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Valparaiso Vidette Messenger Newspaper Archive: March 3, 1936 - Page 6

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Publication: Valparaiso Vidette Messenger

Location: Valparaiso, Indiana

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   Vidette-Messenger, The (Newspaper) - March 3, 1936, Valparaiso, Indiana                               THE VIDETTE-MESSENGER, VALPARAISO. INDIANA TUESDAY, MARCH 3, VALPO SEEKS TO UPHOLD TOURNAMENT EMERSON 1ST FOE TO TEST Valparaiso high school baskelbal team's long established reputation for formidability in tournamcn play will receive the acid test thi. week when Coach Ralph Powel sends the Vikings up against a stiff drawing in their first crack at Gary sectional honors. A first round game with Tolleiton Friday afternoon should not hurt tile Green and White's good name any. When Valpo conies back against Emerson at nine o'clock that samn night, however, its claim to touir.ey toughness will require a lot of de- fending. The Vikings and Norsemen met just once during the regular season Emerson won that engagement, a personal foul party, by a 27-18 score. The Gary squad's speedy forwards. Fordy Anderson and Bill Lazar, away from Valpo's guards on block plays throughoul the game to pour in easy baskets. DJspite this defensive weakness, Valpo managed to keep pace for three quarters. Then Anderson, who had been sitting out a period with three personals charged against him re-entered to lead a voctorious clos- ing drive. Disorganization of both teams, due to hairline officiating, prevent- ed that contest from being a true test of ability. Furthermore, there is no telling what the reaction of the rival quintets will be to the strain of tournament competition as applied Friday in the second meet- ing. Should Emerson have its recently perfected fast break in well-oiled condition for the Vikings, the Gary- ites will be favored to win. Such an offensive may fall apart just as rea- dily as it clicks when the pressure goes on, however, and there is every assurance that Valpo will be keyed to clamp down hard. Carrying the Vikings to the semi- final round, as fate may do, their troubles will not ease a trifle. Lew Wallace is the logical semi-finalist from the other half of the lower bracket, and the Hornets, too, hold a decision over the Powellmen. For that matter, four of the five other major-teams in the meet have trimmed Valpo at least once this ON THE ALLEYS The Pint Topplers rolled the Pin Sockers in the Continental Dia- mond Girls' league last night on the Publix Alleys. The Pin Sock- ers won two out of three games, and had high total by twenty-two pins. Tonight the men's league of the Continental Diamond company will roll, beghming at o'clock. Pin Topplers A. Beibly I. Watt R. Hetzel H. Graham L. Watt 113 109 129 132 180 138 459 VALPO INDEES 'BREAK EVEN ATNAPPANEE Finishing second on the hard- wood, but showing unapproachable form at the dinner table. Old Style By Jack Sords Inn cagers even' on a Sunda.v. of Valparaiso 'broke visit to Nappanee on The Linco Oilers, strong Nap- panee independent net squad, em- ployed a second-half rally to spoil that portion of the Old Stylers' day Totals 663 672 Pin Sockers Boyer 176 114 K. Walsh 91 91 E. Graham ____ 133 124 M. Gallaher ____ 144 A. Megg ____ 132 devoted to basketball. The final 621 1946 1 score was 42-31, Nappanee, alter Valpo had led at the half, 22-19. 187 177 There was i1o stopping the Valpo 91 273 athletes, however, when they, sat 141 145 Totals winter. one of Horace Mann and Froebel. which is expected to puil through to the final game from the upper bracket, are both in that class. Recent tournament history is leaded with incidents wherein under- rated Valpo teams have knocked off touted opponents, however, and the current club will lay all its hopes for success on just such an upset program. How well Valpo fans will support the Powellmen in their necessarily courageous stand will be revealed in part by the local season ticket j to greet two of the five stragglers down later to a dinner prepared for them in the home of Harvey Field, former Vidette linotype operator, now head of a newspaper at Nap- 132 145 panee. The Valpoites used a fast- I breaking attack on the victuals, 1 afterwards declaring that the hos- pitality of the Field home was ex- celled only by Its cookery. Highlight of the rough, hard- fought court battle was the shoot- jlng of Jim Hildreth, Valpo guard 'in the first half. Hildreth pumped in five baskets from midfloor dur- ing that period. The resultant ten points were a big factor in estab- lishing the Old Stylers' 22-19 first- half advantage. Nappanee, boasting the cream of the town's hardwood talent, came back with an unbeatable bucket barrage in the last half, however, SURVEY GIVES SCENES AT BIG LEAGUECAMPS PENSACOLA, Fla., Mar. Bartell, shortstop, re- vealed today that he had put on seventeen pounds since the close of the New York Giants' 1935 season. "The added weight means I am gonna have a good Bartell declared as Bill Terry led the van-Jin a sudden scoring splurge, but the guard of his Giants through a few j rally was begun too late. preliminary exercises at the local Although the five personal foul training base. to run up a long lead. Near the end Tom Smith, Ralph Baker and Ric Youngren hit goals for Valpo ST. PETERSBURG, Fla., Mar. 3. less than twenty-four members of the New York Yankees reported to Manager Joe McCarthy Monday for the opening of the j Lehman, f. twelfth training season. McCarthy limit was in use, Valpo lost two regulars, Clayt Davidson and Jim Hetzel, via the penalty route be- fore the game was over. Box score: Nappanee B S. Phillips, f........ 3 I busy himself chiefly with the rookies this week, as the regulars are not required to report until March 9. G. Conrad, c. LAKELAND, Fla., Mar. day out of the way, Mickey Cochrane, manager of world champion Detroit said today his team would be ready to play their first practice game to- morrow. Twenty-two Tigers re- ported Sunday and four were tardy. Strycker, g......... 1 C. Conrad, g........ 3 Lopp, g............. 4 Phillips, g........... 0 Totals 17 Valparaiso B Gray, f............. 0 Smith, f............ 4 f. c. All pitchers and catchers except' Hildreth, g.......... 5 jHetzel, g............ 1 Schoolboy Rowe were on hand. Cochrane said he wouldn't allow Hank Greenberg, holdout first base- man, to report with other Infield-1 ers and outfielders on March 8 without first signing. j Baker, g. P TP 1 6 2 5 1 7 1 3 2 6 0 7 1 8 0 0 TIPTON RATED FAVORITE TO WIN TOURNEY CONTRACT BRIDGE WRITTEN FOR CENTRAL PRESS SHEPARD FAMOUS BRIDGE TEACHER By E. V. fa__________FAMOUS B BY DICK MILLER (I. N. S. Staff Crrespondent) INDIANAPOLIS, Mar. an undefeated team and her- alded favorite to win the Indiana ligh school basketball champion- ship come through? For 25 years, teams attempting to accomplish that feat have faltered I in the state tournament test. Last year, Jeffersonville, undefeated in i regular season competition, battled through sectional, regional and final tournament opposition until it was within one game of the coveted goat. After 31 consecutive victories Jeff lost the final game, and the state championship to Anderson, 23 to 17. Today, Tipton stands in exactly the same spot as Jeff did one year ago. and where other teams have stood in the past. Winners of 20 regular season contests, Johnny Ward's Blu Devils, choice of many to win she state title, take their place at the barrier, a marked team by every foe they will encounter during the one-month of tournament compe- tition. Assigned to the Sheridan section- al, Tipton must win four games to gain the center title and continue on. Noblesville is slated to provide the Blue Devils their first real test in the final sectional game. To win the state title, Tipton must win six more games two each in the re- gional, semi-final an dfinal tourna- ments. Can it do It? Coaches, players and followers of the 784 teams entered in the 25th annual Indiana high school atli- MASTERINC BRIDGE (54) THE "PLAIN-SU1T ECHO" used only at no trumps, to show four or more cards of partner's suit, thus aiding him to count the number o Ills suit held by declarer and dis- closing liow to play his own cards In case partner happens to be longer In the suit. All this Is very Important The fate of many a contract depends upon which side wins one trick more or less. Unless forced to play your highest card to win the first trick, you play the one Immediately below it, thus starting an echo when partner leai the first card of his suit. On the next lead of that suit you play 'the card lower than the one wlflch went on the first trick, and so on In case you hold more than four cards of the suit, until you hold only the original highest and lowest of part- ner's suit. In case you hold the same number of the suit as partner, you should win tho last trlch If It Is desirable to lead to weakness In dummy. If you wish partner to lead through dummy's strength take care to allow partner to win the last trick In his suit. The hand given today Is one Just e played Improperly, allowing West to go game at no trumps, when he should have gone down on his game contract It was all North's fault. South played the plain-suit echo properly. Bidding went: West. 1-Spade; East, 2-Hearts; West, 2-Spades: East, 8-Dlamonds; West, 8-No Trumps, which held the call. Tho opening lead was the Q of clubs. South started plain-suit 4 GAMES LEFT ON HOOSfER LEAGUE SKE and the other over Hanover. DePauw staged one of the sea- son's biggest upsets when it de- feated rival Wabash last week. Franklin also scored two big victor- ies one over Butler and the other over Wabash. In the other games this week An- derson was to invade Huntington Wednesday night for a league game but Valparaiso entertained St. Via- INDIANAPOLIS, 421 intercolle Mar. jlctic association championship clas- sic had it pretty well figured out today just what they must do to win the 1936 hardwood title. Two days careful study of the schedules for the gigantic elimina- tion test that will begin the coming week-end in 64 sectional centers gave the strategists and dopesters a fairly clear picture of the situation. Of course, 720 coaches who speak a definite word of encouragement P TP j basketball nearecl history stage to- ference foes. 1 day with only four left on the 1935-36 league schedule. Totals 14 3 20 31! 8 of the quartet of remaining games 4 i are non-conference games and a'.i 10: except six of the 20 member teams 3 have completed their season cam paigns. Central Normal, conference cham- pion, undefeated in 16 season sanies, 14 of which were against league Indiana intercollegiate conference standings follow: PASADENA, Cal., Mar. Dykes, manager of the! Chicago White Sox, today expected] HERE'S RECORD FOR CAGERS TO RECKON WITH! sales. Gary authorities have been more generous in their allottment of tickets, placing four hundred of the pasteboards in the hands of H. M. Jessee, high school principal. The season tickets are now on sale at the high school and at down- town drug stores. Unless the advance sale of tiricts does not warrant it, the local high school will suspend classes at noon Friday. AlthoughSXhe meet opens Thursday night, Valpo does not who have been absent from train- BLOOMINGTON. Ind., Mar. 3.- Etnire, Indiana ing camp activities. The late ar- sity basketball player, today had set an ap- i a free throwing mark for his team- veteran mates to shoot at. rivals expected to put in pearance are Ted Lyons, pitcher; Ed Durham, ailing throw- j In practice Etnire warmed up for er, who avers the kinks which have a forthcoming scrimmage by drop- incapacitated his salary arm the ping 16 straight baskets from the past two years are now gone and foul line. After a stiff scrimmage he is ready for a comeback. The he dropped in 129 before missing, stubborn lads who seek raises and i He continued until he tired, missing refuse to work until assured of but four out of 262 frec throw shoU more money for the 1936 season are Shortstop Luke Appling, First moth balls, however, awsiting word on its Olympic entry. Coach Sewell H. Leitzman ordered rest for his Purple warriors after their narrow escape from defeat at Valparaiso the other when they emersed victorious. In addition to Control Normal. Bal! State Teachers, Butler, Indiana State Teachers and DePauw of Indiana conference aloiiL: with In- diana University and Notre Dame seek entry in the Olympic trials. Indiana State nosed its way into second place in the league .stand- ings with a pair of victories pa.st week, one over rival Ball State tor's and St. Joseph's was to go to j to their boys this week, telling them Kankakee for a game with Galla- ,how they can win the sectional tour- :iate conference i gher both of the latter non-con-jnaments in which they compete, will miss their calculations. However, anything can happen hi Hoosier tournament basketball and W L Pet. i these mentors are not to be critl- 1.000 cized for that. Very likely there .750 wi" be many upsets numbered 707 among the list of 04 sectional cham- .070 P'ons when the final games are Q36 completed next Saturday night1 525 Squads that have compiled only fair .581 regular season records may prove to 558 be the best edurance test performers. 500 After the sectional champions JQQ have been determined the winners .500 wi" gather in 1C regional centers, 444 i four to each center, on Saturday Q J 10 9 f 7 A7 3 2 J 10 5 V K 10 S 3 2 64 486432 echo, by playing his 6 (the second highest card Declarer's K won the triclt. Declarer led the 9 of hearts. Dummy's J lost on a to South's K. Had partner led clubs, South would have played hla as called tor by the rule. As th was to lead clubs he retained Jls original highest and lowest cards, but led back his original fourth-best card, the 3. The echo told the story, as plainly as words could have done. Declarer's Ace won the trick. North should have dropped his J, retaining his Q-5, so not to block the suit, but lumbly he player! his 6, and retained ils J-10. That was fatal. Next de- :larer led a diamond and North was n with his Ace, but all he could do was to take his two good clubs. De- ilarer went game, by taking two ipade tricks, two heart tricks, two ilub tricks and three diamond tricks, iad North played properly they vould have won three club tricks, plus the K of hearts and Ace of dia- monds, defeating tho contract. DISSATISFIED ATHLETES BIG FEATURE IN BASEBALL AS SPRING TRAINING STARTS competition held its togs out of the Wabash Central Normal 10 Indiana State 6 Indiana Central...... 12 Franklin 10 Valparaiso 7 Earlham 5 Evansville 7 Himtingtoii 5 Concordia 3 j Rose Poly 1 j Anderson 4 Manchester 6 St. Joseph's 3 DePauw 3 Butler 2 Oakland City 2 Hanover 2 Taylor 1 incldue ence games only. BY GEORGE KIRKSEY (United Press Staff Correspondent) NEW YORK, Mar. With yesterday the official date for the opening of the spring baseball training season, every major league player who isn't under contract can be considered a bona fide holdout. Up to now there's been a lot of poker playing between the magnates and the ballplayers. There are a lot of dissatisfied ath- letes this year. The magnates brought most of the trouble on themselves by talking in big money, and jacking up the price of ball players. When Tom Yawkey shells out about for four of CoAl- nie Mack's stars, and Clark Griffith puts a price tag on a player worth about one-fifth, or less, of that amount, the ball players, some of whom are no longer dumb, get the general Idea. Another thing that stirred up the Hornet's nest was the published list of what seme of the magnates made in 1934, according to the official figures from Washington. Branch Rickey's salary of nearly for 1934 is one of the chief reasons for Dizzy Dean's demand for more than twice what he made last .250 G 7 11 12 confer- of four teams each, March 21, before .222 Itnev reach the final tournament in 154 Butler University Fieldhouse March 28. here choice location. swing into action until Friday niter- Baseman Zcke Bonura and Second! noon, and the usual pep .session be held at the school Friday Ing. Baseman Jackie Hayes. Girl wanted tor classifieds Drive SCOTT'S SCRAPBOOK by R. j. scon Bus fares are t can'l AVALON, Cal., Mar. In prime physical condition, their hustle stimulated by bonus clauses in their comracts, the Chicago! Cubs Monday declared the Card-) are the only team with a i chance of giving a run for i the I936 National league pennant. .Manager Charlie Grimm is confl- j cient of soing into the race with the best pitching staff in the league won 20. lost 13 last season; Lee, 20 and G; French. 17 and 10; Carleton. 11 and 8; the i veteran Charley Root, little left- handed Roy Henshaw. Mike Ko- walik and Fireball Clay Bryant. Examples of Mew Low Fares Chicago St. Louis, Mo. Kansas Cily, Mo............ 57.95 Omaha, Nebr................ Angeles, Cal........... S3H-00 Columbus, O............... S5.00 WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., Mar. St. Louis Br.owns opened training camp activities here Monday under the direction of Rogers Hornsby. A blazing sun was on deck for I he initial workout, Sl.OO foreshadowing the loss of plenty jot poundage by the athletes. BRADENTOX- Fla.. Mar. 3 ii seven inning practice garni; between two Pittsburgh, I'a. Cardinal players here gave Man- Washington. C........... nger Frankie Priscli nothing to en- New York City i liaise about in the way of batting power ho was impressed with the i showing of sovoral rookie pitchers, j I Particularly promlsliiK was the I work of Bill McOet'. BLUE MolorCoach LIMES Lincoln Trail System InftmiHtlon Call Blodi Hotel 1CG-K PLAYGROUND I'KI.SKKVKI) MILAN, o. "barn where Thomas A, Kdi.son played as n uoy will be turned Into n meeting hnl! for the local Boy Seoul. lodRC. H was presented to DIG bcoul.fi by Mrs. Minn Edison Hughes, widow of the inventor. Edison was bom .In Mi- lan, Feb. 11, 1847, LIVE ARE AS A CLJRE. IM SOME. F-fflE. u MI-TED 51A.-TE5 ONEOF 'iHE. MorT UNUSUAL BALANCING ROCKS WIHE KMOWH PoRffeAlf A A c R.O-M Aq MO K TRIBAL MEDicirJE MAM OK -TllE OF A 1M ,-FRANCE ,000 'M. Onlrtl I'rcu Auoiwlion. Inc. .37S March 15 to further reduce the field, year. .300 Next the regional champions must The battle between the Cardinals survive four semi-final tournament j and Dizzy is likely to be more bitter than it appears on the surface. Even after the Cards get him under con- tract, they may have trouble con- trolling him. Dizzy himself says "f don't see how there can be any com- pa lability." Anther player who is going to be hard to handle this year is Ben Chapman, New York Yankees' out- fielder. Chapman is all for playing elsewhere, preferably with the Red Sox. Joe Stripp, Brooklyn third base- man, has antagonized his manager, Casey Stengel, by writing to tne front office: "I only player 106 games my There are ruling favorites in at least half of the 64 sectional tour- neys. In 28 of these where more Want to rent a house? Insert ithan 12 leams compete, play will a small classified ad and get a j Thursday night.' In the others play begins Friday. No team will play more than two games in one day. Two teams or more are figured to have a chance in at least 32 centers. At Anderson for instance, Alexan- dria exhibited definite power last Friday night when it nosed out I last year, but that was not ONE OF -THE OF IN UNIFORM SHOWN NEW ZEALAND STAMP Muncie. Anderson, defending stat champion, and the Alecs are slated to meet in the final game of the sectional, according to the dopesters Down at New Albany the opp- site prevails and the favorites, New Albany and Jeffersonville must meet in the first round at 2 p. m. Friday. Here In' Indianapolis a wide open race exists with Shortridge assum- ing a slight edge because It won over Anderson last Friday night Southport and powerful Ben Davis must play in the first round. Hammond, winners of the North- ern Indiana high schol all-confer- ence title must emerge from stout competition at East Chicago. Wildcats defeated Elkhart, eastern division title winners in the NIHSC in a playoff game the past week-end. Elkhart should win its sectional. Washington, conquerors of Prince- ton in the dccldins game of the Southern Indiana athletic conference title race Is another topheavy sec- tional favorite. North Vernon, win- ner of the southeastern Indiana conference must subdue Orecnsburg. a real test In the Oreensburg sec- tional. Frankfort, north central confer- ence champion, and loser only to Tipton during the season should not have any trouble at home, and the same goes for Martinsville at Bloomlngton. Kokomo, Pranklin nnd other nre In thn same class. The Brazil sectional appears to bo anyone's race. Want 10 rent t nouse? insert A smnII cla.iftiried and get t location. fault." Stripp hit .306 and is pro- testing a cut from t Stengel's answer to Stripp's Indirect charge that the manager kept him on the bench purposely Is that the player buy his contract for and peddle his services to some other team. Among the other most prominent holdouts are Wally Berger, Boston Bees' outfielder; Hank Detroit first baseman; Hank Lelber, New York Giants' outfielder; Van Mungo, Brooklyn pitcher; Buddy Myer, Washington second baseman; Johnny Allen, Cleveland pitcher; Zeke Bonura, Chicago White Sox first_baseman; Billy Dickey, Yanks' catcher; Bob Johnson and Pinky Higgins, Philadelphia Athletics' out- fielder and thliri baseman, respec- tively. SCIENCE EXHIBITS AT YALE NEW HAVEN, ixposition of engineering and chem- Lstry, demnstrating the progress of the various branches of the two sciences in the last 20 years has been opened at Yale University. Included in the exposition are exhibits, dem- onstrations, moving pictures, lec- tures, laboratory tests and mlnia- ,ure reproductions of industrial pro- cesses to see and hear. CHOPS WOOD AT 105 COIJDWATER, exander Mayville, 105, attributes his longevity to hard work. He still wood every day. Quality Liquors, Wines and Gins Complete Variety At Cut Rate Prices FINEST BEERS ON TAP PALACE RESTAURANT Corner Franklin and MEAT SHOPS Valpo's Finest Market 72 West Lincolnway BEEF SALE Good Cut POT ROAST Good Beef SHORT STEAKS lb. 17c Fed Sirloin Steak Ib 22c Beef lb. 12k Good Fresh Ground Pig Liver and Hearts lb. 12c   

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