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   Alden Times (Newspaper) - April 18, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                IM U �liMk k. m. ItiBdar Bahuol M II*. ,Mn4M� wah labbMh nmulat,  ItoT. J. -- It      OHtmOB-ROTTlMt wry llOJ�e-elaak�.m. PraMblna awf Jw- aute* Mhool al � �. m. nnj FyrtSf """^       Thuwtoy T�o. lOmMM uhuhou-BartleM �I 10 JO o-�lMk a. m. 8an4�r 1UI7 �Iter aoraing MrvlaM.  JPi.JBlaM MMIM U lOo'eloeka. m. I aTary Toaaday MOOB. No. MB, A. r * A. If., iplateoouawieatloa oo tba Frt. MMbatoralha fall mooo. at Malawi. TIalUaa bratkraoara saMaad. B. U Plaraa W. M.; �aaiatery. UUAIITAND BBADtNa BOOK-Batldlaa. Opan ararr dayaad UJOnumaU. Ito. m, I. O. O. P.-Maate BM� WililiHy aTaata* at  ntlaya HalL rIM toat- ara oonllaUy laTli �aeralary. fSiSSL IfiPO^ 1*0. IM. 4. O. n. W.-Maata lipUMBaU. Banlat ma�tiii�i aaeoadand M TMaday avaali^a at tmeh montk. All aaabara ara eordiaUy loTlted to at-L 0. aagan, H. W. j J. TomUaaoo. Ba- a.wamKt, �AMaa Iowa. OBaa orar KaatlaCa Oudwaia T. J. RICK, lABBIB AM) HAIBDBESSEB. 4iWl/kr JTraWawal mnmtHlm        mnd Ow mam Hiiiiraiiii dp..�/ thipmt, XU. I mb aall Steamahip tloketa. and ean brinrr -four frtonda or acnd them.  Alwaya raady to laforouUoB.     T. J. BIOK. Aldan, la. J. A. BUTTON, ALDEN, IOWA, Jotarr Pnlilic, Real Estate, Loas k loaa* necoUaled on Iodc or ahori 4laa al low ralaa ol Intaroai. ' A lam Uat of improTad and unlmproTcd iMdifbraais. . J. F. BYERS, -siALsa n- limst, Whips, Rilis, Saddles, Ily Vets, Harnen 0:ii and '^oenl Hone MstiiDS Qooils. AHratlMjIrm to itopalrliiir ~7-        IOWA. NOTARY PUBLIC, iM BdMi, aDNtm nl iDsoMiie AXiOiar. .... IOWA. Wtm and Town Property BANE OF ALDEN, fA       ' MKMI. KUMAXX * BOS, AMMia Hardin Oeunu, iQwa. mt BOUGHT tnd SOLD. bouri o( play, With a itlok fur wl|. 11 m 0 horna, and low llwlt�ll, Whllinii tUo away. Wbim wintnr iiri -iaitor at the rootory. In a moment hu had htvpped from the dingr ofltce to a room Hllwl with, bits of I ho tropicH, in tho Nhape of ricli, bright HhuwU and jeweU, and on u 8ofa a wouiHU prc�hing her hand to bur brow. Dr. MillH Kat down by her, laid his tlngor on her pulse, and gii/.cd down on her face. Dr. Mill iii you much gooi'l." "If yoii will only give li.e reliif now," said Mi.is l.ylc, " I shall be no grateful that I shall be glad ',n see you again as nfieii as you willcniiie." .Vt liDiiie once more in his sluibby othce, there eami' another kmuk. and his luiidlady appeared at the door, "It's Mrs. ISIaek'.s child a�;aiu, hir. ".Vlid what's the matter with Jlr.-IJlack's child';'" asked he. iiH|iatieutry. "His mother thinks In'.1 eaten something that isn't goi)d for him, and it's got tangled round liis heart, " replied iMrs. PrwlgbrrrHT "Taiiglcil round  his granny'."  e.t cluiuied Dr. Mills.  "Is the woman outside'/" * VeH, she's here." "Tell her tn come in. ^Vcll, Mrs, ISluek, what has yo!ir boy bei n gorging him.self with now "I can't tell, sir," said Mrs. lilaek. "I've given him everv roiiiedv I know of." "No wonder ho doesn't got better, then," muttered the doctor, and sat without Hpeaking for homo minutcH. "I'd been taking lioiuo some line things," pursued Mrx. Itlaok, "that I'd been getting up for the lady nt the reotory, and I see tho light in "nere, I thought I'd stop." Dr. MilU faced round and Htareil fUedl^V at the woman. Slio had tlie handling, then, of the lace and frills that clung to that soft, warm neck. "She's nuite ixiorly to-night," con tinned Mi-h. lilaek.' "Maybe you've been there." "Yes, I've been there." answeretl Dr. Mills, shortly. "I'll come rouml and Bee your Ixiy," Mrs. lllack." '1 wo hours later saw him again seated by Mi.ts Lyle's couch. His drop^ had failed to iiuiet that surging brain. He trie�l magnotiiing her. While the hours of night thiobbvil away he sat with hauu.i preitsed on the knotted toiiiples. Every now and then the snowy eyelids would tremble and half liko, und through his whole frame would ruu a till ill. When inuruinK began lo. steal through the window*, he with drew his Htiffeued tliigersi and Iteut low over the aleepor. Did his lips touih her blow? Mnt. I'.vetett, who ^at iu a %iair by tha tire, thought �u, bat the next luoiueut he was tip-tuetug '>is way out of tho i\x)Ui. "Can I know tho outward cause of all thi/r heunked. the next moi'niug. "1 do not think the know ledge would guide you at all; but the shooli--for it wa. tt'�Uoek-waa not peoullar," "I beg your pAi^oivl �var>(ldng thn^ hapi eus to youutunt \m peouUar. " \ uu ai� uiUtttkau. I vm uok au un-oouimuu vouiau,* a^d Ui�* I^rla. liuiMinuKl in kin iKo(�NMiioa� Pr. MilU had lloretoforo had no time fni love; iu faot, ho hod regarded it only as a Mohoolgirl pastime, lint now, after wockn which might have bron a hashccRh dream, ho woke suddenly to reali/.o liiit folly. One morning, MisM Lyio announcetl to him her departure the next day, and was atartled by an abrtiot, I'loarso avowal of devotion. She turned around, looked at him steadily with parted lips and wondering eyes. Then sho raised her hand and lifted away tho dark-brown masses of hair from his brow, and let the warm, tbrillinf: weight rest there, while she continued to gaze wiHtfuUy and intently. "Do not try me too long," ho said, with quivering lips. "I might not," nIio said, "but-----" And (hen her face clouded. Dr. Mills understood it and took up his hat. "Give mo something of yours to keep ?" he said, hesitatingly. She look from her arm a little fancy bracelet tied with a knot of amber riblion.   Ho placed it next his heart. The next morning, while sitting in his otllce, he heard tho rumbling of a carriage, and stopping out uiH)n the IHirch, saw tho enchautresH pass. .She waved her hand to him. He tume. Tho invention of envelopes has been attributed to S, K. Hrewer, a lx�k-sellor and stationer of Urighton', England, alx>nt WM. He had some small sheets of |)aper on which it waa difH-eult to write tho address; ho invented for these a small euvolo]io, and had metal plates made for cutting them to tho rcMiuircd shape and size. TalkallvB I'arrot In a Tar, "Ah, there, boby!" screamed tho parrot hid behind a [lajier which Willie had placed over the cage. Tho old maid looked startled, says a I'hiladclphia pa|)er, and a grin appeared ou the laces of tho other passengers. "Oh, mamma!" croaked the bird. The?old maid glared at e-ach passenger, highly indignant. "Where did you gut that hat, I'd like to know w cut ou the irrepressible bird. Tho clerical passenger looked up in alarm and then felt his hat in hasty confusion. Kveiy one noted the action, and a rippio of suppressed laughter went over the i-ar. ".Ml, there, whiskers!" The clerical man leaped to his feet and frowned at a siU'Aithfaced young man ncor tho fiont. "1 w-on't bo insulted!" he cried. "Ding, ding; two more fares out of the conijinny's pockets." Tlio conductor Hushed and hastened into the car from the back platform. "Who said that'/" ho denmndcd. Willie looked as demuro as an angel. ".lohnnio, get your hair cut." An old man "with long hair made a precipitate departure from tho car. At Bond street Willie lifted tho paper, grabbed tho cage, and got off tho car. Then tho passengers tumbled. Ifo Wa. Fiirglvoii. '   Kxplvshiii ill a Vest Porket. An explosion in his vest |)ocket waa what Mr. Fowler of Agawam experienced tho other day. Ifo had bought some chlorikteof jKitash table!s, and had ))iit them iu the vest rectnitaelo with some sulphur matches. The mixture alw-ays cause's comniotion. Uut unmindful of this fact, Mr. Fowler sat down in his home to have a uniet smoke. Pretty seiou he felt something warm in his ]>ookot;he stuck iu hu lingers to see what was ui>: the matches ignited, tha iKitash explotled, blowing open tho trout of his vest and burning his hauda sevorvdy. Mr. Fow-fur'juin|>�d high in the air.aud tho work of stripping off his ve.it took but a luomuut. Now ho carries his hand in a Mng.-Spriug/ieiU fnioii. _ The international disiilay ol aoiou-lifte progress to be made thu vear lu-oluila Uu) Elaotrical and luduatrial Ex-yUtiou al Edinburgh aud Um �xkl biUou of Botany aud Mloroawpy ai Aulwar^>. At tha laUar will ba oala-%nM iha Uroenleuatr ol Uta �mi ar it, mother, "1 shall send vou bed." Hack to IkmI ho wont, no dinner.  Aftermxm came. bor wont in to see him, his mother ,      ,     , telling her that she had a bad boy up I I'f.V" r,.,., 1.....1... .1______editor al Black art-ehareoal sketch. TiiF. lovo-siek maidra is almost alway* too amall for her sighs. Chioaoo's big feat-ontwittin-g New York in tho world's fair contest. TUF. oat's imrr is the sign of peace. The roosters spur is au emblem ol war. Naturb has wisely arranged matters so that a man can neither pat his own back nor kick himself To know- how to wait is the secret of hope - to have time to wait long enough, is tho hope of sm-cess. A recknt novel in Hexiblo covers ia creating a great sensation . A IJur-lington woman uses it to spauk licr children with. TKAe:ilKH-Now, my children, wo will-parse the sentence. "John refused tho pie." Tommy .Jones, wliat ia John/ Tommy-A ibirned fool. A ut her, she cojiies evcrvtliing she does. De Snooks -Is that so? Uival Belbj (bitterly - Yes, I don't believe kIio can draw her own breath without using tracing paper. MuH. DisKV-.Vm dem do black stockings' you told me "alwut buyin/" Miss Saffron-Yes, dem is lie ones. Cicely; an' dey ouly c-iw' "seveuty-tivo ceuts." ".\m dey .lilkV" "Not 'zactly, but dey'ro jes' as goexl." "Au' will dey wash." "Dat I dou' know ; I'seouly had 'em fo' weeks." (ireat eelitor -I think it would bo a gooel idea to print our circulation at the head of our editorial page. NVIiat's tha population of this country '/ llnsiuo-ss manager -About 70,(KK)"oOO. (.'.rcat editor-Well, we'll not claiL>i a circulation of over OII.ODO.OUU. No use ic being hoggish. .\ lAir.MlFtl.   l-osslUlLITY. Tli.llaiidH of til.' Sioui AneoiH'ii. x14 trioux. - whlii--�.tili-r wi.u likoi all tUli.ja snnoiiooDni Grain, Lira Stoch^ iowa; Wlana, ID., Caal, Wamated tS r� Ctat raalr Live Stock, QBAIN, Seeds &CoaL ALDKN, IOWA.   ^ WZIXZAM KEATDO. Heaii and Sbelf Hirdiars* rinware & Woodenware, ]ooK lEmrsnm la tha maikal; WILLIAM UATEfO. Aldaa. law*. CHICAGO, IQWA AND DAKOTA SbortBst, Quietest and (Mr Direct Line ALDZ9,   IOWA   FALLS,   ELDOBA, AXD CHICAGO, ULWAUKEE AXD ALL BASTEBS FODiTS. ' said his back to He got A neigh Passengers Can Save from HDDBSTO BETWEEa CHICAGO An POIITS 01 THIS UK BT TAKiaO THIS SHORT ROUTE. stairs. Tho lioy lav there in l>e i)� down nu him. .cali"i lilui. mid clt>|�!l liiiii in Uou.\'.' .Sturtliug Uisclo-turf Maele liy a Ite^t in a Bey's Hrceches. Tho follo�-iug story hi told about the editor of oneuf Maine's mo.st iiroouneut dailies: Wheu a small l>oy his  fathcir,  now one of tho most pronuucut mea in the State, was running a printing office and publiiiliiug a wr�kly paper iu one \ � �f the largest  towns' in   Kennebec | County. One day tho ivdviuce agent of a show came' along and ordered soaoe jiosters. priuteel u|>on cotton cloth. His order was tilled, but fosv some renuou ho ne(C-li-eted to call for them aud thoy w-ere thus,loft on the printer's Kinds. Tko printer's wife ran acros* them and as cloth was then high she t.uk tho chith lioiue und used it t i liuo a pair of she was then making for the i)ovi> mentioned, then c iKiy CONNECTIONS AT ELDOBA JITICTWN with the Chlcagc snd Northwestern Railway ior Tami City, Cedar Haplils, Clinton, Chicago, Milwaukee. Des Moines. Cou;icil IJlutfs, St. Paul, Minneapolis and all poiuU in UakoU. Nebraska, Kansas aud the West. ELBOBA with, the Central Iowa lUil-way for (Xiinls Nartli and Soulh. ' I�>WA FALLS with the i*.. C. R 4 IC sud Illinois Cenxral lla/lways. for Water I'lOi Dubuque, Fort Ucjjfe and Siouj City. For all InfMation about Freight oi Ptusengcr HatM, appiv lt> our local ogMlU er address thu-General Freight and Fa� seuger Agent at Eldora. Iowa. JOHN POKTM, �kS. PORTBII. a. r. mn* p. A 10 years of age. .Vs the months roUcJ by tiie jianta-hmns graw- thieudbarx- and at sehoed one day ho accidenluMy tore tie >oat out, leaving aUiur t.;ie iiKit u'; iho lining evpiwed to Tlii. ii! itself would have made I'li- l: \Hir < open At T ; li�vaiu� at .-s." ll u uc. dWs to -.Mto was so;it li.iu.ii to li.-� u : .wi'ig u '.lie li l!u. l.oy '.U'; in le;l.�. .V i KSKo't,a-\ uii-�.-.i..n oi lufcctioi; o an unUiru eh.M lia. hoc iiv. ,1 in I'aii-. .\ child iKirii during Uio com -.Use i -i-of thu uiolhor from pnoumoi.ia ^mi i i  (tHited with the same u;uUviy, aud Uiea at thu Hud ol tlvo da^vs. STAR MSTAMJi AHO BtaelsBitks* laii Blofer. MMPix. iwaiau. SSMiNto Ma PMWMii Man IIMME M_, flMlaliPIHai^Ya .   

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