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Logansport Press Newspaper Archive: October 10, 1951 - Page 1

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   Logansport Press (Newspaper) - October 10, 1951, Logansport, Indiana                              rOBijC LIBRARY Weather GOVERNMENT FORECAST Fair and warmer today and Thursday LOGANSPO ESS GIVE NOW THAN EVER Only Local Morning Paper Serving Cass, Carroll, Pulaski, Miami, Fulton, White Counties VOL. 31, No. 99. NEA TELEPHOTOS LOGANSPORT, INDIANA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PRICE FIVE CENTS George E. SOKOLSKY These Days HOOVKR'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY The first volume of Herbert Hoover's autobiography is to be published about the middle of the month. I am not jumping the gun in respect to the publication date. That apparently is a grave sin. Hovvever, the book recalled to me our first correspondence. Throughout the years of my residence in China, 1 treasured the friendship of Tong Shoi-Yi, an elderly gentleman of cultured habits who had been in the high- est offices Empress as well early Shoi Koslo Vs. Raschi As The Scene Returns To Yank Field New York. Oct. 9 the Downficr'xhc World Scries blew _ as during the j in the Giants'! arly yfars of the Republic- Tong faccs todav, and probably ;hoi-Yi had been like a father to, bct lhe board ;s i :ie and I respected him as tnougn i _, i ____ :_ i that the New lork Yankees It was the Tons family that was interested in the coal mines in North China where Herbert Hoover was employed as a young engineer. and his enemies even now trv to give the that there was something wrong about n IX FACT, in January. 192V, two j Americans came to China to dis- cover whether there was any the I the New York Yankees j will nail down their third straight World Championship; jomorrow in their own ball slauKhtcr per- 1 r pctratcd in a playoff ffame for !5 years, the Bombers put tncj slug on Leo Durocher's won-j 13 t0 j< to run the j victorv' count to 3.0 in their Jy -eof Town Chosen By U.N. Troops In The Meantime Giving Communists Bad Time All Along The Front Tokyo, Wednesday, Oct. 10 Communist high command today proposed an immediate resumption of the Korean cease-fire talks at the Red-held village of Pamnun- jom. The Red leaders suggested the question they raised ex- I tending the neutral zone to include advance Allied truce I headquarters at Munsan he reserved for discussion by the I truce delegations later. The Allies have objected to such an extension of the zone. j The Reds, broadcasting from Peiping the text of their note to the supreme Allied commander in advance of its actual I delivery, said they had instructed liaison officers to meet Allied officers at 10 a.m. (7 p.m. Tuesday CST) to discuss rc- I sumption of full dress confer- j ences by the major delegates. The Peiping broadcast in the English language was monitored by the Associated Press. j The message, addressed to Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, supreme Allied commander, was signed by North Korean Premier Kim I] Sung and Gen. Peng Teh-Huai, __ bj'tho resuU look" a fwffoneconchl- I FOURTH OF WORLD Joltin' Joe DiMareio, the Yankee Clipper. is shown the instant after he slammed a two-ren homer into m s5on I the deck of thc Icft stands in Grounds' N- Y" in the toP half of the fifth inning' Berra' a Old ShnoYi thought that i i i< shown inst to the left of Giant left fielder Willie Mays; short stop Alvin Dark; Third baseman Bobby Thomson. Home plate umpire is Al hi friend Herbert Hoover was Records were tied a11 ovor thc i Barlick. Second base umpire is Leo Ballanfant; third base umpire is Joe PapareUa. Umpire on left field foul line is John Stevens. The Polo Grounds as Gil McDougaid, sacker was j ._s second hit in the currcnt series and put the Yankees ahead, 4 to 1. (NEA Tclephoto) the Yankees' "real rookie infield- __ ___ _ Year's Fire Losses Would Forest Most of State Kiwanis Hears Seventy per cent of the state of Indiana could be covered with forests from the amount of trees lost in forest fires last year, Harold Bodisbn, local insurance adjuster said in his talk to the Kiwanis at the hotel yes- terday noon. "Mistakes with Fire Cannot be was the title of Bodi- son's talk. Ronald Barnes told the member- ship of the value of the Com- munity Chest in everyday life. leader of the Chinese Red army in Korea. It formally replied to Ridgway's message of Oct. 8 agreeing to the Hed offer to meet in the Panmun- jom area. Panmunjom is six miles east of Kaesong, where the first fruitless truce talks were held. The Red leaders, however, were sseflibly.Back Today To Seek Fund Solution insistent that first 'full-scale Tong told his visitors j in a lvork! SCries same. that nobody stole thise mines Tv.t) because the Chines; still havej two batters ever them. Instead he recounted how the feat of the 22-year- the young engineer organized to i oid McDoueakl. who only last sea- leed ik'i Chinese of Tientsin dtir- son was mosl valuable star ing the Boxer Rebellion. I quote ;n the Texas League. None had from my letter: [done it since 1936, when Tonny Mr. Tong then expressed I Lnzxcri of the Yanks helped great gratitude for what had been done twenty years ago. He told thc story of the vase which you took as a memento of those terrible days in Tientsin. Mr. Tong wondered whether you still have the vase which you took from his house not as loot but as a remembrance." THE YEARS PASS and 1928 ap- i proaches. This time the Demo- j crats send a delegation to got the dirt on Herbert Hoover, and the eiatc at a similar massacre of the Giants in the same park.. DiMag- gio's big 50 exactly equalled the record set by Frankie Frisch more than a decade ago. Except for another wonderful job of pitching by Ed Lopat. slick 363 Visit Olde And Two Places In Miami County One of the largest assemblages ever to fourth Here For Annual Show Shriners, here for the annual Frolic ..Saturday, are invited to be guests at the local Knights of Columbus lodge hall, according to an announcement made at Monday night's meeting of the K. C. lodge. Another activity this week will be a stag party Thursday Oct. 11. when a chicken supper will be served from until 8 p.m. Plans were discussed for a sec- Yankee southpaw, it was _a pretty j took attend a Cass county rade school history tour i r. the near future horrible exhibition for fans, mostly the Giants' persuasion, to witness. ,11 was strictly no con- test after McDougaid exploded 10 climax five-run fifth nnmg more these men dig, the more the j which disposed of Larry .ansen, arrows point toward Tong Shoa- nghtnanded Giants ace. see me and I take them to this j aged mandarin who sits among part in the program yester- day which included a visit to Olde Towne, the historical mu- seum at the Peru courthouse, the Frances Slocum State Park and Frances Slocum cemetery, it was announced last night at the con- clusion of the event. A total of Test Suit Demands Free Reporting; of Events To "Public Philadelphia, Oct. 9 manding the end of all restrictions on television and radio broadcasts when haU of the proceeds will of sports events, the federal gov- go to the Community Chest. Gibault night was set for No- ernment vember 5th. Ernest Beall won the j League, accusing it of today brought suit the National Football violating armistice talks deal with the question of extending the Kaesong neutral area to a rectangle run- ning from Kaesong on into Allied territory around Munsan, 12 miles southeast. This would include the Red checkpoint at Panmunjom. TJ. S. Eighth Army Headquar- ters, Korea, Wednesday. Oct. 10 Reds, shifted sud- denly to the East-Central front, today joined North Koreans in battling" Allied forces near the bitterly contested "Heartbreak Ridge" area. Deadlocked Welfare Mat- ter Likely To Stay That Way Indianapolis, Oct. 9 ana's deadlocked General As- sembly ends its public welfare' special session recess tomorrow. The 50 senators, who have been at home for a week, and the 99 representatives, who quit last Friday, will reconvene at 1 p.m. Barring a sudden maneuver, tomorrow's session is expected to be brief. The formal calendars of both houses are clear. Awaiting assignment to a Sen- ate committee are eight "home rule" Republica'n organization welfare bills already passed by the House. In the same category i is a House-arjproved bill giving i legislators SI 5 a day expenses for the current session. The House has no bills eligible attendance awsrd. V _, i magmuceni periornuiiiLt: ui me the most beautiful Chinese porce- j bv :he Na_ lam every afternoon, annkmg j Leaguers with five hits and coffee which he prepares in his a 1 lie M'llMl -OUUcll., his oarlv baseball in nearby Cen-i 363 fourth grade students from tra! park, exactly matched his! a11 township schools attended, magnificent performance of the own fashion, and it all so ex- Only one Giant reached first in the final four in- otic and incongruous to listen to i njncs as Lopat's mastery reached him discourse almost intimately j j._s on American politics, robed in i beautiful brocades. So these i them of thc genius of the young engineer and how Hoover foretold Nightmare for Giants For thc Giants the afternoon Democrats want to know about Was a nightmare. They employed the stolen mines and Tong tells j f jve pitchers in an effort to still the Bombers' bats, but finally succeeded in doing so only in the j the Chinese revolution almost a i final two frames, Co-starring with McDougaid in the 12-hit assault with little Phil Rizzuto, who pushed a two-run ho- mer into the close right field stands in the fourth off Montia Kennedy. The great shortstop also clouted a single and scored three times. Ironically for the Giants, the size of the beating they received Page 10) all township schools attended. The event opened began at j Olde Towne a.m. for the j outdoor historical session under sponsorship of a committee of rural school teachers headed by Mrs. Ruby Cramer, teacher at Walton. The opening address and instructions were given by county school superintendent, Raymond S. Julian. The Olde Towne session was in War Dance Ring Woods, near Thousands To Be Here Saturdai decade before report to the it happened in a Viceroy Li Hung Chang, who would not believe him. This time, I was again desig- nated :.o write Mr. Hoover, re- porting the incident, but that let- ter I do not now find. Mr. Tong, in due course, gave a press inter- view on the perfections of Her- Eel river. midway between Adamsboro and Hoover, in eastern Cass county, at ihe grave of the American soldier? who were killed in battle 160 years ago. The students were Shrine Event Always At- tracts Visitors 1 Thousands of visitors are ex- pected in Logansport Saturday for the Shrine Frolic. The color- ful parade and night program at Berry Bowl always attract throngs of outsiders, who are welcomed here on the occasion of the show by the Shriners. The parade is at 4 o'clock and the show at Berry Bowl starts at though the doors will be federal anti-trust laws. The Justice Department said it picked the NFL for this test case because it is "the worst in respect to having the greatest restrictings on radio and TV of any ma.' soorts activitiy." The suit asked the U. S. District court to issue an injunction pro- hibiting the NFL from restricting television and radio broadcasts of its football games. H. Graham Morison, assistant attorney general in charge of an- ti-trust activity, hinted that if the government is successful in its move against the NFL, it will take similar action to set free profes- sional baseball, college football, boxing and other sports. "If the shoe Morison told a hastily-gathered news confer- ence, "then we'll see what nap- tern front. On Heartbreak French by eleven school buses in addition from Clymers 1 open at 7 and preliminary enter- I peJit' transported is uniformed The o ten school. carloads Twenty mothers of stu- bert Hoover in the conduct of these mines. Subsequently, the en- tire story was told in detail by i B. W. Fleisher in the "Japan Ad- I vertiser" and by George Bronson j Rea in the "Far Eastern Review." TONG SHAO-YI must have j been in his eighties when he was assassinated for saying that the IT Chinese were unwise to be at j Annual Jbvent war with the Japanese, as such a war would ultimately hand China over to Soviet frightfulness that actually came to pass, as we now all know. Two years or so before his j Oct. 17 at the Noble township death, in 1930, when I was re- j school starting at o'clock, it turning to the United States for j is announced by county agent the first time in 13 years, he John W. Connelly, asked me to call on Mr. Hoover j A. M. Richter of the agricul- in the White House to say that-l tural economics department of if these stories troubled the pres- j Purdue will lead the discussion, ident, he. Tong. would come to in which local farmers are urged America to speak for Mr. Hoov- j to take part. (Continued on Page 10) Among questions to be dis- I cussed are: What effects are the and dent? also attended :he historical lour a; did Robert Whitsett, sec- retary of the L'Anguille Valley Historical Association, which has I oerpetuated Olde Towne, Shriners will be fed on the house in a tent to be set up back of the Shrine club, and others may eat there at nominal cost, the Shrin- ers announce. Decoration of the city will be started today. J. S. Buchanan, chairman of this detail reports. The caravan moved on to Peru AU the down town section pius Will Be Held October 17 The annual Agricultural Out- meeting for 1952 will be con- ducted on Wednesday evening. n OOUthwest I el of prices? How will these af- Wilbur, Wash., Oct. 9 Three j fee: farm prices and profits? Will Indiana tourists were killed near hogs, feeding cattle, poultry and Wilbur today when their car col- j dairy cattle be profitable for the lided with a truck. I coming year? Should you store Dead were Ralph O'Dell, Wai- 1 or sell your soybeans? Should ter Hart, 66. and Patrick Haffley, j you buy needed corn at harvest 64. all of. Linton, Ind. j time? Should you purchase need- Washington state police said the ed machinery, equipment and where the children visited the museum and heard an address by Mrs. William West, curator, on the various historical articles ex- hibited. Miami county school- su- perintendent John Davis also spoke briefly. The touring party ate lunch city hall and the Penny depot, will be festooned with banners calling attention to the day's pro- gram. In the meantime, ticket sales for the night event have been go- ing satisfactorily but there are still penty of seats for late buy- the Frances Park snd then Slocum traveled SrS, The show is for the public, on to i not Shriners alone, and it always the Frances Slocum Cemetery j is good entertainment. where a pro.arram was conducted i the children and teachers j Two In Jail In OMo participating. The teachers' group presented Mrs. West with a gift j Admit F Of The teachers committee which j Station At Idaville arranged the program included: Mrs. Rubv Cramer, chairman; Mrs. Chalmer Condon. Mrs. Re- dianapohs brotners are reported Iwra Tiarr ,-inri T.pila Winn. to have coniessed the oreax-in a- Monticello. Oct. 9 In- TWO BURNED Richmond, Ind., Oct. 9 employes the casting i the Idavi21e Standard Service Station and Standard Grill last Thursday. Thev are Paul John. 27, and plant of Perfect Circle Corp. are i Lowell John, IS, who are serving iii. ui w. L l_.-., Reid Memorial hospital here i a lo-aay jail sentence in with severe burns iUifeVed last I Ohio, in a petit larceny charge. They will be returned here by accident occurred about 16 miles Irom Grand Coulee Dam. farm supplies now? Is good time to buy a farm? midnisht. Molten metal escaped unexpectedly from a cupola they Sheriff Nelson Steles wnen L.iey were" cleaning. The men burned have completed serving tna; time, are John Myers. 33, foreman of j The local shentf informed of their the melting department, and i confession in a pnone call trorn action followed a five- month investigation by the gov- ernment into the issue of tele- vision and broadcasting of sports Guests at the meeting were Her- bert Fox. Chicago; C. W. Pardue; John Wrend, Logansport; and Jack Munson, Chicago. Also two members of the high school Key j and American "-.-oops of the U.S. club attended. Bob Jacobsen, i 23rd regiment battered at the last secretary, and Larry Hunsinger, Communist stone wall positions j on the north end of that saddle- i shaped terrain. The Allies "Heart) break" assault entered its fourth week. Just west of Chi- nese Red reinforcements, shifted from other sectors, surged into the area to bolster the hard-press- i ed North Koreans. Not far from the Red outpost __......___ of Panmunjom were liaison j f0r action. A Senate-passed cers met to discuss a renewal of j bin to suspend the 1951 law open- the stalled truce talks, the Com- ;ng welfare rolls to public view munists threw tanks into action js jn j.ne House judiciary' com- as mobile artillery on the Wes- I rnittee. treasurer. mixs i Kill Truman's Morison said: "We feel that the American people are entitled to have free of monoply the right to see or hear what they want." Elizaiislii Happy She Talks To Quebec People In French Quebec, Oct. 9 OP Princess Elizabeth said tonight at a glit- tering state dinner that her heart was filled with pride and ioy by the warmth of the Canadian wel- come given her and her husbend, ;he Duke of Edinburgh. In a brief, simple speech, the princess'told the 250 dinner guests she had had some misgivings about crossing the Atlantic and coming to the New World, but that all her doubts vanished the moment she set foot on Canadian soil. Speaking in French, the usual He Can't Appoint Them On Interim Basis Washington, Oct. 9 Senate took two of President Truman's federal judgeship nom- inations out of pigeonhole today and killed them outright. The action made sure that Mr. Truman could not put his selec- tions. Cornelius J. Harrington and Joseph H. Drucker of Illinois, on the bench while Congress was not in session. Senator Douglas (D-I11) led the fight on Mr. Truman's' Illinois t nominations, because the President picked Harrington and Drucker over men recommended by Doug- las. On the voice vote of rejection no one was heard to support the President's choices. Before today's vote, the Senate Judiciary committee had pigeon- holed the nominations. Had noth- ing more been done, Mr. Truman would have been free to give them interim appointments after Congress adjourned, if he wanted to. In another development, a bill creating new on circuit court of appeal and 16 on district courts plus four tempor- ary district court passed on a voice vote and now goes to the House for action. The surprising Red maneuver, involving the probable transfer of a major Chinese unit, checked an Allied advance. Lt. Gov. John A. Watkins, the Democratic presiding officer of the Senate, is expected to refer the "home rule" bills to the ju- diciary A committee, presently controlled by Senator Roy Con- rad a Republican rebel, and four Democratic mem- bers. Senator John A. Kendall (R- committee chairman, said tonight he "probably will call a meeting right away if the bills come to judiciary A." This committee has bottled up Senate Adsent Ballots GOP organization bills with those approved by the House last week The Senate-passed bill post- poning the effective date of the 07 195! law two years is expected ill rinlr! HiNrtn! to remain in the House judiciary Ul IIUIU JfiUHUU committee, controlled by regular Republicans. It appeared doubtful that House backers of this proposal, i made by rebel Republican state Can Vote In Person Start-! officials, could obtain the si ing Oct. 27 A total of 87 absent voter bal- j signatures of members needed to force the bill from committee. "Essence of the "bdme rule" program is to divorce Indiana lots have been requested by local, frorn the welfare regula- ctizens who plan to be out of the I tions ir.d tun: down a on Tuesday, Nov. 6 election j year in federal matching funds, d'ay, it was announced yesterday Oneof the appropriates by county clerk, George W. Cline. for the next two years. If the Senate judiciary com- mittee votes on the "home rule" program tomorrow, the bills A total o' 28 additional applica- I tions were received yesterday bringing the number to 87 who could come up for final action At the same time ten absentee .ge in Quebec province, she said: "I found myself in the midst of friends and fellow countrymen. And today in passing through your magnificent city, rr.y heart was filled with pride and joy at the this --c, _ this a Dewey Denton. 26, a cupola ten- Shenft N. A. Barnes Williams wmcn Canaca nad saved for my der. 'county, Ohio. nusoand ana me." j wish to cast absent vote ballots, j yet this week. A switch of one Democratic vote on the commit- tee would bring a floor test. Some ballots, which had been cas., were I Republican ]eaders are counling i returned to the clerk's office, a on -hjs happening. Democrat, total of 25 now being ready for j however, say their lineup is solid- counting in next month. Saturday. Oct. the city election i Reports continued to persist that the present session, called by Governor Schricker for last PLANS NEW HOUSE A new three room house will be built at 2126 jefferson street by William Towssend of that address, "i day a voter mav personally j Sept. 24. would run its consti- i obtain and vote a regular absent j tutional limit of 40 I voter's ballot at the clerk's office, i 3. Until that time all absentee vot- must be done by mail. The j 100 Longfellow Kids who filed an application for build- applications for absentee ballots ing permi; with the city clerk- treasurer yesterday. The house is to be 24 by 24 fee; and is estimat- ed a; c See Central Station will be up. to Saturday, I j Nov. 3 and that also is the final i One hundred children from NOW IN OREGON Fire Chief and Mrs. Joe Graf- fis have arrived in. .t-ugene. Ore- gon, where they are visitia? hjs twin brother. Leslie, and hi.T fam- ily, according to a card jus: re- ceived by local firemen. are expected to be gone weeks. i date a voter rr.ay cast an aosen- i tee ballot in person at the court- house. Registration for the city elec- tion closed Monday at midnight d yestercay all ceputy regjstra- Longfellow school were taken on a tour through the Central fire station yesterday and shown all the equipment as pan of the cele- bration of fire prevention week. Fifty-five kindergarten chil- dren were taken through the sta- tion officers were ousy turning j tior, in groups by Miss Jane1 ;r, supplies to tne s Smith. Miss Bertha Hurst brougb.1 -Mr 23 graders, and 22 oj Mr. Cline said that it will be at j least two weeks before registra- i tion figures can be made available. Miss Dorothy Malay's first gradt children were shown through.   

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