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Alden Times Newspaper Archive: March 21, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Alden Times

Location: Alden, Iowa

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   Alden Times (Newspaper) - March 21, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                VOLUME xiir. ALDEN IOWA, FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1890. J I r.^ BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1I.t. J. Simmmun asmaa-Btnien M MM o.'�l nf LOIXtt. No. MB, A. �. � A. M., AU)BN tlBRUyAHD nAOMO BOOM- ALDIN MDQB, No. M. I. O. O. P.-UmM �*'"T. w�to��d�y wnlBK *t UtliT't Hail. ZSfy'H "H^"" wrilliUIr iDTtUd toM-�Md. & M. JoMi, BMraUrr. ..*^iS' S**.?**?' "� * O-W.-MMta f*.^*!:?^* iWolv DiMUnc* Meond aad IMMitar^^TonTiK* o� ��ab mosih. All vunina m�nb*T> u� cordUUy InvIM to �U tajj. X 0. Macm, M. W.; J. TamlUuoD. B�- i. VDUT, p P. ninii, M. D. AMm Iom. OBc* otu SmII^i lUrlwH* I mm ma SUMatktp tlekata. ud au Mog -four rttaadt or laA Uem. Alwara nady to 4if� iBfomaUoa.    T. J. BIOK. AldM. te. J. A. BUTTON, ALDEV, IOWA, lotarT PnHlic, Real Estate, Loan -mo- Fam loAH b��oil�i*d oa loaf or abort �m� a* low ralaa at laWraai. A lanto llai ol Improfcd aad nnlmproTtd tlMidaforiala. J. F. BYERS, Himts, WlipSi Roin, Saddles, Wtf Vtts, HaraMi Oik and tloiinl Bene FDniiUni Goods. to BepolrtBf IOWA. SfMlal AttnUMjHlTOi ALDEV,    -    - NOTARY PUBLIC, It; CUMiB m KT,   ....   IOWA. Vann and Town Property won UIM AXD Bsnw BMK OF ALDM, BOJ. BEEMALL ft MV, Ald�n, Hardin OounM, Iowa. CXCHANGE BOUGHT and SOLO^ ..... ,      , . , t., ^ ROBEHT HOLMES. .umbel, Brick, Cameut antl Lime. A PEEP LNTO A HAllEM. A HALF UOVU WITH HU1.TANAK AND ODALIIMIVKII, Tka Bmprof* W Oarmanr Vlalli Voattiif UaopW umt U Atwordad Bitoaordlawy Caartoiiaa-MM Vlilu Uia Haram aiHl Dawriboa What aha Maw. HE Emprca* Victoria AsfiiatA bf 'Qennany relates laoma intaresting 'iwddentain con-naetion with Iier lataviiiittr Con-�tantiuoi>'.o. Tlie BuItAD ahowed bimaclf a ploaa- n d ligrcoablo lioat. I'or the Empreni'salco he Rxtendod oonrteaie* anoh aa had never l>rforo lieen rooeire cautifiil garden.s iu the Hiiltan's grounds, which are justly claimed to be the loveliest in all Eu-rojH). For a week before she saw them hundrods pf jHsrvauts were busy cleau-tai tkalibM ud aMatiag the gardeners in putting the grounds in condition. Like vverytUng el.io in'Turkey, they suffer terribly from neglect. Although they ara visited daily by the ladies of the* harem, the Sultan' himself takes very little interest in them, and the iiienial.f are allowetl to do about as thor pleare. All the stret'ts leading to the palace were clesnml so that the royal guests might not carry nway a KMPltF.SH or OERMANY. bad impression of tht mpaid. .VII the servants of tlio havoiu wero deoked out iu white gar-mouts, t>�au(iAtlly eiubroidortMl. lle-i�>K but littlo acouHtomcd to �uoh i'U  .oiisislnl of tho V'.mpveiMi. two of arched paaaage wajr, and all.attirad la the most elaborata toileta. Their dreaaaa had been made ex-preaalr for the oeoaaion, and abowed a romarkabla variatT of itylea, some of them being ol the latest Parisian order and othom a ooinproiniaa between the robes of the Turkish lady of rank and thoae of tho Western European. Such a sight in any capital in Europe except Constantinople would have been au imposaibility. It was inconfrr.ioiu in tho last degree, and the Express, although she oad come resolved to show surprise at nothing, ooald not repress a smile. Homo cf the dresses, as she ieur"cd afterward, cost as high as (tlOO each.       ' Tho Sultanas received tho Empress in their i)alace, where a splendid ro-coption dad been prepared for hor. Hhe expressed snrpnsp, no less at tho wonderful richness of their dresses than ot the priceloss jpwels of great size and purity which they wore on ueok, arms ancl lingers. In tho harem as well as in tho Sultanas' palace the orthodox Ottoman garinouts nro worn, although when the ladies go out, which they always do in carriages under escort, more modern styles arc affected, Victoria .\ugUHta sat on an exquisitely upholstered divan and chatted i)loa8-untlv fofuo hour with the Sultuuas, while ebony skinncil Xnbion slaves waited on "them witli refreshments. Shu had a glimpse, ton, of some of tho amusciiicnts of tho harem, and tlio sweetest singers sang and the finest lunsicinns played for her grntificatinn. Like others wiio hnvo been privileged with a glimpse of tho inner life*.of the seraglio, she noted tho iuilolent luxury of the women, their love of friends and their passion for knowledge concerning the outer world. She received the impression that a majority of the women wore comparatively happy and contented with their surroundings, ambition and tho qualities that belong to higher intelligence being found among the Sultanas only. Some of the latter, she discovered, were in no wise behind Euroi>ean ladies in education and feminine accomplLsh-nieuts. One aftenioon. shortly before his departure for home, the Emperor \-is-j vax 11)1)8 KM i'ua itAttiiiii Uov Mm A hw�v>i, mi llw \, �hu.\ wmW�m4 tUu        �ll�tf wiJM sht. vsUii^(i�aa Uv��**Mha mm wm tioitt l'iui**�J�. f\^*�iU�. �t"vlW V�>t' a�%wi. uj'Iu WW Mil Wilt �i4wk�rf m POPULAR SCIENCE. ited the famous mosque of tho dancing dervishes and occupied a Ik>x at one of their great religious ceremonies. A band of Oriental musieiaus rendered sacred music that sounded jarriiig aild barbarous to his ears; long litanies were iliaute eople know how to toUo good care of the feet," said Miss Sloffett, the phy.'.iciau ohiroi>odist of Detroit, as she sat in a low, cushioned chair ond held a lady's foot iu her lap. "All feet are not perfect by any means, but it i.s always the bad tit of a sho9 that produces corns, bunions and other injuries which art'.ift the feet. I ilo not believe that it was ever iiiteiulfd that shoes should bo worn. Tho anoiunts believed this, for tiiey \v(tro-sandals." "Why should .sandals ho worn?" ".So that the toes shall have room to breathe. The great toe, you see is on a lino with the arch of the fix>t, and should stand out soparaio from tho others. The ball of the foot aud the heel serve as two pillars to balance the arch, wliich is a bridge to tho IkhIv. Every stop that wo take that aroh elougatos like tho springs of a buggv. A high-heoleU shoe throws the whofe structure out of balance Ix-cause we cannot raise ouo part without niakiug a false foundation. Wo aro taught toc�)UHidor the iK)iutotl shoo beautiful, but how can it Ih) beautiful when the toot is thrown out of pro|K)rtiv >' v.oiild nut need my Services. .V lady will como iu and say". "My (ts't luis boon abusiii;.? n^o all day.' 1 at oiu-e ask, 'What have you beiui doing to your' (iHit V U is a very oJas-tiv- ujeudior, lUlotl with uorveti aud bluoil \cssols, aud capablo of doing u ywiit doikl ol Work l.wk �t thu (out of a daiii-er uud sdo ^slitt it can amuu-)di di, Tho luHiuaiisi oali ihii to�>.s tho fooV'ti Un^^ors. "It is roiMfdud of tho Uotmwis that iu u co'titiu iuuiui.i( ^vtM with tlttiir batv Uxjt in ordwr tv uuuvw�(uRy r iim|i�i*�s-WlM� I'liyslsai Man Is Conip�-d Or-Haw t* Maka  Llaht WlUiout � BUloh-Olliar Ciirlmis aud Innlrnollira Faels. Pood aatl foBsumptlaii. I'riond, you and I have dear ones we know must leave us soon by means of that devastating American plague, consumption! Lot us reason togotuer. At tho tables of how many farmers and mechanics, I wonder, is the buckwheat breakfast gone iuto disgrace 7 Wo all readily can rt-call the time when countlesa multitudes of families broke their fast of twelve hours, and faccowerless by the strength of the fluid that fights them. I have seen consumption cured again and'again by the simple process of building up the forces of vitality through passive exercise in tho oi>en ttir and the supply of on abundance of nntritious food, and have not tho least doubt that it can be prevented in most instances by the same means. No human being can long onduro the draft mado ujxju it by a cold ^limato and by constant labor, unless it ia well fed, well clothed, and well housed. Somewhere deterioration will show itaelf, and in all countries where |>co-ple are poorly fc or-furms those marvelous things, is formed largely of condeusod air. or solidifled and U>luellod gases; that ho lives on coudoused as well as imcoudonsed air, aud, by meaus  aied of c ndeusisl uir a:id going uKnit on two legs. i>u aoeouut of tho proiluotiou and siiiioly of ilio.so forms of ciuidoused ail   m tln'v i�>.mini lor fiK>d aud olotlii  y eaeh other iu pitehod I'utiles bv means of omduusvH) aiv, and. fnvtlioi', thai inuuy oi tho (leouliar >i'"ei^of i lie Kidiless, udloiM, isiii�ciou.>. till tnre hat eempenaated the laefc af iag pioeeaaaa. In tka wi-im ij, wUob offera a ready esampla, are seen tmo amaO, nmad projaeooaa at tha aide of tba bead. Th�a littia^ dull protnberancaa at* not, aa maDjsnp* posa, single aye*. Each prajectioa contains many tbonnanda of ayea.. I^haae are placed in rows, each one of which is capable of transnittinf an impression of outward objaats, and by tUa means tba fly can see aa well be-iiind as before, aa well down as np, and is therefore pnt on ita guard against attack constantly. A German naturalist counted 6,200 eyes in a silk-worm. The writer ot this article onnated, by means of the micrometer, 14,000 eyea in a drone fly, and, by the samo tpetbod, 27,000 eyea in a dragon fly. It has been proven by actual experiment, ith-the-help pf good microcopes, that each one of these eyes is capable of receiving an independent and distinct impression.     _ �    A Llsht Wllbout .MalrhM. To obtain a light instantly without the uso' pf matches, and ' Without the dangLf of setting things on Uro, is an easy matter, 'lake an oblong vial of the clearest of glass, put into it a piece of phosphorus about the sixo of a pea; �I)on this \Mur some pure olivo oil heated to the trailing imint. the bottle to bo filled about one-third full; then cork tightly. To use tho light, remove the cork, allow the air to enter, and then recork. Tho whole empty space in tho bottle will then become luminous, and the light obtained will be a good one. As soon as the light becomes dim, its power can be increased by o|>ening the lx)ttle and allowing a fresh supply of air to enter. In very cold weather it is sometimes necessary to heat the vial l>e-twccn the hands to increase the fluidity of tho oil, and one bottle wUl last all winter. This ingenious contrivance may be carried in the pocket, and is used by the watchmen of Paris in all magazines where explosive or iDflam neut parts ot �ood milk: rater...................... Milk �ug�r................. IMl (batt�)................ Castilntf laanl)............... Phosiiliata of limt>......... ChlortUfl sKitastlum........ Pboaphat* ma^netla...... Soda itnv)................. Chloriilti >o  eWiUs-try itupplitM iho �Kavii.t vuxuifs that, �> far a� cotti'OHis thiv tho ttUiwattt ailll  MtMt   uiiunto   eiuupiuitiuit, aud bttuolura, whivh is hvvuuil thu rtut^-U tho lUtiiUuota of uvsiiv lht4 utarv�4oUA t^iMt Uiatlita, to all )�pi.i)i^i , Idwti OUkVwitb IIW       Ok tfvuu lhv> li>>i|�at ; ^h>'^) ig�' Klxadnvsa of l*ttr|�oaa. It is a very common observation that many very worthy {awple, more particularly among  the rural districts, have no llxcd pur^KWo iu life, but spend thoir days iu a kind of passive ipiies-cenco, aud are boruo along by tho atro'ugest tide, generally toward tli plare and glitter of the city, or tlehls uul pa-'nre� new l>evoud the sound of their viUi-iKe Ih-IU.   row people iu any of tho walks of lifo eultivato that mental .norgy which is so  essential to luark.d sneees-i or grand aohievemenl .V tiuuiient impul.se towaul a paiiien-lar eiul, followtsl liy a ['oiiod ot dondt, ui'athy and indoleiu'o.  is usuallv ^ i;> plementisl l.v failuie -ml di.aii'.i.il meat; Im) luliin;        .� . or o:i,si..ll  I. llu* ir-.iiu .ili;i-.'T -tf .i ^0,i' - i\Ul.lU-  lUrev'tu.ii     tlu> .1 auvl lU'Me uii-i-i. od licisuu Iv (lm!�,{v -V   ivt)    -"Slliuli^Va   ttjui .�r-v**oher Uud h�d*?eMsi a-i U�  UUa.iUijt   dlsi.iii.m fttV a ouutci to Ijo Uiiot ..h iievdli' lliAU I'.u a i i.k kum.io"! ol hvmve...'' "msiU-h uui,*    W litfu      e If. piilyil Uo ivxuid a 1 oto lioiii        A mttiiilctvH ot th� .uoy^i'iiu k >o.  , luad a� ft'du*�  "VVb* 1 iHi Vr iwta^u wi �41111', -M i�.\v... . lUVUMiiUJpiU i-o di'i i<'  .i'avU>4       \Uo "'l'a\tthu  Uls>ll tuU> IIHhl til tUu Il  V!^V>l|iM ilU   duviot.   U4. nmnit 6nli, Lin ACDEMp WlaaM^ m., OmI, Wi CmL fM. PETER TXYLOR. -DBAUnSI- Live Stociti, GRAIN, Seeds & Coal ALDEN, IOWA. WTf.f.f AM KEATnrO. Daataa ts Heaiy bmI SMf HBinri^ Tinynae A Woodenware, MIHEATDIftnOTESIBiiea IstbsaMikat. 1 GHIGA60, IOWA AND DAKOTA SiortEst, QnidBait ni Orif Direct Um ALDES,   IOWA   FALL8, ELOOBA, AND CHICAGO, HILWAUKU AND ALL KiSTEU POINTS. Passengers Can Save FROM BOOBS TO caictMi Ml nan w m BT TAKISa THIS SHORT ROUTK CONNECTIONS AT ELDORA JUNCTION with the Cbleagi and Northwestern Railway for Tama City, Cedar HspliU. Clinton, Chicago, >lilwaukee. Ocs Moines, Council Blun^ bt. Paul, Miiiui'a|K>lis and all points ia Dakota. Nebraska. Kansas and the Wait ELDORA with the Central Iowa IUU> Way for iwiuts North aud tjoutb. lOtVA FALLS with the B-. C. R- A N. �nd Illinois Central Itailway.-!, for Waterloo. Dubuque. Fori Uod^ and Sioiu City. For all infonition about Frright oi I'asscn.ijer Rates, apply t*) our local sgenll or address the Uvueral Freighl and Paa> nuu^'er Agent at Eldun, Iowa. JOHN PORTCK. W.    POKTIK, THE LATEST! KM09RSED AND IWIO BY THB U. S. OOVSRNMKIIT. irsuget THE BCSTIa tka ttaikei ttuKqtaflllB   

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