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Logansport Weekly Pharos Newspaper Archive: July 21, 1897 - Page 8

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Publication: Logansport Weekly Pharos

Location: Logansport, Indiana

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   Logansport Weekly Pharos (Newspaper) - July 21, 1897, Logansport, Indiana                                 5íV¡  >.lÉlÍilfitHÍiÍtÍi  royal BAKIHO POWPFP ro., NSW YOSK.  WEEKL^PHAROS  WEDNESDAY, JFLY 21. 1896.  CITY ÄND COUNTY.  Tnesday, Jnly 13.  Deputy Revenue Collector Wood, of Kokomo, is io town.  The Peru Journal has a railroad loeal iMttng that Barnum & Bailey's elreus will show in Logantport, Au goat 24tta.  Jamet Pierce, a Panbaodle switch BAD, bad his right ankle broken at 1 p. m. today. Dr. J. B. Shultz ad Jailed the fracture.  The members of the Women's Re lief corpt were entertained this after noon by Mrs. Chauncey Custer at her eoantry home north of the city.  Oallco 3^0 L. L. muslin 25 yards •1: Ghallies 2ic: vests 2 for 5c: lOc ]ei black hose 5c: Belts lOc: 50c rlbboDi 25o: laces one-half price. Trade Palace. *  Following is a list of the horses whieh will start against Coleridge at ▲urora, Ills., Thursday: Conner, S:1U; Pearl C, 2:06^-, Steel i'rince, 2:07, and Red FuZ, 2:10.  A aurprlse was given Mr. and Mrs. 1. W. Howell, of Adams township on Saturday evening, on the occasion of their birthday. The ailair was enjoyable to all present.  Joseph Ivans has been driven by ,the prevailing hard times to return to his first love, and has opened a ihoe shop in Dr. Battery's building on Plum street, Westslde.  Charles Lunsford, the ex-patrol man, is preparing to open a saloon tn the room gn l^orth street, be tween Flftn and Sixth streets, lately vacated by Lee, the feed man.  Motor car 11 hit a spring  w^(on occupied by Jerry Thornton on Broadway near Seventh street this morning. But little damage waa done to the vehicle and there was nobody hurt.  Two train loads of r. S. soldiers pass throught Logansport at 11 • . m. tomorrow over the Panbaodle en route to Chicago, to participate In the unveiling of the Logan monu ment there on Thursday.  Peter Long, who assaulted Fred Meisner, nigbt watchman at the brewery, Sunday ni^bt li under $50 bonds for his ap pearance before Mayor McKee at p m. tomorrow. Other arrests will follow.  While out on her bicycle Sunday evening Mrs. Augusta Mliler, of Col lege street, ran Into a buggy at the '■oath end of the Cicott street bridge •nd sustained a paiDful injury to her left knee. She is under the care of Dr. Arthur Herrmann.  On Sunday, July 25th, the Wabash railroad will run a cheap excursion to Lafayette, leaving Logansport at 8:26 a. m. Fare $1 for the round trld, giving an opportunity to visit the Indiana Soldiers' Home and the historic Tecumseh Trail.  Pera la in the throes of enthusiasm over the discovery of petroleum in a well being sunk for natural gas. Its flow is estimated all the way from 16.to40 barrels. The well will be fhot in a few days whin its stability •nd productiveness will be ascertained.  Samuel Frost was found probably fuilty of stealing grain and meat from William Goldsberry, by Mayor MeKee this morning and in default of a bond In the sum of t300, was re-'Committed to jail. Frost lives in l^ite county. Goldsberry resides north of this city.  When times are dull and business ' inalli the merchant, the professional ^ and others need money worse in at any other time. Jf you small accounts here and there, ;them off. The persona you give money to will pay it to others owe, and thus a little cash will ;'4o ft great deal of good. fVlP. O. Washburn,district agent for liletropolltan Insurance company llu^qaarters in Logansport, has ||n«moted to position of general lOf Ontario, with headquarters ito, Canada. He will leave ir part of the week. Mr. iftteof Newark, N. J., is here fUf. Washburn's place as dls-it.  Attempted by John firowo, the Ci^rmaker.  Badly Eir«cttd Willi the Blees, He Swallowed Two Oaoces of Paris Offen.  The Stomach Pamp Appllcil and He Is Now Thongfit to be Out of lianfer.  About 1 o'clock Monday afternoon while laboring under a bad attack of the blues, John Brown,the well known cigar maker, purchased two ounces of paris green at Johnston's drug store, then proceeding to the court house pump on North street, downed all the »lufT at one swallow.  Shortly after he showed up at Walter Closson's cigar factory, on Broadway, where he bad been employed, and had no sooner entered the shop than he oegan vom itlng. The color of the discharge from bis stomach showed conclu sively that he had taken paris green and while one of his shopmates was sent for a doctor, the others laid poor Brown out in the stock room. Drs. Ballard and Downey answered the summons, and by prompt application of the stomach pump, soon had the rash young man out of danger.  Brown was married a few months ago to a young lady named Carle, and the couple have since lived at No. 12 Elm street, in perfect harmony. Up to within a month or more of his marriage the young man had drank to excess. He abstained from the use of liquor until last Thursday, when, becoming despondent, he drank a little to drive away the blues. The result was that he continued to drink, and finally concluded to end it all taking poison.  Upon being pronounced out of danger Brown was taken to his home on the Westslile.  It was a narrow escape and the young man ought to profit by the experience. He has everything to live for— a young and devoted wife, and and an aged mother and a host of friends to encourage him in all his efforts to do right and live right.  tm ÈÊÊlÊm Umr  TkM fears.  ilr  «S  «aay  !  Died at 7:05 Last Evening at Home of His Mother on Elm Street.  the  Prom Dally of Taeedajr.  Contrary to expectations, John H. Brown, the clgarmsker, died last evening from the effects of a dose of paris green, taken with suicidal intent. His death occurred at 7:05 o'clock at the home of his mother, Mrs. Ellen Brown, No. 12 Elm street, Westslde. He declared that he had taken the poison with the suicidal Intent, and fought against the efforts of the physicians to save his life.  The deceased was 26 years of age. Besides his wife and mother he leaves two brothers and a sister. He was a member of the Cigar Makers Union, which organization will bave charge of the funeral to be held at 10 a. m. Thurday from the residence. Interment will be made in Mt. Hope cemetery.  SHIPPED THE BOAT.  The Logansport Voyagers Went to St.  Loais by RaU.  Captain Stukey nearly broke the little steamer City of Logansport in two in the middle on a sand bar, south of Attica. So badly was it damaged that it would not turn water and was sent to St. Louis for repairs. It is now in the drydock undergoing repairs. If there were no railroads the voyagers would have to walk bome,  GamblInK House Pulled.  A gambling bouse over Frank Downey's place on Wall street, was pulled Saturday nigiit. Peter Jenk-ines, the keeper, J. H. Perkins, John Doe, John Schräder, Richard Roe, J. M. Doyle, William Kelly and Jos. Wilson, patrons, appeared before the mayor today and paid the usual fine and costs, 115.50 each.  Frlskey in Town.  Elizabeth Friskey, an old-timer, now located near Camden, and John Bush, from the same locality, drove to Logansport Saturday to have a good time, and as a result both are languishing in the county jail. The mayor gave them each fifteen days. Their horse and buggy are held at Bevan's feed yard.  k Waning to Famers te fiierclie lore Than Cunal Care te Prevent Losses.  According to a bulletin Just Ifsued by the Purdue university agricultural experiment station, there Is more swine diseases in the state now than at any corresponding period In recent years. U is asserted that remedial measures are costly and unsuccessful, and that preventive measures, to be effectual, must be applied sonn Large herds should oe divided Into bunches, according to size; clfifin pastures, with a reasonabii' amount of shade and an abunn ance of pure well water are safer than the pens: do not permit the use of wallows or surface water under any consideration. It has been found in a series of years, tuat tbc highest per cent, of loss has occurred along the rivers and streams tn which the hogs have access. Use any ration that will keep the hog healthy An occasional drink of soapsuds to expel worms and the use of charcoal, salt and ashes as an alterative will prove beneficial. If the disease should break out in the herd separate the well from the sick and not the sick from the well. On removing the well hogs from the slclc, place them on a part of the farm where no di^ieased animal has been. Burn these that die as It is the only sure method of destoying the germs. Keep everthing clean and let the sun have a chance to do the disinfecting.  It is further stated In the bulletin that the station will undertake a number of field experiments this year, and it is desired that immediate reports be gi^en so far as possible as to the date of the beginning of any outbreak, the percentage of losses and any marked peculiarity of the disease in the locality Like information is desired as to fresh outbreaks as they occur during the season. ____  REFROSPECTION.  tONIGHT AND TOMORROW  Shirt Waists - "  ,ta  urea  ts  s pi  npT^y-ipr  uUi 11 lU^  2 Lots 26 and 66c.  2 Lots 26 and 66c  2 Lots 26 and 66c  LOT I. Shirt Waists worth up from 50 to 75c.  Tonight, choice.............................. 26c  LOT 2. Shirt Waists worth from $1.00 to $1.75. Tonight, choice.................. ......,...... QBc  These goods are Bargains at these prices and will w \ be displayed on our first floor. ^  An Uld Tinier Talks of Harvesting In Days (>one By.  "How different Is harvesting now from what It used to be," said an old timer In the South Bend Times "It was then that a Jug of whisky in the fence corner was a well understood prerequisite and the harvest fields would seem alive with people and the dinner tables would undergo an expe rience that only a harvester's appe tite could Insure. Farmers would be in town offering big wages, plenty to eat and drink If the city loafer would only depart from his lazy habits for the harvest season. Why there were quite a number of wheat rais ing farmers who would take teams and drive away down to Warsaw or-Wabash every year to get barventers. They'd find men there who were through with their harvest and would haul them up here and back and pay 12 to 12,25 per day and board and whisky thrown in. Now bow different. The farmer hitches up to a self binder; goes out and take<) It easy himself and does more work than ten or fifteen men could do in days gone by: has a solitary shocker with him and is through harvesting almost before he knows it and dues not half kill the women folks feeding his harvest hands and nearly kill himself setting a pace for those bar-vest hands in the field. Yes, times have indeed changed."  PROVIN» 84TlSFiCT0RT  Is the New Poor Law—Expeadltaree Not so 6reat  The law, requiring each township to care for Its own poor, Is proving satisfactory. In former years the ex pensa of maintaining the poor was paid from the general fund.  In speaking of the law a trustee said: "It was the habit for people of my township to come In here and recommend that a certain poor man or woman should be given assistance. The man who made the recommenc'a-tion knew that the expense would come from the general fund and thought that his township might reap the benefits as well as any other. As a consequence there were many persons given aid who did not need it nearly so badly as was represented. Now it is different. Every taxpayer of this township knows full well that he must help stand the expenses, and cases are given a full investigation before assistance Is rendered. We allow nobody to suffer, but are more careful In giving out produce, etc."  ({aeengw are Sale.  5 In pie plates 3c: 6 In breakfast plates 4c; 7 In dloDer plates 6c; cups and saucers 5 o; large round vegetable dish 10c; tumblers 5; jelly glass IBc per doz; granite drinking cups 5c; 4 qt granite kettle with lid 25c; granite coffee pot 26c: 2 pie pans for 6c; window aoreeni 16c.—Trade Pal. ace.  The Golden Rule.  mm  OM YES,  Lob  Joaee Came Bark When ■on«y «el Hiaek,  Hie  With  «rief ra Hit Track and Cleihe» ea Hli Back.  Peer  Lon Jones« the Howard county farmer, who told his farm, pocketed the cash and deserted his wife and children, about the middle of last Mareh, was In Logansport last Friday. From here be went to Young America on a hack, then employed a livery rig and drove to the home of Daniel Miller, where hlf wife and children have been living since their desertion.  Before Jones left the country he sold an 80-acre farm In Monroe township, Howard coucty, for 13,-100 cash. On the evening of bis departure be took« a horse belonging to a neighbor, drove to Kokomo where be was Joined by a woman named Delia Oordon, and rrom there the couple proceeded to Delphi. Leaving theliorse and bugn gy In a livery stable, at Delphi, where it was found later by the owner. Jones and the Oordon woman boarded a we<«t bound Wabash train. After that all trace of the recreant couple was lost, and Jones' unexpect ed return was somewhat of a surprise.  There was apparant grief in the eves and general appearance of brother Jones. Hb has probably had his till of high life with the festive Del-la, and she, In turn, is aheao a few hundred dollars.  CULERlUtìE AT PE0R14.  Braphie Account of the Race by Western Horseman.  the  the the  The Western Horseman gives following graphic account of free-for-all-pace at Peoria, III., on the 7th: "In the free-for-all pace the great Badge went the greatest race of his life, but even with Chandler's masterly guidance he was un* able to defeat the Indiana stallion Coleridge. Coleridge was good, and when Badge stopped a few scant inches to the good right under the wire in the second heat, winning It in 2:05), and lowering his record a full second, Custer gave not a nervous wink as to the result of the race. Coleridge had won the first beat in 2:06^, and was beaten only by a chin by Badge In 2:06) in the second, and Custer knew his charge could "stay." In the third heat it was Coleridge to the half, and Coleridge and Miss Williams from the half to the wire, with the former the winner. In the fourth It was a team race from start to finish between the two heat winners. Chandler playing for a snap •hot drive at the finish. But however fast Badge would sprint, the stout-hearted bay stallion would sprint a trifle faster, finally landing the heat In 2:08}."  ALASKA eOLD FEVER.  Effecting Vandalla Employes—Richard of Rock Creek Organizing a Party.  The Alaska gold fever has reached Logansport and some of the Vandalla employes are badly effected. Richard, of Rock Creek, is organizing a party, and has already signed Willie Waddle, Ah Fat, B. Tifuler and Lift A. Few. The trip will be made in an air-ship, which is now under construction at the round house, by Walter Chapman. 6. Wash Kennedy will have charge of the com* mlssary, and Chief Min-ne-man will act as guide. Richard dreamed of the arctic fields last night and was enjoying visions of rivers of flowing gold when awakened by Fireman Mader. The latter stated that be foand S less down on his hands and knees peering through the open door of the firebox of the switch engine.  The score card privilege for the coming meeting of the Driving club hae been purchased by Will Butter-wortli.  IT HELPED THE CITIT.  Echoes From the Bank Reorganization mil Heard.  That our city has been widely advertised by Its action In the recent bank failure, It again shown by the many inquiries received by Longwell & Cummlngs the publishers of our city directory. They have received orders for copies ot the new directory from New York City, Philadelphia, Buffalo, N. . Y., New Haven, Conn., and numerous other places, wHh inquiries coming in dally ffom all points of the United States. This is something unusual and Messrs. Longwell A Cummlngs ascribe It to the world-wide advertising our city has received In the State National bank affair.  Traveling men who come to Logansport say, "all over the country we hear people speaking words of praise for the plucky 'Hoosier city' that not only withstood the loss of over a half million In a bank failure but subscribed a quarter million more to reorganize a new bank."  In the language of the street we ask, ' what's the matter with Logansport?"  A BIG BLAZE  At Abont One-Thlrtr O'clock Sunday Morning.  Frame Work of the Wiillamson Wright BnildlDg Almost Entirely Destroyed.  The frame work of.the Williamson Wright building, at the northeast corner of Market and Fifth streets was almost entirely destroyed by fire at 1:30 Sunday morning.  It was a two story building. The second story was built on a stone wall.  The first floor was occupied by Charles C. Kasch, as flour and feed store and Wm. Hofferbert as a carpet weaving establishment. The latter also occupied sleeping apartments on the secocd floor. He was awakened and rescued from the burning building b? means of a ladder hoisted by members of the fire department.  The building was the pioperty of Wright heirs and was uninsured. The loss thereon has been estimated at 1500.  Mr. Kascb's loss Is probably 1300. He carried no Insursance.  Mr. Hofferbert's property was uninsured,. His loss Is about $150.  The department responded promptly to an alarm turned in by Merchant Policeman Wecht, and did well to prevent a spread of the flames to the adjoining buildings.  The fire was first discovered by Mr. Wecht, and is supposed to have started on the second floor from spontaneous combustion.  FACTORIES IN SIGHT.  Three  Locations  Concerns Seeking Make Propositions.  The newly organlzed|Commerclal and Manufacturing association is already In correspondence with a gentleman who desires to locate three manufacturing concerns that employ from 50 to 250 people. One of them manufactures iron tubing, another architectural iron and the third bycicles. Each one asks a bonus of land suitable for a building large enough to accommodate the business. Each concern has ample capital to carry on the business after a suitable location is secured.  Horses Bring Better Prices.  Horses In the eastern markets are commanding much better prices just now than at any time for several years, and a good feature Is that prices are on an upward flight. Just why this should be is not explained. Horses may range low in prices for Tarious reasons, but they evehtuaUy return to a fair price, and will long ooDtlattt to do 10.  ASSIGNMENT  Of Tincent Kardes, the Brocer.  Market Street  The Assets EsUmated at $900 the LiabUtlies.  Ahm  Vincent Kardes, the grocer at 314 Market street, assigned Monday to M. F. Mahoney.  The assets are estimated to bo  13,000.  Home creditors are named as follows: Logansport State Bank, $676; Lena MInneman, David Brown and Edward Fettig, 1600: George P.Chase, trustee for other home creditors, 11,-493.04.  There are debts due foreign creditors aggregating 11,300 to 11,400 unsecured.  The assets Include the stock, fli-tures and book accounts.  The failure is attributed to the exceeding hard times and slow collections.  THE NEW UULD FIELDS.  Hidden  UIIHcnlt to Reach the Und of Treasures.  The new Eldorado, the newly discovered gold fields of Alaska, is in a moat inhospitable country and exceedingly diflicult of access. By the longest, but the easiest, way it is nearly 4,000 miles from Seattle, the point of departure from civilization. The route is by steamer up the North Pacific ocean and Behrlng sea to St. Michael, the old Russian trading post, thence by trading route to the bend of the Yukon and up that river almost 2,000 miles, across Alaska to the eastern boundary and from there Into the Klondyke country In British terrltoy. Another route, much shorter but far more difficult. Is by way of the lower Alaskan strip and through the mountain passes Into the territory of the feeder of the upper Yukon. This route Is virtually Impracticable for parties with large amounts of supplies, and the returning miners from the Klondyke warn anyone going to the new field without a whole year's supplies, equal to a ton in weight.  The Volunteers of America, now holding forth In this city, are an offshoot of the Salvation army, having been organized after the split in the Salvationists a year or two ago.  City ¿rkeie. LooAngromr, I11D.8JUI7 1«.  ..J 68  WhMt. Corn..  Oats......  Bye......  Hami  Bhoulden  aide«.....  Chlokena.............  Bprlny Chiokeai.. int Butter<  New Potatoei. Lard  Clover seed Bogs.  cattle.........  Calvee.........  Sheep.......  Hay.....  Official fecaimils off Medal Awarded  DR. PRICE'S CREAM BAKING POWDER  -  It  iff s  5 4H 5H S i IS 70  ....... 6  99 H  »(dams 2»  ,.8|2fi04 St .4 M^ oe ..> M 7 S  ë  te  WORLD'S 1893   

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