Eckertnann was sent for and Ho was confronted with the state of the arid also denied that any thing improper had ever passed between He refused at lirsfc to entertain the idea of the but iiiK the girl by her and feeling ahigh regard for he AmagistnKO was summoned aud the ceremony was Im mediately thereafter the unwilling groom went to his own the bride remain ing with her A time ago anil his wife from various to think that there might have been too much haste in condemning their daugh were evidences that she was not in error bin that was suffering from some serious malady of which they were Another physician wascon tho very best whom they could The result of his examination was most astounding to the It freed their deeply wronged daughter from the stain upon her but it buried them beneath a load of sorrow at their own hasty conduct from which they will never An operation performed a day or so ago relieved the young woman of a tumor of tho stomach of tho weight of sixty Is now in ifcrcy Hospital at this and on the road n recovery but her parents are heartbroken at their and the iu is almost The marriage will probably be A CHICAGO TRAVELING MAS Thiewn nt Ulllr His Trunfcs of in May Uob who travels Sorris wholesale jewelers of ar rived here Tuesday night ou the Paul and Kansas City train from the and Iu tin absence of an express wagon left his trunks in the depot with instructions that They be sent to his ho tel in the During the night burglars effected an entrance1 to the de pot and rilled both of the which contained of jew elry and One of the trunks was carried into a field adjoining the depot where it was together with the less valuable portion of its All of the about two hundred and lifty gold and silver hun dreds of pins and charms are estimated in value it Searching partifs are scouring try inall and although sev eril have lately been seen about the depot have been iiqthiug has been found to indicate that they arc the A PROnTABIiE of the General Mianionary Society of tho Charclt ut Washing Spfceiul to Tliu HnwkEyeJ Jlay The raans General Missionary society of embracing the whole Uriitod closed very profitable and interesting annual meeting here They have been in session since Over two hundred dcle It has been the most numerously attended and inter esting gathering in the history of the society Representatives were here from nearly every state in the The en tire proceedings were managed and officered by even to the usliers on duty at the of and of were elected president and vicepresident for the ensuing Our people vied each other in their endeavors to en tertain the ladies while and all of them return to their homes with pleasant memories of the few days passed with the denizens of this pretty Iowa foanty Superintendents in Special to The HawkEyeJ CEDAR 3Iay The district convention of the county superintendents of this district began an interesting sion this Among questions dis cussed the new school text book State superintendent Sabin giving what would be his construction of the There was also a full discussion on nor mal Considerable interest was manifested in the discussion of model country Iowa gupreme Special to The DES May Supreme court opinions Chi Rock Island and from reversed Smith City of from Mitchell affirmed Cerro Cerro Gordo affirmed Vanslyke Paul and Kansas City ap from Butler affirmed from Polk School MASOS May The coun ty superintendent of Iowa closed a profitable session at Clark City last The new textbook law was folly dis cussed and favorably commented Mnch devoted to the Bennett nowtin force in and the opinion prevailed that Iowa should have asimilar The newly elected officers are Hamp ton for Secretary May Shnrt chairman of the republican county conaittee as a candidate for secretary of Schwartz front in controversy over a stock of goodie The opinion is in favor of the Judge Trimble and Attorney Casey were attorneys in the Memorial Day Special to The May of will be the orator here on me morial LAKE May Lafe of DCS has been selected as orator for memorial day at this CEDAR May Hutching will be the orator hern May Slom City Hospital Special to The Siorx May a meeting last evening of the Sioux City lospital association Officers were elected as follows Stone Allison Manley Injured in a Special to The May county was severly injured this afternoon by a runaway horso throwing him out of a road John SiHLUlns Special to the HawkcyeJ May Schilling nictdcd at his home today in shooting limself through the dying He is the same party who struck imith last His widowed mother s frantic over the her reason being n A Fire at IOWA May evening ire broke out in the Christian The liremcn by prompt efforts succeeded n saving the Stacy shops but those of he Christian works were totally destroy The loss is Insurance cause of the fire is Original JaekastV lu Special to The May Anheuser Jush Brewing company have rented a arge brick store room in Crcston for the of liquor In original alocal liquor is will also opeu a house for liquor ill original OTHAPPY BUSINESS TV right 1nable to Movt Their NEW May linn of Wall street brok announced to its correspondents this uoruing its inability to meet its obliga general manager f saidtoday that no statement vould be made for a couple of The he would bo in neighborhood of with only nominal The loss will be dis ribntcd all over the but no in dividual loss will exceed Wil iatus said that already the tinu had re ceived a number sympathetic antl en couraging letters and messages from many persons who were among the The firm has no on my of tho exchanges iu this Boston house also suspended business A LAWYER Mortally Wounded in Ills Older oit Wall May terrible trag edy occurred in Wall street this when a young Alphonso and mortally wounded jawyer Clinton mur derer was but a few hours In the laving just arrived on tho White Star from The cause of the tragedy is as follows Ste hanies father carried on a icss in this lie died two years caving his wife Al ihonso carried on tho but otivcrted ninch of into lepositing with the Safe Deposit Ue quarreled with and assaulted his ind two months ago went to During his absence his mother consultetl Lawyer who advised an at tachment against him iiutl Kisit fie probably beard of it this morning on his and at once went to Reynolds where he held in interview with him in the inner ileartng a shot lirwl the occupants of outer office rushed in and found Steph anie standing over Reynolds with a smoking revolver in his hand and Rey nolds probably fatally woumlcrt with a uillct just below the Stephanie was arrested and Ueynolds rcmnveil to the hospital TO DIE NO laiati Krotlier or Senator SAX May Stan brother of United States Sena tor Lelaud and a well known pioneer of the died at his home in Oakland last night of Died in an Apoplmttlc its May kelson brigadier general was stricken ilown by an apoplectic lit today and An Old Settler Special to The May other old settler gone to his Died this afternoon at at this in his eighty eighth Deceased was born iu Pen sylvania in 1302 came to Iowa in He was a consistent member of thcf United 1rcsbyteriau church of this Quiet and unassuming in his esteemed by all who knew He leaves an aged widow and several children aud grandchildren to mourn his HEW May Chandler was born October in Cayuga Now where family settled in the early colonial On June he was married to Mary Hedge at Bose Indiana residing in Indiana until September 1952 he came west and with his family settled in New where he passed the re mainder of hie After coming to Iowa he immediately engaged in business and was also justice of the peace until when he was ap pointed postmaster by President which office he held for twentyfive continuing the general mercantile busi ness until when he resigned bisoffice and retired from His last days were spent in that peace and comfort which only good men and finally on May while at the home of bis son in he answered the summons which called him from On May 8th he was buried with 3Ia sonic honors in the Barge cemetery hi New London by the side of the loving and devoted wife and who had preceded him on April In hU official capacity he was courteous and kindly to For every one he hud a pleasant word and spoke no evil word to an in pub Hc many he never had a ppqnent who was and lOsdtfei career was wound up with out a stogiespot or A HM of ragged health he defied all ailments mita afaont a year while at his place of business be was with from which he recovered ten r Ont of a family of eight children Whh of Notes of War Sounded by Von Moltke and the Gallic RvpnbUe Feeling That Is tittle than it War Forvtgu May de livered yesterday have riveted on Ger many the attention of all Count von Moltke in tlure iolistag and Emperor William at a banquet in Koenigsbutgc joth sounded notes of and Of ts advent in the near future as at least The young its wont when uttering pat menacing words iu the form of a Although he spoke of the sword of East Prussia defending the the al usion was to not anil Burope so understands The ofd strategist of the German army put iis gloomy forebodings of evil in anguage that no orator in the reichstag1 could match for eloquence nnd if lie foresees a conflict of growing out of the labor move ment which may involve all Enrope and 10 leaves no doubt as to the closet government would support wftlt alf InV strength of the Bite the social jugbear was held up to the of the egisliktors to cover up his real The old warrior had Vrance In eyw while he tulked of gouural social uphea vals aud his referenceto the possibility if more than one campaign before cer powers could bo completely over grown was The speeches iavn created an uneasy feeling that ittle short of it war The ministry suffered u defeat in the of commons owing to the smart tactics of the who arc in high glee over their mmbor for tho Tultamorc division of Kings who has hint some Ameri can proposed an amendment to lialfours land purchase by which money for laborers would be provided out of the surplus accruing from disestablished Irish hurch The with their chief at their mustered In numbers sufficient to force the second reading through a thin the tory whips laving summoned their men for a later This forces the consideration of the amendment in and gives the opposition a powerful leverage for mprovlng Ualfuura The oppo sition can hardly expect such luck when the vote comes on the icensiug hut the government iias been rendered doubly anxious by Frank Leslie at last tacitly admits tvcr intention to wcil the Marquis do Leu The marquis was regarded as blow his own trumpet when he recently in formed some newspaper men of the nit Leslie does not deny it un less she again changes her the uarriagc may he regarded us certain to lu thn near The experience of tln princess of Httt if the title really belongs to the American wife of tho inveterategambler of that may deter other girls from throwing themselves and their Fortunes away on worthless titled Europeans who want only their has returned to old habits and often remains at the gam bling tabl until tho gray lie mry guv tlif habit up when cash ran Vatti welcomed to by a crowded house night enthusiast ically An 1priitiiig at fnrtn Kio DK May A rislnft of the ucoplt aguiush thf took placft Tuesday at Porto A portion of thft troops fraternized with The outbreak wassup pressed by tho police and troops maincd A number of persons were KIototiH May 1 Jf eutischicn the men employed iu the are on Strikers stormed tor houses of the officers of the quarries liWLV murder the director of one of gendarmes finally quelled the disturb ance after a eonllict with the during which i number of the former were An Order ut May An order has issued suspending the admission of stu dents to the Agricultural Academy here until The order is due to recent disorders among the Minister Smith f rotten May Emory the new American minis ter to presented his credentials to the czar The cxarian sub sequently gave audience to and This is what yon ought to In you must have to fully enjoy Thousands are searching for it ami mourning because they find It Thousand upon thousands are spent annually by our people in thn hope that they may attain this Andyet it may be had by We guarantee that Electric if used according to di rections and the use persisted will bring you good digestion and oust the de mon Dyspepsia anil install Vfe recommend Electric Bittersfor dyspepsia and all diseases of stomach and Sold at 50c and per tie at Henrys drug Miles and Urer I An important The act the stomach and bowels through thfr A new They speedi Ily cure bad piles and Splendid3 for women and 3O doses for Samples free at Wittes drag A Bnkawm Special to The Ma Bur lington and Quincy brakeman named Grimes was kilted at Avon thtamornijigif As the approached the station came out of a side door of the and leaning oat was struck by phoreand killed Bust Every Ingredient employed in Sarwparilla to best of Its kind It ta pOMlWe tobny and herbs are carefully ally only thw Dot that from the time of pureluneunttt everytMnir DU WIVU U vtf Why dont try It The Burlington f May f railroad still continues iterate passenger Today it annoi cut to of the rate front st Indorsed by tfce entire or J   

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