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Ames Daily Tribune: Wednesday, July 9, 1958 - Page 1

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   Ames Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - July 9, 1958, Ames, Iowa                                 Ames Daily Tribune  VOL. 92—NO. 7  In Beirut  7 Americans in Building Attacked  BEIRUT, Lebanon < UPP—Lebanese rebels today attacked a Beirut apartment house in which seven Americans and a son of President Camille CHamoun were trapped. The attack was beaten back and all escaped injury.  President Chamoun’s eldest son, Dory, and families of U.S. embassy diplomats were in the building. Dory grabbed a rifle and fired back at the rebels through the windows.  U.S. embassy political counsellor Francis Boardman, his wife, Ann, and their daughter Pamela, I 2 1 2, huddled in their nightclothes in a lower hallway during the battle.  Many Feared Wounded  Three flights up where the firing was more concentrated, Point Four counsellor Steven P. Dorsey, his wife and their two daughters, Gwenn, 14, and Charlotte, ll, took refuge.  The attack shattered windows on the upper stories, chipped masonry and brickwork and left a concrete grill pockmarked with bullet holes.  A gendarme who had been fir-  Officlal Ame# and Story County Paper  AMES, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1958  United Press International Wire Service  SEVEN CENTS  Regents to Ask GOP  Goldfine, Son Doubt That  Adams Helped I o Back Long-Range  Iowa College Program  Plan to Appear Before  WASHINGTON (UPP — Bernard j Goldfine and his son, H. Maxwell, i told House investigators today that they turned to Presidential Assist-j ant Sherman Adams for help in a j tangle with the Federal Trade Com-| mission because they did not trust j the commission.  Goldfine and son were dubious,) however, about what good their friend Adams did them.    NPPffc til Rp  The morning session of the House    IU    EJW  I! influence-investigating subcommit- ^    ■    ■  tee brought Goldfine to the witness V* OTIS I CIG TG U  Building  MOSQUITO SP KA YING—SCAT Scouts worked Tuesday spraying ponds of water in Ames with granulated DDT to kill mosquito larvae. Arlo Ledct, SCAT Scout, said Ames faces a serious problem unless the larvae that are maturing are killed immediately. (Tribune Photo).  Wisconsin Demo Questions Milton’s Use of Army Planes  WAUSAU, Wis. (UPI) —A top Wisconsin Democrat said today he wants to know who ordered the three military planes that picked ♦ .u wi t    ^  U P vacationing Dr. Milton Eisen-  “ ! he  T*l s ,n T  the  how*', the President's brother.  roof later showed the Dorsey,    —  girls where a bullet had creased ~  orrnc ^ Wisconsin Democratic his helmet    arty    C hairman Philleo Nash  The steady chatter of rifle and  said hp  hoped the next time Ei automatic weapons fire was sunflower visited Wisconsin he’d broken frequenlty by the heavier I  Use 5 ' ame  means of transport thud of exploding rifle grenades     as thousands o{  other Dur  and 75-millimeter shells from tank  Ls !f’  and armored car guns.    three    planes,    single-  ».    ,    engined Armv craft, flew from  There wore no reliable reports  Ft sherjda „     to  , ck Ej .  of casualties, although unofficial shower and hts daughter Ruth reports said 25 persons were »# t /vt >    ...v  wounded    Lakes, Wis., Tuesday.  u B9 ., v     * j    ® ne     took the Eisenhowers  Meaty fighting was reported    , 0 w    T[)( ,  meanwhile in the northern port  city of Tripoli.    ft tv  At Wausau, they were met by  End Bridge Battle    ,    an Air Force C-131 Convair for  Officials of the Iraq Petroleum ; ^5,    Washington.  Co. said the army used tanks and I     rj -     Ryan ’  5th Armv  Public  armored cars to beat off a determined rebel attack on the com-    Hi-WflV rflmmiccirtn  pa ny'5 pipelfne terminus eight    ^O mr nijSlOn  mil. north of the c e n t e r of p| Qns     | 0WQ   They reported no dam-  Tripoli.  The Lebanese army beat off in  Road Repairs  a two - hour battle another rebel  attack on the critical Bahsad J,  Iovva Hl S hwa >’ Commission’s Bridge, controlling the route to  C 10 en * lnevt sa *d Tuesday, after Beirut.  relations officer, said the two planes were sent from St. Sheridan at the request of a presidential aid when the Eisenhowers’ car broke down.  ‘Army Courtesy’  “It s a simple matter of courtesy to provide transportation for a member of the President’s official household any time he happens to be in an Army area,’’ Ryan said.  “We didn't think the request out of order at all,” he added.  Lloyd Arnold, chief of the Civil Aeronautics Administration’s Wausau office, said the Convair pilot told him the flight was “not for public information.’’  Arnold said it was not normal for pilots to so advise the CAA, but he said it w’as normal for the CAA to remain silent about military flights.  The flight eventually was revealed by a newspaper photographer who happend to be at the airport when the Eisenhowers left.  In Washington, an aide to Eisenhower said the President’s brother was flown back on government aircraft because his delayed trip to Central America had been rescheduled at “a slightly earlier date’’ than originally planned.  GOP Chairman  “We don’t like the idea of the  Hospital Fund Nears Goal:  Now $ 195,000  jan emergency meeting with offi dais and engineers, that then {would be “no forgotten roads” due jug the repair of flood-damaged , President’s relatives using mitt highways in seven southwestern !  (ary vehicles for personal travel” Iowa counties.    Nash said. “We would  Chief Engineer John Butter said  The total of funds and pledges collected in the campaign for the expansion of Mary Greeley Memor ial Hospital stood at $195,362 today  Tne goal of the campaign is $200,000.  With a few prospective donors yet to be contacted, the campaign committee was confident of push lug the campaign over the top, ac cording to A. B. (Beezer) Knapp campaign chairman.  The final report of the campaign will be presented at a luncheon meeting of the workers Tuesday.  “Hie thanks of the entire com munity go to Beezer Knapp and Zac Dunlap for the tremendous job they did in guiding the campaign effort to its successful completion,’ said W. S. Rupe, honorary chairman of the campaign, today. “They worked hard at what at times seemed an impossible job,” he said.  Meanwhile, city and hospital of ficials were completing final steps in preparing the presentation to State Board of Health officials. Tile interview is to be in Des Moines tomorrow.  Application for federal cost-sharing funds will be made at the Des Moines meeting.  to* stand for the third time.  Goldfine was ready with what his aides said were the complete records on $776,000 in uncashed checks, held by Goldfine firms since 1941. The subcommittee had threatened him with contempt if he failed to produce them. The subcommittee did not get to this phase of the inquiry before it recessed for lunch.  The subcommittee counsel has suggested some of the bank checks might have gone to federal officials who were too timid to cash them but were willing to use them for collateral in business deals. Goldfine has denied that anything like that ever happened.  Godlfine said he didn't know exactly why he turned over to Adams a letter he received from the FTC on Dec. 4, 1953, concerning the alleged mislabeling violations,  “I gave it to him because the letter speaks for itself,” he said.  At another point, Goldfine said he believed the labeling trouble had been straightened out when he got the Dec. 4 letter.  “I had understood that and that's one of the reasons I turned the letter over to Gov. Adams,” he said.  “The thing that bothered me and my son,” Goldfine added, “was what prompted that letter .. . because we had understood the matter had been settled already, it has been straightened out.”  Police meanwhile suggested that four persons undergo lie detector tests in connection with the eavesdropping at Goldfine’s hotel headquarters and the alleged theft of papers.  Report Industrial Growth In State;  r    •    I a    wwuw De made  expansion In Ames  spccd ahead " ba  ^ but declined to  estimate when the construction DES MOINES 'UPI) — Indus* would be finished. trial growth rn Iowa during the Commission engineers have es-first six months of 1958 created ■  Urnate d damage to the primary 1,035 new job possibilities, Ed B.  ,<>ad  system in the seven counties Storey, Iowa Development Com* —Audubon, Guthrie, Cass, Shelby, mission director, said today. {Montgomery, Tremont and Page Storey said there were 34 ma*  at  *®25-(HW-jor industrial developments in  Iowa from Jan. I to June 30.     speed,u P  a!t er    making a    tour of j     v   Included were IO new branch  lhe area cost Wid  be  shared  their wVv plants, 12 newly organized or    by the state and federal  ‘’home grown” industries, two in-    *°v ern meni    WE    ITH    FR    iv    »»vTv^  dustries which moved into Iowa    Batter said    temporary    bridges    "  from neighboring states and ex-j or  “ run arounds’’ may have to be  in-1 Built at some of the larger bridge  like to  know who ordered our military planes for the personal use of the President's brother.  In Milwaukee. Wisconsin Republican Party Chairman Claude Jasper viewed the situation differently.  “These comemnts made by Democrats don't concern me,” j he said. “They’re probably jumpily commission announced the ! nS t0 CPnc!usions - They’re always  .looking for issues and if that’s the best they can do, let them have  By I niteri Press International  The Weather Bureau issued a se-thunderstorm  Red Cross Seeks Funds to Aid Flooded Areas  A disaster relief fund appeal has been announced here by Mrs. T. G. Garfield, chairman of the W’est Story County Chapter of the American Red Cross.  Mrs. Garfield said the fund was being raised to aid families in the Audubon-Exira-Atlantic arca.  Red Cross volunteers have been providing emergency aid at the scene, conducting feeding opera-!  DES MOINES (UPI)—The Iow-a Board of Regents, already on record as favoring substantial pay increases for teachers at the state’s tax-supported colleges, will take up consideration of college building needs during its meeting here Thursday and Friday.  The Regents will hear requests from the presidents of Iowa State  Pre-Convention Hearing  DES MOINES (UPI)—The Iowa Board of Regents plans to ask for the backing of the Iowa Republican Party in its drive for a long-range building program at the three state-supported colleges, it was learned today.  The Regents outlined their request for support in a letter to GOP Party Chairman L.L. Jurge-  fore the GOP pre-convention resolutions committee, which will meet here Saturday and Sunday.  The proposal called for GOP backing of the Regents’ plan to:  1. Boost salaries to college teachers to “attract and hold competent teaching and research personnel.”  2. Ask for “immediate, direct”  and Iowa State Teachers College 1    „    ,    ,  as to their building needs during | ° ra     weekend,  the 1959-61 fiscal period.  A study of needs for “new and expanded” programs at the state colleges also will be made.  To Spray Cook’s Quarry Road or Dust Thursday  The Story County Road Department and the Iowa Highway Commission wiil cooperate in a project Thursday to attempt to keep dust down on four and one-half miles of gravel road near Cooks Quarry northeast of Ames.  Some 12,000 gallons of spent sulfite liquor has been purchased by the research division of the Highway Commission and will be sprayed on the road leading by the Izaak Walton League Park. County  tions and providing shelter for per- equipment will he used to apply sons routed from their homes by the flood waters, according to Mrs.  Garfield. The Red Cross provided 250 cots and 550 blankets along with other equipment. Twenty-seven disaster workers were sent to  the scene.  Sixteen persons were killed in  the sulfite liquor which will be mixed with water at the quarry.  Mark Morris, Highway Commission research engineer, said the solution was applied on the road last  Requests In June  The presentation of the schools’ requests began last month and should be finished this week before the Regents take a one-month summer “vacation.” No meeting was scheduled for August.  The Regents will decide, after hearing money requests from the heads of all six Board of Regent institutions, how much to ask the next Legislature for in order to run the institutions during t h 1959-61 fiscal period  Regent officials last month gave tentative approval to requests for more than 38 million dollars year in “operating” funds for the three-tax-supported colleges. The funds would primarily pay teach ers salaries.  The Regents approved the “for mula” by which the presidents of Iowa State, Iowa and Iowa State Teachers arrived at their requests The “formula” was based on the proposition that the colleges should attain third place among “com parable” Midwest institutions and slay there through 1961.  Sharp Pay Raises  Any changes in the amount of money for “operating” funds the Regents finally approve shall be small because they have approved the “formula” by which the totals were figured.  Other items of business during this week’s meeting were:  1. Study of a report by college representatives who investigated the possibility of a two-year col lege “annex” at Ottumwa.  2. A report of the group studying the controversial married student housing situation at the University of Iowa.  3. Election of a president of the Iowa Board of Regents to replace Harry Hagemann, Waverly.  Naval Base “Annex”  The committee of college representatives filed a report with the Regents last month concerning their on-the-spot investigation of  meyer, Clinton, this week. The| state  appropriations “large Three - step resolution which the  enou ^ h mee * current critical Regents hope to have the Repub-  needs "  for  college buildings. beans adopt will be presented , ^ nau ^ ura ^ e a  long-range plan  for financing educational buildings at the state schools.  Resolutions Committee J About 15 other special groups Regent officials probably will were expected to present their present the program in person be- “drafts” of proposed resolutions  fall and appeared to he effective! for .bout two month,. He .aid jwitateTrtlSrCT there is no visible change in the jthe  Ottumwa Naval Base to supple  I for action by the state convention, {which will meet here July 18.  The eight • man pre • convention ! resolutions committee will sift the various proposals and then turn {over its recommendations to the regular resolutions committee {picked when the delegates to the state convention arrive here.  David Dancer, secretary of the Board of Regents, said in his let-I ter to Jurgemeyer the regents would like to “present and ampli-jfy the major issues of widespread [ public conern” regarding the future of the state’s colleges.  Iowa’s Future Involved “TTie future of Iowa is dependant on trained and competent leaders at all levels, if the stat#  I is to maintain and improve its present position among other I states,” Dancer said.  He said the number of young {Iowans who will qualify for a college education “will double within {the years immediately ahead “ 'Opportunity for higher education {will be “foreclosed for many I these institutions are provided with increased support.”  “The building needs in the.se institutions are great and urgent,* {Dancer said, He said 20 per cent of the classroom and laboratory WASHINGTON (UPI)—Dr. Wil-j^ 80 ®  at Iowa state  Coliege, the bam    G.    Murray,    the    Republican    ,H niversity  °*  Iowa and  Iowa State  candidate for    governor,    said    Tues-     eachers  College was “tempo-  day night the governor can not\ ra L y > obsolete or hazardous.” ‘wave a wand” and make ab the    Barber    the    Regents    advocated  changes he wants in Iowa law.     a    mdhon    doUar     long-range  Murray, an Iowa State College    P**r*m tor the next IO  professor, said the governor must  years * cooperate with 158 legislators to get changes made.    Cli#A  The professor, who will oppose (I    IY 6    OC ll OO I  Gov. Herschel C. Loveless in the     #    t   November general election, said 'Districts File  Today's Local  Weather  Noon Temperature  80  Humidity, 68 per cent Extremes Past 24 Hours Low, 68, 5 a.m.  High, 84, 4 p.m.  Trace of Moisture  AMES: Partly cloudy, ooolcr tonight. Partly cloudy Thursday. Low tonight upper 50s. High Thursday around 80.  ETV E-DAY FORECAST Temperatures through next Monday will continue on the cool side with only minor day-to-day changes and averaging 3-6 degrees below normal. Normal high upper 80s. Normal low in lower 60s. Occasional showers, thunderstorms through the next five days will sversge H to I inch.  Murray Cites Need For Cooperation  [Merger Papers  pansion program by IO Iowa ma.. . ,     .    *    ,    ,    ,    -    ,    -  ufacturers.    1    sites    until    engineers    can design) ,  tn -*naerstorm warning for, the floods and 58 injured. A total appearance of the road except the'men* the three colleges  Payrolls for the jobs added by  and let  contracts for new struc *     CI !‘!    *    today as a lov\ pres- of 31 homes were destroyed and 756 j lack of dust.    ,    __  the new manufacturing concern.'  tuu ‘ s -    suir rom moved into the state. more damaged. All told, 972 fami-i Morris said the use of spent sul-j r Mini lVTnti i hi m f  and expanded industries will coml Butter promised that all road! thumto! ml How*;     lies suffered  some loss, according Ate liquor, a waste product cf the     vr . Dt _  to about 4 million dollars a year.j af, d bridges in the Nishnabottu.'~ n d inraiiv h-,     S     ^     haii     to Red Cross officials.    paper industry, is relatively new!  Ni ;W    UPI)—Magnet  putting an addit.onal $300.0(1) .River arca would be- repaired o.    ?    J    I    T ? ere \ Red Cross authorities estimate in Iowa because of the costs of disturbances presumably caused  *  ..... I    expected    east    of    a    line    from    Leon     some 510 famUies wil ,  need aid  transportation.  Business Here During First Half Better Than Last Year  month .mo the cash registers of replaced and that none of    the Im'McGregor    from    2    p.m. to 9 d rn  Iowa businesses and trades, Storey  area  would be “forgotten.” (CST. said.  Twenty - two Iowa towns gaining new industries so far this) year were Britt (two), Carroll,  Charles City, Clarinda, Corning,!  Davenport, Denison, Des Moines (two), Forest City, Guttenberg,!  Lawton, Madrid, .Manning. Man-' Business activity in Ames    up-(year.    Budget    loans    have    ti  son. Mason City, Muscatine, New i P**rs to bo following tin Hampton. Osakloosa, Ottumwa J business cycle sui-vc Roland. Storm Lake and Waterloo, I throughout the state.  Ion lima towns getting expan- Eddie Wixon, manager of th.  A  local home build*! said theft sions were Ames, Bettendorf, Car- Ames Chamber of Commerce, said bas been more activity in home roll. Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, { “In general business has been I building and  buying in Ames the Creston, Dewitt, Fairfield, Sioux good, better than the first half of I lirst  half of this year than in tile  He said a  new  by eruptions on the sun disrupted  rebuild or replace their homes, for :  me !hod of concentrating the liquid    communications    throughout  furnishings, clothing or for medi-)has heen devised so it can be ship- world lucsday and early local exjx-nses, Mrs. Garfield said. P^d longer distances.  I The cost of the program is es ti-1    —— —   ............  mated at $300,000, she said.    Au/nr^    T/m.m*-.!    D ^^ J  The solicitation has the approval {AWO TO LOUnfy KOO (J and endorsement of the Ames Community Chest, president Robert W.  . , . . .Stafford said todav.    .    ...    „    _    ,  "ipied in ry   ^ , j ,    !    tone    re    ie    Materials    Co.,    Cedar!  Confract Tuesday  - i-r" ■  ---■*-- ——*»»■ -•—»v. hmi j-. .    .    uuu    *1    j    I    Concrete    Materials    Co.,    C    odal    1  e upward j the last five years and w-ere better!, ntnbutions should be mailed. R ap i dSf  received a $35,480 contract!  vs show j the first half of this year than the rn?  St    Count >’    Chapter,    Tuesday    to furnish and haul 17,500  'first half of 1957    !    American    Red    Gross,    Ames.    j     ton *    of    n.iwi    „^t-    #...  City and Waverly,  {last year, and merchants seem ; satisfied with the results of the first six months of this year.”  The only real decrease in busi-{ness here was with automobile reelers. One dealer said his re-Cfipts are down $70,000 from what DES MOINES (UPI)—-Ten Polk they were during the first half ol  Soviet Students To Visit ISC  County families who will host IO 1957. Russian students for five days this month met here Tuesday night to plan for the visit.  The Iowans will give the students, who will arrive here bv bus July 17, a view of Iowa farm life and also show the Soviets the state capitol and Iowa State College at Ames.  The group agreed the main  last three years. He said this is, due to several reasons inducting easier FUA loan requirements.  A household appliance dearer | said his sales have increased substantially ever the first half of last! year. Grocery stores also volume up substantially o\er 1957. A clothing store said the volume for th- first half of the year was lightly under the first half of last  Korea Bonus Forms Available July 28  State officials report applications for the Korean War bonus will ne available July 28.  Highway patrolmen will deliver the forms  Minister-Author Is Speaker At Presbyterian Meeting Here  Political Fodder  One dealer said, “The local re-1ar.  Ct ss ion scare was darted a.* poli- Implement Business Up fodder in Washington but!  A  local farm implement grew into a Frankenstein the poli  tons of rolled stone base rock for the shoulders of 35 miles of asphaltic pavement in Story County.  !  The author of several books on]retd the minutes of previous meet  Hie 35 miles of    work include: religion and pastor to a congrega-  one and one-fourth    miles north ofjtion of 3,000 will speak here Thurs-  Story City; four miles from Mc- day on “Psychology and Religion.”  Callsburg west then south to Ne- Dr. John A. Redhead. Jr., who vada for six miles; south from wrote “Letting God Help You,’* the 4-H grounds for five miles;; “Getting to Know God” and reportedly nine and one-half miles to Max-'“darning to Have Faith” will  report! ' V- - — ------- *°    ««««♦»    i w< ?  ,rora mil « •»“ Ne-[Close the four-day merlins of th, | b y terian  churr hi  recorders who will distribute them vada; two miles east from Iowaj* owa  Presbyterian Synod here. His  J to    service organizations and Kor- 65 north of Collins;    one mile from speech is scheduled for 11:15 a.in i     A  typical    program    w'as    like    to-  jean    War veterans.    Slater west to the    Boone County| in Great  Ball, Memorial Union.{day: 8    a.m.,    devotional    meeting;  Anna Reed, Story County Re- line; four and one-half miles into public has been invited.    941 a rn., seminars; 11:15 a.m.,  Fern a Id from two miles west of!  Dr< Redhead  is pastor of the convocation hour; 1:30 p.m., after-Nevada    First    Presbyterian Church ini n °°n prayer meeting; 1:45 p.m.,  ,j    .    1    .«...., (Greensboro NC The church has trustees* report; financial survey  dealer  r or rs a d  veteran service or-| Sam Steigerwalt, county engin-r    “     1   he expected the Republicans to control both houses of the next f Legislature.  He pledged to consult with leg-j islators o n programs because) any other procedure remit. .  1     county school die.  only in a stalemate in the affairs ? 101 '    * ,le ? rewnanuation. pets.  of state." He was indirectly re-    night and this morn.  terrine to the fight between Love-! ' n * , w . : ,  r , coon  L '  / hC ' !  aupermten. less and the Republican Legit la-1 ^    Schindler,  ture last year which led to the _L°° r d members of the Coto veto of the Legislature's tax and “f'Wf .“f* 1  Fernald Coned*, capital appropriations biUs.    dated    School Di.trioU hied paper.  after ll p.m. Tueaday tot merging  SUGAR TRUCK CRASHES I  bo ?    ‘ nt0 on *-   A  petition wa. filed about 9  '  owa  J f)  A r? u ' a.m. today lo reorganize the Ne-Lee W. hams 4(1, Julesburg, Coto.,  vadJ Schoo ,  Township and shi  ,  was killed here today when the  Consolidated S( . hoo i  Dlstncu ,  wlU)   semi-trailer truck he was driving ^  Nevada  Community Schod  went out of control on U. S. 30 *nd Dj s trj ct .  plunged into the Boyer River.    ^ n ear ii er  petition for merging  Crawford County Coroner Harry  Colo> parl 0( Fernaldi  Ri chland   Maxwell said Williams was crush-1  and  Sherman Township Districts  was turned down Monday night by the county board of education. The board said the petition was disqualified because of the legal variances with state law.  Papers for the Fernald-Colo reorganization were filed by Roger board of education; Galen H. Wil-Hopkins, president of the Colo son, member of the Fernald board mgs, read papers on Christian Edu-J of education; and Lynn M. Rev-cation and promotion, and conduct-  n oid 8t  president of the Fernald cd other business.    ^ard.  “In fact,” said one church off!- Ralph Padellford, president of  day.  The heaviest interference was across the Atlantic from New York to Europe and the Middle | ed in the cab of the truck. The East.    truck was loaded with sugar.  cian “you could call it a large business meeting.” It is open to ministers and laymen of the Pres-of Iowa.  corder, said a school will be held in Des Moines July 19 for county md veteran service or  ganizations which will be handling j eer, said contracts for all of the ouch June  1116  *°nns,    work    have    not    been    let.    He    said  about 3,DOO members.    capital funds campaign report,  Dr. Redhead began his series of I ecumenical missions report, and  .. .    .    , .    .said business wasn’t bad last yeai  Pk' a raw C< ihi. n  U^we'.e''^".^'. b‘u!L    each v -to, , h I ZnexYtottin-'^r ""h ““    iwTSS'TSh'4^’to    j lo. a Council of Churches report Ute petition  ; _    . .  a  *    j    y ,     01  tots year. Good farm prices and  i,ne said  each veteran will have the next letting for countv road sur-  H „, ;     .    ,.4^    o    nr,til    t in nm a  keep their jobs they started buying [expanded opera,inn. requiring* obtain a certified record of hi. facing win be Juiy 22.    ^    ^F** ^  re equipment and larger imple- discharge before he can obtain the  the Nevada Community board of education; Ivin Elliott, president of the Shipley board; and Ray Lounsberry, president of the Nevada School Township board; filed papers for the reorganization of their districts.  Schindler said all districts far exceeded the number of signatures needed. Each district involved must have the signatures of 20 per cent of its qualified voters on  automobiles. They didn’t buy  irs  thing to show the Russian visitors was the farms. “If I were visiting in Russia, I wouldn’t give a hang about their politics. I’d want to  fet out and see their farm,” John Doodhue, Carlisle, on* of the host farmers, said.  the first part of toe year, becau;  nients are r  they weren’t sure what their status would be concerning the rei sion,”  possible, he said. bonus prices at an Ames market appln  Officials said the average lion* will take about two  to proc*  • ranged from $1.60 per hundred] and one-half months  pounds to $5.50 per hundred pounds |    .....  Savings deposits at Ames banks j higher during the first half of this    Iowa    Traffic    Fatalities  have increased during the first six'year over last. At present they a t  !     Thruogh July 8  months of this year. Savings bond{$4 05 per hundred pounds morijl958 sales have increased over last I than last year at this time. 11957.!!’]!  118 IN WEST  NEW YORK (UPI > -  t«  A communion service was held council and a Christian Education {Mf^iday to open the Synod meeting  IC P° rt  closed today’s session. Highest j Th# Rev. E. W. Remle>, minister] The Rev, John Wimberly, devo-nvpt rature    reported    in    the na of Inc Collegiate Presbyterian J tions leadet, spoke today on “Wise  ■un    Tuesday    was    118    degrees af Churn here, was host pastor and las Serpents.” Thursday he wiil talk  Blythe,^ (alif, and Yuma, Adz., the R|v. Arthur Mortenon of Fortjon “A Question Resolved.” Rev, I  s  Weather Bureau said to- Dodge presided.    Wimberly    is    a    graduate    of    Park  2f>5 day, The lowest recorded this During the* convention, the statejCoiiege and has served in Grand 335 morning was 36 at Fraser, Colo, (group has elected a moderato^, I Rapids, Mich.  BAND CONCERT THURSDAY  Last week’s Municipal Band concert, which was rained out, will be performed Thursday at 8 p. rn. in the Band Shell,  Featured on the program will be Mark Lundy, ventriloquist; Carl Snyder, bass soloist, and dance numbers by students of Ann Diik-sen.   

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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