Share Page

Alden Times: Friday, April 4, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Alden Times (Newspaper) - April 4, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                 rn  Mkt Albeit (Time?.  VOLUME XIII.  ALDEN IOWA, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1890.  NUMBER 2.  BUSINESS DIRECTORY  cwitom  tJOWQBJCOATioN.iL cnnRcn ~m>rv<.-.i * m h fpMMfll al U • cloak a. rn. duad,, fteboci u  Mal. (tor Tic** tach Sabbath *vaaitm. Ha* J 4. MU tor IM) . yMot,  UN ll a nirRCH «arrm*» ar*rr  MUN o'aloeh a ai I‘r**< Mn« »m» bf Holiday HA bool at I a in arary saatlng trmrj Th nm Jay airan  LUTHERAN CHT HCH Samoa* „ _ IS*) o clonk a m Sub Jay —■Ullin ll' I af— morning MftttM,  ll I. CHURCH Bar J to. Foray!h. Paa!raf •aratoa* «•) tundav at ll    a m arui  HIS aly. RI. Cleat means* at lOo'atorka rn St—fS—bats*. Fra far maatin* a vary Tub* J ay HHS Tkaraday avactac*  SOCIETIES.  unt Lonac, No an. a r. a a. m,  ta ra|ator-e<«atoaaieath«a on th* Fit-aiaaiBI na im liifnu I Ii fall moon. at a rn-a Hall. Aldan Iona TMMpg hra»hr*o ara ■taattad to attorn) h I. IMaroa W vc . —aratory.  ALDIS LI VR A HT AND RBA DI NO ROOM ta (ay ai aa I Boudin* f*p«n avary day and a*—lag. Sandar it ‘ ‘    "  Hon*, Ai rant* Mr*. .. tUm Lo—* Taylor Saaratory  A LORN MMI, No SM, ratarilay rvantng  amelau  r«®2£  TEX PAU.  ar aaa itmLaor a. im a* so a.  Uh* mitt npon th* mountain* far.  Mk* moonlight "n a «l«*pin» *tr*am.  Or. Uk* aotn* pal* and JI.lam .tar Our |aa! tim wan Th*Cr taatnorlaa Hint* oat grs.p,  Th*ir araru* tiartab Ilk* lh* f1o»#rr ; In vain ar* arrau ti our hand* biriani-Tho** (iv** of our*.  Th* Pant' lion’ rami* and -had ■<»* alit IXJ aa tho*# rat*!? pathway* tr*ad ? And limy who au*w*r not our cai!  Th* atfcnt I Vad.  War* t hwy unrv with n* a* *r* damnf Hi "lr titian** ar* tauting teat.  Or I* It (rat a rt**i-i»)>*it J twain TM* phantom Pave »  Com** tit*?* from that ahadnw Jan I Aught *1** hut •haw** a* in a 'imam: W * |TWt on actual kludrwil I mud W* iat. h a elraiii.  Tt* tm*, of what w* rail oar Part,  V vttionary gllni|>** »* gar.  A* of a twilight tranlng fat!,  And than - forgot Kaw Von* ort.  IN A WILD TOL NT RY.  leapt ad    Y aurir •uharrlp-  *. F. R. Furry, rraatdaot.   _I.    O. O. F.- M**ta  HNW*y Wadaaadav wanine at Utlay « Hall rtoil** —a—ran ar* rordiaJly ttivitod to at —ad. R. M. Jon**, Berratory  ALD BN LO DOR No IM. A. O. U. W MaaU •t Utlay * Bal! H*fular mowtlnga aarond and  —lag* of "aob month. AII rat* ara rovdlaUy fantod to at. Hogan. M. W., J Tomlinaou. ll*   L Na MI I af F.—Maattngi _ *  r* Rail n—tog Cate—* ak  Mi. Fvaar, OO. F. B  —a a  starting n**mbar■ ar* toad R  i ti van to od tort. oaa Olio* ■ « SUI rn. Aldan. Hardin  J* P. FRISBIE M P  Pkfttatoi aa4 Barkan*.  Aldan Inara. OSU a erat h oat log'* ll* r I war*  T J KICK,  BARBEE AND HAIRDRESSER.  ca..*/  Uar wad florin.  Jap  I aaa toil BtesraaMp tickets. and can bring Tahr Dirndl or aad ih-ui Alway* randy to WIT* laformaton. T. J. RICA. Aldan, la  J. A. BUTTON,  ALDEN, IOWA,  Hilary  LNSUIUNt E ACI ENT.  Farm loan* n*gotiai#J on long or abort Alma at low rata* of Into'**'.  A largo list of Improved and unimproved ‘ i for aal*.  F. BYERS.  - DEA I ER IN —  it Whips. Robes, Sadc cs,  VIJ lets. Bara OM 0 is and  than! Horse Fnraisfcim Goods.  Attention (riven to He pa Inn?  ALDEN. -    -    IOWA  Where Feuds Do Most Prevail.  IU J*, iiu>titit ainr>«-rn who live lion? the Mig Sa inly river, which form* tin* ii i \ ii ti tig line in* t ween West Yirginiaand Ken-lucky, ami their neigh Ii nr* of No r t Ii e a * t em Kentucky, who have been no ji rom i nen t for many yearn in feud*, vendetta*, Aud bloody bat fie*, are a most |iecnliar people with a history running away laws into the “JO**, ’Ut’* and 'oO'n and generation* preceding, which, if jiubli*hed. woald throw into the nhade the I rent effort* of the Te van frontier in the dave    of    itn greaten! notoriety.  The    Mig    Samlian* limper, the men  who cyimjKMe tho oorjrnnf the Hatfield* aud McCoy*. owe their pectdinr char-aeterintie*, their vengoful dift|x>*ition, and their undaunted bravery to an an-centry dating back to the time when the foothill* of tho Cnmlierland mountain*. the stream* snd valley* tributary to the Saudi were* flr-.t Nettled In a race of intrepid Indian hunter* and trapjiern, follower* of Coolie, Kenton, Arbuckle, and other leading ipitit*. Bf any of tho*e men in arm* I Indian rujuaw * capture*! in raid*, or purcha*ed from the different warlike tribe* that then inhabited till* region, aud tho blo al of tbc.*c feminine bl anche* of the kinglie*t Indiana (for tradition and document* *tdl in existence ahow that the w lute hunter of that day wa* atill Miinething of an aristocrat, and -chil.in OO od eg or tided to mate with tile <*>iu-moiler mendrer* of the trilie- t i* at tIii-* Ute day plainly apparent in the tall, *traight form*, the keen ens, and long. black hair of many of the older fauulie*. To tin* fact is al*oattributed many of the peculiarities of temperu-nieut aud di*|M)*ition *o anomaloua in thi* age of intelligence, Vround tlie*e Jieople. aa a nude un, liack iii the ’.Wa and IU’* of the jireaent generation, all the wild -pirit* of tin- pail of the Colintrv, who were either driven from the larje center* of population bv violation of ionic it.vt Ute or by (boite, *ceni to bale been attracted by nome occult magnetism, uutil the Big Sandy country liecamc known throughout the country as the home and hidiug place of hundred* of the wildcat character*.  The big Sandy raft*meu became known throughout the country a* the wildcat, molt dangeroua cia** of met) on the Ohio River Their carouse*, their love of . fighting or air thing which partook of desperation ami dei iltrv i* still a familiar theme ftoin I’itt*hurg to Cun innati. Hundred* of a tories of their dare-devil .scape* ate atill told along the rive,', and it wa* not an uncommon thing w hen several hundred of them hail sold their tim lier, w Inch they had Hosted down to Cincinnati iu immense raft* and tied*, for them to get on lioard one of the Urgent boat* which at that day plied the river on their up triji, aud take the cajitam, pilot*, engineers, and other officers prisoners, and then run the ljoat to suit themselves. On such occasions a steamboat would become a pandemonium, with several hundred gigantic devils whooping,    yelling,  spitting tobacco juice against the bulkheads, mirrors, or furniture, while other diajsirted themselves with cards and played “old sledge" or “stud poker until one or other participant got up dead broke or the affair ended in a general fight. I’{ion the hurricane deck nome leading spirit would stand in command of the vessel, while another covered the jiilot with a pistol or rifle and compelled    him to  steer the craft subject    to the  whim of the biggest devij, who was in command. Below one or two sat around the engine-room and “persuaded" the engineer and stokers into submission. On these occasions the amount of steam sa* moat frequently controlled by the ea-IKnlera, aa the boat fairly the water. Every other  no use to resist, as *teamts>atmen soon learned, and the only way to save the Ural and |inij)erty w a* to effect some sort of a compromise, which generally ended in the dare devil* running the steamer half a day or such a matter, when they turned her over to her proper owners.  Although these men were known to lie dare-devil* aud fond of a fight or anything which partook of excitement, they were not all bad by any means. Still, as the Big Handv country was  Across the Blate of Kentucky, through the northweatern part, is a long range of mountainous country filled with foreete snd lined by a dense growth of underbrush. Through this dense forest there are pas*e« which are known like every trail and road to its citizen*. Many of these passes are narrow defiles, where two or three men with W inehesters ran keep track a regiment, and it is through these jrasses that the manv escape* from the officers are made. It is a well-known  know ii to lie the hiding place of b in- fact that for many years a large hand tired* of dr* pernioe*. it got a wide of ImiM-thieve* ha* preyed upon the s|ircad notoriety.    jreople of Kentucky, Indiana. I clines.  Along in the’W* aud TrO's the conn- see, and even Illinois, and that they try for hundred* of mile* alsue and have lieen trailed to the mountains of tielow was filled with counterfeits. Kentucky and into the neighborhood of principally silver dollars. The Oo\ - » some one or more of these passe* -  (’racker’* Neck." near tne West line but verv few of the  THE UTILE FOLK*  Boa- llixi Hnn Hiw So*. Hawi  Tbrr* aaa a Ditto mal dun H*r nam* wa* Kitty (Itrj.  And. roaJlv. It -Md *a*m a* thens!)  en* nor hi i>* aid but cry.  Ton'd beer brr mumms, noon, awd awa And oft nt midnight. too,  And It wna not a pfeasant *"-ind. 'Hoo-boo-boo-boo-boo-bim!*  And to th*** soh* and t«ar drape Sh* sot sr. a and t Ital they.  Indeed of luau tan*htor cam*  On rhrtotnma pay And »t>*n ab* (band her •teeklns 611*4 With pre*aal* (It I* tm*  Upon my worth ab* barat oat with 'Boo lino-bon boo-bon boo "  toby Fatty dan* ISd*'* (Jo ta lira Tarty.  Sunol & GOOSE  -   neat WWW ne——■>  finis, Un Stock  OOALip  ALDEN, •    IOWA*  eminent of the I’nited State* sent out s numlier of it* l>est detective*, and after a long time they located their manufacture at Handv, but the matin-  \ irgima  ‘Ls-party" at id Papa  MKlXntO A STF, I'IBo (T.  afford impend rabic liidingptace* from hiiii the riders can lie plainly seen.  fat -lure wa* not supprcncd until a long timo after everylaaly knew as well a* the officers themselves that the counterfeit was manufactured somewhere iiji the stream. The "Big Sandy dollar," as the counterfeit wa* denominated, w a* a* common a* its more legitimate brother from the mint at Washington or New < irlcans along the Ohio vallov, and it was claimed openly, and I lielieie freonently admitted to this •lay by the older jwnple, that tile "Big Sandy dollar" eon twined a* much silver and wa* as handsome a jiioee of tunnev u* the genuine. Even long after tbs discovery of tbs •■oniockera* den in the mountain the liogm dollar remained in circulation. To tuvvmnt for this rile a rifer has been often told that the counterfeiter* had discovered a  thieve* were ever captured, or the stock recovered. After the band succeeds in getting through into the mountains, it considers itself safe from pursuit.  ('rackers Neck is a fair sample of many of these mountain jtasae*. It is a narrow defile l»etween the overhanging rock* of a mountain, which by some convulsion of nature must have split in twain, (treat, rough stones, covered and wreathed with laurel from the lMittoni of the |>aa* to the aj>ex, lingo! ie jda  while the bushwhacker is as much out of sight ss though In* hail never existed. baud Hjraculators at one time some years ago were a* badly hated a* were the oftb-ers of the law. aud tliev fared roughly when caught, although that fact has changed considerably of late. Home years ago a land sjtecnla-! tor, w bom I will call Blow n. as the story i* still a returninrence to that gentle man. and a Baptist preacher started through the mountain* toward ('urn Ix-rland Gap. They were rilling splat)-•lit! horse*, and. of course, carried the old-time saddle-bag* with them. The' - had not gotten into Cracker’s Nark fifty yard* I rehire they were halted by several Armed men, whom they (lid not see at all until the guns w ere stuck almost in their face*. They were dismounted in a jiff'. aud while one of the men went through their clothing and nubile-bag* the others stood guard O'<-r them. The speculator’* papers soon l»*traved his busine*I, but the document* carried by th** pre ne In "ere a puzzle. They were sermons. The speculator was titsl to s tree and whipped "itll wvibes most unmercifully, after which his baud- were tied and In was seated  vein or mine of silver rn the mountain,    ...—    ........... ...  and that they were “ming pure silver Eon a log while th? gang fried to di-en and more of it” than wa. contained in | tangle the preachers document*. The'  the genuine. Be that a* it nav, the tradition still exists that a silver mine existed and " aa long worked at some l*unt on the Sand' .  I believe SOUS of the counterfeiter.* w»-re ever arrested, and the reason given is that there wa* a code of ethic* among the inhabitant* which granted every one the privilege of ming hi* raw material a* he saw fit. The ism code prevail* to this day in another branch of illegal trad** that of moonshining. 01 making illicit " ln-kv for  IV  well known fact that  craft in the legitimate trade gave the! -jurate ” aa wide a berth as possible.  running hto Aa bank if nacessagy to  iMout of IIM HRJ. Whoa R town or  baU was  ^ V^.--^Ifaat aa stalwart anas  M III!   II ll  NOT ANY TOO SOON.  It I  the article Tau Ih> gotten at almost ••very hamlet no one ha* vet ia^ea foolhardy enough to I let ray the maker and then remain in the country.  The traveler, if he i* not a spy or marshal, ha* no difficulty ill getting as much of the clear, limpid, but terribly strong stuff called “pinatop" or “moonshine a* lie wants. It would lie little or no Use, certainly very mimfe, to rtn-dertakc to hunt dow n and capture the moonshiner, for every tree, or gulch. or mountain side would lie very apt to lie the hiding place of a sharpshooter, and these men can shoot, anti that they arc or erie and uncomfortably fond of it the recent terrible vendettas fully pro v«,  With all these strange characid istics and hacked by a pedigree somewhat unsavory these j»eople are kind ami hosjiitable in the extreme to any one who may come among them. The writer at one time, and that during one of their bloodiest wars, sj>ent several weeks in the mountains aud valleys, ate aud drank, nib- and walked, and alejit with them and he never met with an unkind word, until after the expiration of several weeks’time w Inch lie and bis guides had sj>eut alternately between the faction* someone started  were written in a miserable hand at be*t. a* the preacher afterward admitted. I he only thing either of the gang could make out "a* the title tonne of the *• rnions, “Hared from the W reek."  After lairing over it for Mime time the leader said to tho preacher:  Say, nii'ter. wa* it a stcaiulmat or rain you wa* blowed upon?*  I he preacher then told the men that he wa* a man of God ai <1 that he wai merely going through the mountains to Ne rth Carolina, wherein was going to  although take charge of a church, \fter talking the matter over for some time the\ gave the preacher his hone ami other proji-ert' and told him he might goon. but adv net! him to go back a* In* won I* I be more apt to find the devil than God in these mountain*. The speculator wa* cleaned out aud started back afoot and ndvimhI never to attempt to rome into that country again, aud I don’t 1h*-lieve lie ever did.  I his is the character of the t-onntry w lid. mountainous and almost impenetrable, and thinly jxipulatcd by a people who are a hundred years l»e-iiinu the time* and who to-dny are living over again in a somewhat modified form the live* of their ancestors of a century ago. Is it any wonder, then, that the Hatfields ami McCovs, the Toll)rara, 1'mlerwoods, and other* of like ilk ran and do defy the lnws ami laugh at the effort- of courts, backed a* they often are by companies of soldiers and even batteries of artillery? Nothing but a greater civilization can or will remedy these troubles, but that seems now in a fair way of accomplishment. as several railroads are projected aud more than one commenced through tho lulls and valleys of this rich but at prcicnt almost valueless country.  r report that we vt ere spine, Fortunately we got wind of Ute foot that a “crowd" was coming after na. Three bontee were never saddled more quickly and tbiwe men never mad* better time iw over forty milos than (Bd we, rad we anode it bobo too eooa, m a ample af ballal-boic* through tba overcoat af taar aa mn flair dows  It&wtotaElSeS  A Mistaken Property.  • I'tdl you what, a man needs to be u good judge of human nature to get along well iu my busine*.*," said the tramp. “But I will admit that I got fouled the other day, though it doesn’t liapl>en often.”  “How was that?”  “Well, I went nil to a seedy-looking party with a red nose the reddest nose you ever saw and struck him for a dime to get a drink. Von know a driukmg man will give you money to get a draw where he wouldn’t give you a cent to buy a meal. Now that’s where I made a mistake. The old cock wa* a Prohibitionist, and instead of putting up a atake he had me run in for a vag, and for six months. I have actually been at hard labor. Ifs tough, though, for a man to tx* deceived in bis estimate of human nature that war, I. tell you.”—Twrtt //arrie Expre»».  <* ■'«“*#•"*    ■    .....W"—  An interesting astoopomical discovery is annouRcea frog) Ital*. After ten  Bol investigation. Schiaparelli has that Mercury, Ae planet nearest to the mb, baa a rotation Uke that of the mom. The planet turns anoa an ital axis during the period of its revolution pcupd Abo Mat*’ co thud Aho crbm de ie almfla tatami toward tim ma.  A Fairtua physician hM been aaa> mfo| tMMk • MtHoil iMEMr af vaecfcafilMMi aa Mm leg tLaaa die  There wa* to be Uncle John's house Minims ant Warren were invited, and    and  Beckv though it very bani th.xt they  1  should be left at home with gtandma to anend the long evening.  "I ‘moat know my eyes won’: stay ojhmi till snpjier-timc without rn imma J to tell me stories," complained little | Becky, dolefully, with her chubby banda wrapjied close in her pinafore, w hile she trudged from window to window to catch the very last t/iimpse o' the sleigh before it dashed only sight over the hill*.  how. I'm sorry to say, kicked the distr* right hard with hiaoojiper toe*, and scow led blackly.  “Oh. ye*, thev will. dearie!" cried grandma, cheerfully, winding in tho j Humorous ball* of bright yarn which hid l»een wandering almat the floor. sud doubling together the long wool "comforter" she w as knitting for grandpa. “Yea, of course they will! And tiler'll be bright a* button*, too, for llftell you a story myself."  “A storv of when yon’sa little girl?" queried 6eoky, her sleepy eye* ojien-jug suddenly.  “Oh. but that’s an astonishing long time ago!” said grandma.  “But I like the long ago* liest!" cried Becky and Lew together.  “A long-ago it shall lie, then.” said grandma, (ticking together the burning brands with the long legged tongs, putting another stick on tile bras* headed andiron*, and hrunking the coni* from the broad hearth with the gray goose-a mg. “It nhall be of the time when my father and mother were i i'itisl not to a tea-party, but to Squirt Holm’s daughter’* wedding party I wanted to go right bad, and ti mod and teased, but father and mother said ‘no,’ and I knew that do was meant.  “But I thought upon it a long time, and I concluded in my naughtiness that if I could only iii some way get there unbeknown, why then it oonldn’t l»e helped Ho I went on planning, till bv anil bv a bright scheme came into my *iily head.  “The sleigh* of those days had backs that woald reach slime the heads of aii'liodv riding, and the seats were s kind of (sn. with a lid, that would hold a bushel or two.  “Near the night of the party I slyly put ou my linsey-woolsey cloak aud woolen bood. and crept into this box.  “It was a pretty snug fit. for I was a chubby girl of M, and the lid wouldn't come down very close; but when father and mother got in it came down mi imick on the ton of my head that it made me see a whole akyful of atara for a minute.  “But I didn't dare to cry out. and away we went rumblety-buuip across the meadow, through the long stretch of pine woods, dow n into Kick’s Hollow, thi n sway up steep Young Hill that wa* nearly a mile long and full of curves and twists.  “I giggled to myself, aud thought I wa* having great fun. But it wa* cnt short pretty quick. Aland half-way lift \oung lfill. in the very steepest part, was the Klhow. Here it alw ays drifted badly and was aw ful sidling. Mother wanted to get out, but father thought 'tw as safe.  “All at once over we wont, U-dquilts, hot w ater jugs and father and mother together. The lid of the sleigh seat flow up and out I tumbled with u shriek on top of the heap.  “ 'Tatty Jane Swift!’ (that wa* mr name them, ‘where under the sun did you come from?’ cried mother, strng gung from under a huge wcad bedqnilt and looking at me with stern astonishment.  “I couldn't aav a word.  “'Hid in the ah-igh-liov, 111 tie bound,’ she added. Now yon may just march home alone for your dis-oliedienee!’  “There was no help for it. Ah, I shall never forget bow I ran up and down hill, for it was now quite dusk! ' Then there was the long stretch of gloomy pine woods to go through. I ' stopped on its et^e. , I thought I never could; but waiting only made it worse.  I shat my teeth herd and ran with all my might. I was about half-way  through when--  " ‘Who — who- WhcKvoo!’ sounded right close beride me.  “I nearly dropped in my tracks with fright.  "‘Who! who! whoo-ool’  “It WM only an owl in a tree over my head. Bat when I got home I was ready to alay at home when I was told to by those who know boat."—Youth'a Companion.  BNtaT- T.rv.gg=v rz=-  lo BMaf Knew It All, After All. YaUowly—Whitaly is a Tory in tell) gral fellow, int he?  Brownly -He pretends to be.  T —Ha knows Iota.  B.—Tfcatah ora tiring he Ammo*! kaov.  i-Ba  haurV aratyttiBf,  Wlaaaa, IIL, feel,  Coml PaaL  ll  PETER THYLOt,  -DBAU»  Live Stock, GRAIN,  Seeds & Goal.  I  ALDEN, IOWA  WILLIAM KEATING*  Heavy and SMI Hardware,  PKW ai TiMt Mdrr,  Tinware A Woodenware,  tbs lorises sad dud stoas at  DOK I HUTTO STOVES I BARGES  Tnrutgai cs*  WILLIAM KRATINA, Aldea. la*  CHICAGO, IOWA AHD DAKOTA  R ATIjWAY.  Smartest, Quietest aid Oily Dir: J Ut  BBTWERV  ALDEN, IOWA FA LUH, ELDORA, AND CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE AND ALL EASTERN POINTS.  Passengers Can Save  FROM  2 HODES TO B  BETWEEN  CHICAGO AHD POUTS OM THIS UK  BY TAKIKO  THIS SHORT ROUTE.  CONNECTIONS AT  ELDORA JUNCTION with the Chicagn aud Northwestern Hallway for Tams City, Cedar Rapids ( halon. Chicago. Milwaukee. De* M<-ine* Council Binds, H Paul, Minneapolis and all point) is Dakota, Nebraska Kill sa* sad lim West  ELDORA with the Central Iowa Hallway for points North sud ^uulh.  IOWA FALLS with 'he B,. (’ R A X. snd DliuoU Central Huowajrs, for Waterloo, Dubuque. Fort Dutl?c aud sioul  City.  For all inforstion alinit Freight or Passenger Hates, appl' to our local age nil or addms the General Freight aud Pa*-ienget Agent st Eldora. Iowa.  JOHN PORTCH, W. g. PORTER,  atos‘1 Jinwye.    ii.    F.    aru!    F.    A  THE.LATEST!  moo a seq aho used by the u. a. government.  Ari pl THE BCSI la Br RariMt by Baying Ba  RlaehMtb*  HaiiHmr.  apse  -Whntis that?  -HaflaaanT know thai ba AomrI  mfsbaaal   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication