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Burlington Hawk Eye: Sunday, April 20, 1890 - Page 1

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   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - April 20, 1890, Burlington, Iowa                                PABT ONE THE BURLINGTON ESTABLISHED SUNDAY APRIL 15 CSNTS W ifiBDIEHTS ADViSCED HOI THE FDLHT THE Patrick Claimed te Have Been Part PresbvterianOniversilbmlnBot and The Christian Leader says Joseph Cook lately said come disparag ing things of Univenaliam and some more disparaging of He set his heavy foot down on the latter peculiar energy and Tnitarianism in Boston has been a local After one hundred yean of unparalleled opportunity it is a local Much more was caid by the Monday lecturer in the came His as openly wag to so exnibit the unevangelical to the whence they are at length send ing as to let it be known these phases of Christianity have already baen in the Occident and found In all this Cook was not hand Bis motives are not above sus What he did was but it was not Tt savors of He means to foreclose our opportunity in the and make his evil prediction fulfill A larger and finer type of man would have rec ognized with cordial approval the pres ence of the missionary spirit inthe evangelical and if he could not predict great results from their efforts would have piven them at least a few grains of Unlike his Hebrew this Joseph knows not how to return good for The Central West Pros says Our Roman Catholic friedds are considerably stirred up ever the claim made by Banha in a recent sermon that Pat rick was as near a Presbyterian as any thing If they will read history dispassionately they will find that Barshas claim can be triumphantly Nearly all the dogmas which today distinguish the Papal Church from the Presbyterian have been promulgated since Patricks times tention so A bad rep utation harder to get rid of by a wo man than by a All a nan need to do is to go into respectable society and reform a little and he If considered a good But let no worse wo man try that and ace how it This woman had met the Savior elsewhere than this She had heard Jetu preach somewhere and been converted from the sole of her feet to the crown o her She had an unpolished pardon in her heart She was now a soul in its earliest but her old reputation still clung to The Pharisee did no know that she was changed nor would he take the risk to own it had he known He had always been a very proper person and thought likely that he was among the who needed no phy This woman did not come now to the Savior for She was there for loving She did no say a Sne began to worship anc Simon did not furnish any toilet for his No kits of no water for dusty no oil for the what a foundation was laid for the regeneration of man in Christ Our Lord Wheii Simon began to justify himself and feel ashamed of a reclaimed Jesus rises in the very delicacy of divine ness of courtesy and gently rebukes 6i mon and is not afraid to apeak in defense the sinner This woman was rumored around town Jesus would that day stop at Si mons house and so she was just going to step in a not as a but a to herself to the Re deemer as in the way of and to give occasion for the Savior to make public then and among the critical and goeeipers that she was that she was not really a sin ner but a redeemed Jesus thy sins be and then they that sat at meat with him began to say within who is this that for giveth sine also but Jesus says to the woman thy faith hath saved thee go in Everytime these halfhearted Pharisees make an though only within Jeaus rises at once in defense of the Simon and his friends conduct them selves with great outward But they cannot yet rise to the sense of pquarely forgiven it So they cannot help their inward But Jeeus knows their thoughts and replies to them like to aud ible utterances Doubtless the whole company are ultimately saved through this gracious and if so this wo mans presence brought out the lines of love in all thtir divine But that this woman was already far in ad The worship of the Virgin of the j vance of this pharisee in spiritual ex the infallibility of the Pope of I even at one is Simon rightly judged that he who had and were evidently unknown to The staple of preaching was just that heard to day from Presbyterian and other Pro tea tan I There is not a word about purgatory or extreme unc tion or auricular or any other dogma now deemed by the Papal Church so ossential to the Rood saints teachings sound very much like an extract from the Presbyterian Coufesiion cf The Augustine Hewit in the Catholic World I have been curi uus to discover what it is in the argu ment for Catholic and denominational schools derived from the rights of par ents as opposed to the interference of the which has touched to the quick the sensitive nerve in certain dialing uishodadvocates of called an un Hcurian eystex of Why are those who use this argument accused of and of substituting a plausi ble but fallacious issue for the true and by epecial pleading striving to gain u judgment in favor of a claim which is H covert for the real but hidden cause for which open plea in withheld Why is the discussion turned off on the Vati can Coy the foreign influ the designs of the court of Rome on American and papal infalli bi ilyv It would seem that the question uf tbe religious and Christian element in education is a plain to be discussed on general some of which are common to all others to all believers in revelation contained in those books of the Bible which they recognize ua belonging to the authentic and the rest to all who acknowledge the Christian As to the practical question of the way in which religious education is to be carried it is ad mitted by all to bean American principle that perfect freedom must be guaranteed to societies and so long as that liberty is not abused to the detri ment of rights which the state is bound to all who have distinct and specific convictions respect ing the doctrinal and ethical truths and rules which constitute the substance and integrity of the Christian must regard it of vital importance that chil dren should be educated and instructed in the same by competent and trust worthy Since Catholics are equal to nonCatholics of all denomina tions in all respects before the law it would seem that the education of their children and young people in schools where they are instructed in the princi ples and doctrines of their ought to be regarded as strictly in ac cordance with tbe spirit and letter of our just as much as the celebration of our rites of the preaching of and the publication of The same must bo of of and Methodist FORS1VKNESS AND been much forgiven had greater But he was yet in the caviling but she already in the worshiping Be was in the but she in the of He was judging her in his heart yet she was reading in the awakening dawn of a new born life AMOS WOMANS WORLD IN Solwol aprll Written for Tin LBSSON called invited Jesus to eat with him at A who had been a enters while all eat at meat She approaches and profuse tears fall from her on his where she and wipes his feet with her kisses and anoints Simon feels scandal ized and thinks in himself that Jesus ought not to alow the touch of aainner thus if he were a prophet But he an in detente with the parable of the two who were her tins forgiven and her away in Will the reader please alwayt read the full record before he theee JMUI accepted the invitation of the There was no aectarianiam in It it aaid when this woman knew that sat at meat at the Pharisees i house ene came brought an albuter box of Geike the extraordinary of this ancient anointing oil by laying that a preserved fleak two or three thonaaad old in Alnwick Cattle now opened rataiaa delightful And whether wart the bodily olfactories can the aroma we do know that the oil of oonaolaUoa from that ancient alabaster box to the hearted eiaaer There an ao many aageliof truth ia thfc tenon that We auyme iaUyactethetBMtnmofUfeaadcaar by tiMtaaoaiagof Ha WM a lit tie ilka Be WMartaaaaMedtohave come to Ua fcaeae aa a aad had invited of Mi dan to Mat tat la Will and Changed Ideal ttl Foniiiiiuo The change in the ideal of feminine beauty in the last generation is The generation will remember the pictuivs hanging in their mothers parlors of ideally beautiful These pictures represented a female with a bulging hollow doping shoulders and a thin curved bometbing like a crooked necked A general consumptive exples eion pervaded the females the more consumptive the more Long curls drooped about her and geucrallv a full blown red rose was perched in her hair above the left The picture usually bore the name Isa Rosabella or But all which maybe called the crooked necked squash stylo of feminine has vanished from the Tbe tailor made girl is now the She has square a full flat and carries her head Tinancient sloping shoulder which arlists of that day considered the curve of ideal in our time would stamp a girl round shouldered to and send her in haste to gymnasium to practice exercises that would send her out again flat of square of shoulder and full and deep of The ideal feminine beauty UOTV a suggestion of strength that it kaa art had in modern times and which wings it nearer to the ancient Greek model than it has ever been We begin to understand that strength com bined with harmonious development con stitutes perfect The women artists of New York have set a good example to their sex else A number of the strongest of diem have formed a club of their called the Womans Art They have grown in inlluoucaand numbers till they are now able to give art receptions of their and very creditable The newpijiers announced that Bishop Hursts wife died at the residence of her Cannot a woman have a home of her own eveu to die in A minister writes in The Chicago Ad vance that he had latelyattended a ban quet at which 150 women were and mmy of them made dinner They had toasts and a toast master and a rule forbidding any woman to speak more thaa two The speeches were not only able and but they were 1 shall said the feel more at liberty to urge the women to take part in prayer meet Olipliant is one of the most versatile of Once she pro posed to the editor of Blackvroods Mag azine to write all of one the serial story on she was then en and five other articles on differ ent tonics and in different Martin a retident of had James arrested for threatening him with a proved that it only cold but the court held that it came within the ing of tbe it had not been cooked and three in Be careful how you threaten to kill a man with a baked Free For tbe editor of the Burlington Junction Port been mbject to cramp colic or of which prostrated him lot and un fitted him for bunnest for two or three For the put year he been using Cholera Diarrhoea reBteoy whenever re and U invariably given bias prompt 25 aad 60 cent for by all Drawing Her Ptfau 1 tear there nothiag in MBM Did yon ate ker wkfle you aayiac aaea beautiful thian to aadl kept right would Wm ffeyT MrBecuadni I thought it jmtpoMihle aha Might talk ia her you i tha we of doubt the daaa to ooaMftvft m i GLiMCE AT THE E WOII D liPAi Aggressive Missionary Enterprises Wonderful Changes Wroaght in the Morals and Social Condi tion of the Comparatively few even of those who are supporters of the Young Mens Christian realize the extent and aggressiveness of the work done by that Beside the local work of each it through its state and international com continually pushing into new fields and increasing the number and effi ciency of its The following regarding what has recently been accomplished in Japan as the result of the WES prepared and read by the general secretary of the Burlington asso ciation at the monthly business meeting last Monday evening WOBK Uf Located in in the northwest ern part of the island of the northern island of the empire of is the Sapporo Agricultural It was founded in 1876 by President of the Agricul When he arrived in Japan to inaugurate the at the invi tation of the he was in formed that teaching the Bible to the students would not be He promptly replied that as a hightoned morality was indispensable suc cessful conduct of a and moral ly was inseparable from the he could not proceed if the Bible was to be His firm attitude had the desired effect and he was per mitted to teach it as much as he The result of his teaching was conversion of a band of thirtyone on the 5th ormed an organization called Believers in About a year later the mem ters of the Believers in Jesus wrote a etterto the Christian students of the Hassachufsetts Agricultural where President Clark had resumed hie The letter related the facts and requested the prayers and sympathy of the students in The letter ras sent to then the college secretary of the International Committee of the Young Mens Christian associations and awakened in his mind the thought of the evident adaptibility of organized Christian work among stud ents in Various circumstances strengthened the belief that about three years ago Wishard began to make arrangements for making a tour of the orient in the interests of the association especially among Before undertaking the work he consulted with the leading representatives of the church md missionary and was strong y encouraged by thesi on the under standing that he would represent in the oreign mission lands the definite work of the American The worlds conference of the Young Mens Association at the in 1888 endorced Wishards lan and elected him as the Student and foreign Secretary of the Central Interna ional early in John General 8ec etary of the New asso left his work and went to take a as teacher of English in one of he mission colleges of Prom a circular issued recently by the lew York I extract the fol owing regarding his work While teaching English in one of the mission colleges in and studying he made a study also of the condition of the young and the Christian work done among He found about one hundred and fifty nominally Young Mens Christian but really more like our lociaties of Christian being all attached to individual mission Tokio seemed peculiarly the dace in which to establish a strong asso iation specially designed to reach non Xingtian young men not identified with he individual Besides being he great commercial it is the great ducational center of the eighty hcutand students being in attendance at te colleges and high The Imperial University was considered uch a stronghold of infidelity that iwifts success in gathering enough Christian students to begin a vigorous association there was a both to the native ministers and o the He organ zed associations also in the Upper laddie College and the First Commercial and aided in putting oa a undenominational and greatly in creasing the activity of the central asso ciation already formed in Imme the need of a suitable building or buildings for theee aseocia ions became evident and In September of 1888 Swift wai greatly encouraged by receiving the offer of a Christian business man in this country to give toward such a In at the request of the Jew York association and the American nternational Swift gave up work of teaching in order that he might devote himself entirely to the de velopment of young mens work in that Wishard left this Decam er and reached Jan uary 1869 He met Swift and a number of Christian Japanese students and arranged for a of in the leading Christian college of Japan ocated at In writing about those first meetings Wishard says We entered the work there with hope and a unique combination of sen you Our faith in the pre sentation of the facts concerning Chris tian Work in American colleges filled ua with a firm hope that the recital would find a response in these warm hearted oriental But while studenU are more alike than unlike the wide world there are enough of dissimilarity between the young men of the far eait and far weit to cause we inaugurate the ong expected college association toot in the eait The difficulty of learning to effectively through an interpreter can only be appreciated by those who m erred at the Not knowing just what to do we pur med exactly the tame course which we tad followed ao often in col and the work from the beginning to the end of the visit similar to American college revival that any special deacription it scarcely We held one meeting aafly at or 630 n the The day of prayer for aid the Sabbaths were field aad were toed with A committee appointed to follow up inquiring and bring them and tba in different into contact with frperieneed a rule the mbjecti were treated which characterize evan geliatic work in Some pedal npon the rapematural otjgi of the tad the from of the di vinity of wen caned for OM rabjwt which pedaDy iatetMtd the the plan which Chrfctteaitr been circulated in by skeptical professors from Germany aa The same men also tell their countrymen that Christianity failure in One of thete American the effrontery to challenge me to find tingle Christian in I CO aider my minion to the young men c the east a tuceeai if it simply m to uy to the students of the ChrUtian and government schools that while onl one in twenty of all of our Ameri can young men combined is a member o an Evangelical between one half and onethird of the young ITIBTI in the colleges and universities are profess ing tome indication o the of the I will say tha folly one hundred men attended a meet ing for new held a week be fore we left The same evening fifty men in a meeting for the unconvertei announced their determination to begin praying for themselves ud to seel as it was until they found go the work From Kyoto Wishird and Swift want t about which Wiahard Tbe field is large there are nearly 000 students in the higher of and large apro portion of young men yon will find our enterprising western I should gay the inhabitant include over young Meetings were held with like mccett in Tokyo and several months were spent in visiting ichools and ai other places in the One especially interesting occasion was on June when Wishard entered the hall of the Sapporo Agricultural It was the fortyflfth anniversary of the first Young mens Christian Association in the world and the twelfth of the inter collegiate one of the original members of the Believers ic now a professor in the college was ois int Before leaving Japan Wishard assisted at the first Christian convention of Japan ese Viscount a young nobleman of earnest Christiai a former student in the Amherst Agricultural college a the Northfleld Summer School in 1887 and had returned to Japan with a desire to see a similar movement among the students of Arrangement were and early in July last six hundred delegates were present at Kyoto at this first Japanese summer Wishard wrote The keynote or watchcry of the assembly was Make Jesui and these were cabled to the Northfield Summer School in seieion during the lame Wishud continued work in Japan until October when he sailed from Before closing let me give in Wishards own a picture from one of the student meetings One of the the most interesting and the moil difficult of the work consisted in the inquiry We held two large ones in the chapel at the close oi the evening It was an impos ing sight to see a score of groups of from three to six unconverted students gathered about a profei sor or experienced Christian stu dent eagerly discussing the plan of The meetings for personal work were generally held in our private Sometimes forty or more stu dents would crowd in nd spend from one to two It was a joy inde scribable to answer their eager questions and them step by step into the One of those meetings I shall never The company was pretty evenly half of them skep tical concerning the inspiration of the the divinity of the immor tality of the while the balance were settled upon these and were willing to accept Christ ai their divided the leaving the skep tics with of who was one of the first of the pledged missionary to reach the for eign and who has a special knack or meeting skeptical I took the ottera into an adjoining There were about twentytwo of After talking for some time about the plan of I asked those who had already accepted or were willing to ac cept him there and to announce uly teventeen did and the reasons which they gave for their hope in Christ were as satisfactory as you will ordi narily hear in an American Four or five fellows listened earnestly and sadly to the testimonies of their but were unable to grasp the act of hit gift of eternal So I said to what will convince you jeyond a doubt that the gift is yours rhey did not answer at so I said If I sbould come to you and tell you that rou had fallen heir to a magnificent what would convince you beyond all question to the truthfulness of my word We may be satufled if we could see one of them replied Would that really satisfy your I They didnt grasp my so I Supposing you saw the egal docnmentthe record Oh that would settle the they ex I we are so f as to have the Turn to I John aad let us And this is tie that God hath given educational binu concerning to us eternal and this life is in His I shall never outlive the memory of the in that They fairly snatched their New from their pockets and eagerly searched for the And bendidg low over the pages tiey seemed to drink in the words like Uunty It was a pathetic those boys bending anxiously over the which probably none of them ever seea I could see their although my eyes were becom ing somewhat dimmed and they bent ow the record I saw by faith the bending over the of heaven to witnasthe Pres ently one of the looked His face He reached out his settled it MtUed J16 and they all said the There was joy in that The interpreter laid let pray and while HFW41 Bought of the joy with which heiven wat ringing u around the the lord back HH Bo the work continued day after T portmarterof Electric bM done otier that bad feeling ariting d Liter John and of lame Find Electric Bitten to be new W aardww aame Bectric the nm down and appetite and a aaw Stie on rt George a Henrys iathiijiceofvaft of Fig HE VBRS OHM AID TEH SAILS if A M 810DI Scenes oathe Traia Mon Fictaresqi Thaa PleaaaatAa Uaeommaa Ex perieaee in a fferthern Iowa Comtpondenoe of TBB Sioux April 17 last letter to the great family journal came to an untimely end at 1 in the smoking compartment of one of Pullman on somewhere between Burlington aad Omaha the other night At halfpast seven in the merning th urbane and gentlemanly resplen deat to brunette as to com and mildly insinuating as routed us from sound and dreamless with the call imlfor We rose withdue went through the customary toilet performance in a leisurely manner and then repaired to the dining car to enjoy the very perfection of all morning all the while flying through th country at the rate of forty miles an hour or True to the prediction of the conductor the train rolled into the depot at Omaha recisely on It is simply wonder ul the way time and space are anni hilated Only a few hours ago at home morning three hundrec miles away on the farther side of the Big Speaking of sleeping cars and the porters with their fondness for keeping up old recalls an incident last lummer on a Pullman The writer rejoiced in the possession of an elaborately constructed and costly pair tan colored which were the pride of his On retiring the shoes were carefully tucked away under the lower berth as without a thought of dis In the morning those tan colorec shoes were black as the ace of spades anc wlished till they shone You may well imagine the brief and impves sive discourse that The por ter claimed he had blacked the shoes in L dark corner of the car without notic ng the but a few days later a fel ow that made the return trip in the same informed me of a confidential communication from tha porter to in effect that the TTnitec Association of had re solved that the manufacture of tancol ored was a blow at a timehonored ndnstry and not to be hence he disaster to my The writer will meet that porter sooner or anc mmediately thereafter will occur a va cancy in the ranks of Pullmans em A description of Omaha for the benefit of your would be useless as so many of our former citizens are now rei dents of that beautiful and love to descant upon merits and and have well improved their opportuni ies in that respect The city is the com ag metropolis of the west without Kansas City may at present boast of a arger population but Omaha is making forward and not only n point of population but in solid and sostly private and public in in the character of her lusiness in magnificent sys of street and other public improve and better than all in the enlight ned and refined class of citizens among he later After attending to business duties we dropped in at the Bee building and watched the wonderful press take the from an enormous old and even count the completed pa with almost the quickness of Omaha noted for the per ection of her newspapers in every de and we need not enlarge n that Next door to the large and commodious voiding of the Omaha is the New ork life Insurance companys build is a towering pile of Tour correspondent rode up in the ele ator eleven or twelve and then climbed the spiral staircase for the re taining three or We counted the andings until we were tired and gave as we traveled skyward in the ele The magnificent view from the sum mit of the tower in this building well re r one for the commanding a i expanse of city and country in every irection but we may not like the Wandering we are com jwlled to perpetual re take a hansom for the then be train across to the Iowa side of the iitonrilriver once more at tbe Union adfic transfer at Council Bluffs we ward a Northwestern train for Sioux Taking the forward car we encoun er a jolly party of emigrants on ieir way to build up the new northwest handsome specimens of the mother countrys best bone and are but not quite up to Lmerican ideas of cleanliness not yet The variety of that assailed the nottrils when the car door was opened and the perfect content of the occupants me of an incident many years ince at a small town in northern lie with a number of congenial WM now bound for several days in the during which period the ilace was ransacked for of relief rom the ennui resulting from the long One morning our olfactory ten were astafled with a fearful stench rom the neighborhood of a little tumble own ranch kept by an old specimen from tome foreign shore or The old man wu terribly half savage and Well we invaded the premises and found the old man quietly moking a dirty old amid utterly Ithy In response to our the old gentleman told that had not noticed anything unusual in the Most of our party beat hasty retreat but one venturesome pushed way through the domicile to he rear entrance and there sat cross legged oa the ground several children of anout and In their midct se curely caught by the in a steel trap was a veritable and those children wen playing with the teetiag it with without oticing any mere the old man uy peculiar order in the mar but the writer tUndt ready to vouch for the truth of nar rative aad to produce eyewitneetet In voof We from the forward car quickly upoeiiblamto the in the rear of the whence we find MM comfort oace Again the writer bida yon adieu by the light of the lamp aad music of the raffing earwheel with whittle obHgato bell For a number of yean I have beta vtoleat ease was very widely known at he tuf fered such tevere Hous H Fifty cent for sale by all drug HAWK1YE TOONS A a Written for Tax After the whooping cough and imoritB left me at the age of three health was to impaired that every scamp of a disease that couldnt find em ployment spent iu force oa my peor The last malady Ii the acquaintance of prior to tha begin ning of my narrative was ague ani spinal the of which only left me ninetysix body boots and baggage all and all at the age of In the spring o at the above named I that if I were not soon cured would be a helplest invalid all my life this mada my Irish blood run high ani I decided to go to the country M a farm The next four were ipen in search of a farmer who wanted a hand but one look at my frail figun and pale face convinced the they did not want a townboy and I was I kept up a contin ual prompted by the dread of another sutumer in town wit the At last there came a day when all good hands wera employed and the loafers and small boys were left ia the I was iu my s cabinet shop making a foot stool which I ia tended to present to Mrs Ross the lad that broke up my ague when I bean the following dialogue between father and a Crawford Good Good thee know where I can get a good boy to drop corn one that doesnt swear or and who can be de pended upon A short I have tha doesnt swear or and very but at for being good to work I cant aay as his health is so bad would you like to try himt Whereis thy boy Charles I laid dowa my saw and went to the Crawford wants a boy to drop Can you go Yes I am reidy I replied Crawford Whats thy name and how old is thee My name is Charles I am sixteen Sixteen he repeated dont think I want 1 wat too mindful of the dread ague to se put off by and insisted that he take Crawford didnt believe waa at old I and refused because he thought I Presently he In what year was thee born I This ttate ment teemed to convince him and he continued How much thee want per week or month for thy worl Charles I I want my board and Is that all aaid he and I Just what money you think I thats reason able Ret in the wagon aad we will go to I must bid mother and get my clothes for I expec to stay all After all this done I got in and rode home with I improved in health very anc was soon getting 116 per month ani washing and was offered a hone to ride to the Valley Sabbath school each Sunday and each time ou my return Crawford would take me through a course of questions to see if I wa on the right as he termci My people were Yet I did not believe as they did or as Crawford and at Sunday schoo made it a point to strengthen my belieJ and find fault with Monday morning we were up early and plowinj corn Crawford said nothing wat so good for corn as to have mans breath on it before sunrise consequently we were blowing our breath ou the growinj corn and dyeing morningglory vinet be fore the first rayt of old Sol could be een in the east but Providence had or lained a day of rest and before noon we were lying on the hay in the barn and the rain was pattering on the oof in a shower which eemed to insure a half if it itopped at As we lay there plan ning tbe following weeks I taw a izzard peep from a hole in one of the ogs and eye us cautiously a few mo then disappear and in another uoment it returned and with it They slid cautiously from the log and went into a box of axle grease at the other end ef the I then told Crawford and we thought to kill or catch He took a curry comb and I a I in vigorously and out one but before he could strike it had gone up in side his out at collar and was near hiding II was cold and slimy like a snake aad cared him as it would and in IM excitement he Oh The instant he said it I thought of the commandment Thou ahalt not take thi name of the thy in and put up a job to catch the old you are too et me try to kill him while you punch him out He consented readily pres ently the lizzard ran aad after it tad gotten well out of reach I struck the box a vigorous blow and exclaimed Hell and damnation To say he surprised dries not ex iresa His hair didnt aise for he had but his showed plainly astonishment He put down the ttick and lets go to the After we were in and quiet he Billy told me nee did not twear and I never heard thee but thee must go home now and tell him I dont want thee any long said will you itton to me ten before I go la gave me a nod of aamrance aad 1 you are a nice man but in case you were wone ban You broke a positive command Thou shalt not take the name of tha Lord thy God in while I merely made an idle statement I admit I wat for Matthew 1938 aayi I tay unto you that every idle word that men shall they thall give account thereof ia the day of and I promise to never repeat that itete if you wQl do three thiagt Retain me not ten pa and quit your profanity alao remember to let our communication be yea aad for whatsoever more than cometh of He itraia at a gnat aad wallow a camel A H It It a piine weeafltr at health that the eo the thonM be turn of mm IT DI SKOAL DBHB iirora IT miou tfee Aastriaa Ugkt for Saaer Kraut of Tn March All of appear in the papers re garding the penoaal habits of royalty remarked to your cones a day or two but hardly anything you read aowa ia correct Booeey M at his aame a person of intemperate hab but he really a staunch advocate of cold water a He has held for the position of attittan carver aad tergeaatfootman to Her Maj Quean aad he made it the hobby of not only to become intimately acquainted with the gattroaomical likes and dislikes of Eng and thcne of the of her thanks to a persevering correspondenca the and chief dinner attendants of the different European he to a mouthful ao to speak the favorite dithet of every Queen and at present occupying Her observed been ridiculoualy A few weeks I read in a Boston and also in a Philadelphia that the Queen of Kngland drank strong and had a pradeliction for radiahet in vinegar How ridiculous Once in a blue moon her Majesty asks for a glass of and then it must be that is a bottle of porter is mixed with some Bass QtrasN VICTORIAS DAILY The like most of the other roy is a moderate and simple eater relates 1m the morning while still in a cup of chocolate is given to with a square of hot un buttored At about ton breakfast the Queen taking lean crisp fried with an anc tome thin of bread aad butter is varied on different mornings by substituting a bloater or a dried haddock for the At her Majetty a cup of vegetable with two glasses of and generally a little cold chicken or During the after noon tea terved once or At utually at 8 the Queen a good deal of very seldom any fish unlew it be of which the very fond always a slice of beef with aad the thigh part of whatever game in An or tome grapet the royal and with it the drinks a glass of two of and occasionally half a tumbler of The queen it ia a Before re her majasty unvariably takes a of warm whiiky and and a biscuit Whan ia she be gins he breakfast with a little Htt she her and Why of course just like other old Some she has an appetite for dinner and inclined for something nice served in her own bedroom aad shared by a favorite It then that tbe Ger man comet out of her I have known her to ask for liver sausage and beer and pickled and not at all an uncommon supper at it a of shell fish well saturated with Her majestys favorite without grilled or The prince of Wales it a more elabor ate eater aad likes half a dozen dishes and plenty of He insists on thick soup never touches potatoes or and that a saddle of mutton with jelly the true epicures bon He is a hearty breakfast and ututlly both fish and moat with half a pint of claret and a cup of The princess of a light but strange to adores roaat pork with plenty of Her royal alto very partial to spring aad talad The dnchete of Fife ditlikes soups and aad generally dines off Her the an enormous aad not care what he eats Prince Albert Victor the epicure of he Kagliah royal He daint ily aad tbe family are temperate in a badly cooked or a cold entree usually pro the temper of the future Prince of Wales and Prince the sailor con to having next to no idea of Eating to him it filling a void in his He likM solid of and been known to eat a couple of pounds of tteak at a tingle meal He much beer M a German ttudent HOW THX KAinB DHTM AHD Ia regard to continental continued Mr I will not at tempt to give you their ia ut from notebook you see I know the favorite dith and drink of any monarch who to drop in oa the queen for a vi and I assure you ome are mighty particular about their You would hardly think but the present emperor of Germany one of the mottdifleultmen to The moment he awakM he wants a glass of braakfut mutt include of with several other With he to eat preserved and figs and with he alwayi demands Then at odd he for aad jut before he to bed he will eat a rapper of cold meat aad pieklM to give aa army night Hie the deatyof aad only eatt fish for Tha eamror of Bnatia resemblM the priaaaof WalMiaUalikM aad except that ha prefen everything cooked aad eaormoni quaati tiMOf Oae particular diah of to at the Marl borough aad failed aad ao It it a Rmaiaa national delicacy aad eoaainj of iheap with angar aad garlic aad than served with of f Tha MpraM of RuMia her faith to ehickea ia aay Her majtetyoftoa that M far M the ban door fowl la tha oaly to be eetaa animal that aatd The emperor of Aaetriafc purely Ger likM to fare like a Heidelonrg atodwL Baser knot and Oa the Int of thfc iathekaMiad W w banbafa unless it be a mass called a coal to which flour aad alieMoC lemon are TaeaultaahM aaMd erate but a good despite the precepts of tha Koran A hasty meal U terved to ate di rectly when ha Of that of his many it ia difficult to but it is stated that ha hadoaa ofhto sultanas tied no in a lack aad dropped iu the Bosphoius for eating too freely of King Humbert of Italy toba and calls for rare steak aad thick mutton The Italiaa royal table is noted for its solid aad when strictly en tha kiac likes to carve the joint ii front of like the English father of a ffia beautiful and amiable quean ia a fragila eater and haa a distinct couna served foe Well seasoned and works of art generally please her Bat the joy of ia her majesty of the poetose quean of Kiac known in the literary world aa Carmen lady says that the world aot know how much it owes to the stomach aad it ia cooka who have made rook aad totter in their She aad the cook are almoat aad every an hour spent in earaMtcom sultation regarding the menu of tha Hermajaaty haa invented several salad and sauce and occasional ly cooks a dish for the king with her own The king of like a sensible with hia but being a man of oomewhat groat in occasionally for midnight which the queen doaa cot The Queen Regent of Spain tha only thing she can not adopt in her kingdom is the national taste in She hates and the reason the per mits her ministers to smoke at cabinet and generally at her cigar ette is that the reverened saaon usually have to impregnated with that tobacco is necetiary to prevent the queen from She eats sparingly of plain mutton aad and likes soup and claret with every She seldom tea or or coffee or and it fond of a glate of beer after riding or King Christian of Denmark wont eat pork or He is almost a veg etarian and likes and cold vege tables for supper and Ha drinks champagne and IBCTTLIAR FADS OT BOYAL DINBBS An eccentric eater is King of He hardly eata at all dur ing the but a long meal of several courses served at rather a trial to the digestion of his who sup with him in He fond of liver baked and terved with veal He never eats or any thing except a cup of coffee and a until he hat been up and about for nearly half the The regent of Bavaria aa inordi nate desire for favorite dish ia a huge codfish stuffed with sausage meat and Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria takM the prizo as the most eccentric of all tha great and of His bread has to be made after a special recipe of the late empreas of which she sent to the mother of tha Princess ducks and other have to be plucked an I kept in ice for tana before and beef and mutton are never served unless in the form of a ragout or If the prince ia to hava he likes one of the to briag it alive in a basin for penoaal laipee a email full of varioua kinds of shell under the pedal supervision of tea water being artificially introduced at gnat ex SB it has to be brought in huge Barrels from a long distance Like Lu Prince Ferdinand nothing is too sacred for the and a pia f linnets is nnt aa unfrtqnent diah at the palace of great a gluttoa as Ferdinand is already a proverb with the but not in account of royal eat concluded His Holiness Leo He a dear old and eata becaute nature da nands it thats He whenever his wishes are for toaMthlat with plenty of and a little claret and It offends the pontiff to be served with any part of a bird which suggests form in the leg or for inttanne poultry and game are never put on the but portions of the breatt are placed before by the invariably eats It it contrary to religious etiquette for the pope to share a meal with even a brother If a king at the papal dinner he is served in a separate room with his Bcmaraabte Michael makes the that she caught nn berlunea treated for a month by her family physi but grew He told her the hopeless victim of consumption and that no medicine could cure 9er druggist suggested Kings New Discovery for Consumption ahebought a bottle and to her delight found nenelf lenefited from the first She COB iinued its use and after taking ton ound herself sound and well now doM her own housework and M well M tha ever Free trial bottle of Great Discovery at George Henrys drug store large 50c and having long knowa the alpha jet but only just begun to put letters to gether to form expounded aame of his wisdom one day to hie father while out The village fttb mana name and he a great favorite of He AM on in large Sea Look said goes do you know it asked I can tell by the name painted on it double A certain cure for Chronic Bora Salt Scald Old Fever Tairie Sore HipplM aad t cooling aad of M have been cured by it after all other ttmenthad aad M Mat IOXM for sate br an draajMa What do you thiak of tha dotUaf trader said tha Tramp to tor swapping raito with I like it better thaa I ary aaawend tha Tha bait talve ia tha eatt chapped ecraa aad aQ lUa tt toi   

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