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Burlington Hawk Eye: Thursday, October 12, 1848 - Page 1

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   Burlington Hawk-Eye (Newspaper) - October 12, 1848, Burlington, Iowa                                BROAD WELL JAS i r Wisr cents i with the above will sub to saMKtra charge xMiaonliw TMs rule wlUbi ttaes or less one t oo i 60 00 u under t lines per annum 5 00 u tfi 00 all over e win the price of subscription to in the Sail half one 00 bank of the about er and Sheet Iron Manufacturer VMtea Iron ItOR lTBOlSSAtE ASD RETAIL DEALER in Drugs W iYirHr John Stoves Patent Boughs Kftnn and BeUil Dealers in ot Copper end Ifceet mt SBOFonMaln between Waah r VMHf J Wj sad Hats and r I jij In Staple and Fancy Gro Shoes Kintbnll of Miin and Jefferson DX4LEKS IIT Dry Hardware AVK associated in the practice of OB the corner of Washington and i AGENT and Commission ketween Kain and I r staple Dry Uquora Dr John fraMDEMhisprotenional serviceatnthe citizens X of Burlington and its rtOfflce in the Basement of his new building on tfntrtf Uk ttreet and He Prtib Resilence Commission Cor u Retail Dealer ia Hats Ud Commission Wo IN nUTiStorfT T AND COMMISSIOK MEBCH JC Freslin BttLCas IN Boots and Briigs and Medicines kc co wa Burlington 3Libenl advances made on consignments to sell in this ttnrket at auction or other sell in St Jfew Orleans or the Al ARin Queens ware Hardware Shoes and Main between Jefferson and IS BOOKS AND STATlONEBTf of eve description at the lowest prices for VOBtneirof lowaiSy ANO RETAIL Dealer in ttft Wiuamc i Jefferaoh JOEL KiaSIIBACH Barrett Ai Tlf and Betail Dealers in y Made Corner of Main and IITHOLESALE and Betail in Foreign and Ready Made between Main sad V TTTHOUsALEasd Retail Dealer in Dry it Arson LERS Produce anil aborted Ctntr of Tklnl Biin QlBOtBrtANDHAKNESS Jefferson Dr Ji Cramer Mice JeBenon between JCWELLEB and near Corner of JeBerson Bommo andCounsell6r at 4t TtetHtv AUD AT BwHiia Unit j AHP Bfain wo doors north of Burling octl4Myl BOOT AND BHOE North oT Jef of Vinegar and Family TAIL Hlow u JM MBIKHAXTVJ Vrfn doers Hlow Luke SPEECH OF MR LINCOLN on the Presidential De livertd in the House of Representatives of the United July Tnyler mmt the Mr SPEAKER Our Democratic friends seem to be in greal distress because they think our candidate for the Presidency dont suit Most of them cannot find out that Taylor has any principles at all have that he has but that that one is entirely This one principle is his position on the veto The gentleman from Mr who has just taken bis has said here is very little if any difference on this ques tion between Tayler and the other Presidents aid he seems to think it suffi cient detraction from Taylors posi tion on that it has nothing new in But all whom I have heard assail it A new member from Kentucky Mr Clark of very considera ble was in particular concern about He thought it altogether novel and un precedented for a or a Presi dential to think of approving bills whose constitutionality may not be entirely clear to his own He thinks the ark of safety is unless Presidents shall always veto such bills in their may beof doubtful constitution However clear Congress may be of their authority to pass any particular the gentleman from Kentucky thinks the President must veto it if he has doubts about Now I have neither time nor inclination to argue with the gentleman on the veto power as an original but I wish to show that and hot agrees with the early statesmen on When the bill chartering thefirst bank of the United Slates passed its constitutionality was ques tioned Mr then in the House of as well as had opposed it on that Wash as was called on to ap prove or reject He sought and obtain on the constitutional the sep arate written opinions of Ham and Edmund they then being respectively Secretary of Sec retary of the Treasury and Attorney Gen eral Hamiltons opinion was for the pow while and Jeffersons were both against Mr after giving his opinion decidedly against the constitu tionality of that bill closes his letter with the paragraph which I now read It must be that un less the Presidents on a view of iich is urged for and against this is tolerably clear that it is unau thorized by the Constitution if pro and the con hang so even as to balance his a just respect for the wisdom of the legislature would naturally decide lint balance in favor of their opinion it is chiefly for cases where they are clearly misled by or that the Constitution has placed a check in the negative of the THOMAS Taylors as expressed in his Allison is I now read The power given by the veto is a high conservative power in my should never be exercised except in cases of clear violation uf the or manifest haste and want of consideration by It is here seen in Mr Jeffersons on the constitutionality of any given bill the President he is not to veto the gentleman from Kentucky would have him to but is to defer to Congress and approve And if we com pare the opinions of Jefferson and as expressed in these we shall them more exactly alike than we can often find any two expressions having any literal None but interested I can discover any substantial Taylor on JUeasures of But gentlemen on Ihe olher side are unanimously agreed that Taylor has no other They are in utter as to his opinions on any of the questions of policy which occupy the pub lic But is there any doubt as to wiiiit he will do on the prominent if elected Not the It is not pos sible ivhat he will or Would do in every imaginable case because many ques tions have passed and others doubt less will which none of us have yet thought but on the prominent questions of internal and Wilinot Taylors course is at least as well defined as is in their eagerness get at several here have desired to know case of his a bankrupt law is to be es Can they tell us Carfss opinion on this Some member He it against do you know he is There is noth ing aliout it in the nor that I have If the gentleman knows of anything which I he can show to in his Allison Upon Ihe subject of the the cur the improvements of our great high and the will of the as expressed through their Representatives in ought to be respected and carried out by the Execu this is the sub is Ihis The people say to if you are sball weiave a national bank He ansWers Vour gentlemen not about the tariff Say Shall oar and harbors be improved Just as you If you desire a not attempt to force them on yon J Send up your members ofCotigress from the various districts with according to yorir and if for these or any of I shall have nothing to oppose if they are not for I shall attempt to dragoon them into their adop can there be any difficulty in understanding this To Demo it may not seem like principle bul surely you cannot fail to perceive the po sition plainly The distinction between and the position of your candi date is broad and I admit you have a clear right to show it is il you can but you have no right to contend you cannot see it at We see and to us it appears like and the best sort of principle at principle of allowing the people to do as they please with their own My friend from Indiana Smith has aptly Are you willing lo trust the Some of you We are willing to trust the people but the President is as much the representa tive of the people as In a cer tain and to a certain he is the re presentative of the He is elect ed by as well as Congress But can in the nature of know the wants of the people as well as three hun dred ether men coming from all vari ous localities of the Nation If where is the propriety of having a That the Constitution gives the President a negative on legislation all but that this negative should be so combined with and olher as to ena ble in almost compel to take the whole of legislation in his is what we object is what Taylor objects and is what constitules the broad distinction between you and To thus transfer legislation is clearly to take it from those who with the interest of the and give it to one who and so well understand I understand your that if a Presidential candidate avow his opinion upon a given rather upon all and the with full knowledge of elect they thereby distinctly approve all those opin though is a most pernicious By means of measures are adopted or rejected contrary to the wishes of the whole of one and often nearly half of the The process is this or half a do zen questions are prominent at a given time the party selects its and he takes his position on each of these ques tions on all but one his positions have al ready been endorsed at former and his party fully committed to them but thatOne is and a large portion of them are against But what are they to do The whole are strung and they must take all or reject They can not take what they like and leave the What they are already committed being the they shut their eyes and gulp the Next still another is introducedin the same If we run our eyes along the line of the we sliall see that if not all lite articles of the present Democratic creed have been at first forced upon the party in this very And jusl and just opposi tion lo inlernal improvemenl is to be es tablished if General Cass shall be Almost half the democrats here are for but they will vote for Cass and if he their votes will have aided in closing the doors against improve this is a process which we think is We prefer a candidate like will allow the peo ple to have their own regardless of his private opinion and I should think the internal at ought to prefer such a He would force nothing on them which they dont and would allow them to have which their own candidate if will Mr I have said Taylors position is as well defined as is that of In saying I admit I do not certainly know what lie would do on the Wilmot I am a northern a western free with a constituency I believe to and with personal feelings I know to against ihe of As and with what information I I and be if would not veto the Proviso but I do not know if I knew he still would vote for I should tto because in my his election alone can defeat Cass and should slavery thereby go to the territory we now just so much will certainly happen by the election of Cass in a course of policy leading to new new acquisitions of had still fur ther extensions of of the two is to be which is prefera ble But there is as much doubt of Cass on improvements as there is of Taylor on the I have no doubt myself of Cass on this but I know the demi ocrals differ among themselvesas to his My internal improvement col league Mr Wentworth slated on this floor the olher day that he was satisfied Cass was for because he had volfid for all thebills that he Mr far so good But Mr Polk vetoed some of these very bills Ilie Balti more Convention pissed a set of resolu among olher approvingthese and Cass in lits let ter accepting the thai he has carefully read these that he adheres to them firmly as he approves them In other Dass voted for the and thinks the President did right to veto and riends here are amiable enough to consid er him as being on one side or the just as one or correspond with their own respective My colleague admits that the platform de clares against the constitutionality of a gen eral system of and that CMS endorses t he platform bat he still thinks Cass it in favor of some sort of whatare they As he is those he must be particular and local this is taking the subject precisely JT the wrong pending the oofteyofthe whole people for in object which will benefit only a portion of is the greatest real objection to and has been so held b Mr and all 1 till But behold the objects most nearest free from this are to be while those most liable to it are to be To return I cannot help believing that Gen when he wrote his letter of accep well understood he was to be claim ed by the advocates of both sides of this and that he then closed the door against all further expressions of opinion purposely to retain the benefits of tha double His subsequent equivo cation at to my proves such to have been the One word and I shall have don with this branch of the You and your in are in favor of laying in ad set of parly positions as a unit and then of enforcing the people by every sort of to ratify them however unpalatable some of them may b and our are in favor o making Presidential elections and the leg islatibn of the country distinct matters s that the people can elect whom they please legislate they without any save onli so much as may guard against infractions of the undue and wan of The difference between us is clear as That we are righ we cannot We hold the true re publican posit In leaving the peoples business in their bunds we cannot be We are and even anx to go to the people on this Old Horses and Military But I suppose I cannot reasonably hopet convince you thai we have any principles The most I can expect to assure you that we think we and are quite con ented with The other one o the gentlemen from Mr Iver an eloquent and a man of learn so far as I can not being learn came down upon us astonish He spoke in what the Baltimore American calls the scathing and wither ing At the end of his second se vere flash I was struck and foun myself feeling with my fingers for an as surance of my continued physical exist A little of the bone was left and gradually He eulogized M Clay in high and beautiful and then declared that we had deserted all our prin and had turned Henry Clay out like an old to This is terri bly It cannot be answered by ar gument at I cannot so answer I merely wishto ask the gentleman if tli Whigs are the only party he can think of who sometimes turn old horses out to root Is not a certain Martin Van Buren ah oli which your own party havcturnec to root and is he not rooiinsa little to your discomfort about now Bill in no nominating Mr Clajfc our you Ah in what Tel ye men of what principle we violated We sav you did violate principle in discarding Van and we can tell you You violated the pri he the one great livins principle of all Democratic representative principle that the repre sentative is bound to cairy out the know will of his A large majority of the Baltimore Con vention of 1844 by their constitu instructed to procure Van nomination il they In in glaring contempt of yon reject ed as the gentleman from New Mr the other day expressly admitted that same general availability which you charge upon and daily chew over as something exceedingly odious and But the genileman from Mr gave us a second speech all well considered and put down in in which Van Buren was scathed and withered a few for his present position and I cannot remember the gentlemans precise lan but I do remember he put Van Bu ren fill he got him where he was finally to stink and Mr it is no business or incli nation of mine to defend Martin Van Bu In the war of extermination now waging between him and his old I devil take the the But there is DO mistaking the origin of the breach if the curse of and rotting is to fall on the first and greatest of principle in the I disinterestedly that the gentleman from and his pres ent are bound to take it upon But the gentleman from Georgia fur ther ive have deserted all our prin and taken shelter under General Taylors military coittailand he seems to think this is exceedingly as his faith so be it unto But can he remember no other party have been sheltering for near a quarter of a century Has he no acquaintance with the ample military coattail of General Docs he not know that his own parly have run the last five Presidential races under races under coat tail and that they are now running the sixth under that same cover Yes that coat tail was not only for General Jackson him but has been clung to with the grip of death by every Democratic candidate You have nevei ventured and dare not now venture from under Your campaign papers have constantly been with rude likenesses of the old General upon them hickory poles and hickory brooms your neverending emblems Mr was Young Little or some so and even now your campaign par per nere is proclaiming that Cass and But er are of the true Hickory dare not give it Like a horde have stuck to the tail of the Hermitage lion to the end of his lifejand you are still sticking to and drawing a loathsome sustenance from it afterhe is A fellow once adver tised that he had made a discovery by which he could make a new man out of an old and have enough of the stuff left to make a little yellow Just such a discovery has General Jacksons popular ity been to You not only twice made President of him out of but you have had enough of the stuff leit to make Presidents of several comparatively small men since and it is your chief reliance now to make still Mr old horses and military coattail or tails of any are not fig ures of speech such as I would be the first to introduce into discussions here but as the gentleman from Georgia has thought fit to introduce he and you are wel come to all your have or can make by If you have any more old hor turn them out anymore cock and come at I I wouldnot introduce thismode of discussion here but 1 wish gentlemen on the other side to that the use of degrading figures is a game at which they may not find themselves able ta take ail the We give it you give it and well you may but for a very different reason from that which you would have us The power to all consist in the truthfulness of their applica tion understanding you may well give it They are weapons which hit but miss Military Tailoftht Great in my I was very near clo sing on the subject of military tails before I was done with There is one entire article of the sort I have not discussed yet I mean the military tail you Demo crats are now engaged in dovetailing on to the great all his biographers and they are legion have him in tying him to a military like so many mischievous boys tyinga dog to a bladder of the material they have is very limited but they drive at might and He invaded Cana da without and he it it without As he did both under I suppose there to nei ther credit or discredit in but they are made to constitute a large parl of the He was not at Hulls but lie was close by he was volunteer aid to Harrison on the day of the battle of the Thames as you said in Harrison was two miles off while the battle was I suppose it is a just with to say Cass was aiding Harrison to pick This is about except the mooted question of tlie broken authors say he broke it some say he threw it away and some who ought to say nothing about Per haps it woulci be a fair historical compro mise to if he did not break he did not do any thing else with By the Mr did yon know I am a military in the of the Black Hawk I and came Speaking of Gen eral Cusss reminds me of my I was not at Slillmans but 1 was uhout as near it as Cass was lo Hulls sur like I saw the place very soon It is quite certain I did not break my for I had none to break but I bent a musket pretty badly on one It Cass broke his the idea is he broke it in benl the musket by Il Cass went iu of me in picking whortleber I guess I surpassed him in charges upon the wild If he saw any live fighting it was more than I but I had a good many bloody struggles with the miisquitoes although I nev er fainted from loss of I can truly say I was often very Mr if 1 should ever conclude to doff whatever our Democratic friends may suppose there is of black cockade Federalism about they shall take me up as their candidate for the I protest they shall not make fun of as they have by at tempting to write me into a military Cass on the Wilmot I have Cass in I wish to say a word about his political As a I take the record of his progress on the Wilmot In the Washington of March there is a report of a speech made the day be fore in the on the Wilmot during the delivery of which Mr New is reported to have interrupt ed him as to wit Mr Miller expressed his great sur prise at the change in the sentiments of the Senator from who had been regarded as the great champion of freedom in the of which he was a dis tinguished Last year the Sen ator from Michigan was understood to be decidedly in favor of the Wilmot proviso as no reason had been stated for the not refrain from the oppression of his extreme To this General Cass is reported lo have replied as to wit Mr Cass that the course of the Senator from New Jersey was most extra Last year he Mr should lave voted for the proposition had it came But circumstances had altogether The honorable Senator then read several passages from the as given which he had committed to writing in order to refute such a charge as that of the Senator from New In the remarks above committed to is one numbered as towil Legislation would now be wholly because no territory hereaf ter to be acquired can be wilh out an act of providing for its And such an on its paa would open the whole and eave the called on to ree to exercise its own entire y uncontrolled by any declaration found on the statute In Niles page a letter of General of dated Dewisber from which the fol owing are correct extracts The Wilinot Proviso has been before thecoiintrr some beenrepeatedly discussed in and by the public I am strongly impressed with the opinion that a great change has been going on in the public mind upon this subject in my as well as others and that doubts are resolving themselves into con that the principle it involves should be kept out of the National Legis and left to the people of the Con federacy in their respective local Govern I am opposed to the ex ercise of any jurisdiction by Congress over this matter and I am in favor of leaving the people of any territory which may be hereafter the right to regulate it under the general princi ples of the I do not see in the Constitution any grant of the requisite power to Congress and I am not disposed to extend a doubtful precedent beyond its estab ment of territorial governments when nee to the inhabitants all the rights compatible with the relations they bear to the These extracts show in Cass was for the at once ire he was still for but not just then and in he was against h This is a true index to the whole When the question was raised in he was in a blustering hurry to take ground for He sought to be in and to avoid the uninteresting position of a mere follower but soon he began to see glimpses of the great Democratic oxgad waving in his and to a voice say ing Back He shakes his and bats his blunders back to his position of 1847 but still the gad and the voice grows more and sharper I say er back and back he goes to the position of 1847 at which the gad is and the voice soothingly Stand at Have no of your can didate he exactly suits and we con gratulate you upon However much you may be distressed about our candi you have all cause to be contented and happy with your If elected he may not maintain or even of his positions previously but he will be sure to do whatever the party for the time may require and that is precisely what you He and Van are the same manner of men like Van he will never desert till you first desert CASS OS ABB HA Mr I adopt the suggestion of a that General Cass is a General of splendidly successful to be not upon the public but upon the public He was Governor of Michigan Terri ex Superintendent of In dian from the 9th of till the 31st of aperiod of sev enteen nine and twenty two During this period he receiv ed from the Uniied Stales for personal services and personal the aggregate sum of being an average of 79 per day for every day of the This large was by assuming that he was doing service and incurring expenses at several different and in several different capacities in the same all at the same By a correct analysis of his accounts during that the following propositions may be deduced He was paid in three different ca pacities during the whole of the time that is to say As Governors at tha per of As estimated for office clerk in superintendence of In dian affairs in at the of As compensation and for various miscellaneous items of Indian ser vice out of an per of During part of the that from the 9th of to the 29th of he was paid in four differ ent capacities that is to say The three as in addition there to the commutation of ten rations per per to During another part of the that from the beginning of the year 1822 to the 31st of he was al so paid different capacities that is to say The first as the rations being dropped atlerthe29lh of May in addition for superintend ing Indian agencies at Fort and at the rate per of It should be observed that the last com mencing at the beginning of anil the item of ending on the 29th of lap on each other during so much of the lime as lies between those two Still another part of the that from the 31st of to the 29th of he was paid in six different capacities that is to say The three as above the item of ra as above in addition another item of ten rations per day while at settling his accounts be ing at the per of an allowance for expenses travelling to and from and while of being at the per of And during the little portion of the time which lies between the 1st of and the 29th of lie was paid in seven different capacities that is to say The six last and also at the rate of per year for Ft and at mention ed These accountrhave already been dis cussed here but when we are a mongst as when in the Pat ent we must peep about a good while before we can see all the I shall not be tedious with to the large item of per amount ing in the aggregate to for office clerk I barely wish to remark so far as I can discovac in the public there is by word or either fftniany dis interested wit or of General CasabioH that he ever rentedor ate office ever hired or kept a clerk or ever used any extra amount of in consequence of his Indian General entire silence iare gard to these in his two long I urging his upon the to my almost 00 such items had any real But I have introduced General Cessac counts chiefly to show the wonder ful physical capacities of the They show that he not only labor of iiir eral men at the same ten did it at several miles at i fie same And at eat his capacitiesare shown to be quite as From to he ate en a day1 in ten rations a dayheie fri and near five dollars worth a eVay partly on the road between the two places And then there is an tant discovery in being paid for what one lnsteadf having to pay for if any nice young man shall owe a bill which he cannot pay in any other be can just I board it Mr we have ill of the animal standing in doubt Ke tweeii two stacks of and f death the like of that would never happen j to General Place the sand miles he would stand stoekjldl midway between and eat IheiA both at once and the green Krass the j would be aptto sufier at same By all means make him He wilt feed you bouitrj there is any left after be shall have helped V The WAint ant the as General par the hero of the Mexican warned asyad say we Whigsowe always OppOSJVi you think it must be very awkwsn tad embarrassing for us to go for General TaytoaY declaration that we have always opposed true or accordingly n one may term opposingthe If to asy the unnecessarily and by the President M opposing the then Whigs have verygenendlyoppoted Whenever they have spoken at they hare said this and they Bate said it on what hasappeared good reason to The marching an army into the midst of a Mexican frightening the iabao leaving their growing and other ty to to appear a perfectly nnproToking procedure not appear so to So to call such ah to us apr pears no other than a impudent absnrdltylaai4jl we speak of it But wsjfp had and had become the cause of the the giving efour money and our mon with was support of the then it not true that we have always opposed the WlUki few individual you have constantly hade our votes here for all the neceaaary more than yon have had the HoOSK and the lives of our political brethren In every MlasK and on every The beardless and the miff ture humble and the have Thro suffering and aad in they have ana and fell with Clay and Webster each never to be From the State own other worthy weeent Baker andj Hardin they and one and in the of that we lost our best Whig Nor wen t Whigs few in or laggard in the day of dani In that breathless Buena where each mans hard task was tot beat keck five foes or die of the Ore Beers who four were In speaking of I mean no odiousv comparison belween Ihe lionhearted and democrats who fought On othif er and among the lower officers1 and privates on that I doubt not1 Ihe proportion was I wish to justice lo I think of all those men as in whose as an I too have a ny of Whigs and Democrats Juris mjpj constituents and personal aftd jT Ibank lhan thank j and all for the high imperishable hones they have conferred on our common But the distinction between the eauseo the President in beginning Ihe cause of Ihe country after it was ii a distinction which you cannot To the and the seem to be all You are interested see no distinction between themahd I y lure lo suggest that your blinds you a Weseethedislinctibny as we clearly enoughand our who have fought in the war have no cully in seeing it What have fallen would they alive of our course we can never but with those who have returned no Colonel HaskeU and MaJHtf raeinbers both fought th war and one of them extraorffr dinary perils and hardships still all olher Whigs vole on the that the war was unnecessarily anil un constitutionally commenced by the Presii And even Taylor noblest Roman of them all has declared as a and particularly as a it is sufficient for him to knoxv country is at war with a foreign iffj do all in his power to bring it to and honorable the most orous and energetic quiring about its or anything elsti connected with j Mr let our democratic be comforted with Ihe that V are content with our content w our and content with our candi date and although in their gerW1 erous we ought to be erable we really are they maji dismiss the great anxiety they have on Oafc1 Dissmlim in see I have but three minutes and th forces me to throw out one whole bram of my A single word on still si The democrats are kind enough ti frequently remind us lhat we have sol dissensions in our Our good frie from immediately before Mr expressed some dottfct other day as to which branch of our Taylor would ultimately fall hands That was a new idea to knew xve had but I did icnow they were trying to get our ci dates from 1 would like to a word to our but Ihare the Some such ice certainly oti recaiB   

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