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Burlington Hawk Eye: Sunday, April 6, 1890 - Page 1

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   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - April 6, 1890, Burlington, Iowa                                PARTTWQJ THE ESTABLISHED SUNDAY APfflL 1890 EIGHT HE PJUViTE OF iKD EA1IBOI flow the CorrttpondeMe of Ike White is Handled by the felt Fin ofa rooag LadyHow She Came to Her April HE calling and public of the capital oum bers ten thou During a season tbe ladies of the cabinet re ceive this and senatorial la dies who are well liked meet half this The list of the most popular representatives wife rarely goes over three and even tbe ordinary individual passes tbe allotted five hundred friends before the winter One can conoeive the immense labor attending the proper care of so many and can understand Chief Justice Fullers plaint when she said It takes my three older daugh ters and myself every morning in the week putting down the people who call on a Monday and answering Every year it becomes a more colossal and some women have been obliged to hire secretaries just for that work un less they have If they do the task falls upon and many a wealthy senators daughter works bard as a copyist in the For some time after Harrisons eliotion to the presidency Harrison trkd the task of being her own secre As the moil increased to forty and sixty letters per day she called in the presidents Miss Alice to write her and she herself signed Ever since her re turn to the White House in October she has been obliged to delegate the whole duty to Miss and only personal friends receive letters in the handwrit ing of the mistress of the White When the morning mail comes to the executive mansion the letters are quick ly separated by a who puts all directed to Harrison on Miss Bangers She runs over them throwing aside those that bear the unmistakable script of the The others she carries to Harrisons The two sit down at the Miss Sanger selects those that bear the writing or any of Harrisons inti mate f opens them with her silver paper throws away the envelope and passes the letter to If it is anything she wishes to answer she places it to one Other wise Bhe returns the letter to Miss Sang who takes stenographic notes of the desired reply always on the so that there can be no mixing of Then the grand bulk of l noticed day Before yesterday a young American girl driving along die Champs with Ute dowager Duchesse and afterwards they daapfndfd to take a cup of chocolate in tie I thought the young ladys dreas wac a model of and it with quite French Tbe gown was of drab poult de of brown velvet ribbon around the It was entirely un draped and had a multiple flot of brown velvet The jacket was of shaded cut very plainly only by braid and With that wore a large hat to match in Sarah Bernhardt drove by like a bmt left a vision of apriocease toilet in gold colored plush and cinnamon bear Tbe great not seek so much for dazzling now as she did before shebecame Joan of She acts and dresses her part off as well and seems to live in the sweet delusion all the and every one who knows her aayg she has gained much in all amiable Bemhardt wore a lovely toilet the other day at the gray argentee Irish poplin cut It had a bor der all around of black above which was a deep embroidery in ME DEMI tf THE iigfMiHI OF tke RaBraBg of the Take Oft to Yew Stride taken The secretary reads them at a and the gist to For in u woman in or Ala or Texas writes for a dollar to buy a rheumatism and in leading up to the request inadvertently relates her whole history and the laborious process by which she contracted the riimiMe Misa Sanger says of wiuitsona dollar to buy a cure for her According to the reply she puts yes or no at the head of the and in a few days is delighted with a letter on White House paper bearing the words Harrison begs ine to state that she is very sorry for your but Uiure aro so many calls on her A signature that is probably known today better than any other womans in tlie United Usually threequar ters of au hour is taken up in going through the Miss Sanger then gullmrs up all the goes back to the office and takes the odd half hours be tweeii the presidents or Secretary Hal fords calls upon her to write thean It is said that Miss Sanger knows more tlie presidents affairs than any one except Private Secretary Half and for a matter of ten days before the opening of congress she was theonl v one besides Halford who knew the preei THE AHEBICAS AT THE Our bonnets this alas are ing to resemble cockle shells as to and they are not at all chic nor becom ing but perhaps we will get used to them after Only the exquisite beauty of the flowers and ribbons on them could reconcile Isnt it droll that when bonnets and hats were large parasols became verita ble soldier and now that bonnets are growing parasols are be coming smaller and the new spring sunshades are not much larger ner and all in the brightest of col though some are covered with I noticed at the opera last night that nearly threefourths of the and of the old families wore bouquets of to that the very hall was filled with their Itiaaig but may lead to THE DETECTIVES HAD PROVED Bat ttu Finding of Leachs Body Them to Be Bowland a successful and popular traveling sulasmnn of New disappeared lately in Chicago and two weeks later his corpse was fished out of the Chicago at the foot of Market In this alone then is nothing mysterious or very but in the events intervening there is enough to show that certain sections of Chicago an more dangerous after dark than the wilds of Africa that there are well known whose business it is to rob and murder in combination that the system of the police by perjury end fabricated has been reduced to a and that tin Tbe an of Jumping to most people hi dim ealt to Jumpers vary so much fa bnud that it is useless to say that a certaia athlete can spring wefl on account of long or that some other one can sprinr equally well because he is strong and compactly Gymnastic instructors often theorize on this but my has been that any reason given for a certain athletes eTrdlpnce in jumping could be com pletely dispelled by analyzing tha build tf some other equally good It is to say that the secret of jumping is none other than that attributed to nearly all ath letic games where activity is the predominat ing A wrestler before he can bring about force sufficient to put his antagonist where he wants him must concentrate certain muscles for an Jumping requires the same but it must be of quicker There are many different kinds of but few men are good at more than one or two The reason for this is that there is such a diversity of action in the various jumping and few styles of jumping will develop the muscles used in other Broad which means clearing a dis is the easiest to although there are fewer good performers at It than at high This is because of the diffi culty in practicing broad for be fore one can for the running bread jump a level 75 or 100 feet must be High jumping needs nnly a space of 30 or 40 feet and can be practiced ia a gymnasium almost as well as out of It is not so with broad for tfca athlete to have confidence mast land hi soft and even though there are gymnasiums with a clear space of 100 a box of dirt for athletes to land in ten or fifteen feet long and a foot deep would take up too much space and be too much of a general nuisance to justify its It can readily be seen that when tbe facilities for practicing high jumping so much better than those gives for clearing a the latter have fewer good even though It is a simpler Broad how is more of a test of a mans spring than high for there is less science in it Running broad jumping consists simply of an athlete running up to a mark on the ground and springing from one landing in soft dirt dug up for the purpose so that there will be no injury caused by a Jar from coming in contact with hard The athlete gauges his run so that a certain foot wffl al ways be at the take which is the line from where he In this way necessary muscles will be developed in the lag need to spring The only part in the jump that shows any degree of science is in taking off This means to get the foot on the line when the measurement is mads so that no will be lost by taking off or considered very good at would lax B taking aaa by measured tab even though the athlete foot so it fe to close as is Whsnlsaaos the mnt best amateur record of toed back tfcnaqoart aniocbfrom edge but on another She is a jewel of this young and both the president and Harrison trust her with every is a down east and was born in Connecticut twentyfour Her parents moved to when she was a and it was there she her At 15 she graduated from the high andexpected to go to college the folio wing who was traflic manager of an met with lost hit and the young daughter was to study typewriting and stenog She wrote in various and vac taking court reports one day when of the law firm of Miller rushed in and asked for a She went to his office and was there two when Harrison was nominated to the presi She knew him but tile other stenographer in the office did his work but the day after the nomina Miller sent her to the Harrison and she remained there until when the president gave two months She traveled ahroaS during that tune and in addition to be ing one of the best at the she is also a cultured and noble looking toughs are able to completely deceive the The curious feature of the case is that UM detectives collected abundant evidence that Leach was on a spree the night of bis final that he visited disrepu table and that he walked di rectly from a re spectable saloon into a dangerous alley and into a group of the Mar ket street All be it was proved byevii dence which would have convicted a nun of murder in the courts yet when tie corpse of the supposed victim of robbery and murder was taken from the river there wasnota rirn of violence on it save a alight gash which was evidently due to a the pockets had not been bis diamond ring WBS still on his cold watch and chain wan la their place and so were his memorandum and small change and other including even the key to his room at Palmer The detectives had proved a tolerably clear cue of robbery and murder but tbe corpse still more clearly proved that the man had simply fallen into the river and Once the truth was most of the other evidence was of wtt who had been sure they had MB Leach examined toe corpse and cided that they bad seen aome other One of the women had aad who was referred to as the veiled forward and proved to be an an old acquaintance of the rtrutl lady of the highest How if of the other testimony was correct is still rio fact FRESH FROM March What a pity it k for fnfoinn inbeautiful Paris that France ii npublicant fetes at which were worn costumes that cost weeks of study and set the tAtm of the universe There are now no A littlestupid or a more stupid official at wnlon there are no leany grana speak Camot dreatea but ehe does not make anything her position as the leading lady in thenatton Nobody xxipiee It is aad to eay but it is your coun trywomen who carry off the pain tot fcamliftmn They have the iwt gunner of dianlaying far friends and to all that if tiie corpse bad not been Bowland Leach must have been remembered only as one who had thrown away his life in a reck less detectives had proved Are there many cases thai wronged It by men who know him that Leach had became dttka faU into tin and robbery purely wwanativajof BDNSEJO BBOAP Prom an instantaneous back from that The take off line con sists of a joist 6 inches wide and 3 or 4 inches sunk flush with the ground with the 6 inch surface Its length is and may range anywhere from 8 to 6 feet according to the width of tbe jumping A ditch is dug in front of joist or on tbe side toward the direction the jump is The rules say that this ditch shall be at least 6 inches wide and S inches Its purpose is to prevent the athlete from toeing over the line while for it can readuy be seen that although one may encroach two or three inches over the miniature any further getting forward would result in the foot slipping down in the ditch while hi the act of which of course would prevent even an ordinary being The place where the athlete lands is dug up to the depth of about a Its nearest edge to tbe take off is about 14 feet and its furthest edge 26 feet from the scratch The length of this trough all depends i the class of athletes that use it If an jumps over 23 feet he should land in dirt dug up to a distance of 27 so that then no possibility of his sliding as he in tha soft and being stopped suddenly the hard Accidents of this kind have happened which have laid athletes on the shelf for some time with aspramsdaakhi or a strained tendon in a foot To explain the take off a little tt may be mentioned that the reason of pres ent construction is so that fouls can be easily Tbe old custom was to have simply a whitewash line on the level Ifao athlete should toe over a quarter of an inch or so it would be apt to came a THaoWS TOO From au instantaneous when I jumped 23 feet lljf I toed back 5 inches from the Stfflen another when I jumped 23 feat I I toed over between 2 and 1 if I bad gone over an inch or two further I probably would not have cleared over 30 feet on account of the spring from the ball of foot being My system of off correctly is in having a mark ranging from 49 to 51 feet back of the take If the conditions of the day are about 50 feet wfll be the although oa one oc when there was a strong breeze blow ing in the direction of I had to go back to 53 feet to prevent getting up too near to the When the best record was made my take off wag 51 although I started running from aboutSO feet My method of running up to the take off is the same nowae On that occasion Iran with increasing speed toward the 51 foot getting the left foot at that That being the foot I spring with is the reasoa I commence running fast with it My right then went at about 45 left at right left right left right and then the left at tha scratch These strides might have varied two or three but no and it wfll be noticed that they were about six feet long tostart in creased to seven feet toward the except the last which is only All jumpers take a comparatively short stride just in front of the take because of inability lift well if it is put too far in front In springing one should endeavor to get as high as possible without sacrificing too much momentum for it The illustration run ning broad jump shows an instantaneous photograph of an athlete while in the The position of his arms has not much to do with the jump aad will unconsciously hold them to the extend or even swing them according to his The illustra tion thrown too high shows an athlete who made such an effort to get a good rise that sent himself and the distance be will clear will not be what it would have been had be left the ground It will be no ticed that he is turned sideways and look as if they were It is a sight often seen in a running broad jump A good way to a running broad jump ia to experiment in taking off properly and jump in a not paying too much attention to tha but a special point to run up with confidence to take If one mark does not do try an even after an athlete distance has been he will find that on certain days it wfll suit him and at other times it will Begin by jumping easily and after confidence obtained effort may be Another jump for distance is thestanding broad which is without doubt the sim plest form of jumping practiced in Every schoolboy knows how to do There is no learning to take off for the athlete stands at a mark and simply lifts himself with his landing as far away as The illustration standing broad jump shows an instantaneous photograph of an athlete just having taken a The arms are thrown which is always WEATHER nUMMHHMUB a iff Parehaae of Oakland Baal tar tkeCejiti Ways af I have just bought aome more real It occurred in CaL I had the assistance of a I nope he loss will not overbalance the It occurred in this way A prophet on a ivho was hard came to Oak land suddenly a few weeks ago and be gan to ride up and down on a two wheeler and for to warn the people to ease just after Jumper left the I a reserved set of by saying sometimes obtain amp utation for deep thought I always envy anybody who can de thy Such mei nake good presidential Can I mind The time come in this country when it is hard to unite good qualifications as a candidate with the necessary qualifies for a soc nrtsrful nfflmai The Rule in March or April does not go down cellar and bring up bis gladiola or remove the banking from the side a He does not mulch the atpar agoft bed or pxune pie plant of nki the front yard or salt the Hedow not even wipe his heart broken andneg lected He makes no especial change in his great life because spring has He till looks serious and like a man who is laboring under the impression that he is about to be come the parent of a These children of the Piute brave never ma They do not take their places in the history or the school readers of our common The Piute wean i bright red lap robe over his and generally stiff Quaker hat with aleath er His hair is very black and and is mostly cut off square in the neck by means of an adz MEETING flee to the high grounds and also the wrath to he the waters of the great deep would arise at about the middle of the month and smite the people of Oakland and slay and float the pork barrels out of their and fill tbeir cisterns with people who sneered at the This prophet in this way did a good He attracted much and had all he could do as a prophet for several Many Oakland people were especially as the great intellectual Sahara of the prophet also prophesied a high wave which would rise at least above the bills at the Palace hotel in San Fran With the aid of these two gen middle weight I was en abled to secure some good bargains in corner lots and improved property in Oakland at 10 of the estimated In other I am putting my limited powers as a prophet against those of Professor the painstaking or possibly it is eaten off by The Piute is never bald during After he is dead he becomesbald and Johnson Sides is a well known Piute who had the pleasure of meeting meal He said he was a great admirer of mine and had all my writings in a scrap book at He also said thai he wished I would come and lecture for his I afterwards learned that he waa an earnest and hopeful liar from He had no scrap book at Also no Sides at one time became quite distinguishing himself from his tribe by reading the Bible and confining his shirt tail to tbe narrow confines of t pair of cavalry trousers instead of giv ing it to the irresponsible breeze as other Prates He now established an hotel up the valley in the Sierras and decided to lead a life of He built an hostelry called the ShackdePokerHnnt and advertised in The Carson Ap a paper even the editor of says fills him with won der and amazement when he knows thai people actually subscribe for Very soon Pintes began to come to the Shack to spend the heated Every Pinto who took The Appeal saw the advertise which went on to state that hoi and cold water could be got into every room in the house and that electric silver voiced over suggestion of a ditch the scratch line would of course be considered taeable nnlun a square edge could be main Therefore a board is AH Jumps are measured from the edge of thii which is also tbe edge of the preci If an athlete the ground ia front of this ditch it is a and as ex cavaiion is 6 inches wide no can touch the ground without getting almost tbe foot in front of the take off en to the flat ground even in front of the and course any judge would notice Joist is specified to be that distance is sufficient to cover the of tbe foot If board were wider it would interfere wtth tbe spikes in jump A great many when they first try i running broad jntap with spike show timiditv rmuuag im to the trratrh awrk placing thenfoot on the board on ao eoBBt of tbe tbe spikes win stick SlXHOSam VKUOt Tram an When in the act of springing tha athlete wul start with his arms at tbe side and throw them up at tbe same time contracting the of The up ward movement of the helps to propel the There is absolutely nothing to learn in this jump and as a test of a mans spring it is considered Men who do not take part in athletic exer in settling a jumping wfll generally choose the standing broad jump on account of their knowing bow to do it Jumping with an excellent all round for not only the legs bnttha are amateurs seldom tWs competitions without artificial aid of gbotPresident Tommy whose mind if notion tbe it was VWBis Willie Tom my Jones did matea I saw Umt Upon my what I wanted to and was resting suddenly alafvei I the elevator wan wood and throw A Tew at remove an tear in this Another feeflig liability of inn inn slipping dowaia ditckbriafittg about a wrenched of this kind are and only after ooariderablfi eaa an athlete ran up to take off with fan of not nathinl iawl trr proparly is to fran that i foot indicator of who Krst Second not tha one First they use nothing but cat leys in thai BaaleHow do you like year boarding place Fn aback padding today tasted sawdust to Pm arewcctfaanuDiofi to Ate Hid wteewaadarkeaedwitBanvm and gifted ass of and the bicycle prophet of the Pacific I am will ing to stand or fall by the As a prophet I have never attracted attention in this mostly because I have been too busy with other Also because there was so little prophe sying to be done that I did notcare to take hold of the industry but I have ever been ready to purchase at a great discount the desirable residences of those who contemplated a general collapse of the or a tidal wave which would wipe out the general government and cover with a placid sea the mighty republic which God has for some smiled Moreover I can hardly believe that the Deity would commission a man to go out over Cali fornia on a bicycle to warn when a few red messages and a standing no tice in The Examiner would do the work in less Reasoning in this manner with a sturdy logic worthy of my rich and unctuous I have se cured some good trades in down town and will await the coming devastation with a calm and entirely un rufHed California at this season ct the year is a miracle of aa most every one Nature heightens tile effect for the tenderfoot by compelling him to cross the Alpine heights of the Sierra Nevada mountains and freeze to death in the cold heart of a snow weather beaten and be reaches the rolling green hills is greeted with the rich odor of I submitted to the in sults of a tottering monopoly for a in the heart of the tired and sick at with chilblains on my feet and liniment on my other I burst forth one bright morning into this realm of eternal The birds sang in my frozen I shed the gnnnysack wraps from my tender feet even as a butterfly or a tramp bursts his hull in the spring and I laughed two or three outdoor which shook the balmy branches of the tall pomegranate trees and twittered in the dense foliage of the The railroad waa very kind to us at That was when we were buying our Later on it became more harsh and reproached us at Con ductors woke us up two or three times in tbe night to gaze fondly on our tickets and look as if they were sorry they ever parted with On the Central Pa cific passengers are not permitted to give their tickets to the porter on You must wake up and converse with the conductor at all hours of the and hold a lantern for him while he spells out the hard words on your I did not like and several times I murmured in a querulous tone to the But he did not mind He went on doing tbe behests of his and in that way endearing himself to the great adversary of I said to an official of tbe road Do you not think this is the worst managed road in the United States always ex cepting the Western North Carolina rail which is an incorporated insnct to humanity that of ha on what wfaaoh yea view it you wera trying to divert travel to the Southern also the roBtng the good the tbe the the the right of way and the new laid train everything except the ana tuna wnich would natn raHy revert to the yon not business witha ateady and a fBleyeT I laid I certainly I wrang his hand softly and aM be began to oV the At Beno we had a day cr ta to observe city from tke with a first class hotel could be found at this So the Piute people locked up their own homes ejecting the they spat on the fire and moved to the new summer They took their friends with They had no but they knew Johnson and they visited him all In the fall Sides closed the and taking a rubber with i capacity of two he resumed his blanket and went back to live with When the butcher wagon cai the next day the driver found a notice of and in the language of Sol Smith Good reasons given for seO Sides had been a temperance man now for a at least bat with the humiliation of this great finan cial wreck came a wild desire to flee to tbe maddening having been mon keying with the madding crowd alJ So silently he concealed a bot tle of Beno embalming fluid and secreted himself behind a where he was asked to join himself in a social He had hardly wiped away an idle tearwith the corner of his blanket and replaced the stopper in his tear jug when the local representative of the ofBeno came upon He was re ported to the and his character bade fair to be smirched so badly that nothing but saltpeter and a consistent life could save At this critical stage of The came to his and not only gave him the support and encouragement of his but told Sides that he would see that the legislature took speedy action in reau ing his alcoholic Tbroogh the untiring efforts of Da there a bill was framed whereby the drinktaken by Johnson of Neva be and is hereby declared null and form whilst waiting for the tw Woeould not go away tbetrai atari at aay about a tbel On a certain day Davis told him that the bill would come up for final sage ana no aouct pass without opposi but a sack would have to be raised to defray the The tribe began to collect what money theyhad and to tell their grasshoppers in orderto raise Johnson Sides and his tribe gathered on tbe day named and seated themselves in the Slim old warriors with firm faces and beetling to say nothing of havingtheir hair but yet with no flieson them to speak sat In tbe front corpulent wearing health se cured by telegraph listened to the not knowing anything that Was going on any more than other people io who go to watch the Fi Sam Davis and told Sides that the bill had passed and that he WM now pure the driven I law him last but it seemed to me It was about time to get some aal legislation for Once Davis met Sides on the and waa so glad to see him that I like first and would always be glad to see Whenever yon letme know where you The next week got quite aJot of telegrams along the tfaelndiansridefreeon account of their sympathies with the These tele grams were dated at difierentostationa along the and were hopeful aad all being maitad col lect They were aboutaafollows Sam Nev March m I am JomtsoB Every little forquitoa Jong Davia would get a cheery sometimes in the middle of the mght when he was in assuxms him that Johnson was and would go cheered andwootfced and Deputing than anythins yon would like me to aay be fore I any little word that wOt com fort yon when I am gone Stricken I dart yea auke those 15 CKNTS not Wi MIEJUBEM Iff SON WHBIE 1HM3 HIVE BrtcUa tke Bavarian DaaBaAaaie lomiae of Clara IxMiaeKel tenr aad Christine ttfeanotablefact that the Honors of are seldom divided equally hudimu drama and Fifteen for in there were more great siagara than gnat Now the case rtrksui years ago Xusson aad Kellogg were in their but it would have been hard to select at that four actresses as we or two truly great prima donnas with many Of great promise and fully a dozen of almost phenomenal talent When Oerstert voice gave way after months of illness the calamity was not ban alone whole world lost by ft In 1887 she sang for the last time in When she landed in New York on a Ifovwmber lag of year she intended to carry out an extended concert once in Kew York but her old who had gone expecting to hear that won derful bell like which had so pleased them hi times gone were A few afterward she sang in TStnt Ha It was apparent that she could not continue the and she retired to tha home of her a New York hoping that a few months of rest would bring back her vocal It was a vain That Now Haven concert was herlact Notwithstanding Gersters wonderful in it was in opera that appeared at her best In the lighter like La Sonnainbnla and Linda diCha she was absolutely un She is said to have without finest on the modern She was born at in and made her debnt as an opera singer in Vi Before she ETKLKA visited the United States for tbeftrst hi HOT she had been triumphantly received at St Petersburg and Seven years before America heard for first time the wonderful voice of Btelka Ger Annie Louise Gary made her debut in Sew The younger generation of music lovers hardly know who Annie Louise Cory but the older who heard her remember her with a thrill of admiration for her talent and regret for her absence from the She was born in a little town in in Even when she was a girl her voice was so rich and mellow as to attract attention and herfather sent her to Boston to study Shortly afterwards became a member of Bortols church choir and did so well that her friends organ ised a concert for her and the result enabled her to go to Europe in 1866 to her In 1807 she made a success ful debut in Copenhagen as Azucenam H She sang in Sweden and Kor way under the management of Ferdinand StrakoBCh won veritable to Berlin and The young prima donna was rapturously received in the United States in aha nude her first professional visit to tha country of her She sang in company with Nilsson and other famont ar and was at ouce established the representative American Misa Garys admirable qualities did not stop with her ability to As a woman she was a lovely as she was talented as a What ever was hers was also the property of she played the part of boofer lady in real lif e as well as she played sang har mimic parts on the A pretty story is told of her kindness to a poor German woman and her little It was during tha early days of the famous mission at Five New York as well many other prominent peo was straining every point to keep any oasis in Gothams desert of iniquity and was a frequent visitor to the mis sion She sang one night some simple to the group of children who bad been fathered together from the surrounding and her sweet voice and gentle man ner completely won their It was per laps a week later that a carriage drove up to he theatre door just as Miss Gary flnisb ng her evenings It contained one of the ladies from the whotold UmCary that a poor German woman bad called at the mission aad asked with stream ng eyes to see the who had sung to the The woman would not tell why she wanted to see Mies but begged for ler so piteously that they finally promised to pnt the case before the great ch tomsz Miss Gary hesitated only long enough hange her stage costume for a street she drove pose haste to iwaby the German Theyfoond in a cheeriest attic of abackrstreet and in her shivering The during her catted lady who had Ctoy relieved the tired mother of held the cbfld in her own i sang softly fkrt had heard her smg ceased at In the lands bad bust and had brought But cold and hunger had already tbair and the cbfld away little life in arms ameer sang low and sweet of e who said Suffer unto Otry retired from about years after having marrfatarkh Yorker named BM of one of Gothams bag good is to be done there a cboraa during a Brooklyn not long but says not mof a solo in public it hardly fair to Clara ieKeUoggwithtbeprime U far abe magfrf Iwt i at tar Thrlajpr than not omitudfroam bar of Such clearo had seldom been heard and it is improbable that the future has many soch combi nations in KeUogg was of too tew women who bam made great sue thepab lie without first mating a sncom with the newspaper She was never a favorite with the repartervi and apparently had no desire to It is said that she did not always aven take pains to courteous to The joke about ness of Mary Anderson is proverbial hot ie said that all the witty paragraphs sent out MaryV expense had been rehashed from similar ones written with as their subject Down to she was looked npon as being almost without sentiment Then her little romance devel Years one seems to know how manyshe had been saved by a plucky young man tram This youncBBBK was Carl a nephewof Mmatrak He was a good deal younger tham Hiss Kellogg but his heroism resulted in a strong friendship between and friendship developed into They married in and so far as any body knows have been very Writing of ECellofczs marriage recalls the entirely different but no less unu sual one of Christine This latter took place in Paris in The Spanish Count de Casa was tue and the strange of it was the story that Nilsson married the count not because she felt any very overwhelming affection for but because she loved his daughter so The latter was at the time a grown up young and hod for several years been Nilssons traveling companion and dearest Her the was very fond of his and objected to having her away from him so Finally tho matter was satisfactorily arranged by the marriage of the loving papa to the no less loving who thus became the mum ma of her beloved By the it was just lief ore her mar riage to Count de Miranda that Nilssoa her earthquake experience at It was in the morning the shock and almost in on instant hotel was a Notwithstanding the craan of tailing walls and ceilings Nilsson did not lose her presence of She did not to but she did stop to unlock her trunk and take therefrom about in money and The counts daughter shared her room usual wrappias themselves in blankets and they made their escape as best they This was not Nilssons first thrilling In 1885 she was singing at Stock She had just finished a song when the enthusiastic crowd rushed toward Charles XII The police vainly tried to stop fainted and children screamed and a frightful panic The that followed was horrible lathe Hundredsof people were trampled underfoot and the which so short a time before bad been tilled with the divas wringing re verberated with theories of the wounded and Nilsson through it all remained calm and did her best to prevent the panic from extending to near She dis bursed thousands of kn HIT to relieve the suf ferings of the woundetl and con the proceeds of which were ilevoted to tho same good DAVIS 4 One of tlia who died recently la was well known to the amateur athletes of New He was only 25 years and his career very promising la every He had taken good care of him bad never and the result that he possessed a physique which nothing couJB His Gus champion long distance bad de voted a good deal of time to the Instruction of and the young mail started on tour of the world to beat all He went to the different big posted a for and remained several weeks hi every town waiting for the to come He defeated them after an other with ease at all and had made aa uninterrupted record In when he was stricken with typhoid pneumonia and carried Henry Young as liis college seems to be preparing to follow in illustrious fathers He haw appeared on the as the title role in the of Brownings Straflord bjr OMW Bagland untversity English papers be enthusiastic of by hnce of his The easeami p tm the subtlety of his facial i and the skillfully graduated trail bom quiet pathos to powerful intensity all admirable and stamped him at an actor of great Young W handsome and general ftfc sail that whilff bettiike esaaj lacks i hauteur which   

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