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Ames Daily Tribune: Saturday, July 20, 1974 - Page 1

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   Ames Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - July 20, 1974, Ames, Iowa                                 THE FINISHED PRODUCT—Mrs. Grace Piercy is shown above in back of her home on Meadow Glen Road. She built the porch, and a floored area under it. virtually by herself over a three-year period. The work involved moving a rock retaining wall and digging out the area by the house in addition to the porch construction. Mrs. Piercy worked entirely from plans “in her head.” At left is a view from the west wing of the porch, above the stairs, showing the railroad tie steps from the lower level to the patio. (Tribune photos bv Bill Wickersham)  New pay plan moves long-term employes up in pay grades  Final revisions of a merit pay and job classification plans proposed for adoption by the State Board of Regents were outlined to the board today.  The systems would affect about 7.000 nonacademic employes at the Regents’ institutions, including Iowa State University’s nonacademic staff.  Robert H. Hayes and Associates, Chicago will present its recommendations to the board at Tuesday’s regular meeting in Des Moines.  R. Wayne Richey, the regents’ executive secretary, said the new pay plan would provide “substantial” increases in salary ranges for general service employes at the three state universities and two special schools. He said the plan represents a hike in salaries of more than 12 per cent, including payment of disability insurance premiums beginning next Jan. I.  The recommendations include a plan to move longterm employes up in their pay grades to recognize “past service.” Most employes will also be eligible for a five per cent increase as they complete the necessary time on their “steps” during the year. Richey s statement said. The merit pay plan has been a center of controversy in recent months, with nonacademic employes contending it would not provide fair salary increases. About 150 Iowa State University workers staged a two-day “sick in” last  month to protest the plan.  A public hearing on the plan was held here June 29, and Richey said Hayes’ final recommendations took into consideration employe complaints about the plan.  Richey said the proposed plan recommends a 7.5 per cent across-the-board increase for all merit system employes who are within their assigned salary grades, and a five per cent increase for others even hough they are at or beyond the maximum for pay grades.  In addition Richey said, all regent merit system employes will receive necessary pay increases to being their salaries to the minimum steps of their pay scales. Ile said the new plan also would improve pay in a number of positions traditionally held by women at the five schools.  The executive secretary said the plan also would provide shift differentials and guarantee fair pay adjustments for longtime employes who may not be at the top of the new pay scales.  Hayes, whose firm was hired last December to help the regents’ staff in developing the plan, said. “Our firm feels very enthusiastic about this proposed pay plan We feel it will fill the needs of employes and institutions alike on an even-handed and equitable basis.”  New laws, appraisers reduce land Commission condemns  By HARRISON WEBER The highway commission is acquiring a great deal more of its land through negotiation rather than condemnation.  Gordon Sweitzer, commission right-of way director, said only eight per cent of the 1,471 parcels of land acquired by the commission in the years ended June 30, had to be condemned Even then, only four per cent disagreed on price In cases involving the other four per cent, condemnation was the only way to get title Five years ago, 25 per cent of the land acquired by the commission came throught the condemnation process. Highway Director Joseph Coupal, Jr., helixes there are three basic reasons:  First, the law was changed by the Legislature in 1971. Instead of a sheriff’s jury setting the award in a condemnation case, a compensation commission now performs the task.  Under the sheriff’s jury system six people were selected to decide damages in condemnation cases. No more than one could be from the county where the property was located and there was no requirement that any of the six had to possess special qualifications. Present law required each county board of supervisors in each county to select at least 28 residents for possible service as members of a compensation commission. One-fourth of those appointed must be owner-operators of agricultural property, one-fourth must be owners of city or town property, one-fourth must be licensed real estate salesmen or brokers and the remaining one-fourth must be persons having knowledge of property values in the county, such as bankers, auctioneers, property managers and appraisers.  The chief judge of the judicial district selects by lot six persons from the list, two owner-operators of agricultural property when the property to be condemned is agricultural property; two persons —owners of city or town property when the property to be condemned is other than agricultural property and two persons from each of the other two groups A compensation commission has the responsibility of assessing the damages to all property located in the county to be taken by the applicant.  A second factor in reducing the number of condemnations. Coupal said, is that the highway com  mission has recruited and trained more qualified appraisers.  “The fact is that we (highway commission) are doing a better and more equitable job in appraising the property,” Coupal declared. “We’re spending more time working with  See Commission, page 18  Little woman' builds sunken dining area  By BILL WICKERSHAM  When workmen arrived one morning at the building site of Dr Kenneth Piercy’s new home, they found Mrs Piercy tearing down part of a concrete wall  The height of the wall was incorrect on the building plans, and when erected, blocked the view from a ground-level window. Late one night more than 20 years ago. Grace Piercy, armed with hammer and chisel, decided she wanted the view.  Mrs. Piercy takes more than average interest in her home on Meadow’ Glen Road. The living room reflects the marshalling of different styles and periods of furnishings and art by a critical and eclectic taste. The result is a feeling of casual decorum which seems to recall an earlier day when elbow grease was more important than chemicals in house-keeping.  Not A New Idea  What the well-ordered interior does not tell the observer is that Mrs Piercy did all the interior painting and refinished many of the furniture  pieces herself included an upright secretary with enclosed bookshelves that once housed the first volumes in the Jesup public library And a wooden porch across the back of the home, with steps leading to a sunken dining area carved into the hillside, does not tell you that Mrs Piercy made it herself—by hand, without draw plans, and virtually without assistance “I suppose,” she said, “I began forming the plans in my mind while we were still building the house. By the time I started the work on it four years ago. the design was complete in my mind I didn't change a thing  “There was a practical reason for it too. I he old brick terrace vxe laid in shortly after the house was completed had become unusable. The grass was coming up through the cracks between the bricks and the chiggers made it uncomfortable. It seemed a good time to begin on the new project.” The project took the better part of three years, and the hardest part came first.  The original brick terrace measured 22 feet bv 16 feet. It had required construction of a stone retaining wall approximately 30 feet long and three feet high across Ihe terrace itself to prevent nature from eventually depositing the terrace in the valley below.  “The first step, of course, was to take up the terrace bricks and then move the retaining wall about 20 feet down the hillside,” Mrs Piercy ex plained.  “Mr (Charles) Calhoun showed me how to make a retaining wall without mortar when we built the first one,” she said “So I dug a four-foot trench for the new wall, dug out the stones from the old wall and rolled then downhill into position.”  Use For Everything  Each spade full she dug for the trench was carried hack up the hill for later use as fill Each of the small plants which had taken root in the old retaining wall were preserved and replaced in the new wall  See Room, page 14  Ames, Iowa/ Saturday morning, July 20, 1974  Volume 108—-No. 17  Bush comments on Nixon  Republican National Chairman George Bush, in Des Moines Friday for a dinner honoring retiring U.S. Rep H R. Gross, R Iowa. attempted to exude confidence about Republicans’ chances in next November’s national elections as might be expected.  In presenting his case. Bush ticked off COP successes in fund-raising this year, and the “clean bill of health” given the national GOP by the Senate Watergate Committee.  Bush, who met with news reporters before the Gross festival, was inundated with questions about the party’s attitude after Watergate:  The televising of any impeachment proceedings would be a matter for the committee to decide, he thinks. No, he is not concerned about partisanship in the committee vote “although they’ve given me heartburn along the line”; if the proceedings should become blatantly partisan, “I think the people would be resentful.”  Turning thankfully to other  topics. Bush said:  —The Republican Party cannot support price controls; the other major answer is to curtail Federal government spending “that’s a very important answer to inflation and is strongly supported by the Republican Party . . . ” “The economic issue is number one, but the problems is world wide “When we assign the blame to the U.S., my thesis is there’s plenty of blame to go around. Democratic Party congressmen are the major spenders and should get some of the blame in the fall ” Ratings such as those the Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) and Americans for Constitutional Action (ACA) give are “ a valid index of spending.” he said.  The RNC is 30 per cent ahead of last year in fund raising: last year it raised  $5.5 million, this year Bush hopes for $7.5 million, enough to run a successful program  Is the RNC attempting to separate itself from the President? ‘‘We’re for the good stuff and against the bad stuff.” Is Vice President Gerald Ford talking too much? Since the RNC pays for the vice president’s travel, it takes a very direct interest in his political appearances.  “I don’t agree that he is traveling too much.”  And finally, back lo Watergate and all its confusions.  “In recent days, there is more of a feeling in Washington that the President is not going to be impeached. But that’s not based on the  evidence before the Congress, and we will know soon enough .”  During the afternoon sessions, the platform committee decided not to recommend a study of state laws dealing with smoking in schools. The vote was \4-8on a resolution suggested by two Waterloo high school students Susan Gilette and Larry Williamson. Williamson.  The Committee discussed references to President Nixon which were to be included in the platform and decided to expand a list of his accomplishments, particularly those in foreign affairs.  But it also decided to retain part of a paragraph in the draft of the platform which suggested “those  See Convention, page 18  GOP LEADERS—Republican National Committee chairman George Bush (left) and Iowa Republican chairman John McDonald met newsmen Friday at the opening session of the CiOP state convention in Des Moines. Bush said he was in Iowa to deliver “a note of optimism—we’re going to do better than has been predicted." (Tribune photo by Rod Biggs)  Evidence doesn t show definite tie between funds, decisions  WASHINGTON (UPI) — Six volumes of material released Friday by the House Judiciary Committee contained little evidence supporting charges that President Nixon ordered favorable government decisions in return for campaign contributions from the milk industry and ITT.  But the committee noted that the White House had ignored its subpoenas for 66 tapes on the milk and ITT cases, and Democrats have said there is enough evidence available to include the two matters in articles of impeachment the committee will debate next week  The material included tapes of six previously unreleased White House conversations. When they heard the evidence several weeks ago. Republicans and Democrats agreed there was little to substantiate charges that the administration settled its antitrust suit against ITT after receiving pledges of $200,000 to defray cost of the 1972 Republican National Convention.  While Republicans felt there was little evidence that Nixon raised milk price supports rn 1971 in return for a $2 million campaign pledge, several Democrats agreed with Rep Elizabeth Holtzman who said “we have a case for bribery here.”  Committee Democrats drafted possible impeachment articles this week that included both the ITT and milk matters.  Tile six volumes included two by James D. St. Clair, Nixon's chief Watergate lawyer. St. Clair maintained that Nixon played no role in settling the ITT suit, and that price supports on raw milk were raised because of “economic and traditional political considerations”- not because of the campaign pledge  One newly published transcript shows Nixon, his speech punctuated by profanity, ordering that his antitrust chief abandon all efforts to block the biggest corporate merger in history. But there was nothing in the tape linking Nixon’s action to ITT’s offer  Pressure Hard  The President’s demand on April 19, 1971, that the case be dropped followed months of relentless pressure by ITT executives on numerous high government officials, and came on the heels of the firm’s offer to defray convention expenses.  According to the transcript, Nixon spoke brusquely to Richard G. Kleindienst, then deputy attorney general. Nixon ordered Kleindienst to tell Richard McLaren, head of the antitrust division, to drop the suit against ITT.  “I want something clearly understood, and, if it is not understood, McLaren’s ass is to be out w ithin one hour. The ITT&T thing -stay the hell out of it “Is that clear? That’s an order. The order is to leave the “Now, I’ve said this, Dick, a number of times and you fellows apparently don’t get the message over there. I do not want McLaren to run around prosecuting people raising hell about conglomerates, stirring things up at this point. Now, you keep him the hell out of that. Is that clear?  “Or either he resigns. I d rather have him out anyway. I don’t like the son-of-a-bitch.”  Kleindienst, later nominated to succeed John N. Mitchell as attorney general, said at his confirmation hearing the following March, “I was not intefered w ith by anybody at the  White House. I was not importuned; I was not pressured, I was not directed.”  On May 16, Kleindienst pleaded guilty to false testimony and was given a one-month suspended sentence.  However, none of the material shows Nixon was aware Kleindienst was lying. But Kleindienst’s statements were covered fully by news media at the time and caused the White House such concern that a special committee was formed to make sure the nomination got through the Senate.  St. Clair argued that: “there exists no testimonial or documentary evidence to indicate that the President had any part, directly or indirectly, in the settlement of the ITT antitrust cases.”  McLaren had lost his attempt to block ITT s merger intentions in the low er courts, but was confident of winning in the Supreme Court When Nixon learned that the next day was the last day for an appeal to the high court, he acted swiftly.  “I don’t know whether ITT is bad. good or indifferent,” he told Kleindienst. “But there is not going to be any more antitrust actions as long as I am in this chair God damn it, we’re going to stop it.”  See Evidence, page 18  Weather  A little cooler tonight and tomorrow with a chance of thundershowers. High Saturday in mid 90s. Fair Saturday night with lows in mid 70s . Sunny and hot again Sunday. Winds ft-15 mph Saturday. Rain chances 20 per cent.   

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