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Tipton Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 30, 1939 - Page 1

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Publication: Tipton Tribune

Location: Tipton, Indiana

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   Tipton Tribune (Newspaper) - January 30, 1939, Tipton, Indiana                                VOLCME" XLTV, NO. 102. TIPTON, ^ , | ] i      ! ___ Oct. 4, 1895, at post office at Tipton, Ihd., under the act of March 4, M79. INDIANA, MONDAY EVENING, J^XCARY.SO, 19S0. AUIO CRASHES Two   Four-Car   Accidents Were Investigated by the Officers. NO SERIOU^ INJURIES Netherlands Would Parley on  Prelecting Art   in  VTnrj The Hague. Tile Nether-j lands, .Ian. 30.-The Nethei-).nnl government lias addressed to   pwsld!nfc: ot]u>1. the Addison car were damaged the ;offlcers an ^ ^ trailer being a complete wreck. While the parties were viewing the wreck a car driven by J. P. Bradley of Tipton came along going east and being unable to stop crashed into the Addison car, which was further damaged. Another four car crash took place in front of the St. John church Sunday shortly before noon and was attributed to the icy pavement. A car driven by Carl Butz was coming from the north on Mill street and was meeting one driven by Charles May-iiard going north. Butz applied his brakes and his car hit the one driven by Maynard and skidded it into a parked car of Ed Ripber- Boy,! 5, Saves Three From Fire Clifford Morris, 6, holds his baby Brother, Jerry, to show how he earned the child from their burning home at Sanlick, Va. (near St. Charles). The boy hero made three trips into the flames to rescue^Jerry, another youneer brother, and a younger sister. , SALE Of PLANES IS. DA JULIUS GIRL Ai M County Nurse Will Conduct Examinations inline Quest. FREE   TRIP   REWARD Indian Province Sets Free Its  40,000  Native Slaves Bambay, India,' Jan. 30. - The Bombay presidency, a province! ot India! hay freed 40,7. 00*0 native serfs from centuries-jold bcndage^Eo land owners, f . Thkir subjection was part of ia system, whereby serfs or ;"halpatfs',' borrowed money to ;get. married and repaid land lowners at rates so small they inever could hope to clear their [debts in a lifetime. The.India National Congress I party leaders, Mohandas K. : Gh'andi and- Vallaphi Patel, ; have! been agaftaring for abo-Itycn of 'the  ?m. All Interested  4-H  Club Members Privileged to Make Trial. 1 E AUTO PLATE BILL TO 1� Germany's Dictator States Aims and Purposes of His Administration. WARNING TO POWERS Millions of Persons Heard Public Address Over World Network. �  Where will    Tipton j county'-! j healthiest 4-H Club boy and girl'        ;..      , - _ , �     1, _.      ,. Legalizes Permanent Grace be found? This question is to be ,     & Senate Committee Is Going Well Known Woman Sue The blizzard was part of snowstorm that struck with sudden fury and swept in a great aiv from St. Louis through Illinois. Northern Indiana, Southern Lower Michigan, Upper New York state and Central New England. The Chicago Motor Club reported that all iinotor traffic was at a standstill in Northern Illinois, Indiana and  Southern ( ....   ________ Michigan. The club warned that; Washington, Jan. 30. - The automobile travel in  that terri-(senate military affairs committee president, and Arthur Barr, sec-1 Northern retary-treasurer. The committees in charge of the various riepart-| ments have performed all of their duties and the session will move with clock-like precision. I In addition to the four talks by Deep Into Probe of Trench Purchase Imany are opposed (Hy i United 'I'rcss.) Washington, Jan. 30. - cumbed Suddenly at Home Near New Lancaster. C I prominent institute workeis, Mrs: i L. H. A'anniee and O. F. H ill. the j program will include special musical numbers, reports of officers 'and election of officers. I    At noon the ladies of tit; Gold-jsinith Methodist church will serve :;a hot lunch in the churchj dining ' room and everyone is welcome. Tho afternoon session opens at u m iup,�J1:3� and anTlnB    the    session, ger.   The Butz car also   skidded jawards wil1 1,0 announced.].      * and struck  the  parked  car  of!    1,1 connection with the institute M. H. O'Hara. tory will be impossible for several days. Imay request j today a copy of a ! letter allegedly written by Presi-! dent Roose\'elt to government de- Garnet Teter, 35, of Gordsmith �who was going to his home about 2:30 Sunday morning skidded and I a junior and senior corn and home economics show will jbe held with cash prizes for the winners and the exhibits will be displayed struck one of the boulevard lights jfo>" inspection of those attending near the corner of West Jefferson !tne institute. and Columbia Ave., breaking it off I In addition to the exhibits, bus-and putting that section of the !ness sessi�" and addresses ]�' city out of lights until the damage Mrs- Vannlce and Mr. Hall, spc-was repaired. The car of Teter was Icia! numbers will be furnished by hadly damaged an* had to, be jAdams & Renle> musical enter-towed away from the scene but the Ualners; demonstration of magte driver Was not injured with the I aI,1 -sleight-of-hand by Paul Jar- exception of minor bruises. Kenneth Zaloudek and Robert Coryell were In a crash at the in-_^ tersection of'Green and Washing-ton street Saturday night, in which both cars were badly damaged but the drivers escaped with slight bruises. Zaloudek was   going'  east on o Washington and Coryell who resides north of the city was coming to the business district driv-�m       ing south on Green  street.   The �       cars met at the intersection, tha crash bringing a number of persons out of their homes in that vicinity. Early Sunday morning roads and streets which had been shaded were so slippery it was hard to walk and a number of persons suffered falls bnt no seriouB injuries have been reported, j        v . *'*  I Gored by Bull. (By United Press.) Rockville, Jan. 30.^-Gored by a bull on his farm, Harry Webb, 84, was injured fa-tally yesterday. The bull tramp*ied on Webb after rijHflg him along the ground. He received several fractures and inr tenia! injuries. rett and community singiiig. Every\jody is welcome^ there heing no admission charge to any part of the program-       j       j . ;        i Jim Ragan, of Normanda, who was taken to the Beechwood hospital over a week ago, bordering on pneumonia, is in a critical condition at the hospital. | � (By United Press.) .Indianapolis, Jan. P.O. - -More thitn 2,500 highway workers fought to clear snowbound highways today after a two-foot snowfall blanketed part of Northern Indiana. Parts of nine highways were closed and the highway department reported it in-ight he necessary to close more of them as snow continued to drift heavily! The heaviest snowfall was reported in the north part of the La Porte highway district where three highways were closed with about 24 inches of snow. In the southern part of the Fort Wayne district six inches of snow fell. Highway workers kept roads open in'this section. No snow was reported for the central and southern part of the state nor were any accidents reported to the highway department. ( All available equipment was called out In the emergency and department officials hoped to haye all closed roads open by nightfall, j In Southern Indiana, heavy rains over the week end forced the closing of four roads as water swept over the highways. The roads closed were G4 east of Huntingburg, 14D south of French Lick, 1C2 southeast of Jasper and 245 near Lamar. | _-l_-^-4-,-r- Spanish War Is Certainly Very Near to an End With Franco's Victories Perpignan, France, Jan. 30J- A Fascist triumph in Catalonia appears to be beyond question j today. It seems sure that the Span ish tragedy will end its Jdashjlof active war very soon. �Meanwhile, every road in Nor 'era Catalonia is choked w^th refugees; who have neither food 1 or shelter for several days, and�\.he government services, ; ^cattei ed .here and there throughout he area, are disorganized I panic. In previous' retreats iji Spain, one baa bean aware that �li- the iis- IOUI3   UOA   UOQU ---n--- aster was supported hy undefeated spirit. Now that [spirit no-more. There is no use trying to recall the epic days of Madiid or otherwise 'attempting to le-cloud the finality of the present [catastrophe for ythe government. The army is without munitions and the civil population is without food. Government functionaries art scattered through a dozen different towns, and some of them I did not succeed in escaping from Barcelona, tthere lg no means transferring what remains of tjhe [government machinery to. the 1 e-leaguered south'. Thousands � of women and-children have.neltlef I bread nor shelter and no place go.. partment heads asking cooperation with a! French mission buying military planes in this country. The committee met in .secret session to continue it� investigation of negotiations whereby Franco is purchasing the latest type American-made planes with the jidministi'ation's cooperation and of circumstances surrounding the presence of a French air ministry official! aboard an experimeu-i tal bomber !tbat crashed.near Los Angeles last week.  The committee's meeting was the major congressional event as national defense and the administration's foreign policy became the'chief issues before both houses of congress. Passage of the relief bill by! the senate Saturday with the a.mount of the appropriation definitely settled, cleared the way for] emphasis on the President's preparedness program. Military affairs committee chairman, Morris Sheppard; D., Tex., summoned G, Grant Mason, head of the civil! aeronautics authority, to determine whether the plane that crashed, precipitating the French purchase controversy, was intended, as an addition to the ail force or as a! commercial product The letter, a cony of which the committee was expected to re quest, reportedly was written; to the state, war, navy and treasury department* asking extension of courtesies to French representa tives who were understood j to have $65,000,000 with which j to buy the njpst modern ; fighting planes The committee heard Craig, army chief of staff, in executive iesslon Saturday, answered" during the coming j month and the lucky girl and boy j are to receive a priz; . These two' youths will receive; trips to the 4-H Round-Up at Purdue University nextJune   and. jcompete in the state ,4-H hfialth contest. During February, Miss Maude Welch, the county health nurse, will examine all interested 4-H boys! and gifls on her visit to the [various schools. She will nominate several of the more healthy boys and girls to be examined by doctors at a later date, probably in *:-;- I April. The healthiest   bay   and j       . � [girl will be selected by the doetdrs LAST ' RITES   TUESDAY \ani win receive pointers to im- Iprove their health.for the state -I-�  jcontest. \.' ' j   All 4-H boys and"gtrlsrwho are Mrs. Nellie Julius,    wife   -of1 interested in this achievement and County Councilman D. A. Julius. !award should see Mi9s W^lch ,-. .    >     .        , .    , j when she visits their, school. Fol- diea at her home Saturday even- ,   >. j        . � . ,,.,, * ! lowing are the days whej Miss ing, death being sudden and fof- |Welch will visit * the respective lowed ah attack which started [schools: Prairie, Monday after-wi-th a severe pain in her head, jnoon; January 30;-Kempton, Tues-Tho attack resembled apoplexy iday afternoon, January 31: -Third latid   Mrs.  Julius  died  within Period of 60 Days to March 1. VOTE STOOD 87 TO 1 short time after being' stricken. .Funeral services are to be held 'ward at Tipton, Wednesday aft 81 jernoon, February 1st; First Ward at Tipton, Thursday." afternoon, February 2; Goldsmith,: Friday at' the Bast .Main Street Christian afternoon. February 3 ;Tipton high church in.Elwood, Tuesday after-!school,. Monday and Wednesday, nT,, n�    i ,       ,       J fall day, February 6 and 8; Sharps- noon,- with Rev. J. C. Drake and; .,,     '    .       - , , ' - |ville, Tuesday afternoon; Febru- Rev. A. A. McColl officiating and |a].y T; Hobb8t Friday   afternoon. 10;   New - . Lancaster, Monday afternoon,;February 13; interment will hn in the El wood j February was said to have'teatlfled that sure" from the White Hpuse,per-mltted a French'representative to inspect th< new plane.   He was Gen. M^lin an JHe cemetery. The sudden death of this splendid woman was a severe .blow to ramlly and friends, and the suddenness left them stunned. Prior to the attack, 'Mrs. Julius had been in her. usual health and had prepared the evening meal, cleared the table and washed the dishes and she-and her husband were preparing to go to the home of Mrs. Julius' .mother, Mis. Mary Judy, in Che Omega community to spend the evening. The deceased was a life-long resident of the New Lancaster community, having been born on a farm In fhat neighborhood Aug. 23, 1871, being one of several children born to Henry "A. and Mary E. (Vanness) Judny. She was married to D. jft. Julius Augusts, 1894. and the husband and four children survive. The children are I Clarence of Now Lancaster; Lawrence of Hobbs and Noia of: Elwood- One'son. Royal Julius,;preceded the mother to the grave,; his death occurring suddenly! at | Kokomo, March 3, 1938, ho being found dead in his Windfall," Friday afterno-jn, February 17; Todd, Tuesday morning February 21; Ross, Tuejday. afternoon, - February 21; Independence, Thursday morning; February 23; Clay, Thursday, afternoon, February 23; Beech .Grovo, Friday morning, February j 24: Jack-!son, Friday afternoon,: February 24; Lutheran school, j Tuesday morning, February 28; jSL. John's' school, Tuesday, afternbon, Frb-ruary 28. !�'�.. Ill With Flu. . (By United Press.) Indianapolis,. Jan. 30. - The house of the state legislature today passed a bill establishing a permanent CO-day grace period from Jan. 1 to March 1 for the purchase of new automobile license plates.. The vote was 87 to 1. A similar" bill passed  by   the (By  United  Press'.) Berlin, Jan. 30.-Fuehrer. Adolf Hitler told the Reichstag and the world   tonight   that   Germany's . dream of centuries- has come true under six year? of Nazi rule. Hitler declared that Germany in the future "will not tolerate that western states should attempt to intervene' in certain matters that concern only us in order that thereby they might prevent certain natural and reasonable solutions/' i . The Fuehrer's warning appeared to be directed at the great democratic powers, which hava been vigorously criticized by the Nazi press'in attacks recently directed chiefly at the United States. Europe has been "rescued from j the red pest" by Nazism and Ital-jian Fascism, the Fuehrersaid. in laudatory reference to Italian - �'*"  �- "~ ~. ia   lituuuiury   ruic eiiue   lu sehate.is in the house roads com-|Premler Beuito m^imi mittee. The-senate may, substi-j AdversarIes of the Nazis may tute today's bill for its own meas-| ..hate' and fear us but tney e3. ure. The license extension bill ,teem us.. Hitler said, and the was sponsored by Reps. Robert A. threat that Germanv wonId sink Hoover of Goshen and Roy J. Har- ,nt0 cnaos has been overcome be. rison of Attica. {cause of the Nazi "miracle." i Most important of the 21 bills j Hitler said that prior to the advanced to third reading in the janchluss-of Austria - he had liouse was a measure to repeal In- ; made up his mind to include Aus- diana's truck weight tax law, us recommended by Governor Town-send. -It probably will be passed this .week. I The slate senate's textbook investigation had a repercussion hi the house today when Rep. Paul S.' Brady, .'Muncie-Republican, introduced "a resolution to commend the/senate for its inquiry and endorse Its work. The matter was referred to the public morals com- tria in the Greater   Reich   "at, whatever cost."   Now, he added, the .overwhelming majority of the 80.000.000   persons, in  Germany are behind the Nazi program. He referred to the annexation of the Sudetenland and to the Spanish civil war as other phases of the Fascist-Nazi' campaign against communistih influenle in Europe. Hitler said that Geruiany had ihittee,after: Brady! read some pas- I not threatened anybody but had sages from one school book lie described as "filthy." It contained some profanity. j Marriage Decrease. � i. (By United Press.) i; Valparaiso, Jan.: 30.-Marriage licenses Issued: in' Porter county during] 193S dropped 1,270 from the 1937 total of 4,210, the county clerks', office disclosed today. The reason for -the decrease, it was explained, j is. the ruling by the state -supreme -court in Janu- Miss Alpha Whisler, reporter for the Tribune, is 111 at her home in afryf 1938, requiring, that women Hobbs suffering with jan attack applicants for jl'conses must be qf the flu. She has been confined residents of the county   for   at to her bed since Saturday. least ai year- home ihj that city. �Mrs. Julius is also survived by two brothers;'Samuel .and Albert Juday, and two sisters, Mrs. Ollie �� -� n------� -t.------   1    , Hughes' and jMrs. tela Dunn, and the warjdepartment. tt^er ''pres-jthe ngeja;:mother, Mrsl Mary Elizabeth. Juday of Omega, She is al-fso survived |by a   number   of reported to have said that   the war department opposed eoopera-tiotk with tjhe French mission* but that 'etrkusjk authorit,ies; jvere in i|. ��''��''. ' The 'deceased!was a long-tin^e and active member of the New iancaeter Christian church and a pmah [held ih,;high; respect. The body Milliejin iatate at' the home until^ taken to the church for services: aid frif nas may call at any iSttf^aV their by some: newspa- -^U-ollMtlnn 'ha ...�     j-i--�       , naturall^tioB.^be ^ObWlon wa^Uken ric-Uy-!to{ t: adfoiMion by theffojrerniUMBt' |tb>fc ttesituallbn. involved offejtt repreeintativea of Oei^niuiy, ' '1 Q/ttawa. Jan. 30.-Prime Minis- |tiy a German consul iff Montreal, ter! Mackenzie King has informed parliament that German t Nazi ac- UJ        v.qji ...uu   v.v,^u.  11.   ...u...>.�.. In Winnipeg, where Archbishop Slnnott of the Catholic church recently engaged! in a controversy I With Erich WIndels, German Con-[tjul General of Ottawa, it was declared by The Winnipeg > Tribune that "a direct' 1 tie-up" i between consular officials and Nazi: Propaganda had .been.! establishes by records in the rofflce of the Provincial j Secretary ot 'Manitoba. i*ln cases _ where! naturalized -Canadians of German birth can Ci'shown to' ha|ve] beenvacting as l'i t^taj1 for Nazi [propaganda � iB^^p^urfed! only defended, herself against foreign threats and the consolidation of anti-German activities in j Czechoslovakia led I to the Nazi I action against the republic. Just before Hitler began speaking, Goering was re-elected president of: the greater German Reichstag* by a unanimous rising vote.       ' it was understood that an influential group including : Paul Joseph Goebbels, propaganda; minister, and Joachim von Ribben-trcp,: foreign minister, had urged Hitler strongly to reply to President'Roosevelt and other American critics of the European dictatorships, 'Such men as Goebbels .and Ribbentrop. it was asserted, advised Hitler that he ought to rebut emphatically ptate-men|a' made by. foreign critics, and notably by tho President:-but that: as usual they were opposed by Field! Marshal 'Hermann .Goering ."Nazi No. 2" and other so-called "conservatives," who Wanted Germany's relations with foreign : countries built up in the interest of( 1 the four-year plan of economicj.seIf-sufflciency. Hitler worked untIL the [early hours1 ok this morning on! the semilnal' draft or his speech, in complete Jprivacy, j dictating into a machine from rough notes he had Jotted down as ideas occurred to him.  The bfc day of the'Nazi year, the anniversary of - Hitler's rise: 6966 C33D 5 16   

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