Thursday, October 12, 1950

Albert City Appeal

Location: Albert City, Iowa

Page: 5

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Text Content of Page 5 of Albert City Appeal on Thursday, October 12, 1950

Albert City Appeal (Newspaper) - October 12, 1950, Albert City, Iowa THE ALBERT CITY APPEAL Thursday, October 12, 1950 The Hurricane — THE STAFF — Editor—Dolores Grosch. Assistant Editors—Debby Bengt-son and Beverly Henderson. Reporters—Elinor Almquist, Ka-thryn Kischer, Betty Bauer, Myrna Joenks, Lorétta Stern, Marilyn Andersen, Dorothy Selke, Kathryn Fleming, Mary Vanderheiden, Norman Hansen, -- Dale Martin, Sandra Behrens, Birdie Fast, Mayta Sievers and Merlyn Bjorklund. JUNIOR HI HAPPENINGS The Juii'u -ligh W.ùrl-Arindâ have new football suit.«, but lost theii openn,ï ^ainn, Thty wore deicated by Laurens, 2S-7. One nf the hlgh-hghti of the game v/as a 50 yard run by Harry Blu-sys. Albprt ¡Mty's touchdown was made when Larry Selgelid passed to Larry Tasta'l in the first quarter. The junior high plans to play other games and let's wish them luck in the futaie. The sevenesh grade .students are studying hi^h and low pressure and how the air is heated in science. Trees and the western hemisphere .iro the .subjects being covered in geoginphy. Thty arc giving oral pxp^unations in gram mar and in math they are studying estimates. The eighth grade is studying' the Revolutionary War in history. They have fiovered a bulletin board with pieture.s of the e.ents which took plai'j when Ameriej» became the United States of America, and everyone is iAvited to come and see it. If you remember the song Dry Bones, the seventh grade can tell you all about those bones he-rause in health thiiy ha/c studied bones, skeletons and ioints and have drawn pictures, af «ihcm. FUTURE FARMIN The vocational agriculture boys received a shipment of yearling western ewes. Since the arrival of the sheep the boys have ibeen 'busy drenching the ewes for stomach and nodule worms, using a solution of phonolthiazine. They are also learning the management of ewes througih the 'breeding period. The boys are preparing advertising for the sale of their purebred gilts and boars. They are studying a creep and supplement that have been recommended to them by Damon Cat ron, swine nutrition specialist of Iowa State College. PEEKIN' ON THE PRIMARS PAST AND PRESENT Robert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Brown, is six years old. When asked if he liked school he shook his head yes. His favorite subject is numbers. During recess he likes to slide on the slide. His favorite color is red. Robert has two girls in his life; his sister and his girl friend, Alice Bloom, who is in second grade. There is a saying "Like father, like son' and it sounds like Robert is going to follow this, as his plan for the future is to become a farmer. We hope this dream will come true. The past is about the only thing being studied in history. Mr. Protexter's class is studying the Hebrews and Mr. Harris', the Revolutionary War. Both classes are to have hard six weeks tests. MUSIC NOTES THE BIG WIND Loretta Stem, Merlyn Bjorklund Friday night Betty Bauer and Myrna Joenks were seen with Gerald Ehn and Charles Hartley of Laurens. Myrna must have enjoyed herself as she is now wearing Chuck's class ring. Hope you had fun Saturday night, Karen Swanson and Pat Svejda. "Annie Get Your Gun" 'must have been a good movie as Joan Martin and Gene Grice of Laurens journeyed to iSioux Rapids to see it Sunday night. Yvonne Sundholm and Dennis Xagengas of Pocahontas were together at the Lakeside Roller ;)ame in .Storm Lake. Hope you ■-•njoyed "flying on wheels." Janet Andersen's car must have been loaded down Sunday afternoon. We understand Mavis fohnson, Valerie Guslafson, Geno I'ussing, .\mas BishoJeiry liylt Kenvp and Pat S.ejda were ridln vith her. Friday ni ht Harriet and Vae Harper were seen with Gene Tus ing and Chris Vierow. TRY ALBERT CITY FIRST OLD CiES Because wheels, frames, «xles get cm of line... wear liit« iiacvcBljr... ouise blow-oua tad lots cf oonttcl ... Be ufe! Let MS oonea jouf ctr M« «kb our scientific BBAE Equip mwt TluMk ¥•« Itpair Mai fm Dtéñ Peterson Motor Co. STORM LAKE, IOWA A. C. ASKIN PEEKIN' ON THE PRIMARS Karen Ann Berg is the little blue-eyed daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie- Ber^'. She has blonde hair and a very cute smile especially with three teeth missing.^ Karen's favorite pastime is playing house and her favorite playmate is Carol Lee Bjork. She said that she has no boyfriend, but when some of her friendu said it was Leland Olson, she hojk her head, yes, Karen likes the" Albert City school and her teachers, Mrs. Nelson. Her favorite subject is reading. Question: What do you lik .nost about ACHS? Mary Griffel: "I like the higl ichool parties. I wish there wer. more of them." Don Rohwedder; "I like every thing about ACHS, but if I had to single it down to one thing, : think it would be the teachers." Joan Martin: "Lowell Robert .sits 'behind me and I can talk t-him." Lowell Roberts: "Joan Martin sits in front of me and I can talk to her." Myrtis Nqrdine: "What I, like most about ACHS is all the swell kids." Ronnie Walstead: "The rea.son I like school is to be a teachers pet." Dwayne Bhlers: "They offer a wide variety of subjects, then you need take subjects you don't like. Betty Bauer: "Working on the .aper, especially The Big Wind. .\lso the school parties." DR. ATXAN LANDE Optometrist Eyes" Examined Glasses Repaired Storm Lake, Iowa Ph. 107 Office over ElIerbroekB .. ifSfífSTStsitSfirsfí^ifSfs^^ ---------------- / Don't Wait f«r C«ld W<qtli»r f Citih Yo* UnprtporeT^ Burns any fuel EFFICIENTLY! Heating System Your beet insurance against fiiel shortages and excessive fuel prices! Bun\p gas or oil with virtually the «w""* efficiency as single-purpose furnaces... and also bums coal conveniently and cleanly. We'll make quick change-over for you any time with Leimox gas or oil burners made spedflcally for the Auto-Fyie. See this amazing unit today! LËNNÛX Cox Heating & Sheet Metal «MmUUNBTMMttFACTUiaS «MimMEEMRr WUM IUnMntTlM. J| The principals for the high school operetta "Meet Arizona", have been chosen and are as follows in order of their appearance on stage: Everett Nordine, iLael Loving, Duane Miller, .Dennis Larson, Marlene Anderson, Bill Gilchrist, Virginia Merry, Arlene Poaison, Jerry Lawlor, Kenneth Burmeister and Rachel Beck-lield. LINGUAL LISPIN SPYIN' ON THE SENIORS The sophomore English class has gained ground in that they are aware when they use overworked words in their oral recitations. They will complete this unit at the end of the six weeks, but they will continue to remind each other of these faults for the' remainder of the school year. The speech class has received several eojiies of one act plays that will be cast for class work. During the six weeks of school they covered seven chapter.s; but now they expect to make this material their own, through ap-y.lieation as they study the one-n t • Invfi. Marilyn Lee Anderson was born March 9, 1933. She is the eldest of five children. She has three sisters and one brother. Marilyn is five-feet-three inch es tall and has brown hair and blue eyes. French fries and hot rolls are her favorite foods. Other favorites are: color, blue; songstress, Doris Day; song, Sam's Song and subject, bookkeeping. When asked if she has a pot peeve Marilyn replied, "Yes, teachers that nag." If Marilyn has any spare time you will probably find her sewing or reading. Her favorite pastime though, is "going to Des Moines." Marilyn has attended school at Albert City since first grade. After graduation this spring she plans to attend college at Drake or North Park. SQUIRRELS This Is a public safety service of your safety-minded bHsi* nesszs and this newspaper in cooperation with the Iowa Safety Congress. Soon another Iowa winter will be upon us. That means your heating syatem will have to be in order—ready to providii ihe warm comfort you'll want all winter. But a furnace can be a dangerous fire hazard, too. Defoetive heating plants are the third most common cause of fires. That's why the fall and winter sen.sons I always bring an increase in home (Squirrels have not been the only casualties since the season opened recently. Allamakee Co. law enforcement officers are seeking squirrel hunters who kill-.| ed a valuable purebred Holstein , And that's why it's so im- heifer on the Leo Hawes farm. I i-ortant to check your heaLin;? Apparently someone mistook it system now for hazardous defer a squrirel, which is not easy, feets. At Chariton, 17 year old Willie, Clean up around your furnace; Adams went squirrel hunting and get rid of rags, waste pape.- and 'limself in the leg. other things that may catch fire. Always put aslies in a metal container, covered with a metal lid. Keep the furnace area free of dust and cobweibs. Call your furnace service man. Have him make a detailed check of your heating system—the tiii-nuie, smoke pipe, healin};' pil-e.s, chimney and other possible danger points. Have him make any needed repairs. 'I'bcn ask for a comijlete inspection ol' your home by youi-local fire de|,artment. Do it now - (luring National Kiie Prevention Week. Remember a furnace check u i this week may save you grief and loss of a disasti-ous fire this winter. wAoñmé dnukiea? OR YOU AMD THE MAM MEXT DOOR? RUNNING AMERICA is thejointjob of 150,000,000^ople. It's the biggest job in the world today —keeping it running for liberty and for freedom. And the whole world's watching to see whether Americans can do it! IN MUCH OF THE WORLD today, the people have resigned from running their own countries. Others have been quick to step in-^ first'with promises of **security "—and then with whips and guns—to run things their way. The evidence is oh every front page in the world, every day. FREEDOM COMES UNDER ATTACK. The reality of war has made every American think hard about the things he's willing to work and fight for—and freedom leads the list. But that freedom has been attacked here recently—|ust as It has been attacked in other parts of the world. One of the most serious threats to individual freedom has been the threat of Government-dominated Compulsory Health Insurance, falsely presented as a new guarantee of health "security" for everybody. THE PEOPLE WEIGH THE FACTS. In the American manner, the people swdied the case for Socialized Medicine—and the case against it. They found that Government domination of the people's medical affairs under G>mpulsory Health Insurance means lower standards of medical care, higher payroll taxes, loss of incentive, damage to research, penalties for the provident, rewards for the improvident. I They found that no country on earth can surpass America's leadership in medical care and progress. They found that able doctors/ teachers/ nurses and scientists —working in laboratories where Science/not Politics, is master—are blaxing dramatic new trails to health for Americans-and for the world. THE "GRASS ROOTS" SIGNALS CONGRESS. In every community in the Nation, people stood up to be counted on this important issue. Thousands of local women's clubs, civic groups, farm, business, religious, taxpayer, medical, educational and patriotic organ izations spoke out—giving the great United States Qingress its unmistakable Grass Roots signal from home! And ever watchful, ever sensitive to an alert people. The Congress saw that signal, and heard the people speak out, loud and plain. That's democracy in action. That's the American wayl Today among the 10,000 great organizations on militant public record against "O)mpulsory Health Insurance" General Federation off Women's Clubs American Farm Bureau Federation National GAinge Veterans of Foreign Wars National Conference of Catliolic Cliarltles American Protestant Hospital Association are: American Legion National Association of Small Business Men United States Chamber of Commerce National Association of Retail Grocers National Retail Dry Goods Association American Bar Association e Doctors of this Nation are grateful that the people refused to be wooed by the fantastic promises of this un-American excursion into State Socialism. • Doctors of America are dedicated to serve their fellow citizens at home and their comrades In uniform, wherever service to this Nation may take them, e And the thing they stand ready to fight for—to sacrifice for—to die for—is not the alien way of life of Socialism, but the prideful security of a free and self-reliant people! THE VOLUNTARY WAY IS THE AMERICAN WAY! e Throughout the Nation, free men ahd women, working and together, are finding the American answer to every question of medic service, care and cost. Hundreds of Voiuntaiy Health Insurance Plans are in healthy competition—sponsored by doaors, insurance companies, hospitals, fraternal organizations—by Industry, agriculture and labor, e Today in America—70 million people are protected by Voluntary Health Insurance! e Throughout the Nation, families are insuring themselves against the major costs of illness—at reasonable, budget-basis prices. Voluntary Health Insurance takes the economic shock out of illness. Protect your family now. e For information, ask your doctor—or your insurance man. An American's greatest heritage is the right to learn the tacts—and to speak his mind. Maintained with honor and used with sineeritg-4hat right will guarantee forever that PHYSICIANS OP THIS COMMUNITY PARTICIPATID IN PAYINO FOR THIS SPACI ~ ~ AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION • NATIONAL EDUCATION CAMPAIGN ONI NORTH U SAUl ITRIIT/ CHICAGO, ILLINOIS .......« 1 }

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