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Tipton Tribune Newspaper Archive: August 18, 1922 - Page 1

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Publication: Tipton Tribune

Location: Tipton, Indiana

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   Tipton Tribune (Newspaper) - August 18, 1922, Tipton, Indiana                                Entered as second class matter Oct. 4, 1895, at postofflce at Tipton, ind., under the act of March 5. 1879; VOLUME XXVII, NO. 208. TIPTON, INDIANA, FRIDAY EVENING, AUGUST 18, 11)22. OBJECTTO INCREASE TAXPAYERS OF COUNTY JXOT IX HARMONY WITH STATE BOAR11. They Will Stand by the Officers in Fight lo Retain Present Values. Tlio taxpayers of Tipton! county are decidedly opposed to the pro position offered by the state tax hoard to increase the values in several grades of property in the county, notably farm lands; and improvements, agricultural implements and hogs, and they will stand by the county oflieers in any fight they may see fit. t.o make to retain the values fixed by the local taxing officers.' The order of the state board, we are informed, is mandatory, and some people also have the understanding that any order in that direction! v.hich is made by the state tax board can be enforced by law. That may ho law. but it is not good horse sense. , We have well informed citizens of the county who will say that Tipton county property is listed at what would be regarded at this time as a fair cash value, and the bins' thing was true March 1." which latter date is understood to be the date on which value basis must rest. Now the state tax hoard comes along and tells our people that Tipton county property is worth more than the price indicated by the people who 'are on the ground and should know. Possibly the state tax board" will have the authority to order this increase,; but it is not plain to understand how the board will enforce that order if the taxing officers of this county decline to place: the pro-posed values on .the tax: duplicates, and provided, also, they decline to �^collect the faxes upon r. :'�rFoble. . .The -well Jb 120 feet deep and wa ter/'came within a few;feet'orethe, top.-ia* U"ne.,�TMel^e^Itfa^d?it NEEDS RETOUCHING TARIFF BILL, OX EVE OF VOTE, SEEMS SLIGHTLY INDISPOSED Will go Before Congress   Saturday For the Fnnl Action. Washington, Aug. IS.-With only two days and a night left in which to work, the senate was faced today with a flood of amendments to the administration tariff bill, which is to be brought to a final vote, late tomorrow. Renewal of the sugar, dye and other fights which have occupied the senate from time to time in the last four months was on the schedule. Advocates of a dye license em-ba:go won what was described as an almost complete victory last tiigJt with the approval by the senate of an amendment providing that dvt-iea on coal tar dyes and chemicals comparable with those proja^td ' this country should be bas'.-', on American valuation. Th-j d;--ies were made 7u per cent, and i iVi cents a pound) on finished products. enator Moses (Rep., N. H.), one of the chief opponents - of an embargo, announced he would demand another vote on these dt�les? which represent substantial Increases from those previously approved. Under the provisions of the measure as first written the duties would have been based on foreign authority to change to American valuation and to increase the duties by HO per cent. TIME FOR SUMMER FURS. J. P. Jarrett died at his home on North Mill street Friday morning at 7:30 o'clock, after a' brief illness lasting only a week. Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the home, 820 North Mill street, conducted by Rev. Fred Sharp.' Burial will be at Jackson cemetery beside the; first wife. Mr. Jarrett waB past sixty-nine years of age, having been born near Jackson, north of Tipton, June 1. 1853, his parents being pioneers of the county. i August 12, 1873, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Matilda, Rogers, and to their union; ten children were born, of whom six are living and survive the father. They are William Oscar Jarrett Clyde Jarrett, Andrew Jackson Jarrett, of Indianapolis, Mrs. Nancy C. Goodrich; of Elwood, Mrs. Ella Brower, of Anderson and Mrs. Sarah O. VanBriggle. near Sharpsvllle. "The deceased children were Jacob Henry, Julia May, Claude and an infant. Following the first wife's death, he married Miss Nancy Russell, of Windfall, fifteen years ago, who survives him. He is also survived by one [brother, Isaac Jarrett, of Cicero, a half-brother, Francis Jarrett, of [Anderson, and two sisters Mrs. Anna Boring and Mrs. Susan Graham, of Anderson. He is also survived by several grandchildren. Mr. Jarrett was a farmer and after moving to Tipton a few years ago, he continued to work on the farm, being of a very industrious nature and of a kindly disposition. He was working on the farm-of A. ,B. Whisman, northeast of Tipton, when taken ill a week ago. He was a member of the Baptist church, his membership being at the Jackson church. Old Sol Hit High Mark in Parts of State Friday. . Old Sol was hitting the high marks in Indiana Friday, Columbus and other cities reporting 103 degrees of heat in the shade; and here in Tipton the register was around 99, which is sufficient, as Tipton people have no desire to outstrip other sections in this matter afheat. The weather man has been promising better conditions, and those who are accustomed to living in hope will no doubt gt some comfort out of those promises. APPLICANT FOR BUTLERVILLE. Another Member of Stout Family Is Feeble Minded. Upon application "of the county nurse, proceedings' have be^n started in the Tipton circuit court, asking that Ada B. Stout, twenty-six years of age, be sent to the home for the feeble-minded at Butlerville. . The girl is the daughter of William Stout, of Windfall, and the son was sent to the institution a short time ago. Threshers Have Feast. Wednesday evening the threshing company, with the Schuyler Doan engine, which has been operating in the community south : and east of Hobbs, completed their; work for the season and were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Legg, southeast of Hobbs. The evening was spent in games on the lawn and twenty gallons of ice cream with home made 1 cake, were disposed of. On His Vacation. J. D. Davis; mail .carrier on; rural rpute three, has been granted a Vacation of fifteen days, and together with his, wife,! Ieft Fr,dav for JLa-fayette where | they will visit with relatives. Later fhey will make a visit to the southern part of the state: Bruce Summers la looking; after; the patrons on the route in hhv absence. ^ '    I �� -      � :; '%' -i Improving Nicely. Mrs. S. R_Qlaas was at Ind'lanapi oils Friday, spending the' day with jher sister, lira. Thomas iTowjtaandi TVho la at the Matlradtet lioapltal. iayi 1 ing submitted: to a surgical operation DEATH OF J. P. .TARRETTJ Demise in This City Following a Brief Rlness. i THOMAS Ul'TLKR HEAD. Former Tipton Man I lied   Suddenly Friday Morning in Chicago. LATEST . INFORMATION FROM RAID COXFKREK'E. OPTIMISTIC. !_____.   .;    . Stone Says Country Kiiimnds an liu mediate Termination! of Strife.'-; At 2:::� Friday afternoon the! Tribune "was advised dial Pre.-id-'iil L Harding delivered "nis! message  to Thomas Butler, son of Robert ami Mrs. Httiler. of Atlanta, and. a funiM r rc.-ijsnt of Tinien and a ini'iujier ci tin* Tipton bar, died in Cliicng.i Friday morning at 5:30 o'clock, his d'.-ath being Cue 'to an acute :n lark of appendicitis, the Information of his death being wired to -Tipton a P�w minutes .after lii.5 death. It is the desire of Mrs. Butler.that the. body be buried fit Tip-tun, and the interment will take place Sunday, the hour not having been im'.irated jn uir> first message that v.as received liere. during the j day. congress in which he asked Cor more'. jIr. r>utler was about fifty-seven explicit legal props lo be givtn thej,eais of age and is survived by the labor board fjir- the guidance' and j Avi(;|nv a,,|. j,-0 children, there be-, adjustment! of our industrial affairs, j illt, ., s., Adams, who is a student enabling that jhody to ^prevent fur-! .,, (;,iver. and Mrs. Myram Peter-thar disturbances of the kind that | s ,, (>f -j'Ui;.a- okla. The widow inflict the couiitr yat this lime:        'was Miss Tillie Rarhmann.   of   No- blosville. previous to her marriage I to Mr. Butler. Mf. Butler spent-a large number NEWCASTLE UNCERTAIN. Team May Bo Black Horqe- Winners Over Noblosville. Noblesville might have Tipton's goat, but there are teams in the state ^hat still - have their goat in the field, and Newcastle seems tq be one of them. Although Frankfort did put it over them-with a 9 to 8 score, that might be explained as a little tough luck at the last when the pitcher was anxious to get home and threw the ball away. ; Goldsberry will pitch for Newcastle, Mr. Hopper said Friday. We have heard from Goldsberry before and he must be some lad. He was the Wabash star once and a few years ago the same fellow made the all-^tate college basketball line-up. The dopesters will have the game won or lost by Saturday night, but the game will be called at 2:30 Sunday at ball park. GENEVIEVE WAR 11 DEAD. Famous American Tragedienne Died . Suddenly in London. London, Aug. IS.-Genevieve Ward, famous American tragedienne, dlled of heart failure .trfday at her home at Hampstead. Burial of Relative. Mr. and Mrs. David L. Thomas; of Columbia avenue, and Mr. and Mrs. C. | J. Fisher, of Anderson, returned Thursday - evening from Boswjell, where they had been to attend the funeral of John Good, 'brother: of Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Fisher, which was held Thursday.        '    . Mr. Good's death was very sudden, Mrs. Thomas having had no intimation of illness, or that the brother waWnot in his usual good; health previous to the message Tuesday evening announcing nis "death. Paid Fines for Speeding. Ulysses Cage and Fred Warner; of, Sharpsvllle, who were arraigned i in the court of Squire; Broderick here Friday morning for speeding through the main part of Sharpsvllle last Sunday night plead . guilty to the charges and^pald fine of $1 and costs ea�Sh, the amount! in each case bejng 110.95. . : :Mrs. Blmer Green left Friday Sailhaw, Mien., where she Iwjill U|tqr aftveral day* irith Mr, and!-   ... It was alsoisaid that the labor and road chiiffs- were continuing' their parley in!; Ne �York, the liopc being that some setiloment of tin-rail strike: would be reached. Thej leeling was that the present confer-1 ence would terminate the strike.     I Washington, Au^.' 1 .President Harding was tolda today by S.'m-itor Watson ( Rep..; Ind. i. one of his.ad-' visors in the. tail' srrike, that lung distance telephone eom'eivtnions with brotherhood chiefs and representatives (,( the railroad executives m New York. !had' disclosed both sides "hopeful j of a settlement ol j., the rail strike �t today's meeting-' Discussions- jof. the ' truitblvsomc! of th? yc.irs of his life in this cit;., having taught school in the county, and practiced, law in the city Tor ..everal years.- He ha- been living in Chicago for a number ow years and v.as engaged in the legal- practice, his special attention being given to thai of a consulting attorney, ami lie had been quite successful In a  financial way the past several yea r.-. . Hi- parents. Robert Butler and wife siir.viv. They live at Atlanta it d.-es also the brother Seth.. Rev. William Puller, of Pittsburgh. Pa., seniority issue-were said bv the In- and Cal Butler, of Kokomo. are also diana senator to be based -on a .'plan i which roughly would provide; 1.-That the men who did not gj on strike go to the head: of the list in seniority. , -'. That the pmploye.sj who walked j out July 1 or later have- seniority j second to 'the'' in,en -who remained I at work. I That "the new men' taken on during the strike have a seniority ranking below the other twj groups and he retained in employment by ! brothers. ARCADIA WOMAN DIES. Member of Christian Church There Fifly-Fmir Years. tite railroads wherever It possible. | Jones, of Arcadia Senator Watson said T.. Dewflt Cuyler, chairman of the Association of Railroad Executives.- and leader of the executive'in the New York conference, hadj expressed himself over the telephone as   her home at Indianapo-j lis. after visiting at the home of her sister-in-law, Mrs. l.aDonna Blount and family, on West North street, having been at Cicero last week attending the burial of Miss Hannah New York. Aug. IS - The'strike Miss Jones, who was an old friend of the-Blount family, had held membership' in the Arcadia Christian church continuously for .VI years. Although living at Tipton, Indianapolis ami other points during that time she still claimed Arcadia as her home auR never changed her membership, although she was regular in attendance at all M; E. - COUNTY MRETING. church services where she happened of railroad shaii crafts iunions ma'';^ )-lve_ l>e settled herej WarrenS. Stone, til'}       - �. � the Brotherhood of '.ocjoiv.otive Engineers,- said today as ;the commit-1 tee of five rail' brotherhoods closed several informal conferences 'before meeting the rail executives to continue! their .work of mediation. "The strike must bej settled." be Held nt the Cily Park Sunday, Seij-_ tentber :?. continued, "ami it'-'must be settled ! oi The fifth annual county mooting the. Methodist churches will be right here at' these mejetings. Con i hel " ''ark Sunday, Sop-dltions over the country demand |tem,,er " A.mMt excellent -Program that.a settlement be made at once!ls n0w being Perfected-and It is ex-and wo are  optimistic ; that it' can | pec,?Kciidnll vtllc. Mrs; Nellie Hutto, 6f North Main street,-has leased her usitlence and It spending !� Beveral wenks with Tier sister,| Mrs. I Nettie 'Wist, in Dayton, Ohio. !�� : II 1 . - :h :" . ' .'.� The] first tit Septembe , Mrs. Hutto and'hVr dankhwr, Mh�| 31anche Hutto, whjoj is-njpw ittendlri tithel/aate^n IndlaiUiaorualloolI^geJ la^<4Iun
                            

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