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Alden Times Newspaper Archive: April 25, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Alden Times

Location: Alden, Iowa

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   Alden Times (Newspaper) - April 25, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                VOLUME XIII. ALDEN IOWA, FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 1890. NUMBER 5. 1 'A I if, "BUSINESS DIRECTORY aOiniBM*TtOIIM.CROBOH-aw*leH .Mh MMka* U �Mm�. a. Inadtr Hoboal * Mm. MrvlMlMeb R*bb�Ui vaolnc. Itav. J BN LIBRABT AND BlADINO ROOM-ta laymaiii^BBlMlac. Opto tntr daranl iMIaYkrIor.BMiratanr. AI'DIN USDOm, No. IM. I. O. O. V.____ ---Waiaaatar armlnn at  UtlaTl BaU. -----Ikna an oordlaUr laiiUi %oH- Joaat,aae>aUr7. AU�N LODOa No. I�. A. O. V. W.-Haala .M CUafi BaU. BMnlar mMUii�� (aaoad aad laat Taaaaar aTmlncf o( a4ob moatta. AU tHHlaa mMibaM aia oonUaUr ia* sa|i|e yyUo Uava Walksii Into Ida l>p raw-What !� in Ho lha �(tiii� la� mmA SavgaoB, -AMaa loA Oflca OTat EaatlaCi Hardwan BABBm'im HAIBDBISSEB. I aaa nO Maaiaahip Uekata. aad can brtni ranr Moada or acnd IkMn. Aiwari rcadr to vtiva iBtenaattoa.    T. J. BIOK, Aldau. la. J. A. BUTTON, ALDE9, IOWA, Kotary Palilic, Real Estate, Loan donbtful Htate of prosorvatioD. Ho waaocar theabnt- ment of one of Chicago's awing-ing bridgeii, and Uiinking iiorhapH of the blue (ikies of hin own atinuj land, wan trudging along, all tin-mindful of tbec-ir-i-umManco that, ninoolioloHtrainod hiM eyeH, the pon-derouM bridge had opened to admit of the pasHagu uf a roBHol. "Slop!   Htop! criml the   |)olicn ofllccr whoso duty it wan to guard the a|>proachuH to the onoraioua swinging Htrtioturc. Ul>on the l)rink" of the abvun th(> thnughtluitit fruit peddler ))aui(ed and looked back. lint the warning had ttome too late, the whcela of the cart liad begun to descend. The man might have Hsvod himaulf at the ux-leiiNO of hia cart and Htock in trade. He did not atop to rcaxon, ho had no time for that, but with the inatinotive lore of |)ro|>erty clung to the handle of hia truck and wont down with it into tho dark, ill-amelling watora of tlie Chicago Iliver. TliaukH to a tug-l*uat whirh was in the art of panmiig and tlio bridge-ten-ili-r. tho unfortunate man wan re.tcued and rB.Htiscitatod. The matter waa brielly mentioned in tho daily papera tho next moruinv! uud the event for-givlton.    Tho   ocourroUce.    however. arnonrni for pnah and progreaa, mora than kept pace with the improve-menta, and orowdo cen ntruckin the idea of tunnoliit^ tho river. This waa Roon acted upon, and at an onormoua expenae two tunnola, each for wagon* and pedeatriana, were nonatruotod under the river, connecting the South vHh' the North and West Hidun. At flrat thcKO wcra very |)opular; but before long the |>coplo wearied of them and returned their jflitronago to tho bridgea. Then an ordiiianco waa naaaed regulating tho :>poniug of tho bridgea and limiting the time for thoin to temaiu open to ten minutcH. At preaent, much to the diKgnnt of tug- A  , AMvn, Hardin Oeuntv, Iowa* 1.1.-TTi; .lis. EXCHANGE BOUGHT and SOLD.  Lmb mi Baal firtata. RIBERT HOLMES. a Hpadaltj. Hoac) -DBAtia a- Lumber, Brick, Cement and Lime. m;(>>:!i.MU Iho duiiRetH aii'l inii'^iuirpa peo'iliar to oitii-^ iiitersecto.l li;. a river proviih'il witli iiiiivalih' l>ii'lj,'!-*. Few i)f Iho liugo cities of tlie ocinn-try are aUoi;etliei- oxompt from this difllculty. .As, liowovor, the niiisaiice variea with the fre.nieney that ft bridRO i.s opened, it (oIIowh that ChicaKO, with ita enormou.s lake commerce. muHt bu tho moat afflicted of all. I �Tho preaent metroi)olis of tho West, and, aa moat of linr citizens and many outaidera aa well tlrmly t)eliovo. tho ptoai>ective inetro|)oli.s of .\mori<'a, was originally founded at the moulli of a 'amall and exceedingly aluggisli oreuk, which waa croaaed liv its few inliabit-auta on a aingle plank that could bo removed to admit of the pnasago of an occaaional canoe or akiff, the only kind of craft then plying ujion tho C'liioaKo River. Aa the erabryotio "t^ueou of the West" glow in population and importance, the value of tho river In-gun to bo more and more appreciatiMl by lior entoT\)riaing iiihabitanta. Oraduallv it waa broadenetl, atraightened and deepeiHHl to allow of Ihe paasage of veai-el* of larger and atill larger tou-naKo. When the woat and north divisions of tho citv liegaa to be cjuito largely fettled, the river waa no longer regatded as an unadnlteraled bU e-iiig pro|>OHcd. The moat feasible of them seoma to l>e tho one which pro-|)Oses to build docks, i)rotocted by iireakwatera, along the lake sliore, and close up tho river entirely. Kmptied of its foul water, the chaiuiel could bo filleil up, thus aildin^ a large aereago to the city in it� most crowded iHjr lions. Or it cunlil lie useroaehed the Clark street bridge, the lorses on a keen run to acquire Ihe momentum necessary to carry tlie heavily loaded vehicle up tho sliari) incline. Like a number of others, this bridge is swung by an elevated sleatn engine, and opens with extreme rapidity. The driver did not observe that it waa already in motion until w ithin a few yard.s of the precipitous wnll of stone. Uy a iiiiiftcle almost he was enabled lo stop the ear and save his half hundred passengers from a fearful aonnded abnlly, tlie apirited horses took fright, liccame unmanageable, and, deapito the beat efforts of tho coachman, who iiarrowlv escaped with his life, dached on to licath and destruction. Fires are not the only dangers that menace the men who.se buninesa it ia to extinguish thcin. The open bridges ore their eunstaiit dread. The horses are driven at the liighost possible speed attainable, and are given, universally, the right of wav. Dashing along, frequently in the dead of the night, with a storm raging (>vorbead and icy paving-stones beneath, what wonder that accidents frequently happen. Many a "lire laddie" has found his woy into the river, and it ia miraculous that many Uvea are not lost through thoae :atowaya of death, tho open bridges, lot long since a hose-cart waa driven where a North Hide bridge was sup-posetl to have been, ami Iho horses were drowned. Hut not runaways, darkness or icv j pavements are to be chargeable with all ' the disBstcra and losses of life by rea- j � n the approaches- Curiosity- in aliout tho ': strongest of human motivcr., and many [ people under such circumstancea will ! aland uoon the extreme verge of Ihe ' abyss, Ino better to command a view I of the river, that lliey may see and ; announce to those less "favorably situ- i ated what ia going on, and the clmnccH j for tho closing of tho bridge.   In such cases, a sndden quarrel, a fright, or a pick|)ocket may cause a commotion and a movement on Ihe part of tho , closely packed throng which will crowd i the adventurous ones upon the abut- j mont over into the river.   This has frequently hap;iene( io maat Ma�|iaoktKl r^Utive, was driveu uvei tka apynka^'t to       Uarriauw sinwt WJaiL whiuh unfortuuatoly waa uimiu, M thriM |>arUhed.  WKUa tho waa upou tha lutig viaduut �aaa the uuutaiuua railroad iiNiMnulivtt wkUUa beuaaUt lii'vea their minds of all anxiety, an lo from the water. It ia to tho disgrace of Chicago that I tho dangerous condition of the bridgea is not obviated. That this could readily be done, no one with the smallest )' r-I ion of mechanical knowledge can doubt for a moment. Many plans, some of Ihem no doubt feasible, have been suggested ; but m) far none of them have ever been adopted. What is wauled is an appliance whirh, as tho bridgu swings ojien, will automatically close, and that securely, tlie open gateway lo death which at present monaeoa human Ufo. The invontoraol the W�wl ought to think of aiul solve this \>wl*-lem. In doing it succe.ssfally, llu>y wiiuld not only receive an amide nr-ward in money but confer a lasting Ixuiotit upon humanity. -DiriijhiBaUt-II-in in ('hicaijo Ledger. Kr* �aa Sura Vuu Kuuw Your As*! One ot the comiuoneat mistakes made ia by uaople iu answeriug a (|ueatiuu as to thalr ajge. You UMvt a youu^ man who anoouaeas with au invitatMiu lo eom� attd-'amile* with hint tUat he ia "^11 yaaia old to-aar-' Iu aiuetaau caaaa otiiaf twan^ ha ia, aa a utatlar of iMt, |�l ao yaara ol a^ak He dataa his aca Irmu Un Urthday. aat (ruin Ita amtifavaarj, I hava na doubt thai thowMila tt|MMk thousaaila u( youaa Ota* hata ntarvhail to tha |>olU uadar tha in|Mr�aii4oa that tkvy had raavhad tha la^aWta il yaaia an^ wara aatitlail to ^ola. �lK> vwa Uaking ol �itii�a>tahi|> hy ajravr or Dta jiaalar pati al it.- SoMF.TUiNii to be stuiM�d-a shirt front. A PIN ia like a man. U ia uaeleaa wtion it loses ita head No oNK wants to put out a wonran who blazes with diamond:). A wfjMAs'a bcanty may be "all m her eye," but it is there just the sama WAurAliK has its romance; e%'en tbo din of battle has a sort of an engagement ring. It is always safe to leorn. oven from our enemies-seldom safe to instruct, even our friends. "DoEH it pay to strike?" aaka nn exchange. Oonerally it does not, especially if the other fellow U tho bigger man of the two. Mbh. S. -Have we everything out of the house now? Mr. .S.-Everything but the children. Yon know the landlord won't allow them in the new house. SlloF. factory foreman (in thnnder toucsl-Wbal'.s the matter there? Did you slit that leather wrong?-Opor-otive (humbly;-N-o, I only cut off my lingers. BEFonr. the Ventis of Milo: Smith-ers (reading sign)-"Hands off." Tho poor idiots! l)o they think any one could look at that statne and not know the hands were off? "I'm bright. I'm Bhar]i," exclaime d .Tones as Ihe clock bej^an striking the hour of 12, "it is a fine night, but I expect it will storm when I get home." Mattie-Dot, whot is a zebra? Dot (who has been looking into natural lius-tory for the last hour)-A zebwa? Why, Mattie, it's nothing but a funny little horso that wears stwiped stockings all over-clear up to hia ears. PaI'a-It no use talking, Emma; these Sunday evening meetinga havo not lo bo shortened. My latest f?as bill was enormous. Emma -It's not my fault. It wouldn't be half a> big if mamma ilidn't come into the i>arlor �o often '�Ti:i.i, ine, ('liailey,"said voting Mrs. Tucker to her husband, "is that man a cannibal?" "Certainly not. Wlial makes yon ask such a ijuestion ?" "Bo-cause 1 hi>ard him say just now that ho was going around the corner and swallow two thigers." "No." .SMU (ius Do.Iay, "Idon'tcare I much foil these lomperance people, yon . kuow. but 1 .should uevah think of put. ting an enemv into my mouth to steal away my brains."   ''-\nd if you did," � said a friend of his, "it would be a good I joke on the enemy." I    LM)Viintax ottice with diminutivo pug)-I understand that dogs have to be registered ? Tax clerk -Yes, madam; one dollar.   Mrs.  O'Flannigan iwith t big bull-dog I-Hay, mum, hb's a clieat-iu' av ye. He only charged mo wan dol-i lar fur thia big, foine aubnal. ;    I'uii.oBoi'HF.ii (at the theater)-It U : most remarkable to me how that hero and heroine can act so vividly, like truly impasioued   lovers,      'Theater I habitut^-Off the stage those two are I mail and wife.   Philosapher-Yes, it'.i : remarkalilo-very remarkable. 1 TlIK tki.EliU.vm's  ItKTOItT. (Ill a table two iiiuaii*�,.|i lny aUia liy Udts, I    F.acli (xMitid uii a �lltlt>rtmt way. I     "Ft'rliK|M I'll moet iirim-u� io-.l�y. , I I'm vurry fi>r you an.l your cnniiiioupUctf taak. ]    Hut, tb'ou. you"r� nolcaM^r nor liaglil; , Sn wuiuterlu ni>-�lty'i Miitilo I ni�v b�*k, t always colilH forth w4h thu liifbt.' AUliouitli." ��IU tho I.>k�r�iii,  -jiarl of thii'a Irtiu, Ot U>aHtlni{, my frft'itd. Iiave aviaru; No uiatuir hew royalt;^ Bmik'a upon you. Vou'rv uiilv a 'rtaiit:;' afTalr." 8IIP8011 oonm -DBAunt m- Grain, Live Stocky A4.DEN, IOWA* WiaaM, OL, Cad, Warratoi W fW Ccat. WmO, PETER IKYtOR. -saiunni- Live Stock, GRAIN, Seeds & Coal. ALDKN, IOWA.   J WZXXZAJf KEATIHO. Hiaiy and SMf Hantari, PKMHiTaHiMiiy. linware ft Woodenware* MIHEATneSTOmiBilGEI GHIGA60, IOWA AIID DAKOTA Sbortest, Quickest ani Only Direct Liu BBTWUH AIJ)E!f,   IOWA   FALLS^  ELDOBA, AND CHICAGO, MILWADKEK AND ALL BASTEBa P0WT8. Passengers Can Save FROM H00B8T0 CHtCASO AID POWn ON THIS Uli THIS SHORT ROUTE. Au aneedolo mhich showa to what lengtha jealou.-sT mav Ik> carried is relit., d by T. A. Trollbpo: We tog*, one morning, a little ciciorsion toTuaca-lum, on tthiclk my wife nxle ik donkey Ix'kinging to. a very M)ini>eteiit guide. 'Ihia man kaew every |>oint where it was desirable lo dra.w' rein ia order to. enjoy the lowcly and, varied views. Thi� donkey, wlio, no doubt, know all theaa halting plarea as veil aa kia inasttir, once turn�il aside, from tha path, iu a very busijH'Hs-like (aMhiou,. and planted himself before a gate fiom whiclk a speciallv plea.si!v outlc�k was to be i^eeii. ^y wife, thinking to pleaa� the man, a^tid: "HcYS well rour dr�key knows his buhiiv*�i. Ho Vume t-J hiiiiaeU to this love)^' view, jaat aa if he enjoy�d it." llak the effect of htr words' was very startling. 'Ihe man becama suddenly aiul furuiualy angrv. "No, not he! I-~I know Ibaw to make ladies and ^eutUmen sa� the views, aud all (hat la to lie si-eu. He!-Im is an aaa, aud knows nothing. l-I am the guide!" he cried, again aud again, "llie ImmsI ia au aaa, I tell yoix! He kaowa nothing T lu hhort, ba waa luriouAly jealous of his ikmkey, aud bitterly reseuted tha iiuapliiueuts i>aid to the b�ast's sa^ cilor as sa mueb taken ttoot his uwu urais�M. 'I'hU U au axlraaia casat bat Jaaltiusjt ill ita tttiblast fcuui ia a laail, uut�aaualug iaiuulaa abiob abttuld b� �t�B�laiU4 iU bittb. CONNECTIONS AT ELDORA JDKCTION with, the Chicaga and Northwestern Railway for Tama ity, Cedar Rapids, Cliatoo, Chicago, Milwaukee, Dcs Moines, Council Bluffs, St. Paul, Miuneapolia ami all poinU ia Dakota, Nebraska. Kansas and the West, ELDORA with the Central lows Rail-ay for points North acsl South. IOWA FALLS with -iic B. C. R. 4 N. and Ulinois Central Itajiways, for Waterloo, Dubuque-, Fort Dodge and iilous Citji F>r all Inloration about Freight oi; Paascngcr Kales, sppiv to our local sgent*. or address the Qeneral Kreight and Paa< scagvr AgcDt M �ld�ra, Iowa JOHN POWTEII, W.S.POIITCII. THE JLATEST! IHMUIO AND IMIO BY THB tt. a. o�vmiiH�T. �NfilTNtKVlB�a   

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