Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Alden Times: Friday, April 18, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Alden Times (Newspaper) - April 18, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                 VOLUME XIII.  ALDEN IOWA, FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 1890.  NUMBER 4.  BUSINESS DIRECTORY  CMI7MCKEB.  OOVOBSOATIOKALnrunofl    *»-h  Pl Multi H U •clock ft. ta. Hu ad* r Hchool ft* Hat terete** tech tebbMh •batling Hot J O. Mtllar. DD. pMi'  (I KAM AH n n CfftmCB fewi-w* #vsry •P*T M IO At o'clock ft rn PiMchla* *wrr other Baster, featey He bool ti ii m cwt STmIViImI" mactiag mry Thoradftv ctco-  ORAMA* LDTHr.H A H CHURCH ferric** twry HahbftMb at lo AO oai.uk am fen tar  IliaitlHftly after morning aarrlcft,  .ML A CHUA) H IUt J W forty th, rector.  < at ti o’okwk  CHILDHOOD ! DATA  • T I HIT r HIRT. AOBI> THIRTY HH,  II I • wee I were tho lay*  of tut youth A n ti the t nth went hour* of pl*jr. With * ct lek for ti  hor,* iii>.I • wH. low twitch. Whiling tim tim* *w»y  W'lmti winter titre*.! ber *nowy TMI Over th* tumidw ftn.l Acid.  Then mum the tint#, to *    *    rn,  rtiiMtijr  ma  wa Br Bra taatey  > aa. elm meet lag at IO o'clock a. to fehbftth. Pmror mooting erory Tooaday >f or on lag*  Maim  HAP TA HT LO DOE. No. MAA f t A. M, fill moot la raga nu c. rarawnt- ftttoa ob tho Putty otjakat aa or fetor* tho fall moan, at Wft-tettt Hall. Ald**. Iowa. victual brethren era wordlftUy I art tad to atte nil B I. Plant* WM.; A w Crook**. to rn tar r  AIJDHN UBA A RT ANT UPAHINO ROOM— I* Ba yth nod Ho Md tog Opal) ororr day ami •"Mill Matey MOOD tort T early wbierlp Mea*, ii otete Mr*, f B. furry Pro«id«nt; aam LotMa Taylor, tor rotary  ALDHN LO DOH No. Md, I O O f Meet*  Hotefday croalag at Otloy c (UH  breth red are cor.II all 7 Invited V) at-M. JOO ac, Hor rotary  ALDHN LODGE No ICI. A. O O W -Me*to Ct Otter* Hail Hee u I ar meeting* fteoond and amt Tooodar erenlng* of e*cfc month AU vMMtac naomtMir* are cordially Inn tad to *t-■Tl. C. Bog or*. M. W., J. TuuiUneon, IU  With iialt* of (now a* hard a* atone We. large-l the enemy'* (tai m Ailratuwil f ret limk, til IU loud hurrah*.  A* tho victor* chary*! In rank.  I Rut mu lug with her rain and thuu dor (bower*. A tv f fleecy lauiha at play.  Brooght Hellier iieart* >o chielrou folk Than erer the «inter gray,  (leer children, let na prepare for the tim*  When wa chai] grow aged and i-tor,  When tho angel Death, in hi* mitooof l lack, Khali rome and knock at tho door. OrSTST.IILX Mo.  THROUGH I RIT LSE.  MT L. H. tv  |AU J. HJUT. HH  QWRffS  hImmh OBn  tv I Mm. HarCUa  P P. PBI SB IE M. P.  Pkytelaa ami Harfoa.  Blite lava Ofllo* orat Keating'* Hard war*  T. J. RICK,  BABBIE AND HAIRDRESSER.  Urna md Ore-TIL  I tea aal! Ntaomahtp tickets and nan brine pour friend* (IV arad them A: way* rowdy to •ive inform*UDO. T. J. RICK. AJJoc. la  J.  A. BUTTON,  ALDEN, IOWA,  latin Futile, Real Estate, lean  INBURANCE AiJKNT.  Farm Iowan negotiate I on loot or abort Blat al low raloft of Internal.  A lane Ual of tmprorad and unimproved lands tor .ale  J. F. BYERS,  —- PCAI BR IM-  Hunts, Whips, RAIS, Saddles,  Tty Biti, Harnett 0.1a and  taal Horse FnrnisiiiDg Goods.  Pp!rial Atterntl«n Given lo Repairing  ALDEN, ~    -    IOWA  NOTARY PUBLIC,  M Estate, Gdectin a1 Insurance  AGENT. iLDDf, -    -    -    -    FOW.  farm and Town Property  BANK OF ALDEN,  BBD. BIRDSALL A SOB, Hardin Countv, Iowa.  EXCHANGE BOUGHT tnd SOLD.  {MImUou mad* a Spacial!?. Hone} • Lttui aa leal Estate.  ROBERT HOtMESe  -DEALER IR-  Lumber,  Brick,  Cement and Lime.  IOMTA*  Dr. ?.*filln Hat in hi* office casting up bin yearly acc,dint*.  “Wa." hi •'aul, after careful consideration. “I think next year I can get a carpet ami nome new chairn here. I want one new chair, anyway," mot mg uncanny. “I ought to patter ami paint, too. I wonder if I coaid afford to do l*»th! If I made my old ha rue** taut, I could; |>erha|>a I can find a second-hand one.  I.ike many other country idirHiciami, Dr. Mill* wa*, though well educated and itoaseiiscd of more than ordinary ability, very (tour,  He wa* interrupted by a summons to a lady visitor at the rectory. In a moment he hail stepped from the dingy office to a room tilled with hits of tne tropic*, in the sha(te of rich, bright ahuula and Jewell*, ami on a ftofa a woman pre**mg her hand to her brow.  Dr. Mill* Hat down bv her, laid his finger on her paine, and gazed dowu on her face.  Dr. Mill* wa* a plum country doctor. thirty year*old, just from calculation* a I milt sc-ond liaml harm**.*; but, a* he nat with In* hand on that hot brow. I ant afraid hi* reflectiona were not ex ai-til of nerve disturbance aud hi* infallible remedv.  “Have you been subject to tin -e.attack*?" he tanked, ut length,  “Yea," unsound Mi.** Lyle, “for the la*t few week*. Tin* is the worst, though."  “ i here is serious derangement of the nervous system," raid he. “It will take time to cure it."  "Hutyou can give me so:.n thing ti* relieve thi* pain, can’t ;.ou. Doctor?" and the large, melting eye.* looked up at him with infinite entreaty.  “Certainly," he replied: “but aome-thii.g tenpin ary for lo-npltt. I must j nee you aguin if I am to no you much j good."  “lf you will only give me reb now," *m.l Mi.** Lyle, “I hill Im- i grateful that I *hall be gla<l to neeyou nguni ;i* often av you will come."  At home once more in In* 'buhl office, there came another knot h, aud hi* landlady appealed at the door.  “It’* Mr*, black * child again, air.’ “And w hat’.* the matte! with Mrs Black'* child ?" ticked lie, impatiently.  ' Hi* mother think-, he'* eaten something that isn't go. d for him and it’.* got tangled round hi* Ii cart, - ’ replied Mr* Bodykins.  “Tangled round Iii* granny!” ex churned Dr. Mill*, “la the woman outside ?"  “Yea, she'* here."  “Tell her to come in. Well, Mr*. Black, what has your lioybetn gorging tumsclf with now?"  “I can’t tell, air," Haul Mr*. Black. “I've given him every remedy I know of."  "Jib wonder he doesn’t get better, then," muttered the doctor, and Hut without npeaking for bouw minute*.  “I'd I tee u taking home some fine thing*," pursued Mr*. Black, “that I’d been getting up for the lady at the rectory, and I nee th.* light in Here, ho I thought I’d atop,"  Dr. Mills faced round and ntarcd fixedly at the womuu. She had tho handling, then, of the lace and frill* that clung to that soft, warm neck.  “She's quito poorly to-night," continued Mr*. Black. “Maybe you’ve been there."  “Ye*. I’ve been there," a na we red Dr Mill*, shortly. “Ill come round aud ace your boy, Mr*. Black."  I w o bour* later *uw him again seated by Mi** Lyle's couch. Hi* drops had failed to quiet that surging brain. He tried magnetizing her. While the hour* of night throbbed away he Mat with llano* pressed nu the knotted temple*, livery now and then the *uowy eyelids would tremble and half ii***, and through hi* whole flume would run u tin til. W lieu morning began pa *teul through the windows, lie withdrew Iii* stiffened finger*, and lieut low over the sleeper. Did hi* lips ton th her blow? Mr* Everett, who -at in a Amir by the fire, thought so, b it the next moment he was tip timing ‘«i* way out of the room,  "Call I know the outward cause of all th!.?" headed, the next morning “I do not think the know ledge would guide you at ail; but the shock—lur it wa. a .hock - was not peculiar."  “I beg your pardon! Every tiring Iii al hx*q en* to you mi** be peculiar.  * You ate mistaken. I ain uot au un emu until won.au,'' *aid M » t Lyle.  I rn mo in»d in bn piofotMiou, Dr.  Mills had heretofore had no time for love; in fa<4, lie had regarded it odd as a schoolgirl pastime. Hut now after week* which might have bien Im*bensh dream, he woke suddenly t n alize Inn folly.  One morning. Miss Lyle announced to him her departure the next day, and was startled by an abrupt, nam avowal of devotion. Mile turned around, looked at him Hteadily with parted lips and wondering eye*. Then she raised her hand aud lifted away the dark-brown ma*se* of hair from hi brow, and let the warm, thrilling weight rest there, while she continued to gaze wistfully and intently.  “Do not try me too long," he said with quivering lip*.  "I might not. she said, “but And (lien lier face clouded. Dr. Mill understood it and took up his hat  "Give me something of your* t keen?" he said, hesitatingly.  Mile took from lier arm a little fancy bracelet tied with a knot of smiter rib!Min. He placed it next his heart  The next morning, while sitting in his office, he heard the rumbling of caruage, and stepping out upon the (torch, saw the enchantress pa**. Sh warm! her hand to him. lie turned into his den again and drew the bolt How dark aud dreary everything looked.  Five years rolled round. At s high window of the Grand Dome, in New York, stood Miss Lyle. in a sail and weary attitude. Mile had jnst return!* from Europe. Huddenlv she turned to her companion and said  “/.anile, yon know I believe in tm pulse*. I have one AO go ami see Mrs Everett, the minuter'* wife, in Hazlc ton, for a few days. You will not lie afraid to stay here alone without me?  “No, dear, if you will not remain there too long."  Niue Lyle turned aud went into lier Itod-mom. aud next morning wa* on her way. Dr. Mills was sitting down to siip|ter one night, after a long, cold ride among Ins patient*, when sudden Iv the licit rang.  “Well," be said. wearily, a* the serv x ant entered. The girl |>ut a small parrel into Ins hand, saying “A mea sanger brought it over from Mr*. Ever ett’«.” There was something iii th dainty way in which the little parve  was tied up a delicate fragrance that reminded him of In* one dream of ha] Illness.  “What a fiHii I ani." he said. ha Ik untied the parcel. And ujsm opening the box he found a bracelet tied will mulier riblion.  Tile color rushed to hi* very fore head: hi- heart Isnt fast; his Huger* trembled as he lifted tho bracelet. It wa* the exart counterpart of the om laid aw ay in his desk.  The Doctor put on hi* hat and strode rapidly down the street. He seemed ten year* younger than an hour ago Very soon he found himself in tin presence pf Mine Lyle. Site received him warmly, and after a moment lo said, “I have kept the bracelet,, see And you have come to reward me."  "Yes, I Ilave come." That was all  A few day* later Min* Lyle went back to New York.  “I am going to lie married." *he said to her friend.  “And that heart-break which ha| (toned just Is 1  fore yon went to Hazleton, live years ago?"  “There i* the secret. I found one hood after who Njxoke u* if hi* love was real, but the wound wa - not healed, so after five year*. I returned and found him waiting for me, and think I -^all Im* happy.*  Two live*, through impulse, have certainly been made liuppy.  I ut roil int ion of Envelope*.  Befoie Sir Howland Hill introduced the )ienny post, envelopes were little used, as a double charge wa* made for a (tailer inclosed in another, however thin each might Im>; even the smallest clipping from a new spaper necessitated an extra fee. The use of envelope* became common after May ti, 184H, when stamped and adhesive envelo|ies were introduced. The first envelope-making machine wa* invented by Edwin Hill, brother of Boland Hill, aud De La Kuo'h machine for folding cn-velope’s was patented March 17, 1845. Tho invention of envelope* has been attributed to M. K. Brewer, a I took sidler and stationer of Brighton, England, alinit 1830. He had some small sheets of pajier on winch it wag difficult to write the address; he invented for these a small envelope, and had metal plates made for cutting them to the required shape and size.  * Explosion in a Vest Pocket,  An explosion in hi* vest pocket was what Mr. Fowler of Agawam experienced tho other day. Ho hail bought some chlorate of (s>ta*h table's, and had (int them in the vest receptacle with nome sulphur matches. The mixture alw ays cause,* commotion. But unmindful of thi* fact, Mr. Fow ler sat down in his home to have a quiet smoke. Pretty soon he felt something warm in his l*>cket; he stuck iu his fingers to see what wa* up; the matches ignited, the potash exploded, blowing open the frout of hi* vent and burning his banda severely. Mr. Fowler jmniped high in the air. and the work of stripping off his v c*t took but a moment. Now he currie* hi* hand in a sling —bpringjUtUi ('niou. _  __    ________  THV international display of scientific prog rte* to be mat Ie tins v ear include the Electrical aud Industrial Exhibit iou at Edinburg Ii aud the Exhi billon of Botany and Microscopy ut Antwerp. At the latter will be cele 'bi alod the tareentenucy of the compound microscope.  THE LITTLE KOLK*  Th* l air Skate*.  fest** Ilks tin* patrol .lohnay'a  Are *-ii Ii tti*r«• I-.ti• thin**.  A Im? < an Of wit I, them lUaMl A* wall aa if ha ,1 wins* tilv,» IImhii an Icy (Mf walk,  Or fr> -i*n Wt of porn!.  I think lie f ti go to Halifax,  Or i*> ■«* 1111 v twiyond.  An«l rwt when I auk,*I lohnsf,  Ari hoar or no age, or morn,  A* lift neon hi* itfttwu Iftftgu* fthoi* (Avn! •kimmtiMt |*ft»t th«iioor,  If Im wont.I <b* sn ftiTftnil o**>r (emu th* l-.wn. ftotrsft lino# a'KiTft N» I’lfftftftDt "yaft i.rnli.-r~I |nio a frown.  An,I lift (mean niplftiiiinu It wa* ,<i far t.i go Twowll takft «<i Ion* It was (ft roll Ha ii lur va in ({it i (low '  I think I 'va Iwnnd «me en. rot;  I iiftt akftiftft ara nwlft sri,I I run Al Clair , hat l*ry, Iftt an t loft'.ll xvii, n nr ran. I • ar* Ut Jo -Tonth'i (Vm | hi toes.  A (fright Hnf.  A bright little Iwy and a good looking young lady came into an elevated oar together yesterday end commenced talking about the tickets they had just thrown into the ehopjsVa 1k*x. Their conversation attracted the attention of the passengers near them.  “How much do those ticket* cost?" asked the I ny,  "Five cent* each ten cent* for two," wa* the reply.  "That would lie five for twenty-five cent*, wouldn't it. Jennie?"  “ Yes." Maid Jennie, and a* she noticed the interest displayed by the listener* hIic concluded to “show him off."  “Now, tell me, how many ticket* could you get for a dollar?"  After nome he*itation the answer came: “Twenty."  “Well, if you were to nse two every day, how long would the dollar's worth last ?"  Thi* was a puzzler. The little fellow thought it over for a long time. Suddenly his face brightened, and lie Htojqied tho “showing off" by shouting  ‘Whv, until they are all gone!" — .Vine lord Time*.  Talkative! Carrot In a Car.  ‘Ah, there, baby!" screamed tho parrot Iud behint! a jiajMr which Willie I tad placed over the rage.  Tho old maid looked startled, says a Philadelphia |ta|M*r, aud a grin appeared on the face* of the other passenger*.  “Oh, mamma!” croaked the bird. Th^oid maul glared at tach passenger, highly indignant.  “ Where did you get that hat, IVl like know?" went on the irrepressible bird,  Tho clerical passenger looked up in alarm and thou felt his hat in hasty confusion. Every one noted the action, aud a ripple of suppressed laughter went over the car,  “All, there, whiskers!"  The clerical man leaped to his feet aud frowned at a sui'* itll faced young man near the front.  “I won't lie insulted!" he cried.  “Ding, ding; two more fare* out of the company's pockets."  The conductor Hushed and hastened into the car from the hack platform.  “Who said that?” he demanded.  Willie looked a* demure as an angel.  “Johnnie, get your hair cut.”  An old man with long hair made a precipitate departure from the car.  At Bond street Willie lifted tho pa-M»r, grah>M>d the cage, and got off the car.  Then the pa-senger* tumbled.  II* Wu I • >r(l ven.  A Lewiston little 1k>v declared a philosophic indejiemlenco, and accept ed the comae (lienee in so matter of fact a way last w eek that it may mako a story, even if it is not so very funny, say* the Lewiston (Me.) Journal, Iii* mother dressed him up in a new flannel shirt and sent him to school, The shirt irritated his entitle; or, in other words, he itched. When he came home that night he was cross, and very rosa fora small loy, and he declared lie aud the dart had parted company forever.. The next morning, as the mother prepared to dress him for school, the UOY drew the line at the birt.  “No,” said he; “I don’t wanter wear that shirt."  A brief debate ensued, in which the I toy apjieared to have formed hi* opinion ami to have decided to stick to it. The question, when put to the house, w a* carried by the boy, w ho would not don the shirt.  If you will not wear it," said his motlier, “I shall send you back to bed.”  Back to IhhI he went. He got no dinner. Afternoon came. A neighbor went in to see him, his mother telling her that she hail a had boy up stair*. Tho l»ov lav there iu lied wide wake, hi* little cheek* Hushed with the situation, but show tug no sign.* of change of heart.  Don't you xvant to go to school?” asked the neighbor.  “School!" was the reply. “I shall never go to school again! “  Don’t you want to? "  Y'oh, bdl I can’t. Eve got to stay here.”  All your life?”  Yesiu,” xx aa the reply; "all my life. I shan't never gel up agaiu, prxib'ly,"  NX hat could a mother’s heart do ftgftiust so philosophic WU acceptation! t tile Cerium tiu>u of a career a* thai? What but kiss him at Wa and go and buy the hula bunch of pluck nome dowuy little uudeiahuta that would *«v»r tickle Aim?  PITH AND POINT.  Black art—charcoal sketch.  THC love-si. k maiden i* almost alway* too email for her sigh*.  t*Hi« Auo'a big feat outwitting New Y'ork in the world’* fair contest  Tuf. cat's purr is the sign of peace  !  The rooster s apar is aa emblem of war.  Na TUR I’ has wisely arranged matter* so that a man can neither pat hi* own ! hack nor kick himaeif To know how to wait iathe secret of I hope — to have time to wait Ii ng enough, is the hope of alli ce**.  A nm st novel in Hexihie lover* rn creating a great sensation . A Bur-  1  lington woman nae* it to spauk lur children with.  Thai URS Now, my children, we will , parse the -entence. “John refused the j pie." Tommy Jones, wlxat ia John ' | Tommy A darned fool.  A GOOD instance of all* en co of mind wa* an editor qnoting from a rival pajier one of his own artifice, and heading it, "Wretched Attempt at Will" CHOtLT— I am practicing on the typewriter every day now. Mollio-1 thought there wa* a remarkable improvement in your courting here lately, Yeast What’* Smithers playing in now? I rii&sonlieak Hamlet. “Dies he enter into the spirit of the piece?" "Oh, ye.*; he is taking the part of the ti host."  “Or what nattonalitx i* * our husband, Mrs. Flaherty?" "Faith, and I don’t just know. He was Intro in England but he ha* lived all hi* lite in this country."  Aught subscriber I am mad all the way through, and I want my paper stopped. Editor Y'es, sir; do yon want to (lay what you owe? Anjn^ sulmenb-•r No; I ain’t mad enough far that.  Tramp Can yon give me a bite to eat, madam? Minister’s wife We haven't a lute in the house. A donation party swooped down on us last night and cleaned us out of everything but the furniture.  EDITH —I don't like electric light in a house. Jack Why? Edith because it can Im* turned on so unex|i«ctedly by pa, for instance. Jack? Well, let us go out on the piazza. The moon won t (day us any trick.  STND a Y-SCHoot,    teacher Willie,  how would you feel if you should ask somebody for bread ami bt* given a stone? Willie a jewelers son* lf it xx a* no Inciter titan the one on your I shirt front I'd feel aw ful.   #  Diking a wifeL call: Mrs. Wiggery What is that thing, William? Mr. Wiggers Why, mother, that's a ahem well, you know; why, thats my new dictating machmo. Mrs. Wiggers Oh! I wa* afraid for a minute it was one of tho-e type-w riters.  Dr Shooks — Is your pretty little friend much of an artiste? Rival Belle Nothing original alinit her, she copies everything -he doe*. De Snook* s that so? Bi val Belle (latterly*  Y'es, I don't believe sin* can draw her own breath without u>ing tracing papier.  Mrs. Dr*ky Am dem de black stocking*' you told me “aliout bavin V*  M I** Saffron Y es, dem is de ones, Cicely; an’ dey ouly i-ott’ “seventy-five cent*," “Am dey bilk?" “Not Vactly, but der're jea’ as good ” “An* will dev wash." "Dat I don' know ; Tse only had ’em fo’ weeks."  Great editor I think it would be a good idea to print our circulatr ti at the head of our editorial page. What s the (Kipulation of this country ? Business manager About 70,Q(Xl’00(). (treat editor Well. we’ll not dan.* a circa- j I at ion of over tio.UXMkR). No use in being hoggish.  A PHK ADPI'!. POSSIBILITY.  Tlutlftiiili of (bi- sioux  Ardnjft ii. "tittnuuf,  To tin) bani/white naritU-r VU I .La* all ttiii.fi Blout;  Hut wl.•- will h.> tlloux  Whrtl tile frolicftOtU* Sioux hwoop« down on lout ftcftlim Kim. *n4 cttofx III Ut iu HOUX?  Chitilga Hull.  Startling I)Nelo*urr Made by a lieut la a Boy’* Breeches.  The following *t try L* told about the editor of one of Maine’s most prominent dailies:  When a small lioy hi* father, now-on * of the most prominent men in the Stale, was running a printing office j and publishing a weekly paper in one f the largest town* in Lvenndieo County.  One day the advance agent of a show came aking aud ordered some (sister-, printed ujsm cotton doth. His order w as filled, but for some reiteou he neglected to cull for them aud titer were thus left on the printer'* hands. The printer's w ife ran across, them aud as doth w a* then high she t ok the c loth j home and used it t» hue a pair of pads she wa* then Awaking for the ! editor alleve mentioned, then c. boy IU years of age.  Aa the month* rolled ks»us grew th read ben* oue day he accidentally out, leaving about ^ e big ex (Mated to in-a woald have 'n ade tic I thev la .vined t:il lh* i they chisel cd tho fo! standing oil' IxxkL/ upv large tv po  Doorx o(ii‘tx At 7 : *. Fe.. •.  I mw; na at .*  It is nm dites to ft'.xto ha th was *eat boma to h.* n, aer in  SHP80I t C0D8IR  -  PILLAR HR tit —  Grain, Lin Stack,  COAL.,  AUEN,    •    IOWA,  Wine—, 111., 6m1, Wamated ti CmL FmL  PETER TRfiOR,   DR AMB Ut-  Live Stock,  GRAIN,  Seeds & Coal  ALDEN, IOWA.  WTT* LI AM KEA TUG.  Healy and Shelf Hardvare,  PKlit ai Tiki GMny,  Tinware A Woodenware,  rn  (att* markst.  CHICAGO, IOWA AND DAKOTA  Stiortet, Quietest and Only Direct Lute  ■■TWBHH  ALDEN, IOWA FALLS, ELDORA, AND CHICAGO, IIL WAUKEE AND ALL EASTERS FOISTS.  Passengers Can Save  FROM  2 HODES TO 5  Brr wee*  CHICAGO ARO POUTS OR THIS URE  BT TAKIIM  THIS SHORT ROUTE.  CONNECTIONS AT  ELDORA JUNCTION wall th.? Chi) age and Northwestern Bail way tor Tama City, Ce<lar BapiiSa, Clinton, Chil ig<>, Milwaukee Dc* Moines, Council BluJa, St Bauk Mii.nc:i[sii.s and all points ic Dakota Nebraska, Kan*ax sad the West.  ELDORA with, the C' Utral Iowa Railway for points Narth and S»«tth.  ’ HAWA FALLS with the ii. C R A S. And illinois Ccrzral lta/lwsys. for Water ! * nj; Dubuque, Fort Dt Jge and Siouj City.  For til inflation x-miil Freight ox Bas se Direr Rates, apply u. our local iu- )nU «'r address tho General Freight and Fte meager Agent at Eldora, Idvl  JOHN PORTER,  Ute I MWW  MKE. PORTER.  a. r. atua r. a  THE liTEST!  ENDORSED AMO USED BY TNE Ik 8. OOVUEMMTft  VMI (ii IK KST fekOa Nwtol ky Onfhf Ow  bv tiio pM 'ta-aud at schtstl  toro the -eat I*tot o', the Im- I  I hi. it it sell I  * .aide but j emu* w hen > Vvi'.g Wi>,.La  the tilling lh  ta a ca  ISTAR  POOTABLE  ruts  AHO  BMsitls’ Haii Rlortr.  A -al of t a t nu*., ti of t Dei! an unUiru vhdd ha. ckv ur*d it) B A child bm a via ruq| ‘*'u‘ iliac of the mother fioiu pu,<u ,.> im »«*< • fvvtwl with the HIW mal*.tv, aud vbwu at the cud of fixe -IA' *  C.  4pm A IHA  item compact.  tuiPU. oui ast! ■aiUM-r of tffrrxila* waxiretj ws. Paw axxte toy mil RAfsiwtaaw mmd MwwHltt  STM MACHINE OO.,  GBB MBB Tutu HffkliQ, MiYb   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication