Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Alden Times: Friday, March 7, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Alden Times (Newspaper) - March 7, 1890, Alden, Iowa                                 VOLUME.XI  ALDEN IOWA, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1890.  NUMBERS.  i  BUSINESS DIRECTORY  cmnom.  a1 rn * JPWCHU Ren H*rv(r«i rash ■abbatial ll eclork a. rn. Ss May School mf  It rn tterrlPM sseh Halhsth rv.nloc. Jut J O. Millar D U , p**h.r  OERMAN NL m. CRrilCH MrrlaM ar arr 5?.? I •• IO JO o'ekwll a. in l'r**chln( rrrrr 2* 1 **;    »»«»«la*    Hp    hod ii I a rn a vary  Raids*. Prayer meeting amy Th a rad ar arati lw« st 7 ae loc I.  OKUMA N KUTT! KRA I* CHURCH Serries* •jew *«.til.atli at IO JO e tlnek a. na. Ktn iay Mod immadlataly altar mort;in* servicer.  _ M. R. CHURCH Re* J. W. F.irart h. Pastor    _Sunday    al    ll odnrk a rn ae.I  JJM>_m CTaaa —ail— at lo or lock a rn. •awry Sabbath I’rarar meeting arar y To aid ay and Tburaday evening*  simon i con,  —   DKAl.RHR rn-  Grail, Lin Stock  f  -AMD-————  OOAXj,  A (.DBN,    -    •    IOWA.  aoflonn  RADI A rn* IX) DOR No. MO, AF A A. M .  will mad ta raga tar communlcst inn na the Ft! Jay evening aa or bafora tha fall noon. at Ma-nome Hall. Aldan. Iowa. Ylatuag brat bren ara •nrdtail* malted to attend H. K. Pierce VV M., R w Crocket, Heeratary.  AI.DRN r.IRM AHY AND BRADING HOHM -In Raymond Handing Open erery day and e*-n»ng. Munday ai rooted Yearly suhwrtp-u..na Alf anta Mia. |r R, PujTy President , M Im I Attila Taylor. Hor rotary  AI.PKN IXiDOR No im. I. 0.0 F- Meet# •very Wednesday cyanin* at Ullay a Hall VUU Ina brethren are cor. Kelly int iud to at-*an<J. K M. Jooaa, Mecretary.  ALDEN TODOR No ]«|  A . O V VT Meet* S? JU? • Hall Hegnlar meetings sec cod and leal Tuesday armings ot es, ti month. AU ^visiting main lier a arr r.rdlailr Hinted to el -J * CL Huger*. M W . J Tomllnron, Keened et  •■MOO IXIOODR. No an, I af P.—lf se Mag, RrRRadRIN Tuesday iv ■■*■■* al ens* #Q|i DMar*i Ball. vYcttlag latgRte a1  my mMmi rn J. rvMiy. a a f. » Mn, Lot A end AL  Kau J, FT BRT.  WI NMR, rn., C#*L Warranted 93 Pet  (VOL Fm L  PETER TAYLOR.   DE ALK It IU-  Live Stock,  GRAIN,  Seeds & Goal.  rn LORT CHILD  PT MIW. nroi ROM p. MOH*rnE.  limit I lost! In the bewildering throng,  IU Ike, I by the haitian current • urn Ina strong . I Amid Hie ravage roar Its noire la drownml.  Ho mr her caught th* feeble, plaintive Bound; ‘ Mamma ■ main ma !* It (-alia, then glaneaa aby, Betraytng dread of erery | na aer-by,  Its eyas arn tear blind, ain! (ta feet i Are. O, an weary, wandering the atreel ; "Mamma! mamma/*It alia andrena again, Addin* .ach time a keener note of twin ,  It nin». then pause*, im era br luted with fear*,  I For only stranger* erat* its milt of tear*.  The trace* of a plot brr * rare  THI 11 linger In the mrl«l and emmy hair;  The playing children tempt it hot la atop, Though III Its hand I* rlnti-beil a «lri|—I top, And a# It hume* through ilia allen town,  One little a tor king slip* unheeded doe ti.  A* last the faint *}>|»*| la heard,  And rlrepitig heart* of sympathy are *tlrre>l;  Rome lien,I to ask IU name - It* motlier « name  On all lite world It seems ta have no claim.  It stares at every one In blank amare ; While o'er Its brr a tangled ringin' -trays.  Arrested on IU errant abura*.  The eery tear* are Rand la, k to thelrkouree;  | One chubby hand i* lifted t»i It* brow.  Its heaal droop* like a Imiketi flower now;  I To ask suggest or rial, alike are v aln.  No bint of bom* or mother ran they gain,  But a lid dr Illy fr< Iii out f he crowd A |»i wsmv da wt  like sunshine from a cloud. A aob of gladness heaves the little breast • Uys'andrr* bel im tm,re, they know the rest -Mamma I mamma " It shoats with ringing joy, And h> b* r heart the inidber Hasps ber la,)  Kl w Yon* Ctrr.  Til Kl TOOK HIM I V  enough, anti I do know hi* {atopic, though, of .-nurse, not intin ately." “Knew Alf?"  "Ym."  -An* Told)?"  "I.lo.  "Look here, von moot know my  I MM Mf run,ink’ 111 BKD.*  liven out titer* in  Out  ■J Cawater at law. Fromot attention given to oolkmtioaa. OR— per roar a Brown'* Mora. aldea. HarJia Sawatf, Iowa  JP P. FRISBIE, Mf D.  Physician aa J Sarge)*.  Alden Iowa OBf* over beating* Hard war*  IMI  ALDEN, IOWA.  T. J. RICK*  BARBER AHD HAIRDRESSER.  dr—    AeM.aal M***oki* IXae mn.! Mer—  aaaaa /weareraaw CO., mf FWrpwet. IU.  I awn sell steamship tickets, and can bring Four friend* or acad them. Alway* ready to giro inform*uoo.    T. J. RICK. Adati, la  WILLIAM KEATING.  Daalar in  Heavy and Shell Hardware,  Pocket iii Tille Cutliry,  Tinware A Woodenware,  tbs lar*aet and 9neat stock of  Mi HEATING STOVES i HANGES  Ut the market.  J.  A. BUTTON,  ALDER, IOWA,  GJkJtKBL.  WILLIAM K BATINO,  Aldan. Iowa.  O lie overtaken bv night in tho loneliest part of Hast Tenner,;..,,, is t.i flit* traveler a ,-oiulit iou to Ih> lament,*!, writ.,* I >p»e I*.Read,  , ^.in tho Chicago Ti nit*. Til* r»»ad is rough and the deep valley* have gathered a darkness so dona.* that they seem the very but tomb-** pits of blackness \ rav of yellowish li^ht. trembling its way I through the gloom, cornea down from a hill where dog* are harking. The traveler in gladdened anil. riding tip to • log cabin, about*: “Halloa'" Some one opens the door, j "I would like to stay over night with I yon. I am cold. hungry, ami tired, and don't (relieve I .RU go another . J v  “Wall w e kni|f t Kale in no pus son. ea/e we an't g< t/nMMaeo for a pusson ter sleep; lint/f vo^kim right dow n  brother Fete, that Calhoun County."  “I am ac piaintcd with him. there he is know n as Imng Pete."  "Wall. I deelar, stranger, von air gettin’ interestin’."  “Shall I get .low n and rome in ?"  “Tea, Intl wait a minit. Now yon air a truthful man. air yon?"  “I have always Ireen regarded a* anoli."  don't  just one thing, aa* looks a little ana*  and I will en-  Notary Public, Real blate, Loaf  CHICAGO, IOWA ANO DAKOTA   ARD—  INNUHANt K  AGENT.  Farm loan* negotiate I on long or short ■time af tow rates of Intern*!.  A large list of Improved and uaimprovsl lands for lain.  J. F. BYERS,  Shortest, (Juiciest and Only Direct Line  BETWEEN  ALDEN. IOWA FALI.M, ELDORA, AND ( UU'ALO. XII,W AUKEE AND ALL EASTERN POINTS.  — BBA UCB nr—  NarMft, Whips, Rifeit, Saddles,  v Fly Rats, Harness Oils Rad  General Hone Fonmbiif Good:.  N peris I Attention ItlveR to Repairing  ALD UN,    -    IOWA  Passengers Can Save  FROM  3 hours to S  BICT WEEN  CHICA60 ANO POINTS ON THIS LINE  BY TAK IND  THIS SHOUT ROUTE.  NOTARY PUBLIC. tai Enate; camla id Immies  AGENT.  AJLDSar. .... IOWA.  Vann and Town Property  BANK OF ALDEN,  BXU. BULDO ALL * SOX, AMU* Hardin Countv, Iowa.  CONNECTIONS AT  ELDORA JUNCTION with the Chiragc nnd Northwestern Railway for Tams t i*J. Cedar Rapid*. Clinton, Chicago, Milwaukee. De* Moines, Council Blurts, St. Paul. Minnen|wilis nud nil point* ic Dakota, Nebraska. Kansas and the Went  ELDORA with the Central Iowa Railway for points North and South.  IOWA FALIdd wiih »he B., C. R. A N. and Illinois Central Ha/lways, for Water loo, Dubuque. Fort Dodge and Sioui City.  For all inforatlon about Freight oi Passenger Rate*, apply to our local agent! or address the General Freight aud Passenger Agent at Eldora. Iowa.  JOHN PO WTM,  W.«. PORTER,  CL jr. mmd J*. A  ^ EXCHANGE BOUGHT tnd SOLD.  CjUccUjri Made a Specialty. lone)  • Lmb «■ Beal Estate.  ROBERT HOLIES.  -DEALER BV-  THE J.AIEST I  ENDO RMD ANO MID OY THS U. A GOVERNMENT.  IHlfH THE MfTta Ma Market teyBgyiafl th#  Lumber, Brick, Ce  STAR IMBUE BOL  ■MdMlHlMR.IHIPAAA.SV.  MWVRMT VMMM9 eWTPWR MS Va  van ter Jim Mawa's lie’ll keep you I the flnett aorter shape. Live* light down thar at tho foul of the hill."  The traveler turns aw av di*ap|>oint-e<l, of eourao, hut lo* baa plaited a i wreath of faith upon Jim Ma*on who • live* “right dow n thar.” ami onward he goe* through the darknea*. Hi* hortte Htuiuhle*. and Mimetime* he ha* to atop and feel hi* way. Mile after mile i* panned, it neem*, bnf no Iream of light come* trembling out to meet  r  him. He came* the man who Im* lied to him, and in hi* anger he think* of finding hi* way hack and choking the Hooundrei, when *uddenly a light down the valley warm* hi* heart. He ride* up to a cabin. “Halloa!" Door in opened; man poke* hi* head out.  “Jim Mshod live here?*  “What do you waut with him ?"  “I want to *tay all night.”  “Oh, ’lowed mebbe ver wanted ter Hiiatch him up befo’ tHe Oran’ Jury. Ye*, I live here.*  “Well, I wa* told away back yonder,  I don’t know how far. that you would accommodate me for the night.”  “Kod-headod feller wa* it that told vou ?” he asked, (still standing with hi* head (toked oat.  “I don't know; it wa* too dark to see.’’  “Wall, if it wa* a red-headed feller it waK my non in law, an’ I roekon he’* the biggest liar in Ka*t Tennewry.”  “I don’t know who it wa*, but the qneation in, can I stay?"  “Question’* mighty ca*y answered, Yon kain’t.”  “lint, my dear air, I can not go any further."  "Bleeged to yon for callin’ me a dear Mar, but I reckon you’ll hafter go furder. Ham Mayhew live* right down thar, an’ I think he’d be glad to take von. Jest tell Bam that you air from Texas an’ know his folks that v ent out thar throe year* ago. Tell hup you knowd Alf. and ToMl and the rest of ’am. My brother Fill went out thar with them. Community lost a good man when Pete left, I tell von. Tall. rawboned feller that could lift one aide of a steer."  I was the traveler, and I saw my chanoe. No casuistry could stand up against such inducements to tell a lie —yea, so great a necessity of it. I would deceive him.  “My dear sir. I am from Texas, anre  till the pnlpit, an' the folk* don’t know it, but I rvokoa yon hi-am of it an’ COMV to take his place. Wall, PII git up arly an’ build a Are in the meetin' hon ne, an my l>oy ken ride all an>un' an' tell the folk* that have beam of Brother Rice'* *ickne** that Brother Henderson will preach. Powerful glad to *e«« von. Why, brother, I noire yon an’t sick. air yon ?"  I must have looked Ired at that moment ; indeed my hair munt have Iregnn to rise on the top of my head. Preach I couldn't have Haul nix word*. Would it do to undeceive the old Billow? No. He wa* comical in some respect*, bat hi* eyes said “ Don’t yon fool with me."  The woman entered: "Furpity sake. Dick, air yon still trying ter eat the bmthernp? A pu**on would think that von never hurt mdxsly in your life, yon air **o lovin’, but Bam Bettis wouldn't think *o,"  "Wall, he told me a lie, Put*, an' I wcm’tstand that frnm nobody. I don’t mind a man cheatin’ me ontcn a dime one** in a while, but it won’t do fur a pusson ter Im ter rue alwrnt nothin’ a tall  “Come on, brother, an'eat a bite," *aid the woman,  I had I men exceedingly huugr\. but my Hpjretlte WU* gone The life of the l>oniiHecker hen might have l»*-n spared.  “I e.t|iect a powerful sermon from you termof ret. brother." my affect ornate host remarked. "We an’t had out like ter doubt I    " *tirr«*l lip in some time an’ we  want'em stirred. Jest want von ter I pile doctrine upon thnt pulpit till you'd j think it wa* a fodder-stark. That’* the ouiv way to pica**- our folk*."  Me returned to the witting-room. Something had to I*' done.  “Now. brother.'’ *aul the host, “jest step right up thar and go to l»-d. fur , yon ll need a little sleep,  “Thank yon, but let me go out ami M-e als nit my horse. '*  “•Mi, no; I’ve fixed lorn all right.  “lint Pd rather look after him again."  "Wall. Ill go out anil *e«- to him. V>u jist must sleep, fur me want a (Miwr-rful sermon termorrer. T ake off yo* shoes right down here by the fire. ' “No, I II take them off upstairs.”  The room above wa* reached by means of a ladder. I bade them g>**f-night and climired no. My intention wa* to ascape before daylight. I could not help but groan when I glanced about the risiiii There wa* mr window anil I could not escajre through the room Indow. “I must make a hole through the Boof," I mused.  Would th ev never stop talking? At last th. •y w ere quiet. The clapboard* must have lM>en held down witll spike*.  It wus awful work. but at last I succeeded ir, making un e|»ening large enough. To get out on the roof ".as  led herself with putting I •“ '     n , ,at, ** r  1  '•«  wa "  1 U>  b'* 1   order. and. dor.Bg the  ,l " w M 1 , , rmv ' l *V *• -orner and in trying to climb dom ri supped and tell off. I fell on a dog It must have kill.sl I tim. for nothing far removed from the grave could have sounded j .such a note of despair. The obi in in I did not awake. I roamed round and j round trying to find the stable Found j it at last. Went into th. wrong.st.ill and wa* kinked by a colt.  I mounted and rode awav, Wv horse was so tired, notwithstanding his food and rest, that he traveled with diff; cully; but I Urged billion. Daylight v-aineand then I cursed myself. I had left my horse, a magnificent animal. and had taken an old stiff-jointed, j knock kneed thing that would not have | brought JIO on the public square of a village. Should I go burk ' Oh, Ro I rode or stumbled on uutil the old plug gave out, and then I walk.sl and carried mv saddle.  EVOLUTION OF NTTI.IHH HATH.  s.,me mf tke  *•»..!« mf Wllllner.  I ••Itlonakla  I “All, boh, an* I yon, but thar’*  I univ on, . that piciou*."  “Tell tne what it deavor to explain,"  “Wash you would explain. You se.., I an’t go' no brother Fete an’ never did ha v e none. Urn Fete tu.ys.-f. Knowd yon wa* a rascal -<*>n a* I heard you *j*eak. Clood-nighl."  Ile all it the door aud I turned aw ay. My horse *ittml)Jed, -o rough was th*-way, ami ut one time fell to his kn.s-*. It UlUHt have lieeti twelve o’clock when I Raw another light, When I yelled a man op, nisi the door.  “Whoa that?"  Another lie might la- successful, I would take a desjM-rat.- chance.  “I am a preacher," I answered, “mid. hungry, tired, and lost in this aw ful night of darkness. Can von tuke me in ?"  “What Wirt of a preacher?" “Metlw*list,"  “W'all, I reckon lie ken," a woman'* mice answered. "Jest get right down an' <-otnc in. an’ Dick, yon take the brother Vt 1m»ss. Blew my life; the idea of a preacher bein’ lost sieh a night as this. Walk light in, brother," They had been to lied, but a great log fire burned in the immense fire place. The man took my horse and the woman lm*i  her hon*.* in order aud, (luring Utile, deplor.st the hardships to which I had lieen subjected. The man. a comical old fellow with dead gras* whisker*, noon returned and shook hands with me time and again.  “Mighty glad ter see you, brother. I Hen t l**en a preacher Mf my house fur I a | kjw erf a I long time. Powerful glad j ter see you. Stranger coni*- along in j the arlv part of the night an’ wanted to stay with ti*, an’ although we’ve got a first-rate 1**1 up-st air* I sent him on down ter Sam Mason s, 'cause I 'lowed silt Inn’ moiit happen. Powerful glad t.-r see you."  He leaned over. and. placing his ham!  on my knee, ga/, ,1 affectionately into my face.  “I>ick," exclaimed his wife, “don’t eat the brother up, fur mu nay sake."  “No, PtiHs," he rejoined, “f love you too well tor deprive you of that air pleasure. Brother, what is yo' name?" “.Sanderson,” I answered.  “Wall, I am powerful glad to see yon, Pit**, slip out thar an' snatch the feather* offen the Domineoker hen and cook her fur Brother Manderson. Wake up Sun an* tell him thar* er preacher iii the house. Wnali you could a met my daughter Polly, but she married Sat Buckley last week. A* good a w orker at the mourner’* I tench as you ever Heed. Draw cd the Fettygaat lioy*  H E fAnion* lo-ttsihihty of aa >Yi«ntal priest in aa arstattc trance is nowbsrs In companion with I h m indifference -bown by a fashionable w o rn * a sag <c*d in trying ou a new bat ha-fore the glass and I woald stake a large sum tbs! none of (be ollentt of a certain fanion* Nsw York e*. tabli*bment per--sited me as Inal chatting with w« ll. rail ber the l o*-me I bad asked ber ie describe to me lbs complete genesis of a fashionable bal.  “Do yon wish," she replied, “to hear lbs history of the bat I made for Mr-. James Brown Potter? It ta a typical CRM.* And thereupon *be narrated the following 'When the rebeemel* of ’( amil!#’ were t-egun, Mrs Potter came to me to order a bat. Now. CamiHe I* a nervous woman, fashionable ae to clothes, aud. alio** all, eccentric. Bd entrtcity. then, must be th,- dominant trait of tbs bat. But it munt *l*o partake of th" individual taste— the caprice of the actress. Now. Mrs. Potter known very wall that one of ber principal < barm* is ber wavy, itnffv. red,tub hair. which seems always on the jaunt of en, npinir from it* pins md of rolling down ber »hoaldere. She therefore wished to have her hair show both in front and l-ebsnd. Having expressed (hi* desire, she seated herself b-forethe large mirror, and I placed upon her li ght auburn lock* tbs frame of tho longed-for bat. Ii wan at this moment only an an-promraing compound of crinoline end wit#; hut jieticntlv and carefully, with many 'hinges and th" most minute alterations. often stepping back to studT the effect. I did my beet to adapt the ce. u-Inc bsad-dresn lo the actress’ striking face. In two sitting* tbs frame wan outlined, It wan then given to the -craw-sewer, who ut otxe <onied the model. Then we logan to look for trimmings that would mike toe hat barmoui/e with the gown. There was really sn • in-berrassment of choice, for you know how inexhaustible the milliner * palette always is, with its flowers. fruit*, feathers., birds, insect*, furs, rtb-l*on». Velvet, lace pearls, steel, jet; tbs entire fauna and flora of erection agree in trv mg to lend luster to our work* of  1  art. Such is the n*ual history of *tage hat*. Ladies see them at the flrnt representation of the play, and if the model meets with success, every one wants a copy of it But there are mony hats.  ; too. wbi< n are introduced by society, j leader*. People see them at some public gathering, at church, or on the drive, and our astomt-rs begin to call for duplicates of them. Th, re are fanhionabie women who are quite proud to know that a hat ehnnteiie-i with their name has gained a vogue."  W hen a hat ha* once lice ti carefully elaborated, and is favorably received by the public it become- forthwith a type, subject to all sort* of modification*. I hut the primitive model gives rise to bat- a* numerous as sands of the sea or *tars of night. - .Vtic lurk Ifltir to f 'kvngu f.nt'jrr.     4    y                ..... . ....    r  i     yuk khcApf..  in when nobody elite coaid tench Vin I’m powerful glad tor see you. WB st sort of n ho** air you ridin’’?"  “A pretty fair animal."  “Wall, T reckon we ken ntrike up a trade term©trow before church tuna, ” “Before church time?"  “Via; the meetin'hone# in right down thar in the holler; no yon didn’t mis* it no mighty fur atter all. Don’t pay no ’tention to that noiae. It’* only the Domineoker hen a aquawliu’. Better aquawl, too, fur when that wife of mine ■pleads the ital rn* of her hands out on a hen, why the hens life ends pretty soon afterward*, if not right thar. Mighty mod thing they sent you, fur our regular preacher is sick sa' kaiu’t  A Narrow View of the Case,  “I alw ay* laugh." relate* an old r«--i dent, “wh#*ti I remember an exiierienca I had when a boy. I lived in the courtly, aud one day myself and antithet lair had occasion to go to town. Blowed me fifty rent* and wa* to pay me when we reached town, where he intended to get change for TI. In going to town we had to eros* a creek. It was early in winter aud the foe wa* strong eiiough to hold me, bitt he w as a great deal heavier, and in following nolle broke through. He at once began to yell and sc ram I de for dear life. The water wa- quite deep and he was in considerable danger.  “ By .love,’ I exclaimed, a* I fluffed and panted after my exertion,‘it wa* a pretty tough job get ting you out of that creek.’  “ ‘Ye*, gol darn it,' he replied, ‘and you wouldn’t have done it if I hadn’t owed you fifty Cent*.’" \l titian kern Wigeon* in.    *  Oyster* of Portly Nile.  Tile biggest edible oyster* in the world are found at Port Lincoln, in South Auntralia. They are a* large urn a dinner plate, aud the same shape. They are sometime* more than a foot aejon* the shell, and the oynter fit* his shell so well be doe* not leave mnch margin. It is a new sensation, when a friend asks you to lunch at Adelaide to have one oyster set before you fried in butter or egg* and bread-crumb*. But it is a very pleasant sensation, tor the flavor and delicacy of the Port Lincoln mammoth* are proverbial in that land of lux or ie*, titigburg Dinpmh ti.  M. Morro, of Turin, ha* found that the fresh blood of fishes act* as a powerful poison when injected into the circulation of mammals. The vc no mon* property exists in the serum, is destroyed by the putrefying process, by hearing to nome 1,900 degree* Fahrenheit, by alkalies, and by Mineral and organic Mids, except carbonic ccid.  Ari  Nut Tall Enough.  History ha* recorded that a foreign prince** to whom Henry YUI. of Lug land offen d In* hand in marriage -cut ba. k the j,anted an*wcr that if -ne had two lit avis she would gladlv hat-placed nne of them at hi* Maje-ty’* ! disposal." This allusion to the fate of Aline Boleyn and Katherine Howard w a* a good sjM-eum-n of epigrammatic i * Hoariness of that ja-riod: but, -ax* Mr David Hor, an equally creditable I performance ha* l*-en furnished bv our ow n agt*.  Just at the time when vague rejiort* were beginning to creep abroad that derma BV wa* meditating a fre*h extension of ber frontier at the expense of Holland, a Dutch official of high lank happened to be visiting the court of Berlin, where he wa* handsome!v entertained. Aiming other spectacle* got uj> to amuse him. a review wa* or gani/cd at Pot-duiu.  "What does your excellency think of our moldier* ?* asked Prince Bi* Diarck. a* urn- of the regiments cam* marching pn-t in admirairle order.  "They look a* if they knew how to tight," refill,,I the visitor, gravely; “but they are not quite tall enough ” The Prince h*>k**l rather surprised at tin* diMj'aragmg criticism. He made no answer, I Kl we ver, and several other regiment* filed past in succession; but the Dutchman’* verdict ujsin each aud all wa* still tbe same; “Not tall enough."  At length the llrenadiers of the (•nard made their apjx-aranee a mag niticent laslv of veteran*, big and stab wart enough to have satisfied even the giant loving father of Frederick th. (treat; but the inexorable critic merelv said, “Fine soldiers, bnf not tall enough "  Then I’riuee Bismarck fairly lost pa ti* nee. ami recoined, somew hat sharji Iv, “These grenadiers are the finest men in our whole army; may I a-k what your excellency i* pleased o mean bv saying I hat they are not tall enough ?"  The Dutchman looked him full in the face, aud replied, with emj>ha*i*, “I mean that we can flood our country twelve feet deep."  He PcaMan Be.  “Please buy a paper—I’m stuck," w hined a newsboy a* ne approached au old woman in front of the Soldiers' Monument Hat in,lay afternoon.  “Ibiod lands! bat von can’t lie!" abe replied  “Ye*. I am,"  ’’But you can't la* The mud is all frere up, and nobody nor nothing can bs stock. Boy, yon are *tarttng out right to land on the gallus" Detroit Fret iVes*.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication