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Logansport Times Newspaper Archive: July 23, 1897 - Page 8

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Publication: Logansport Times

Location: Logansport, Indiana

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   Logansport Times (Newspaper) - July 23, 1897, Logansport, Indiana                                 "r.  ■'Z  fäty  r;  tm.  -  OOlfelNO.  to H* Ooab* B«* thmr WIU b* Bara oo ItebMtala Ttmxm.  WBI8KEY SUICIDE.  Rockbottom Prices.  THE BNTIBB ¿TOOK OF  The purchasesrs from the assignee intend to convert entire stock into cash in one month.  THE  Mu5t be Sold Regardless of Cost.  Mighty few people are paying regular prices for clothing while this sacrifice sale of The Hub's stock is going on. We are selling men's, boys', and children's suits at the price that the cloth cost.  Hats and Furnishing Goods at the same rate; be quick, or  else lose a chance.  THE HUB,  Harry Frank's Old Stand,  liiMttbMtrkial attgrogsUofai m i ^ «d tor this bàtticele.^(tWttitbey I , «cdira tbey ax« more often % set of Vutistonnsrs. about fit to pisy in s i<Hirtb rate town dowD in Arkansaw. In due time however these pests will be this way, in about the following order:  "Old Brindle in Fly Time." ; "The Three I^earsed Calf." "The Girl From Cly noers. " "The Buntins Bam." "John Joiies the Comedian." "George Turner's Caterwaul." "Monkey Wanted." "The Shed in Autumn." ^"Swimmine in Eel River." "Hunting Frogs With a Pop Gun." "Seining for Mud Turtle's in IMpe Creek." "The Shultztown Maid." "A Game of Craps. ' "Hell on the Wabash." These are only a few of the attractions for the couiing season.  Admission fees will vary: Men with high plug hats, 25 cents; low plug bats, 40 cents; dudes (full bloods), 15 cents; mixed breed, 20 cents. Free seats in the gallery for those whose rear pockets are well stuffed with "Kentucky Due," such as is advertised in the LoganS' port Journal.  Shop will open at sundown; barnstorming begin a little before daylight. In the meantime you will be enter* tained by the stamping of hoofs and the whistling of gentlemen, in the gallery.  Mk. Windt, Boss Manager.  John H. Brown, a Cigar Maker,  Thx^ ttmr» wt"«to Ì7» ^ ^n« bj gwaiiawlas ù Oiw«« pf Fui« Gma Moater Kombooo—OM ipT tb« Mittaml BwialM of «b*  Saloon.—Waata to Die Md Fichte ^ Phyalclwu Whlto Thoj' «r» ■ dMTorlDK to B»v« Hu l.lf«.—H* IHm «t 7;08 Moadajr ETcnlaic.  Fourth Street.  Rockers.  Something for the children-something that will help to keep them cool. You can|buy them for a few days so cheap that you can afford to please the little ones.  MR. YOUNG DEFEATED.  Tb« Tailor Saea Charlea Graffia for tb« Paymeat of a Salt of Clotbea Bought bjr tbe Latter'a Son After He waa of Age.  228 Market Street.  One DoxBn Gatjinel PMograptis  and One 16x20 Crayon  AIALA FOR S3.00.  Satisfaction Guaranteed.  A. Q. NEWPORT,  That was quite a law suit last week in 'Squire Laing's court. AI Young, the tailor, sued Charlie Graffis for the payment of a suit of clothes, $30 we believe. Tbe clothes were ordered by and for Will Graffis, the mail carrier, about two years ago, and were charged to his father. It was shown in tbe trial, however, that Will Graffis was of age when be ordered tbe clothes; that his father did not authorize the bill to be charged to himself, and the court held tbat tbe . father was not liable. Merchants should be careful as to whom they charge Dills to. Where there is any room lor doubt the merehant should insist on a written order; in fact, this is the only proper way to do.  In this connection we may give a bit of our expeiieoce. Some months ago we printed some foot ball bills for a minor, one Mell Gordon, son o.f M. M. ,Gordon, the real estate man, supposing the boy was perfectly good, knowing his father to be such. But instead of being eood, we found the young man to be good for nothing. Bsing a minor, we supposed his father was liable, but upon inquiry, we were told tbat bis father was not liable for this bill; tbat his father would only be liable forspch articles as the yourg man really needed. We drop this in here as a warning to others. Because a boy's father pays his bills is no sign tbat his son does, and all of us would be batter off if we'd pay a little more attention in ascertaining who is worthy of credit before extending it.  assigiwEent of KABDES,  610 Broadway,.....  This offer good for the next ten days.  Logansport, Indiana.  The Grocer.—Namea H. F. Mahoney Aa-algnee.—Beaoarcea S.SOOO; Liabll-Itlea ««.SOO.  RIGH FURN18HIN68.  Every woman wants to make her home lovely, her environment dainty and eles:ant—equal to the best home she has seen anywhere, and better than the average. Many of the handsome homes are furnished from here—you'll be surprised when we show the quality and tell at what price. The high character and low price of our furniture is too well known to require any very loud spouting from us,  J. w. HENDERSON & SONS,  saO Fonrth Street,............Logansport, Indiana  The third business failure for Logansport, within the last few weeks, took place Monday, Vincent Eardes, the grocer at 314 Market street, naming M. F. Mahoney as assignee.  The assignee states that tbe stock, fixtures, and accounts owing the firm are worth $3,000, while the iiabilities will reach $4,500. Dull trade and slow collections are credited with the responsibility of the failure. The fol-owing home creditors are secured by chattel mortgage: Logansport State >ank, 8575: Daniel Brown, Andrew iTettig, and Lena Minneman, t600; George P. Chase, trustee for home ditors, SI ,400. There is about $1,400 owing to outside merchandise creditors which is unsecured.  W. H. WHARFIELD,  AT 410 MARKET ©TRBKT,  SELLS FURNITURE—  Chairs, Parlor and Bed Boom Salts, Tables, «tc., etc.—  ON EASY PAYMENTS.  Fine Furnishings at Money ©avlng Prices.  Slashing Prices.  We are slashing prices right and left. Our fall goods are arriving daily. We must close out our summer goods. Prices will be no object.  Ladies' razor toe shoM tbat sold for $4.00 and $5.00, now.................$10  liidiM' walking duMt, formerly $1.75, now............................... 10  to  Everything cut very nearly in two. This will be a genuine summer clearing sale.  E. M. WALDRK.  Tmant OOlcan.  Truant officer is a new term in this section, and perhaps a word of explanation is not amiss. The last legisla-;ure male a compulsory education law, or, made a law compelling all children between eight and fourteen years to attend school; and to see that the law s enforced each county has what is known as truant officers, who get $2.00 a day for their services, when at work. While The Times believes it is the duty of thé state to see that all its children attend school, we take no stock whatever in this manner of enforcing the law. There were plenty of school officers, already on the list, to enforce this law, without making any additional expense.  The county is divided into three districts, as follows: No. 1, all the territory north of the Wabash river; No. 2, Logansport; No. 3, tbe territory south of tbe Wabash river. Orlando Powell has been recommended by County Superintendent Cornell for District No. 1; James Holman for District No. 3. The former is a Bepublican, the latter a Democrat.  These officers are appointed by a commission composed of the county superintendent, city superintendent, secretary of the state board of charities, and one member of the state board of education.  Another is added to the long list of deaths caused by the legalized saloon. Another unfortunate has drunk deei of the dregs of sin and has sacriflce< his life on the altar of rum, and now occupies a suicide's grave in Mt. Hope cemetery.  John H. Brown, a cigar maker employed at Walter Closson's manufactory on Broadway, stepped into John M. Johnston's drug store Monday about 11:30 and purchased an ounce of paris green, volunteering the information tbat he wanted it to kill rats. He went immediately over to tbe court house pump, where he took the tin cup from the pump and mixed the whole ounce with water and gulped it down. He then went to the cigar shop, and was soon taken violently ill and commenced vomiting up a pure green substance, and it was then known that he bad taken paris green. He was placed on some boxes in the rear room and Drs. Downey and Ballard were called and did what they could to save his life. Brown, however, didn't propose to let the doctors bring him ont of the kinks^ He fought them with all the strength he had. He bit Ballard's hand, chewed the rubber hose to the stomach pump, tried to swallow a cork that his jaws were propped open with, and when they at tempted to pour milk down him he spit it out as fast as they poured it in. His mouth bad to be pried open with sticks, so obstinate was he. Finally a tube was injected through his nose and the poison pumped out in this manner, and it was believed that he would get along all right, but he was determined to die, and die he did.  After lying in the cigar shop and vomiting all over everything within bis reach for over an hour, he was carried out into tbe little back yard between The Times office and the cigar factory, which, though right in the heart of tbe city, is about as dirty anc filthy looking place as you will find around Logansport. Here he lay like a bog for a time, with nothing under him but tobacco stems and nothing over him but old Sol's hot rays. Af ter baking here for awhile he was tak en home, where be died at 7:05 in tbe evening. He seemed considerable better after he got home, but he said be wanted to die, aud begged bis folks not to do anything for him. ThepoisOn bad gotten a strong hold, and the whiskey be h9d drunk assisted materially in absorbing tbe poison in tbe lining of tbe stomach. When tbe undertaker prepared tbe body for burial he found traces of paris green through the body.  iirown bad been drunk since Friday of last week, and bis employer informed him Saturday that he could not work foi him unless he stopped drinking. He in a ineasure had so-beied up Monday morning, and went to the shop to get a dime to get a drink to taper off on. He got tbe dime, then be got a second dime, and it was with this second dime that he bought the Paris green. He told his employer when he got the money that he would go to work at noon.  While lying on the tobacco boxes in tbe cigar shop be was surrounded by curious spectators. Two brothers were also there, and there was about as much feeling exhibited as if he had been a hog. One brother, who is deaf and dumb, was there soon after it was known that John had taken poison. After a while he sent for the other brother, who was fishing in Eel river. He came and immediately went to work trying to get some milk into the brother's stomach. As stated above, John refused to take the milk, and this brother, with about as much concern as though he was talking to a dog,8aid: "Well, if you won't take it, then _ d— you, die " And to further show the brotherly love existing, when John seemed to rally a little this brother says to the dummy, "You stay and watch 'im." The dummy asked him where he was going, and to the utter astonishment of all those who beard him, he said: "Goiii' flshin'."  Brown was married al)out three months ago to Miss Emma Carle, and they lived at« No. 12 Elm street For years before bis marriage he ha( been a hard drinker, but had stoppée a short time iMrior to the marriage, and this was his first spree since his mar riage. He was twenty-six years o age, and we believe he had spent ten years of this time a drunkard. Tbe writer remembers well of seeing him reeling drunk as long as eight or ten years ago. A young wife is thus made a widow through the effects of license« murder mills, and yet we are told tha ; if we let the saloon alone it will le us alone.  After gnlping down this tin cup o poison Brown got a pieée of paper and wrote his will at the cigar «hôp, bu no (me paid any attention to him, not knowing at that time that he had tak en the deadly drug, and sunposing was just writing a letter. Hie left his effects to his wife, as we understand it. He belonged to tbe Cigar Makers' Union, from which organization his wife will receive $350.  Tbe funeral was held from the house yesterday (Thursday) morning under the auspices of the Cigar Makers' Un ion.  Wclosci tllem ootwe wUt sell ^ Iwti:^^ sammer shirt* St rockbottom prio^. Our stock embraces the ^t makes ot ( articles, and we feel certain that we can salt yon. Tbe hot wc season has only fairly begun, and you will wabt to keep oomfott. able, and there is bo better way to do this than by laying in a sop-ply of our warm weather goods.^ To show you the redttc|ioM »e have made, we submit to you a few of the prices, togethilr with the former prices. Compare them.  Straw bats, formerly 75c, now. ■ ■$ Straw hats, formerly $1.00, now.. Straw hats, formerly $1.25, now.. Straw hats, formerly $1.50, now.. 1 Straw bats, forinerly 12.00, now.. 1  Laundried White Shirts, were 50c, now 38c.  When you want a suit of clothes or anything in tbe gents' furnishing goods line it will pay you to see us. Our summer shirts in negligees, percales, and outing flannels are offered at heretofore unheard of prices. This is no stereotyped "one-fourth off money« losing" fake, but a genuine bonifide reduction sale.  J. D. FERGUSON & JENKS,  ¿22 Markét Street.  You can save.  50 Her m  shoes at ourCfl  Aaron Greensfelder, ]  Northeast Comer Third and Market Streets.  on all purchases of summer  clearance sale.  MIGHAEIa'S  LOGANSPORT, INDIANA.  Book-keeping, Penmanship, Shorthand, and Typewrit-ng are thoroughly taught. Positions guaranteed to pay jW or more per month. Send for catalogue.  Q. W. MIGHAELL.  Arthur Baker,  THE OFTICI/IM,  Has removed his office to Ben Martin's jewelry store, MO Fourth street. We are the only persons in Logansport engaged exclusively in the optical business and making a  Tlioroilgli Examiniition Free of Charge.  he  ilftlMltbiMit,  LogMUQort. laâUtta.  Parents, guardians, or custodians of children are liable to a fine of $10 to $6), to which may be added imprison-meat Id the county jail not less than two nor more than ninety days for failare to comply with the law.  John Hildebrandt went sein hnnt* ^ last Wiek owr into the jungles of White.'At Raines DeLong's jplace newHeadlee, Jdm foand a s^ as loBg as the «odeni tape worm, and about w «cgrantt«. Joiuijg^ lM's  Betorns After Elcht««m Vmuw.  After eighteen years in the Michigan City penltentia^, James McMillen has returned to liogansport and is now, in the last stages of consumption, stopplM with a family on the west-side. He was sent op from this eity for life for the morder of John Bay-mond Jackson, a traveling man, at a ^aee near the Sonthside sehoolfaoase. (ms was in 1879. His partner in the crime was Andy Moyidhan, who died  ^""^^^^ost be one's feeling^ when, aftèf dghteen years behind grim prison wallB, be again witnsssss flsk of waving com, ripened wlmt, the blossoming Tines, tbe running stiMnu, utd all tlM myriad forms of ufel Tbe way ol tbetnwnnwor is haN.  SPRIP t SUMMER WOOLEflS  direct from the best foreign and domestic houses. We are  showing an assortment of suitings and overcoatings for this spring that can't be excelled in the state. Call and we will be pleased to show you through.  PIRRGR, Ttie Tailor,  318 Broadway, Logansport, Ind.  SaiiB 10 to 20 Per Gent on Foot Wear  Economy in purchasing your boots and shoes can be made quite a neat saving in a year's time. We can save you firom lO to 20 per cent m this line, and sell you as fine and substantial wear as the marketafiords. If we have never Isold you goods» let us show you what have; if we have sold to you, we bow you will: come to see us again.  tJ. Q. Bweetser,  $2Bl[axkot8taMt,o»odlatbeCK)MMBato« Lofwsport, loAiM»«  Ì.V  \  i, .  A  1 ..i..   

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