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Alden Times Newspaper Archive: May 2, 1890 - Page 1

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   Alden Times (Newspaper) - May 2, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                THE ACTS OF (CONGRESS. �VCCIMOT  MVMMAIIt'   Of A  WKICK'H Li:(iiNi.^Tivi': wiiiiK. Mil* and �(nliiUoiit iiiirmliirrrt ntul Topic* niKUMWl liy llij .SaUanal llndr ol In tb� Monio on tbo 'JSd Biin�-tor Coonrell uffered  reiolulion, iihich �nH Mined in, diiectloK ths miptr-iDtoudrnt of opDHui III commnuicnln to lb� ii-'Uile lb� loriu of rule* sud reuuln. tlooi ailopUd bjr bim for obltiulDR iliitii-lloi to farm morlg*�oi. Hrnntor Plnab'i ranfllatlon, benioforo oSrrtd, for lb* InormM of treRRorr ptirebMo >nd ooin�Ba of kilrrr, wax |iie�oii(�d und Guittt moTM an Rddilion to it, tbe furtbar ��-olulioD tbiit frc* coiiitge of illTer ll nMntml lo it loniid flnanolal policy nnd Anniitudod by nil great iBtaraata of tbo coonlry, and Ibat Ibeiefora all Inwi- limiting lljs coin. �(� of allver ought tu be reiitsltd. Senator IMunib couveutod to let tba rea-olnllon lis over for tbu prenont, no aa to giTa Heonlor Mitcboll an o|i|iortiinitv to addrraa tba nanala. Hoiiatnr Mitchell ad-draaaed the aauato In favor of tbo oonatitntlonal nuifiidmoiit proposed by biui tor tbe election of Kvuator* l>y i , , popular vote. At Iho conclUKiou of Sena- I ".�} or MitrhfU'a rcmnrku tbo retiolntion woa rrfertcd to tbe couimilteoon privilpjion nnd eledlonx. The biiuoo nrnHnduifot to tho unlional zooIomIchI pnrk bill whh aiirtod to nnd tbi- bill now ^uua totliu proitidoiit. The Diattiut of Coluiiililn upiirciprlittlnn bill waa piiNKpd iinil nfti^r cxei'iiliTe HCKiiion tbo aonnto luljournoj. In tbe bouiio on Iho UJd tli� .'omniitleo on wnya and nicana reporlcd � bill pro-Tidiug for tbo cloaaillciilioii nf wornlod clalba na woulona. Itefarrcii tu tbo committee of tthula. C'auler, of Maaaii-Icbuactta, moved Ibat the houae toocur in tho aenute amcnd-Uaota to the vorld'a fair bill. Tbia being graad to the bill ia finally paaacd nod will lie aent to tbe proaidrnt for hia aanctlon. Tbo houaa then vent into eouiDiittoe of the vbola (Payaon, of lllinoia, in the cbalrloa the legialatire appropriation bill. Wilboal tluiahiug the bill tbo rommitlee roaa and tbe bouae adjonrowl. In tbe aanale on tbo hcnalor Sherman, from tbe commillae on foreign rela-tioiia, reported back to tba aeuate, in li'U if tienator Itragao'* bill coBnafotug the irriualion of tbe arid Unda in tbo valley of '.bo Rio Grande river, the concurrent rrao-ution rcqueating the preaident to eutvr nlu negotlationa �itb lbi> govornmfni' of Sleiico on tbo aubject. Aifopled. Sena-.or Cbaodlor offerca a rcaulalion to incnr-lorata among tbe atandrng rulea of tbe xoato one to ex|iedite tbo taking of volea ind facilitating public bnaiuoa*. Uoforrcd o tho committee on rule*. It providaa for yroredore almilar to that in tbo bouao to lead nB dilatory motiona, etc., and ulao irovidfa that the prraidiog officer may ante to be entered on the journal tbe laraea of xenatora prcaout an't not voting o make np a quorum. Tbe conference �|iorl on the bill providing for a tampo-ary aovernmenl nt Oklahoma waa agri-od 0-yraa, M; nay*. 6. The bill now :a*a to tba prCHideut. Tbe bonae bill .mending tbe act of Aognat I, 18K9. .ulboriilog tbo cOnatmction of  high fagoa bridge aoroaa the Uiaaouri river .t ur near Sionx City waa paaaed. Alao PnalB bill for improving Arkanaaa paaa in Teiaa: aenate billupproriating 914,859 to eimburae South Dakota for tba expenae f tbe couatitotlonal convention: aenate ill amending aud further extending tho �nc&ta act of Tob. H, 18S7, providing for be allotment of Innd in aoveralty to tho tidiana oD tbe variona reaervatiooa, iilc; I'Dalo bill appropriating ftiO.OUll for tbe onatrartion of a mililar}' atore-bouao and fBce* tor army pnrpoaoa at tho Omaha Jllitary ilepot in Nebraiika, and for olbor urpoa-H. Tbe land forfeiture bill waa beu taken up and the aenate odjonmed. lu tba bQoaa on tbe S3d Mr. Uarmer. of |oDDaylrania, praaentcd a memorial of |ia Manafactnrera'  �o-lie. Beferred. Tbe bouao then went into ommittce of tbe wboUi Ur. I'avion, a lIlBOia, to the chair, on tbe lenialative �p-iropriation bill; the pending queation l>o-ng oa the motion to atrike out the claimo irovidlng derka for aenator*. After rou-iderable debate Ihe motion to atrike out raa last. A lengthy diaeoaalon on the erbol ameDdment then enaoed, alter rbicn tbe boaae adjaomad. lo tbe aanete on tbe Mtb tbe bouae bUI o InaafartbeteTanQe cottar aervice to the lavy depeHmenl waa again token np and be amendmeotajcapotted from the com-uiltee on naval aifaira agreed lo. ianator Hoai then repotted from the losmttlev on privilegea end elecliona a >U1 to amend and aupplament the election B�* aad to provide fur more efBetent en-wicanenl of tbe aarae. Flaced on the laiandar. Conaideration of tbe revenoe Inller bill waa than reaomed aod Senator ibermaa oppoaed It. The land forfeiture >UI waa then taken np aa unflniabed bnai-leea and the amendmenta reported from :ha committee on poblio land* agreed to. ^dlooned. Tbe booae on the 21th went into com-aillee of tba wbole, Ur. Payaon, of Illi-aoia. In the cbair, on the letUlotiTe appro-' MtotlOBbill. The bill vaa diMOMcd Sor-bg Ihe entire dar'a tecaion, and without Ictlon the committee roaa and tbe bouae Mjoomad. In the aenate on the 25tb tbe aenate bill to aotboriia tbo aala of timber on landa teaerred for tbe Uenominee lo-diasi in Wtaeonain waa plaoed on the calendar. The aenate tbeniaaamadeonald-i rat ion of the railroad land fotfaiioie bill*. Peadlag dlMOMlon, the aonate look np aad pwMad the bonce Joint Niolntion ap-^loptiating $160,000 for the teiiet of dee-tUaiien in the diattiot ovetflowed by tbe MiatiMippi riwr and tribntarie*. Con-tinutionV the lead foifeitnre bill waa then iMtUMd. bat vlthont aelioB the biU vaBt o*tr. After tbe deUveraaee of enlo-liMWtb* late Bepmertalite Oay, of LdiUalMU. the eeaaM adjoviMd. Ia Ike hoMe  i�aippi, rialog to a qneation of iier-onal privilege, read eitracta from aapocial to a Philadelphia paper ataliug Ibat in hia apeeob he bod ottered a vulgar. tirade agalnat Senator Quay and characteriied bim na a thief, aud oloae eeoh with an attack upon tho piety of Poatmaater-Uenernl Wnnamaker. llo dnuied that be hud ever called Senator Quny a thief. He did not know Senator (juay, but nndor-atood ho waa a man of aomo goofl trail*, iiud bo woa no pnrly to any cooapirncy to injure or defame bim. Tho bunne then went Into commiltfo of tbu whole on tbo le{;ialotiBa appropriiitlon bill. After tbo adoption of aevorttl amentliuonta the com-mitlee rnao and reported the bill to the hoiiHo. On ordering tbe provioua quoation no i|iiurnin votod,er land ontriea in Uomboldt county, Cel., made nndor tho Oct ot Uorcn 3, 1HT8. While only obout forty ontriea oro directly ol iB*ne,.iully. CO.OOO ncrea of the Redwood tlmb.'r louda ara involved. Aa a raault of an invealigaliou ordered by a load eonmiaaiooer in IHIM. be diacovorod, 01 be reported, thot TOUor 80U entrica, con-laiaing probably lb* moat valuable timber ia tbe world, and eatimoled to be wortb f ll.UUU.QOO, were froudalent in oharai tor. Potoola for about 150 ot Ibeae eutrioa, however, bod olreody bean laaaed. It wu maintained by tbe commiaaioner Ibot thv ealria* were procnred IbroagU fraud. The Bootllib Inveatmeat ocmpaoy, of Edin. borgh, Sootlaad, ara now tbe principal paitiee in inleieet and they claim thot they beoome ownera by the bona fide poymeni of 97 par ecre. end are innocent pnrobae-ere. A. T. Britton, of Waablngloa, Will-lam J. Meaeiee, ot Heollaod, aad Wa. H. �wUI, of Chicago, appeared for Ihe claim. HlgU Uvlac Canae4 Ii. A warrant baa been iaaued for Ihe arreat of Oeu. B Ivea, ei-aaaUlaat dlitriel at. loraey, laf Mem, Maaa., oa aeharge,ai forgery. Theawaal ia-aaid to be �( 000, aad tba MBpiataaatU tbe Firat Ma-tloaalbMk�� iiaba.�bltb bad flO.MO of bia payar. It ta ahw ilalad that Ivea aaedapbia trili'a H�tM at tM.OW aad part of aaoibai aalato of wbleb ba wa* Irmatee. Tba BMaiqr, baa�)e, vaa aaadap ia aitiavagaat Uv(ag. If aa b�a baaa tmatad and aboitly ar-lalgaad. Ha plaadad gnUtv aad wm bald fat tba �ipariat coart.   _ waa ao loaa ef life la lb* eoal Book Ipi^ta, Wye., aor evea �ay aaitooa iaJaiiMle Iba aMa. HIS RECOMMENDATIONS HKcicBTAnv Kvava ipKAM or rmc AaHICVLTVHAI, BITl'ATION. UnalMr ahonid He the Aim of the rar-mer In RIa rradaela-Tlie MaHgace la-snbua-Other PraelloBi aiinaalluna. Hon. J. U. Rnek, eeeretary ot egricnllure, baa i**aid tbe following circular: For month* part from all part* ot the eounlry there have reached nie many oom-mnniealiona, many ot them tiom large bodiaa ot man, all ot them from peraon* deoerving eoniideration, and all of them deeply in eameet reepeetlDg the preaent condition ot agrionltnral depreaeion. In mod oaae* the communication* *ngge*l Ihe eonvielion ot the writer*, not only aa to the gravity ot the emergency, bnt aa to ita oaoae or caoieo and poaalble remedial and all ot them appeal lo me for aome sxpteaaion of my view* on the aubject. To anawer each one of Ibeae commonico-tlona aeporotely wonld be more than any one mon connndertok* lo do, and, moreover, I om reluctant to aeod out an ci-preaaion of my viowi in lettora covering merely o pboae or poflion of tbo  rnii.r� .Viiit Do. . I will confine myaelf lo a nioro enumoro-vion of the firat cloaa of cauiea indicated. On many forma I regret to any we find o depreciation ot tbe productive power of the land dne to caioleaa calture. We find a want too often of bn*ineea-like melboda, due to Iba foci thai in eoriler timoa bnai-ucHB training woa not regarded oa an esaential preparation for tbo farmer'o work, where 0* to-day with altered condition*, wuen every penny, and I may ajy ovory moment of time ha* to be profitably oo-conoted for and in Ihe face oi world-wld* competition, a onccaaafnl farmer mnit be na well trained and careful in buaineaa o* tbe atore-keeper, and bia equal in Intelligence and gcnerol edncotion. Nor ore the important qoeationa of anpply ond demand ot morkal prieea atndied witb tbe vigilonoe which charocterizoa tbo niotbodi of our merchauta and nianufacturera. Tboae loat moreover have tho advantage ot tranaoctiog their bnilnrNa in im-metliate proximitr to trade center*, where the wideat Informatioa in reference thereto ia reatlily obtainable. Our farmera' orgonizatiooH are wiaely aoek-ing to anpplemeut tbia woutforthe former; tbu ugricultoral preaa i* oarooatly working in tho aame direction and ono of tba moat important dotioa devolving upon tbia de-pottment, conaiata in gathering ond promptly diatributing reliable information on all tboae aabjecta which are eaaentially iutoreaticg to tha farmer. It romoina for him to avail bimaelf of tho information tbua Huppliod oi hia chief protection not only ngaioat over-anpply of ccrtoin pro-ducta, but gaiuat poaaible over-rcaobing on tho port of pnrchaB�ra. The farner muat look with anapicion upon ouy at-tompta to abridge tbe aourcea of hi* informatioa. Hia advantage will alwoy* be in the fulleat knowledge of the facta. He mnal carefully aindy tbe cborocter ond the quolily ot hi* prodocl* rather then mere qnontily.ond olwoy* bear in mind thot, whether pricii ore high or low, it i* alway* tbe b**t good* at Ihe best obtainable price* that are tbe moet readily *old. Uany ot our farmera have been land greedy, and. And tbemaelvee the owner* ot more land than tbey oaa properly care tor in view ot the comparatively high price of labor in the rorol dUlriel, and in view of the fact that but a eiull portion of mankind, comparatively, can profitably control the labor ot other*. Tbe praJenI former will limit hia elforta to that which be con elBciently perform. Again, more attention muat be pivoo, eipecially to oar weatem farma, to tbe raiaing by tbe former for bia own nae everythiug that may bo utilized by bimaelf and bonaebold oa far aa foil and climate will permit. >*urm 3iurlawa*a. The burden of mortgagee upon farma, home* and louda ia uoqueatlonobly dia-conragiog in the extreme, and while in Home coaea no donbt tbia load moy hove boon too reodlly aaanmrd, atiU in the majority ot coaea the mortgage bo* been the recall ot neoe**ily. t except, ot coaraa, anch mortgage* a* reproaoul bolonce* ot purchoae money, which ore rolher evidence* of the farmer'* ambition and en* lerpriee than of hi* povaity. On tbe other band, tboae mortgagri with whirh land ha* been encumbered from the neoeeaily of lie owner, drowing high rate* of intereet, often taxed in oddition with o heavy eom-miraion, faove to-doy, in tbe foee of eon-llnued depreeaion iu the piioee of alaple prodaola, become very irkaome and in miiuy CUM threaten the fatmer with tb* loaa of home and land. It la a  or, in de-pieoittioo and weor and tear ot hoiee* and oonveyance*. entailed upon the farmer by the wretched condition of country road* befora arriving ot the etotioni he there meela Ihe vexed quMtlon ot freight rotee, n dItBcult ono to (eltle eotiafoclorily lo oil potllea under any ciroumitoncea, but in many caaaa at ill further compllcoted by lhacQodltion ot our whole railrood eyitem. Many of the road* wore balll at o lime ond ooder conditious tbol greatly enhoaeed their coNt, Compoliog Imre built under more favoroble oircumatkncee, pceaeni compnriaona of loequolity which often aeem like injuallce, and on the other bond II muat not be forgotten that mony rood* ore over-taxing their conatilo-eot* in on effort to aecore dividenda upon 0 total ot copitol and bondeddebl, a portion of which ia purely tlctilloaa. Thai many ronda fail to pay any dividenda ot oil, while tho total profile of Ihe railroad* throoghnut tho country roprcaent bnt a eomparutivoly email dividend upon tbe actual coat of conatrnction, plant and equipment, still in no �i o palliates tbe grievoua wrong of ntlomptliig to aeoure o profit upunfictitioua valiioa. It ia still too early to auggoal any important modification* in tbo intcr-atalii cummerce low. A fnllor trial is needed to judge properly of 11* effects and to aopKt^at jiidicioua amendment*. The condition of oar agriculture ta (ocb that a large proportion ot onr f arm-ere must depend upon facilitioa for reach-ing ilialant ndorkota, and ths low will hardly accompliab ita purpose ot Becuring tbe grcaleat good for the greatest number if its ultimate result should be lo raise the coat of tbe long haul. Its most valuable oOoe will be to prevent injustice by forbidding the gronting by tbe roilroada ot apecial privilegea lo certsin cloaaei or corporations which are denied to the community at large. The Middle Man. Aa'otbcr cotMe oporoling to depresa the price of the farmera' honust toil, is tba undue increaae ot tbo class ot middle men and Iho diaboneaty and greed of many of them. Hence Ihe wide gulf between tbe high prices charged to tbe conaamcr, and the low price* paid to the producer. Tba middle man with certain limit* muat ba regarded ns o oeceaaity. There oro mony tbioga bo con do tor the farmers which tbe latter cannot do so profitably for them-aelvea, and under auoh conditiona it ia wiae to employ him. The evil which exiata at tbe present day in tbia direction could undoubtedly be mitigated by, firat, a familiarity on tba port of ths former bim-itlt with the market value of that which he boa to sell, and second, a better system of oo-operation among the farmers both in tba dlspoBol of their crops, and in tbo pnr-oboae of their aappliea. t'uuLrullliia Cuiublnalloita. Much haa been said and written alleging tbe eiihtonce of unlawful combinations for the cxpreas purpose of so controlling the markelH as to lower tbe price of tbo farmer's prujucta, and of other combinations whoso object is to raise tbe price of tbo articles which the farmer consnmea. That such combinations exist is impossible to doubt, and tho sorious results of their greod and iielfisbnoas are oubanccd By the (,'ravo diflicultiea .ittcnding any oHort to limit their evil eQecls. This is one of those evils BO closely allied to the matter of intar-ststo commerce, that ita regulation may poaaiblv fall within tbe loKitimate province of nutioiial logialation. Tho gronl difficulty lies in the close observance of tbe line o4 ileinnrcslion which cHarly exista between combinations for mutual aolf-help, protection and tho advancement by legitimate means of the interoata of a class, orafi or indualry. and combinalions or iruato inapired by greed, whose objects ore unattainable aaveas tbey iufringo upon the legitimate rights of others. In spito of these difficulties, howover, there cannot lie any doubt that on earnest demand for adequate legislation on tbia subject, sustained by popnlar opinion, receiving tbe earnest ollention of our strongest minds, will eventuolly result in soma odequate moana of controlling this gigontic evil. l>ralocllaii fur Ihe raruier. i now come to tho consideration of one of the gravest cauaea in my opinion of the present agricultural depressions, but which I am happy to stole can bo effectually and directly dealt with tbrongh national legislation. Few people naltze that onr imports of agricultural products eatimated at prices poid by tbe coosnmor* are about equal to ogricuUnrai export* eetimatod at prices poid to the farmer, jet sncb ia the case. Our imparls of products sold in competition with those actually produced oa our own soil, amount lo nearly $115,  OUO.nOO and oa much more could be produced in our own soil under favorable coudilloni. We must surely conclude thai wo have here anoiber oause of depression. J BKE.V .V.'TA > A.M AKK11. Truublw ll�twe�u the Weatem Vnlun and the liovernment. The aovernmeiit is now indebted to the Western Union Telegraph compaor for obout ten monlba' aervice, iot o bnainess omounting to obout 9200,000 onnually. Thetelegroph company has refused to oo-cept the rote fixed by I'oNtmaslor-Geoeral Wanomaker, end the latter bos declined to moke oay further modification. Mr. Won-omoker'e role la 10 cents for ten word* tor o diiloaoe of 300 mil** or le**, ond o proportionate inoieaaa for greater dietonee*. The Weatem Union I* aliU con-linuing to take all government meaeagaa, bat ever eince tatt Jaae Ibey Itave refused to receive any pay on the basis ot tbe new rale*. It ii aid thai the company propoiea to insti-late aalt to determine the legal queeliont involved, aad that it will deny that tb* goveriuaaat baa a right lo fli a rale which ia not a Jaat raaaDeralioa for the aenicee reodeied. aad will claim that the rat�exad by FoBtaaater Qeoeral Waaamaker I* of this charaatar. The oompaay, it ia ander-�tood, lafnee to accept any money for telegraph aetvieae until tha coarta have raa-derad a daeieloa. No anit, bowavar, haa aa yet been ioatiloted, and govemaMat olBciala era woadanng wbaa Iba lelegtepb eompaay ptopoaee to take aetlea. At Kalla. la Oalicia. a oMh aumharlaf 4.000 peiaoaa aadaaa allaek oa tbe Jewiab qaaitaraaAHakadaaaahatol dwalUafi aad atana.. Tbe lioope waio aallad oat to dtapma tbe rteteia. bat tbey M aol aae------ bafoieelawaof Iba eaS'iiriaHadai wtar "bafow elaeo �ab KMo hlUad aod amay lajwad. CHEBOKKKH WlfcL HKLI., ir Certain Thlnga Ara Ceaeeded Tbey Will INaiMae ur ihe Onilel. It ia ns longer a qneslloo whalbar Ihe Cheiokee* favor a sale or not ot what ia known aa tbe Cherokee onllet. Mince Chief Uaye*' arrival home from Waehlng-lon elty there ha* been almost a conrtani demand made upon him by both half-bteeda and tall-blood Cherokee* lo ooo-veoe the national coancil in exlla aeaaion and declare at once that they favor a aala at $J per acre and certain modiflealloB* oi tbe treaty ot 1860. They do not do thi* for feer thai Ihe government will lake theee lend*, right or wrong, bat it I* become Ibey hove come to the conoluiion Ihot It le to their inlereat lo make the aala. They aoy it tbe government will agree to remove oil inlrodcra ia their country eoat ot 96 degree* end keep them out, obrogate the flfleenlh article of the treaty of 188G ao-tborizing the aettlement of civilized Indiana eaat ot tbe 9C degreea, repeal all land grant* to roilroda rnnning tbrougb their country, recognize tho jurisdiction ot tbe Cherokee courta over all their citizena, both civil and criminal, and give them 93 per ocro, tbey would profor to sell ratbor than hold tho strip and lease it at tho price that it is now leased for. AB TO narmm. The Cama* Agve*a*wt with lUgani *m KIII:AKS  �)K I.KillfNINtl. .V Itealilenm Rlddlxl rrora Oarret tu Ol-lar-Miicli irHitiacf, Uotir. Uuriftg a tbnndvt storm at Faribault the residence uf Charles Ilrnndenberg, which is situated in the uorthwe^torn part of Iho city, just north of tbo Cannon Vallev railroad track, was struck by li(;htning and riddled from garret to collar. Mr. liran-denberg, who was lying on a sofa near a west window and directly under the chimney, wo* quite seriously injured, but not fatally. Tbe bolt seemed to strike tbe chimney first and demolished it. Poaiiog down into tha atove, it tumbled tbe pipe down and melted' ond tore o bole through the zlno on which it was standing. Mr. Urondenberg was lying with his feet toward tbe stove, and received the shock on hia left foot. It paaaed the entire length of hia body ou the left aide, cauaing tbe fleab to inflame. Tbe bolt seemed to leave Mr. Ilrooden-berg'a body at the left elbow, tearing tha sleeve ot hia shirt and a hole through tho sofa at Ihe point of bis elbow large enough to receive one's hand. The boll passed into tbe cellor, where it played havoc Wltb the fonndation ot tho house, making many openings in I be wall. Every room In tbo house was damaged to soma extent. The only evidence of heal dis-covorablo about the wreck is where the zino was melted. The pine board under the zinc was not burned in tbe least. VKIIY  IIIUII W.VTEIl. CuiidlUuii ur Iho Uvernoneil Ulalrlcta In Luulslana Both ends of tbo Martinet crevasse have been secured and determinod efforts will be mode to close it. Tho water ia rapidly tilling the country to tbo rear. Tho pooplo of Gross Ktee and Woat llston Houge aro na fast a.s poaaible taking their stock and cattle ovur to tbe bills for safety. It ia tbunght tho highest plocea in tbo la\t�r place will escape tbe ovcr-Uow. Tbe steamer Wheeler, lb it has l>eeo doing relief work around Morgaoza, haa arrived.   Her captain aoys; "Wo went as high aa tbe month of tbe Red river in search of all that needed assistance. Wo brought down a fow people and some atock. The steamer Henry Marks proceeded down the Aatchafolyo, bat the people there refused to leave theit, homes. So far there has been no loss of life reported, and the damage in the overflowed sections at and in the vicinity of Uorganzo are confined almost exclusively to crops in tbe field.' llwklMs  Mtudrnta   at llnlcrra  College. The members of tbe Theto Ua Epsilon frateraity of Rutgers college ot New Brunswick, N. J., had what they call o high old time Tuesday evening. The fun, however, moy cost the lives of saverol of those whom they initiated into the mya-leriea of tbeir circle. Eleven men bad been choaen oa membcra without their knowledge or eonaent ond Tuesdoy evening wo* selected for the initiotory cere-monlee. At 11 o'clock a concerted roid wo* mode on the sleeping plocos of ibeir victims and the candidates coptured. Tbey were blindfolded ond their bond* tied behind tbeir backa. Then eooh man woa stripped entirely naked and morched into the at^eet, At 0 certain point tbe eleven were biought together and tied iu lino like o chain gong. Tney were then solemnly walked through tho streets, receiving chastiaoment from switches which their drivera held. There ore several small streams in tbe neighborhood of tbe oolloge and one or two pretty bad bogs. Through theso the naked boys wore urged and then tbey were brought to the bonk of tbe river and walked over tha aharp itonea till their feet bled, and tbrongh briora ond unherbrusb until their bodica were loceroted. Even tbia did not aatiafy Ihe thirat tor excitement and deviltry, and the poor victims were untied whoa in tbo center oi the Albany street bridge, ond one by one, by means of o long rope, were lowrrvd down into the river ond held there for o few minutes with the water just to tbe level of Ibeir njoaths. The shivering set woa then taken to Iba place of rendezvona, dreaaed and forced lo drink lorge iioantltiea of bad whiaky on tha pretense thot it would counteract the bod effect ot the dipping. The men were then taken lo the boll, where they were again etripped oud on Ihe book ot eocb wo* tattooed in lodio ink theaacred mark of Ihe Thela Uo Epeilon. The inl-lioliou eloeed with a general shaving ot hair from Ihe face, bead and body. A wild oud bilorioa* debauch called a banqoal ended the night'* orglee. Wi^tagOwl Mtehlgaa'a BoMtad I>eb|. Oo Thureday, May 1, the laat ot Uichi-gaa'a beaded debt, amoantiug to tai9,00U. will matare aad the boad* wUI U oaUsd in and paid from Ihe alnkiag toad. Tba boada iaaaad tor war parpoaee aggregated 9a,US,t00. AbonI one-halt were payable at tha laaaaora of the atale, and were long alaee letlied. The remaiaiag halt are payaUe May 1, laW. ESoHa have been BMde to retire all theee aad aavo the inter-eel. b�l Ibey eemmaaded ao high a pr*m-lam IbU all ooold not be eecaiod uatil ma-laiUy.______ Oaaaoa la aagaHellag la Loadeatera loaaof l�.9M,U09fiaoea lo complete the Lariaia nitlwm. The repoblieaaa of tbe beaae aad aaaalo bare agreed opoa tbe tUvar bill. Tbo agreemaat ia la barmeay witb the aaeanio adopted by tbe aaaale eaaetia eoauBittae, with impotteat amaadmeal*. The UU providaa Ibat tbo eeeretary of tbe traaaaty direet tbe patebaae from lime to Ume of allver balllon to the aggregate enonnl of 4,500,000 ooaoea of pare allver la aeeb month, at the market priee theieef, aot exceeding tl for 371 US-100 gralaa of pore eilvrr, and lo iiaoo ia paymaai Ireaatity notee of the United Blatea lo be prepartd bjf Ibe lecretary ia each form and loeh denomination*, ot not leea than 91 nor mora than 91,000, aa h* may preaeribe. The treaaary notee iiaoed ara to be redeeowble on demand, in lawful money ot tba United HIale* trooeary, or by 'any *�ti*taBt Ireea-iiVer, and when *o radcemed may be reissued, but no greater or le�a amoanl of such notes to be ootslsnding at any lime than the cost of tbe silver bullion then held ia the treasury, purcboeed by *nch note*, nnd such treasury notes shall tw reoeivabia for customs, taxes snd all public dnee, and when so received may be reiesued, and such notes, when held by any national banking association, may be counted aa part of ita lawful reserve. Provided, thit upon demand ot the holder of any Ireaaory note* provided for, tbo aecretary may exchange for anch notea an amount of silver bullion which will bo equal in value at tho market price thereof on tho day of exchange to the amonol ol such notea. Tbo aecretary of the treaaary shall coin sncb pottion of ailver ballion purchaaed under Ibe proviaion* of Ihe act as may bo necesaary to provide for tbe redemption of the treaaary notea provided for, and any gain or aeignlorage ariaing from each coinage will be aeeoanled tol and poid into the treasury. Silver bnllios purchaaed under the ptoviiion* ot tbo act wilt be aubject to the require-ments of tbe existing low and regalalioai of tbe mint service governing tba methodi of determining the amount ot pore eilvei . contained and tho amount of chorgee oi deduction, ii any. to be node. So mack ot the Oct of Feb. 28, 1878, entitled "Ar oct to authorize the coinage ot o stondoTC silver dollar and restore ite legol lendei character," aa ro(|nirea the monthly par-chose ond coinage of the same into siivei dollors of not less than 92,000,000 not more tbon 94,000,000 worth of (ilvei ballion i* hereby repeoled. Tbe oot i* te toke effect thirty days from and otter po**-age. In addition to tbe provisiona of tha bit: already staled it ta provided that money now held in the treoaury to redeem notional bonk circulation in eoeea ot liqnldotin: banka, bonka redncing circulotion, etc., is to be converted into the treaaary. "Ths fond leeellmated to amount to about 978,-000,000, which will be rcalored to cireola-tion. The committee on rulea will report a reaolutton requiring consideration ot the bill by the house at the earliest poaaibi* moment witb strict limitation on the length of debate. .Senator Teller, ot tbo Seaote aub-com-mittee, diaaanted. Later be said ho would make an effort to secure free silver ooinoge, and failing iu that be would oocepi ths next best thing be could gel. When tb* measnre cam* up in tbe senate he would move to make certificates legal tender. v.\xrE*s WAnKnor.sK .sc'iieme. The Nallonal Farmera' Alliance Claims II �a Ita Own. The senate committee on agricallure and forestry has just bad under considerotion Senator Vance's bill to provide for o system of warehouses for form produce ihroagbont the country to be operated by the government, which is to iaaue ita notes upon the depoaila of grain therein. c'ol. Polk, president of tbe Nolioool Farmers' alliance, read a long argamenlin anpport of the maoanre, which ha aaid waa formulated by a committee for that pur-poaa by a convention of the Notional Farmera' ollionce and Industriol ollionee, held in St. Louia December 3, 1889. He aketcbad the decline in agricnl-torol voluea in the foce ot the morveloui progreee ond development ot other indnetriea ond inleieat* during lb* pa*t two decadea, and inaiated that aome-Ibing should be done for tha former. Ha cborged tbe foolt upon the finonciol ayaten of tbe government, which hod reenlted in high prices for niooey and low prices tot products. Ha suggested that aa a remedy silver be W�tdH>d to ita place aa a money metal, with all rights of coinoge and oU qnalities of legol tender which gold po* -aosses. tha is*ae of suQlcient amount* of currency direct to tbe people at o low rat* of int*re*t to meet tbe legitimate demand* ot the business of tho country ond which shall Lo legal tender for all debts, pnblio and private, and to secnre to snob issues equal dignity with Ihe money metals, by leasing it on real, tangible and sabstontiol values. Col. Polk was followed by Dr. C. W. UoCnne, ehoirmon of tbe notionol committee on legislation of tbe ollionce, who addressed himself moie portioulorly to the merits and details of the svstem ot'wore-bonaes as outlined in tbe bill. He os-sorted that merebondise thus stored would not deteriorote in value, and thot Ibe system bad proved teosible and prm2tieol in C.'litomia, where Ihe Groageio' bank in im loaned 93,00U,00� on eertilicatea ia-aued to farmera on wheat depoaited in warebooaee oad owned by them. Peuaded Uar Koom Male %m I>calli. The slate inelllotleo ot Cronaton, B. I., waa the aoene of a tragedy. Mat; McCarthy losing her life at the handa of Catherine Hanley. The aaaaoll ooeoned lo tba old womva'a ward. II waa U p'elook and the inmaiaa were aalaep. The aigbl' waleb,, Ur*. Charlee Norton, heard Ibe aoaad ot a etighl acnflU aad haataBe�\ above lo eee tbe MeOarty womaa betas aaeiatadte the cloaei adjolalag. where abevo�iled blood. She waa labaa beak to ba* aad dtadalmoet iaalaatly. Bafotodaelb aha �aid the Haaley woman "bad pooaM aad maidaied her." Tbe woaao alept aide by. aide ia eepeiala eote, maeb to tbi annoyanoa ot Ihe Haaley woaaaa whoea real waa broken by Ihe laviafl* el tba Me> Corty I William Lohu, who for eevea yean had beea ooafldaatial hoebkeeper for Foab 1 Mook. paialeia. 8t. Looio. bae ataleo. aiaoe IIM0. ia Ihe meat mjttmhm OMO-uer, IS.Ua. and haa beea arreelad. Hoiae latiag waa Ih^ Oauee.   

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