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Ames Daily Tribune Times: Monday, August 14, 1933 - Page 1

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   Ames Daily Tribune Times (Newspaper) - August 14, 1933, Ames, Iowa                                 Sign Up With NRA  «  °° 3«ur duty. Your help is "ceded NOW. Millions of men end women may suffer this winter lf you delay.  Ames Daily Tribune -limes  STORY COUNTY’S DAILY '  gas.  WEATHER FORECAST  Fair to partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday. Not quite ae cool Tuesday in extreme east por-Hon.  VOLUME LXVI1  Official Ames and Story County Paper  AMES. IOWA, MONDAY, AUGUST 14, 1933.  United Press Wire Service  NO. 37  ROOSEVELT BACK AT HELM OF NRA  CESPEDES FORMS RESTORES ORDER  May Be Cuba’s New President  Nation United Behind Successor Machado  To  (Copyrighted 1933 by United Press)  HAVANA AXR)—Cuba’s new cabinet, a coalition of th* strongest leaders of the factions that overthrew Gerardo Machado, took the lath of office Monday in th* grand salon of the presidential palace and Cuba’s “new deal” was officially inaugurated.  With the pew government firmly ^trenched and two American warships In the harbor as a gesture of support for the new regime, conf!* ience returned to the capita), workers returned to their tasks and the city turn*d from panic and appre Tension to an atmosphere of joyful -elief,  Barly in the morning, business cautiously experimented in a general reopening of doors, waiters •eturned to cafes and clerks went back to their shops for the first line since the general strike thai precipitated th* collapse of th* old -*gim*  KEY WEST. Fla. CB)- Mrs. Jerardo Machado, wife of the fallen president of Cuba, and a party of relatives arrived here Monday on the former prest* ient's yacht. Alfredo Zayas. Ma-:hado is in the Bahama island**.  By WILLIAM H. LANDER United Press Staff Correspondent Copyright 1933 by United Press  HAVANA, Ci!»—President Car-1 Job Manuel d* 0*p*des formed a cabinet Monday and with all Cuba behind bim went to work to •ester* order. H* had th* coopera-'ion of the United State in his intention of giving the island republic a new political and economic d*al.  As the final cabinet list was be ing drawn destroyers steamed past biatomic Morro Castle into the harbor, elltwuettfd by a bright half moon. They anchored along the water front.  The destroyers came In token of the United States government’s suppor of the new government, and not as a threat of intervention.  The new president formed his cabinet at I a. rn., immediately after Joaquin Martinez Saenz, leader of the powerful secret revolutionary organization ABC, pledged collaboration with the government.  Salem went to the American embassy to make his promise to Ambassador Sumner W’ellea. Welles left at on e for d* Cespedes’ residence, where the diminutive, low voiced executive had worked sinoe early Sunday morning on the staggering task of restoring order after the turmoil of the last few days.  With his cabinet formed, the tasks.  First was to quite the populace. Saturday, when General Gerardo Machado's hated dictatorship ended. th*v burned, looted and killed. The killing continued Sunday, and at leatt 20 were assassinated during the day. Nearly all were members of the Partida ta Porra (party of the bludgeon) the gunnman secret s*rvlce Machado formed assassinate his enemies. Shots were heard frequently throughout th* night as Porristas were hunted through the streets.  One of de Cespedes first acta wag to declare martial law thru-(Continued on Pag* Two)  Dr. Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, above, former Cuban ambassador to the United States, and former secretary of state, is successor to President Gerardo Machado of Cuba. De Cespedes will serve pending selection of a permanent president.  NO INTERVENTION, SMS ROOSEVELT  U. S. Sympathy With New Government  HSM CENTER YOUTH KILLED IN CAR WRECK  Auto Somersaults Into Ditch; Three Are Injured  STATE CENTER — Robert Rich eson, 20, son of Mj. and Mrs. R. E Richeson of this place and former Iowa State college student died en route to a Marshalltown hospital Sunday night from injuries sustained when he was thrown thru The top of the automobile in which he was riding as it somersaulted Into a ditch.  Richeson and three other friends were en route to Marshalltown about 9:30 p. rn. Sunday in a car driven by Perry Bovie of State Center. The Bovie car hooked fenders with a car which was mak ing a right hand turn off the high way onto a side road about three miles east of Marshalltown, turned over several times before right ing itself and Richeson was thrown thru the top. His skull was frac tured.  Miss Helen Malloy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Malloy of State Center, who was riding in the rear seat with Richeson was badly cut about the head. She is now re covering at the home of her par (ems here.  Bovie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bovie of this place and assistant in the county treasurer’s office at Marshalltown, had both legs bro ken and was reported still uncon scious early Monday morning in a Marshalltown hospital.  The fourth member of the party. Miss Mildred German, w ho was riding in the front seat with Bovie. suffered cuts about the body and face and was unconscious for several hours. She was in the hos pital Monday. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. G W. G*rman of State Center and she is an instructor in  Huge Public Works Program Being Translated Into Jobs Under  Direction of Secretary Ickes; Over $1,000,000,000 Approved  Editor’s note:    Secretary  of Interior Ickes in the following dispatch written express for the United Press tells how the $3,300,000,000 public works Jfund.ls being translated into actual jobs for the unemployed with the utmost speed. As director of this phase of the national rerovery campaign, Ickes has charge of the largest construction program ever undertaken by any nation.  Actual construction work has a1  r *ady started.  Preserving ail reasonable safe shards for the public’s money, delays have been avoided whil* making effective the intent of *ongress and the will of the administration.  Approximately a third of the finance power congress vested in | the president for a period up to [two years thru the public works fund was exercised in six weeks. and the federal emergency administration of public works is preserving under terrific pressure to speed its program of priming industry and moving men from  will not, that billion dollar seed voked. The first heavy blow to planted so swiftly w’ould go right j unemployment was taken at the ahead sprouting into jobs thrtiout {earliest moment possible, when  By HAROLD L. ICKES Secretary of the Interior and  Public Works Administrator inuusiry ann moving men from intelligently on a low-cost basis! ing for honest pay on roads to-Uopyright, 1088, by United Pres*' relief rolls to payrolls. With with slashed overhead has now  1  day. Three hundred road proj-WASHINGTON <11“)——The fed- satisfaction the pubUc works ad-j been completed and is function-i eels giving employment to 27,-  fhe country.  Ordered by President Roosevelt to serve as federal public works administrator, I have watched the administration strug gle and succeed in its efforts to get the program working. The start, without any organization and a policy which had to be built as we worked, I believe is the most difficult period from which we are now emerging.  Our decentralized state organization for handling the program intelligently on a low-cost  President Roosevelt allotted $400. OOO for road building. The money was immediately assigned to the states. They have now qualified their roads projects with the government thru the United States bureau of roads and the advertising of contracts and other requirements for protection of public money has gone forward with minimum delay.  Workmen’ called back from idleness thru the public works administration are actually work  eral public works program is moving off paper Into jobs in every state in the union.  In the short space since June  ministration is receiving reports j ing. But while we were build- OOO men to 185 counties of 19 of men being called back to work ing, we could not hesitate, for states have been approved by the under the program from all over ours was an emergency task for government. The period of wait-  the country. But the full 'orce  16 when the national industrial j of the public works effort will recovery act was approved, over not be felt immediately. It is $1,000,000,000 of the $3.300,-j working now’, but it is cumula 000,000 public works fund has rive in effect. If the Washington been allotted to specific projects, organization rested now, which ii  which there was dire needling is over. Thruout the country Therefore, the public works ad-1 the detour signs are blossoming ministration drove on with im- j —each indicating where real mediate and continuous action, work for wages with all its returning dollars into jobs.    j    generative    and    beneficial    powers  Available machinery was in-' (Contin:.cd on Page Seven)  WASHINGTON OLE) — The cruiser Richmond wts ordered to proceed from Panama to Manza niIla. Cuba, Secretary of Navy !    *    °|P    schools.  Swanson said Monday after con up tins United States I Erring with President Roosevelt  Tavlor and Claxton I    *   f  WASHINGTON (RE) — American warships steamed into Cuban va-  Diphtheria, Scarlet Fever Show Increase  DES MOINES - increases In diphtheria and scarlet fever, and a marked decrease In whooping cough are noted in the health summary of last week from the report of the previous week, issued by tim state department of health.  The department reported the following new cases of contagion last "eek: Diphtheria, 9; scarlet fever, 13; whooping cough, 28; tuberculosis, ii; Infantile paralysis, 2; mumps, 4: typhoid fever, smallpox and meningitis,  0De  each; gonorrhea, 43; syphilis 44.  Hrs Monday to protect Americrn We and property, it was reported in one quarter that they were to bolster th* n*w government of President C rlos Manuel de Ces-pedes.  Two swift destroyers, the Taylor and the Claxton, arrived off Havana within a few hours after President Roosevelt had ordered them to the Cuban capital. A third, the Sturtevant, was directed to proceed from Balboa, canal zone, to Manzanillo, on the southern coast.  The president ordered the three ships to Cuba after a long conference Sunday night with Secretary of State Hull. The white house emphasized that the dispatch of naval vessels to protect Americans did not constitute intervention.  The action by the administration wag unexpected. The president apparently feared th* sudden change in government might lead to further violence which would endanger Americans.  The administration was represented as eager to show’ that It stood solidly behind the Cespedeg government.  The Taylor and the Claxton had been cruising off the southern Hp of Florida, less than IOO miles from Havana. The Sturtevant at Balbo was farther away, but officers said It should b* able to reach Manza nillo ift 30 hours sailing.  President Roosevelt’s statement announcing dispatch of the warships said:  “Latest advices are to the effect that domestic dlstn-fcances, Includ ing acts of violence, are occurring in some parts of Cuba among certain elements of the population.  “In ‘he*-* circumstances, j feel (Continued on Page Five)  Test Your Knowledge  Can you answer seven of these teat questions? Turn to for the answer*.  page 8  Medical Assn. to Cooperate With 4-H Club Work  The Richeson family resided for some time in Ames, while Mr. Richeson served as manager of the now defunct Ames Si’ver Fox com pa ny farm north of Ames.  Funeral arrangements have not yet been made but it is thot services will be held here Thursday.  VETERINARIANS IN ANNUAL MEET  I. S. Faculty Men on Program «  Members of the Iowa State college veterinary medical faculty will take a prominent part in the program of the American Veterinary Medical association’s seventieth annual meeting at Chicago Monday to Friday.  Dr. H. D. Bergman, head of vet erinary physiology and pharmacology at iowa State, will act as toastmaster at the banquet to be held at the Palmer House Wednesday evening. Dr. Bergman also will present the report of the committee en proprietary pharamceutioals, of which he is chairman.  Dean c. H. Stange. head of the division at Iowa State, will present a paper. “What About V’eterlnary Education” at the- Tuesday afternoon general session. He will pre sent also a paper on “Significance of Additional Information Concerning Hog Chob ra.”  In addition to the work by tile college men, Dr. Charles N. McBride of the federal bureau of ani ma J industry experiermnt station in Ames will read a paper on *Hn-vestigation of a Disease in Young Pigs.’’ Dr. McBride is one of the three men who discovered hog cholera vaccine.  Other college faculty men will present papers as follows: Prof. H.  (Continued on Pag* Five)  WILE PLAN ORIVE TO CREATE JOBS  Meeting Is Scheduled Tuesday. Night  Mary Pickford ToTurnN.Y. Play Producer  MVT. NEAR GOAL OF EVEN BUDGET  P. esent Income Equals Current Expenses  WASHINGTON, (U.P>—The fed-,«    ...     p ral government is nfar its goal  STf.Ut T U f!?2Lf.*i.'. 0 ^ U S «"• «»*>» tor* her visit east. .hr of a balanced budget, except for  NEW YORK (GJR)—Mary Pickford expects to appear on Broad-  .    I    way    in    a    new    role, that of pro-  Another general meetingl ot the  ducer an()  , h# lB { tndl , ‘ >k( ,  group of business men that gath ,,  paft |n  , he play T| , lf WM  ,    .    ,    .    . j i    > one reasc  plans for a reemployment drive in      .    .  Ames, will be held Tuesday at 7:30 ,i ™    ’    .     ,ha     ' b, ‘  p. rn In the council chamber at the  1 ha '  a     »"<*     a     "bort    story  city hall.  The advisory committee named last Tuesday, and which met Thursday night, will present its recommendations for conducting a  concerted drive thruout the city during the next few months to ob tain the reemployment of labor In  Ames.  The advisory committee will pre sent two outstanding phases of the reemployment campaign As agreed upon by members of the committee Thursday night;  Recommendations First, the committee will recommend that th* campaign be divorc ed wholly and completely from all connections with any particular lines of business, and that it be expanded to reach ail residents of the city by means of the membership pledge regarding employment of Antes labor and payment of a wage scale commensurate with a decent standard of living for the laborer and his family.  Second, the committee will recommend that the reemployment campaign be waged on the ground that the people have only two courses, either to hire men for home improvements or odd jobs, or pay the cost of public charity to support unemployed families in the city next winter.  It is estimated that at least 200 families in Ames are suffering because of unemployment. The seasonal building activities have almost wholly failed to materialize in (Continued on Page Two.)  heavy    emergen*) expenditures  which    the administration believes  should    be paid for over a period  of years rather than out of current  h er  j receipts.   ar _    j    The    emergency expenditures,  rived    Sunday    night.    She    said    J    Including the $3,300,000,000 public  her    business    visit    would    extend!     wor ^ K     program and oth^r extra-  to IO days or two w’eeks.    [ordinary    activities,    are    not car-  She refused to discuss dontes-  to sell.  g  tary. Elizabeth Lewis, and cousin, Mrs. Verna (khalif,  Senate Racket Committee in Session in N.Y.  NEW YORK OJJi) - The govern int nt’s war against racluteers began to take form Monday at the first hearing of the senate racket committee, which received suggestions for control of firearms, form ation of an American Scotland yard and a law reviving the whipping post for young criminals.  Universal fingerprinting also was proposed by Edward P. Mulrooney, famous for his work as New York police commissioner and now head of the state beer board, who ad  Stephenson Store Robbed of Cash by 2 Women Shoppers  Two wo» ten perpetrated a conf I dence game and escaped with more than $30 in cash from the till at the Stephenson dry goods store, 2534 Lincoln way, Saturday afternoon, according to a report Mr. Stephenson made to police.  The women came, made a small purchase and spotted the ca*h drawer. Returning in a few minutes, they add*d to their first purchase, and then while one of them tried on a new coat, the other slipped back and robbed the cash till. The robbery was not discovered until a short time later, after the women had had an opportunity to escape.  1. Where WLB the late Mayor Cermak of Chicago born  2. What city is called the Wash ington of South America?  3    Where is Togoland?  4    Define filicide.  b: Name the cities that have been    capitals of the United States,  6    Where is Cape Ann?  7.    Who are the Kru?  8.    Give the date of the    Battle  of Waterloo.  9. Has the twentieth amendment to the constitution been ratified ?  10. Na n r Hie Hi lt I; h king who  aaA ifittxk Itlnalink  5BHK3BEE3HESS8.2EHHMIE." :"r. I!  NEVADA — The Story County Medical association will cooperate with 4 H club officials this year In staging the girls health contest, which is an annual feature of the Story county 4-H club achievement show. Dr. W. B. Armstrong of Ames, president of the association and Dr. Sperow of Nevada, seer* I tary, will be in charge of examinations, the schedule for which has been announced as follows:  Arizona’s Petrified Forest Is  Visited by Ames Scout Party  Souvenirs are little mementoes stands. This and other evidence  tic affairs when Douglas Fairbanks’ name was mentioned.  "I ara very sorry,’’ Mary said,  I raising her hands, “but w e cannot discuss that.’’  SEVERSON WINS GLAD SHOW CUP  Scores 130 Points In Annual Event  M C. Severson, 1125 Grand avenue, vice president of the Ames Gladiolus society, was the winne.  Saturday of the sweepstakes cit)) j ted to $242 667.4 s  5. Ordinary exoffered by the Ames Garden club ptnditur.s. Including many mil-each year to the person receiving  1  the highest number of points in the annual gladiolus show.  The seventh annual show was held Saturday afternoon and evening in the banquet hall of the Sheldon-Munn hotel. The attendance at the show- was large, and keen interest was displayed in the exhibits.  Mr. Severson scored ISO points He also won the Iowa Gladiolus society silver medal, the section sweepstakes In the single spike variety class, the character and type class, and the garden flowers special class.  Second Place to Madrid Second place winner in the show was C. L. Goodrich of Madrid, who scored 79 points, winning the American Gladiolus society bronze medal, the sweepstakes prizes in the variety collection class and the named variety class.  The Beresford family of Ames, including Ken, Don, Ruth and Bruce, took third place with 65 points; Ed Kooser, president of the Ames Gladiolus society, fourth with 53 points and VV. Neil Adams, secretary-trcasurer of the Ames society, fifth place with 37 points.  ’I he Beresford family was award (Continued on Pagx Two)  ried in the “ordinary budget." The | vanred the idea that young crim public works costs arc to be I Inals should be lashed. He address amortized over a period of years  by sp elal taxes of $225 000,000 annually voted by th* last session of congress.  Steadily rising tax revenues from legalization of the sale of b*er and increased business activity, together \ itll large reductions in running exptnces of th* government, have virtually achieved a balanced budget for ordfn ary operations.  In the first IO days of August the treasury collected in taxes and other income a total of $79,453,914 and sptnt $78,783,515 for running expense.  Front July I. the start of the current fiscal year, to August IO, income of (he government anioiin-  lions of non recurring pat ure, came to $274,401,484. This $32 000,000 de fie it in ordinary operations is ex pee. ted to b 1  made up when full effects of the economy program are felt and September quarter income tax payments come in.  Emergency expenditures in this period amounted to $137,759,942. in the corresponding period of last year relief expenditures thru the reconstruction finance corporation amounted to $188,810,514.  The total income of $242,667,485 from July I to August IO was nearly double the $122,714,947 collected in the corresponding period of last year when some of the current taxes were not fully in et-feet. n'otal expenditures, including emergency this year were $412,-161,427. against $654,512,886 in the corresponding period of last year  cd the committee, meeting in the austere assembly hall of the bar association, after Senator Royal S. Copeland liar! raised the question of firearms control and Joseph B. Keenan of Chicago had outlined his idea of Scotland yard.  Semi-final .xaminations (two high scoring girls fron each club) —August 18, Dr. Armstrong’s office In Ames: Loyal Lafayette Las ales, Howard Hearty Hustlers, Milford Merry Maids. Happy Hearts, Awol, Sunny South Servers and Clever Climbers. August IS, Dr. Sperow’s office in Nevada: Lively Lincoln Links, Cloverblossoms, Happy Helpers, Peppy Pals, Happy Pals, Jollyette ana Indian Creek.  The two highest scoring girls from each semi-final group will -e port af Dr. Sperow’g office in Ne vada, Monday August 21 for the final examination to determine the  ■ ! III bim I Mf  jwimi? CTllnpiOB, *  that Uncle Sam has decree must be left In their natural habitat in the national parks and scenic reservations under federal control, so the Antes boy scouts expedition discovered on entering the great petrified forest of Arizona, last week.  A message received from the party of five boys under leadership of Harold E. Sehibidt, Monday, related this and other inch ! dents on their visit to this natural wonder, just before heading to ward the Grand Canyon of the Colorado riyer.  The message reads as follows:  “August IO. Yesterday, we left the Painted Desert and entered the Petrified Forest National park. We stopped near the entrance to pick up some souvenirs but a couple of forest rangers happened along and gave us some vivid In structions.  “We proceeded on to the forest areas to see the huge petrified logs. Among the most Interesting was the agate bridge which Is a  giv s rise to the theory that <h*se logs drifted in from another region, became water logged and sank to the bottom of the prehistoric sea which was supposed to have covered this area.  “Minerals gradually replaced the trees, molecule by molecule, to form these beautiful stone logs, beautiful carnelian, agate, topaz and quartz colorsV     %   “Geologists who have sun eyed this area have found fossilized sea animals which date back 50 or 60 million years. Most common of thfse w’ere mud animals closely related to present day lizards. This wag one of the most beautiful and most interesting places we have visited.  “We are now at Grand Canyon ’  ***** —    • ♦ - -nm*   —  Pair Married in Air  SEATTLE (URI — Here’s one bridegroom who was properly “up in the air’’ at his wedding. He’s Howard Deeter, 21, who married 17-year-old Elane Dunbar while 5,000 feet in Hie air  huge petrified log across a wide in a ship piloted by Frank Wha I-  chasm. All the lr* *ar.- lying on es.    A Jut-lice ai    LU ii    fly rev  tig* around. Mot A.    ...■*  MW"**'* iim    Mi*.  r f.-lf'W  H IXJ ti HDB* ' (H XRX  AUTOS DAMAGED IN FOUR COLLISIONS SAT  lour auto accidents In Ames Sat ttrdiy afternoon and evening were reported to police. Women in two of the accidents r*>ide at the same residence In the fourth ward.  Autos driven by Prof. Regina Friant of th* home economics depart ment at Iowa State college and J. M. Munsinger, president of the AmeR Grain and Coal compo try, col. Ihied at Kellogg afeuue and Fifth Afreet, about 1:20 p. rn. Both j ars were damaged. Miss Friant lives at 307 Ash avenue Mrs. Anna Mendel on. also living at 307 Ash avenue, was in collision while driving her car, with another car driven by Clarence 8la Via. 503 East Second street, at Lincoln way aud Sheldon avenue about 5:50 p. rn.  ^ A car driven by Mrs Max Levin* 530 Welch avenue, and the Ames Laundry company truck driven by Ralph Buggies were in collision at Lincoln way and Riverside drive at 6:80 p, ni.  Carr driven by XI Elliott, J2s Hyland avenue, and Marty Murphy 621 Seventh street, were In collision In Main afreet about 8:15 p rn.  Nearly all carf in there mishap;! Btu Owu^n. (ttSUiSX  TI  TO AUTO THIEF TRAIL  Ames police were piecing together information Monday that points to the trail of an auto thief who stole a car In Boone, abate doned it here and took another machine from Ames, Saturday night.  Walter P Motlier reported Sat urday night that his 1928 Chevrolet sedan hearing Missouri license No. 149 442, had been stolen from In front of 307 Stanton avenue.  Police Sundav took possession of a new Buick sodan abandoned Sat-urday night to a side street south of Lincoln way in the fourth ward, found Monday to hoe bien stolen in Boone Saturday night. This car had Virginia license plates.  The officers als- learned that the license plates were stolen from another car In Bonne Saturday night, parked near where the Vir git ia car w as ta - n. It Is thot prob able that th* Amra car is being driven with 'he Boone lieens* plates on it.  RETURNS TO BASE  Leader Becomes First Air Marshal  OR RET ELLO. italy <IT)—The 23 ships of the Balbo squadron which survived the historic flight to Chicago and back reached their base at Orhetello Monday and were reviewed by King Victor Emanuel.  The flying boats were drawn jup in parade formation, and the king passed the long line In a motor boat w’hile the crews stood at attention on the great wings.  After the review. Victor Emanuel congratulated the fliers and led a parade thru the streets to the city hall, where an informal demonstration took plate.  The squadron was then released on a two months furlough in recognition of their special serv  ice.  General Main Balbo, youthful  SEEKS AGREEMENT ON COOES FOR RIG BASIC INDUSTRIES  Noted Economist Quits Advisory Board for Consumers  WASHINGTON <U.E>— President Roosevelt took a guiding hand Monday in his national recovery administration’s efforts to swing three key industries, oil, coal and steel, into line under codes regulating competition, wages, and working hours.  Codes for these giants of American business have been delayed by protracted disputes within their own ranks and controversies with the NRA. Pending final solution of its problems, the oil industry has been authorized to operate under a modified form of the prest* djntial re-employment agreement. The others still are outside the fold of the blue eagle.  As Mr. Roosevelt took personal command of the recovery drive, one of his first acts was to go over the disputes with Kenneth M.‘ Simpson, deputy NRA administrator, who presided at hearings which failed to bring greement on proposed codes for the three groups. With Simpson’s report at hand, the president expected to meet with Chief Administrator Hugh S. Johnson.  The issue of price-fixing is the crux of the oil controversy. Major producers insisted that the government prescribe prices that would assure them a return sufficient to meet the higher costs of increased w-ages and shorter working hours.  Johnson opposed this, feeling that federal regulation of production would stabilize prices. NRA economists and interior department experts have tackled the problem and hope to have a solution by Thursday, when 24 leader* of the industry are to ittfef with Johnson Th* coal and steel controversies have cut a still sharper* ttne between policies of the Roosevelt d-ministration and those of powf»rfuf industrialists, including MelJons, Morgan and Rockefeller interests. Important sections of the coal industry virtually have defied tne administration to try to force them to end their traditional non-union labor policy. .Johnson declares their code must permit workers to organize in accordance with the provisions of the rerovery act. He is believed to have the Bill support of Mr. Roosevelt, who has power to prescribe a code for the industry.    *  While Johnson concentrated on the big industries, he relied upon consumers and local campaign committees to exert Increasing pressure on stores and other employer* to sign the blanket reemployment agreement and to live up to ft* terms.  “Buy! Bum now !” he extorted (Confined on Page Two)  !CONFERENCE GOAL IS MORE, BEITER STEAKS  CHICAGO TR)— Means of producing more tender steaks and juicier ( hops were discussed here Monday as the national cooperative meat investigation conference opened for its annual session.  Representatives of 30 of the  air minister and commander of Batlon  n  leading agricultural exilic armada, was created Italy’s periment stations and the I nited first air marshal Sunday in glum {States department of agriculture, orous state ceremonies during Together with nom marc tai experts,  met to ponder every phase of meat cookery.  Iowa farmers produce one-sixth of the nation’s corn crop, bul only 4 cents of the average farm dollar comes from the sale of corn, Prof. Fred J. Beard of Iowa State college explained to delegates.  “iowa’s corn crop goes to lh*  historic milestone I market on the hoof, he said.  “Eighty-eight per cent of our farm income is from livestock, 4 2 per cent is represented by th* hog crop.*’  Professor Beard called attention to the increasing use of pork.  Municipal Utilities Fall Under NRA Code  Despite a telegram received last W’eek by Governor Herring, a copy of which was received by City Clerk A. B. Maxwell, to the effect that all government agr notes and institutions were exempt troni provisions of the VRA code, Dr. Maxwell states that be has other information showing that municipal utilities do come under th* code The Ames municipal electric and water department already have  to (.HftnAiiftmiiiiliM) irn   -  which the Roman populace gave him and hts daring comrades a thunderous ovation.  “I congratulate you in the name of the italian people." Premier Benito Mussolini said warmly as he placed the marshal's helmet on Balbo’w head arid phi braced him. "Your flight will remain indelibly in the memory of man as an in aviation."  II Duce presented medals to the other members of the flight of 24 seaplanes amidst the cheers of the people packed about the Palatine hill where the ceremonies took place. King Victor Emanuel received th*’ men in a half hour s audience at QuiTina I palace. He congratulated each individually and conversed with them on their adventures  Aped Woman Give* $60 to Bandits to Prevent Kidnaping  WAUKON. <r.p> How Mrs M. F. Schierhols, 86, of Lanaiug. la.. gave bandits $60 she had saved for taxfs to save her two-year old great grandson from kidnaping was told by police Monday.  A man and woman entered the Schierholz home Saturday night, held i.p the aged woman aud he daughter, Mr*. Charles Markle)-, 43. \\ hen beating and a match ap plied to her bare feet had not in duced Mrs. Schlerholx to tell where her money was, the bandits threat* ned to kidnap two-year old J De'id Hum, Mrs. Schierhols sur-I  AUNT LINDY SAYS-  This has been a hot old summer even with all the baseball fatu got vt   

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Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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