Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Albert City Appeal Newspaper Archive: March 29, 1956 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Albert City Appeal

Location: Albert City, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Albert City Appeal (Newspaper) - March 29, 1956, Albert City, Iowa                                 Itftftii^liflMjill  mrniääm  /í. e.  P9Hp04*âé.  The Albert City Appeal  "A Progressive Newspaper Setving a Progressive Community  Fifty Fifth Year SSSSSSS!  AH)ert City, Buena Vïsta County, Iowa  Thursday, March 29, 1950  Number Thirteen  PBBD WARING AND HIS PJENNSYLVANIANS AT SPENCER APRIL 9  Dr Arden Alnmuist, medical missionary in Africa waa a ¿Ouner gaesjt in our home laat Thuiaday evening. During the vislUng, tiie conversation took a turn tomrd American newrtquipers and nwg«» zines whidb appear in that part of the world.  P P  Dr Almquist told us that many of the natives where he is stationed are able to read Sngllsh. Any time 'they see an American news,paper or magazine they literally pounce on it. And what is tihe first thing they read?  P P  The first (thing they turn to Is the advertisemen'ts. They not only read them completely, but they spend oonsideraible time actually studying them.  P P  According to Dr Almquist, there is nothing tbat better portrays (the American way at life to thes« natives than (the advertising they read.  P V  The most disheartening thing a newspaper editor hcara is, "I never read the ads." It would certainly be )hlghly 'raoourAging to realize tlhat his readin« public itiuzns to the ads ^rst and pursuea them very carefully.  P P  Let me suggest that we read the ads even if we thinlc we cannot learn more about <tihe American way of life.  P P  Bz Tike never realised how hard it is to drive a bargain until he bought that sCKondhand car.  P P  The inconsistency of htanan nature was well e]q[>resised by the on« who said (that men will drink anything put before them, but «(h«^ very carefully the oil put in their car.  P P  The beast is raising its ugly head and right now it loola t» if March will exit with a itremen-dous roar of a liom.  S(pencer, Iowa - Fred Waring and his half-a-hundred Pennsylvanians are coming to Spencer Apr 9 to present their big new musical show "Hear! Hear!" It's a program of wonderful Waring music combined wifb imaginative scenery, and extensive wardrobe and thrilling electronic devices.  Bing Crosby aaya of it, "It's, real music! The best ever!" Cole Pojiter declares, "Superbly staged. Spectacular prodfaction. A great show."  Waring, one of the nations out-s landing showmen, is making a return engagement to Spencer. His show la&t year was acclaimed the '«best ever" otf the big name productions brought to the fieldhouse. The fieldhouse seats 41B5 for such performance.  An old time minstrel show is headline for "Hear! Hear!" Gaily costumed in the traditionally colorful wardrobe of the minstrels and aided by thrilling mins.trel songs, the members of tIhe Waring glee club step forward for solos and specialty acts exactly as they may hikve done a half a century ago.  There are religious and patriotic songs, popular tunes, semi-claasics and love songs to round out this pageant of musical joy. Choregr-aphy has added to the production a gay and exciting folk song sequence.  Fred Waring, Jr, a college student, makes this debut as a performer in "Hear! Hear!" playing the trombone and banjo. Another father son combination is the singing team, Leonard and Bob Kranen-doak, known as "The Happy Warrior«."  Fronk Davis, acclaimed as the greatest Negro voice since William Waidield, is a featured soloist. A native «on of New Orleans, he has been made an honorary citizen of the "Cresent City," iihe second  FARM  NOTESf.Uiitìri  by Leland Long  If a fanner is godng to U|kkA a profit tins year, be will haire to follow a slogan such as "ease tihe Squeeze" or "adjust or bust.'-' Laeit year, we felt ti>e firat jolt of post-war adjustment. Will ligfatn' ing strike twice in Hhe same place? Apparently some Congressmen think so for they are woricing feverishly trying to develop « ifarat program which will g^t votes this fall.  Wihat will farm prices do this fall? The weather 'has a great dMl to do with the answer.  If we have a good crop this year and Congre.-^ doesn't g^ too wild we can. expect 90e com. A dry year may see com reach $1.80 or high er. If this year is as dry as last yeai-, our com may be no more ll'.ian fodder. Our sub-soil waiier reserve is very low. mmem&er that grain sorghum or soyiboans will produce more under drougth conditions than- com. Soyfbeana that fail to produce beans will still give you a high-quality hay. Grain sorghum will do much batter than corn on a dry year and will mstoh it in yield up to 60 or 70 buaheU per acre in « nonnal year. Grain sorghum is equal to com in fattening cattle and »Imoat as good in feeding hogs, is does preswt some prdblems in harvesting and alorage.  Cora acreage allotment .may be raised to close to last year. I would be inclined to reserve that right to sea] my com. Perhapis I would try grain aorgton on that S acre strip which would noratally be in com.  Check up on youtself, Did yoii Inoculate all legume seed before  seeding? Cleaij and treat your oat seed? Cover your legume seed only Haul $^ome manure to the ha^ 40' Prune your gnqMs ? Order garden seed? Try farrowing peiuT Run out of hay ami silage? Have some <aU.Meded rye for  early pasture? Mark gilts from «nail Utters to  go to market? Consider aowing barlay instead of oats?  Add H poand «f tedino to jrour l«guow mlxT  PROGRESS MADE IN RED CROSS DRIVE  ■Mrs Eva Gutel, chairman of Albert City and Fairfield township asks that all club or other group Red Cross pledges be paid promptly at the Albert City 'Savings Bank. Rural contributors can help to speed the closing of tihe drive by sending the Red iCross envelopes in quikddy.  Albert City and Fairfield town-■ihip are doing well, having already turned in $400 of the $560 quota.  Your heli> in getting pledges to the bank or in hurrying along the envelopes will be appreciated by t>he chairman and committee.  Easter Concert Sunday Evening  "The Seven Last Words" will be ^iven by the community choir at Our ■ Savior's Lutheran Church Easter Sunday evening at 8 o'clock. The choir ia under the direotion of W W Kischer with Hilvie Johnson as accompanist.  Soloists are Mavis Aronson, Judith Nelson, Edythe Young, Lester Larson, Marlowe Peldman and Howard Johnson.  SCHOOL FACULTY ELECTED  RE-  'Siiipt Lawlor was offered, and 'be accepted, a three year contract to his present position at a meeting of the board last Monday evening. All the other teachers were re-elected and, voted a flat |100 annual salary increase.  At a previous meeting, Anton Turek was re-elected ¡board chairman.  Mrs Laura 0?'inberg of iLuveme, Minnesota arrived Wednesday in the home of her 'brother and sister, Harry and Esther Anderson, to spend Easter fhere wiith relatives.  Negro to be so honored. The first was Dr Ral^h Bunche.  Pretty young harpest Rosalie Randall, pianist-comedientiie Nonna Douglas, handsome vocal soloist Joe Marine, and two alert skiig-ing artists Bob Sands and Patti Beems all are part of the show. It is the climax of 38 years in sihow business for Waring.  "Heart Hear!" is brought to Spencer by the Special Events Committee of the Chamber of Commerce. Tickets are scaled from $1 to $3 and on sale as of Mai-ch 26 at the Chamber office.  Methodist Services  C R Ofct, Pasitor SUNDAY 11:00 Worship service Community Canter  Ev. Free Churcti  Rev. Glenn Nelson, Pastor THURSDAY 2:30 Prayer Service in parsonage 7:80 F C Y F Meeting FRIDAY 10:80 Good Friday Service, Dr DL Foster, Mara hon will bring message. SATURDAY  9:00 Bible in..tnielion class SUNDAY 9:40 Sunday .■iohool with classes for all aeres.  10:45 Morning Worship and Communion Service 7:30 No evening r.erviee. Easter concert by Convmunity Ohoir Tuesday  8:00 Quarterly business meeting W®DiNBSiDiAY 2:30 Dorcas ¡Society, White Cross meeting  'Welcome to all services. Bring your friends.  St John Lutheran  Carl A Wenger, Pastor TmJRSIDAY  8:00 Lenten Service FRIDAY  10:30 Holy Communion SUNDAY 10:30 Easter Service  f>wthpran nmrrii  . Knt. V Lftwr»-i(>e,- Pastor HOiLY THUiRiSiDAY  1:§0 Women's Missionary Society Deasert Luncheon and Quest Day. Bring a gt^est. Men are invited. HostessM: Mrs Pay Galbraith, Mri Gunnard L Andewon. Mrs A. R Werner, Mrs Bmil Olin, Mrs Ralph Carlson.  8:rf) Holy Communion <3000 FIRIDAY 10:46 Worship SATURDAY i>:80 C/Onilrtnation Class 1:80 Junior choir rehearsal EAtSDEOH SUNDAY 6:46 lAither League Easter BMriefaat  9'M Sonday :School and Bible eiaiMt  l(h4B Eaater Serirke 8:00 Ganteta by Oownunity  Choir MONDAY 7:30 Church boards meet; also at 8:16 and 9:00  8:00 Evening Missionary Society Hostess Mrs Melvin Aronson. TUESDAY  8:00 Church choir relhearsal Adult membership class if there are applicants rnUBSDtAY  7:30 Luther Leagrue FLOWER COMiMIflTEE April BASTE» SUNDAY - Luther League; Mrs H E Johnson, chm. Mrs L H Johnson, Mrs Anna Jafvert, Mrs W A Johnson  St. John's Evang. ind Reform Church  Rev. August Bock, Pastor FiRIDAY 10:00 Good Friday worship service SUNDAY 9:00 Sunday (School 10:00 Easter Service with Holy Coimmunion  /ion TiUth. Church  C. C. Gutekmiat. Pastor  SUNDAY 9:30 Sunday ScSnool 9:00 Service in German language 10:30 American Service TUEJSiDAY 8:00'Mens Club 8:00 Church Council  Covenant Churcl  V»«han Sundberg. I^tor  THURSDAY 4:15 jfunior Confimation Class 7:00 Choir Tehoarsal 8:00 Young People's FRIDAY 8:00 Good Friday Communion Service to which we welcome all who belong to Christ SATURDAY 9:30 Senior Confirmands meat  •stinday  9:4R Sunday tSchool and Bible classes for all. 11:00 Worship Hour - Message "Life's New Wmension" World Missions Offering. 8:00 Sacred Cantata MONiDAY 8:00 Broliwrhood Meettn«. All men invited WEDiNESDAY  8:00 Bible |S«adies and Prayer 8:30 Qtturterly BoBiatw Meeting We welooma «rarmia to onr Serrice«.  From The Superintendent's Desk  Would you like to see a spectacular demonstration of the properties of liquid air, if so, come down to the higlh school auditorium April 3rd at 2:45 p m and enjoy the program presented by K A MacKenzìé. Mr Macenzie is a world traveler, writer and lecturer. He has a weekly column in thè Topeka Daily Capital and a regular program over WIBT-TV. I am sure that his demonstration will be informative and entertaining. Everyone is very welcome.  A report was handed to me from Mrs Mantin Anderson of Iihe Mus ic Mother's Aupiliary stating that 614.19 was cleared on their carnival. As has been said before in this column, this money will go toward new equipment, unifomis, etc for ithe music department. We extend Ihearty congratulaitions to the Music Molfliers for" their successful money raising effort.  'Sbme discussion was carried on at our board meeting relative to offering Kindergarten in the next school year. The plan is, if it is to be offered, to have full day sessions during the last 12 week« of the scàool year. We hope to get ballots to every parent who (has a youngster of this age, (5 yeara old by Nov 15, 1956) but if you are anissed, we would aippreciate it if you would come to ithe office or drop us a note expressing your opinion. The board of education is very anxious to have our school, as nearly as possible, satisfy the education need's of our community. We are also very conscious of our responsibility to the wishes of the (people. We would like to know ■wftiat your wishes are in this instance.  The High School Mother-Daughter Tea that had been scheduled for March 29th lhas been re-scheduled for April 4th.  Rodney Carlson Lynn Lincoln Wed  A wedding of interest to many in Qhis community took place at the Grace Lutheran Church in Marathon Saturday evening, March 17. ■Former resident, Lynn Lincoln, daughter of Mr and Mrs Warren Lincoln and Rodney Carlson, son of Mr and Mrs Eldon Carlson were united in marriage. Rev B T Er-holm, pastor of the dhurch, performed the double ring ceremony.  Attending the couple were; as brides maids. Pearl Ann Carlson, sister of the groom and Mrs Donna Brown, college class mate of the bride.  Attending the groom were his brother?., William of Laurens and Donald of Ames. A tlhird brother, Wesley, served as head usher, assisted by Richard Carlson. Candle lighters were Colin Lincoln, brother of the bride, and Corwin Ritchie.  An Easter Message  ACADEMY AWARD PICTURE AT TIME THEATRE  iDhe 20lih Cen'ui-y Fox production, "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing" won the Oscar for movie with the (best song. This fine picture star?, Jennifer Jones and Wm Holden. and was actually fibne in the Far East. It will show three evenings, Sunday, Monday aivd Tuesday.  Mr and Mrs Rodney Carlson  Apiproximately 260 guests were received ait the reception. The bride dhosen colors of orchid and white were carried out in the floral arrangements and other appointments. Also taking part in the wedding from here was Mrs Carl Swanson, who cut and served the wedding cake.  Both Mr and Mrs Carlson are graduates of the Marathon Higlh School and both are now students at Buena Vista College in iStomi Lake, where Mr Carlson is taking  .lim^.r  Calendar of Events  The Priscilla Club will meet Apr 4 with Miss Esther Quist.  Legion Auxiliary will meet at the home of Mrs Edna Johnaon Tuesday evening, April 2. Program Committee is Mrs Terry Buse and Bob Diehl. Please note change of place.  Community Club will meet at ithe Community Center April 3.  A week ago Tuesday afiiemoon a group of ladles called on I^^b Martin Aronson tp help her eel elbrate her birthday. They were Mrs Roy Schultze and Jonell and Mrs Elsa Aron«oji. of 'Laurens, Mrs Walt Holmen, Mrs Marlin Anderson and Kristin. Mrs Lee ISUhiuler and Sharon, Mrs Francis Porath Mrs John Carlson, Mra Fay Gal' braith, Mrs Joh^ MMdox, Mra Oliver Aronson and Laura, Mrs Dean Sundblad, Tommy and Sally, MiM Hilda Forsberg, Mrs Hubert Johnson ,Mrs Ray Allen and Mrs Matt Lillig.  Mr and Mrs Marlin Anderson and children and Mr and Mrs Fra neis Poratth and children attended the examination of confimiands at the St Peters Lutheran Ghunsh at Newell Friday evening; their niece Pauline Neshiem being one of the confirmands. They jo^d other relatives at luncfh following the service in the A O Porath hoiAe.  Mbs Vira Wilbur and Bath of Sioux lipids spent the week end •viriting in the Wesley Anderson iWDM. —  pre-medic course and Mrs Carl-aon is a student in Elementary iEiducation. 'Dhey will reskle at Marathon. u|>on returning from their honeymoon.  •>-Shaw Studio Photo  JIENS AiNDEBiSiENS OBSERVE SILVER ANNIVERSARY  The Silver Wedding Anniversary of Mr and) Mrs Jens Anders^ was celebrated by relatives and friends at Hhe Covenant Church laat Wednesday evening.  Rev Sundberg served as program chairman and led in devotions. He also gave a talk direciling his well chosen words toward the honored couple.  |^[>ecial «iusic was furnished by Mrs Leslie' lEmst and MAw Joe Loving, who aang, "I Will PUot Thee" and » voe^ aolo by IMrf Ray Oustafaon, "Talke My Hand and Trust in Me" accompanied by Mrs Leslie Young. Two silver anniversary readings by Mrs Evarett HuHgren. Jim Pearson pre:.ented the guests witih a gift from tihe chuTch.  After tiie receiving line a soc lal fellowship was enjoyed in the church. A buffet lunch was served witih Mr and Mrs Avery Sihold acting as host and hostess.: The igoest ti^le was aippionted with cut flowers, «ihrer candle holders and tall white tapers.  Mr Andersen gave a »hört talk, thanking the «mop for ittw cou tsy. Their daughter, Janet, presid-«d at the guest book. They also were the KaelplMitai of other ca and gifts.  Mr and Mrs Sig^Nordlund an4 family ' spent Eiaturday evening visiting in the home of their son and family, Mv and Mra Roland Nordlund.  Naisliiboi» Md frienda cal«lbrat-edtiia birtlMliy^ Mrs BmaUn* Towktai:.  What great joy has brought to mankind! We always like to review this event which never ga.s old for us. Wlhat is some of the evidence upon which the Be^.urreetion from the dead is based?  The Chrisi.ian doctrine of Uhe Reaerrection can be a »tumbling block to fai.ih, when we allow ourselves to exalt aaid exaggerate death to a degree altogether beyond reason and Scripture. We then speak, and mourn as though death were the last law of life, but liie ii-, the law of nature. The earth was dead, it was "waste and void' iind wiUhout life ages ago. But now how the earth Uveal There is hardly a clilf too barren for nature not to hang blossomiog flowers upon it; the old earth teems with life. In ithe light of the fact it appears just as easy and natural for God to call'bade life to all mankind that has been laid to rest in the past and will be laid to rest in the future.  It ia to be observed that man, \J.-.e crown of crea»'.ion is give« 10 more pain, anguish, distress and suffering than any otheir organism in the whole creation. This ihappens not necessarily alwvya because of his own fault or the fault of others. He is fac^ with this problem no matter how hard ihe may 'try to rise above the unfavorable and trying situations that, confront him at various time?. Now atfir.i, hand one might wonder why man endowed -^th such great gifts and potentialities alhouid suffer more than any other living creaiture. We are sure of course that our heavenly Father uses all sorts of meaois, and methods to discipline, correct and set man right, all of which prompts us to believe that man was created for greater things aheail of him, Man's destiny ia not reached whan i« laid to reat in the grave, but shall arise to a greater life, if so he has lived a life in accordance with God's will and ways.  A verse everybody knows from memory or should know is the verse John 3:10: "o^or Uod so loved the world tlhat He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believes on Him, should not perish but have everlasting life." Uod has provided for ua all things necessary for all our pihysical needs. He is likewise deaply concerned for our spiritual needs. He iput forth Hia greatest affort and presented His greatest gift in the sending of Chriat to minister to mankind upon earth preparatory to offering His life a» a sacrifice and ransom for the sins o£ mankind. Our heavenly Father, far from being content and with a deep yearning for the redeemad souls of mankind ia craving to continue His love in t&e Life beyond, which implies that this privilege is in store for all as 'the Aipostla Paul puts it, for all who love his appearing on the day Remr-rection. What, eye hatJh not seen and ear hath not heard or ihaa entered into the ;heart of man; God has prepared for them that lova Him.  Notice ihow Jesus spoke of death? When Jairus' daughter bad >ed away he told the people who had been hired to do tha mourning for the family: "She is sleeping.' There were a num^ of people there, who laugjhed at him, thinking it were fooUsh of Christ to say it. But he took her by hia hand and called her to life. When called to come as quickly as he could to see Lazarus, Jeaua said that he were sleeping by which He meant to say most likely that he ihad died. Notice ow Jesus called Lazarus to life as ha called him who had been dead four days with a loud voice: "Lazarus come out." And Lazarus arose from that sleep as Jesus likad to call it. When he met the funeral procession where tihey had carried out a young man, the only son of a widow He had iflie procession to stop and call to him as a per&on would call one from (his sleep: "I tell you, young man, ariael"  How assuring of life beyond the grave are the words of Chriat spoke comfort to Mary and Martha when their brother Lazarua had passed away, when Ihe said: "I am the resurrection and the life, he who believes in me, though ihe die, yet shall he live and whosoever liveth and believeth in me, shall never die." How very encouragingly did He speak the words: "Father, I desire that they also whom Thou hast given me, may be with me, where I am that they may behold my glory whidh Thou hast given me." We must not omit still another remark Jesus made, most likely not once, but often also: "In my Faither's house are many rooms, if it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you unto myself, that where I am you may be also."  Indeed Christ is risen, He is risen. The stone waa rolled away. God could not suffer the Holy one to see corruption. He lives and we shall live also, after we arise from our graves. May we be ready to face the judge of all earth and anxious to go with Amen.  August F. Bock, Pastor  4-H Newa  The Fairfield Farmerettes mat (Saturday, March 17 in the home of Suzanne Vegors. Members answered roll call w<bich was "Haibits I have seen in girls I like."  After the busdness meeting the following program was given; "At The Gate Of Heaven," sung by 'Jhe club; history of the song by Carolyn Milles; talks, "Courtesy Pays" by Karen Sorbe; "Good Manners in Public Places" by Jean Ann Curtis; Individual demontrat-ions, "Malting a Mitered Corner," <by Margaret Turek; "Making a Laundry Bag" by Ardya Garberd-ing; Team demonstration, "Making a buileton board," by Audrey Hansen and Mary Ann Ritchie.  A delicious lunch was serv^ by itha (hostasaes, Siuzume Vegors, Audrey Hansen and their mothers. Jean Ann Curtis, reporter  Mr and Mrs <jordon Lange and children, Mr and Mrs Verh Benna and children and Mr and Mrs Harold Bloon^ and children celebrated the aeventit biriihday ot Ruth Brow» on Friday evening in the Waldo Brown home.  Mr and Mm Wayne Pyie aeeam-panted Mr and Mrs George Disch' ler of Gillet Grove a wbek ago Friday 'Jhrottgh Tuesday on a trip. They ware guests in the Ralph Pyle home at Proctor, Colorado, in the Wm Koller home at Denver, M^th friericls in Wyoming and in the John GeMes home at Kimbule S Dakota.  Mr» Oharlie Pyle spent Monday afternoon in the' Roy Lauridson home.  Mr and Mi» Wilbnr Hanson and family and Mn Hand« Hanson «t Spirit Laka ipanfc lEtoiday evening <viiKiin» ivlUt Mr and Mm Fred  mmrn ^ ■  Engaged.,.  Mr and Mrs Casfper iSylvaater of Wanamingo, Minneaoita wiab to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their dauigbter Patricia to Lyle Daukers son of Mr and Mrs Vernon Dankaiia of Goodhue, Minnesota, formerly oi Albert City, The wedding is scheduled for April 14ith.  Mr and Mrs Roy Wilkinaon at« the parents of a daughter bora Tue. March 27. iShe weighed 7 Iba % o«. Grandparents are Mr and Mt» AI* bert Beckfield and Jfra Fk^rane* Wilkinson of Storm Lake.  Mr and Mra Don Hwrig ara tit* parents of a 6 lb lOVi oc aoa bom on (his mother'a birthday, HaNti tt at the Buena Viata hoepiital. Tha young man has been named Seott James and he has two brotben. Grandparents are Ar and Mrs Carl Hrrig of Comfrey, Mian, and Mr and Mrs I-var Harold.  Joann Sundblad and Galea OIm« left Monday mondng fdr College at St Peter where tbsf «ttl attend Student Prtopectiva Dajw until Thursday. Mary Fradtkkw» will return home with them for bar Easter vacation.  Mr and Mra Joe Loving entertained at dinner Monday «milng. Their guests were Bev and Mm iSundberg and ifamily and Mr and Mr? Sig. Nordlund.  Mr and Mrs Harvey Haivar and Harold and Mrs B<A AodanMm attended the baptismal aarvfea for Clayton Maekia lidd at the Ms1ih> odiat Gbuiwi^ at LMitms. Gtaytott  .■UiwJiw   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication