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Logansport Pharos Tribune: Saturday, May 3, 1890 - Page 1

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   Logansport Pharos (Newspaper) - May 3, 1890, Logansport, Indiana                                LOGANSPORT DAILY PHARO8 16TH YEAE SATURDAY EVENING MAY 3 1890 NO 5 JOHN BRAYS Corner on Umbrella In the foMowinjr Gloria Silk Como Silk Henrietta Silk Millltta Silk Century Silk French Satin Fast niack Cotton Serge Satin Boiclers Scotch Ggms And all grades in Cotton Rain Umbrellas Tho aDove are made on tho Paragon Frame Plain and Fancy Gold Han dles Plain and Fancy Silver Han dles Plain and Fancy Oxodized Handles UU Glove m fitting I PATNUflSINO Aro most favorably known throughout the United States for their perfect shape ele gant fit great comfortand as they are excellent wearing Corsots are the most econo mical Call and buy For Salo at WILER i WISES Bee Hive Dry Goods House Will Cure Your Headache 12thSt Drue Store DELICIOUS BREAKFAST DISH ASK YDUR GROCER FOR It FURNITURE PRICES THti LOWEST Our Designs None but the Best Workmanship Allowed to Leave our Salesroom J IV Henderson SODS K A KIKEOEK JtODXEY STRAIN I Strain UNDERTAKERS Calls Promptly Attended to Day or Night v Xo 1153 NoBS ONLY JUBTBEGUN The Labor Troubles at the West ern Metroplis A SOOEE OF NEW STRIKES ON HAND DUSTERS ARE THE BEST 100 styles prices to suit all AYBKS Soys Sold bv The Numlxuof Strikers About Doubled ami thtf 1ur pouters difficulty ot Yet lilack Workers Kx teml Their Holiday Indefinitely iintl Are Followed by Numerous Otlier Industries Coul Miners mid Owners Kind No Common Ground to Meet Upon CHICAGO May great purarle labor Thursday seems to have been the signal for action among thu dissatisfied workmen of this city and now the ranks of the actual strikers have been swelled to twice the number that was on strike Wednesday The most unfortunate feat ure of the situation is that the bulk of the uew recruits cornea from that portion of the city called the black road where so much turbulence took place in 1886 and if signs count for anything they are ready for the same scenes this year No sooner were the men out of the shops than the latter were picketed and the word went the rounds that no man should work This spirit pervaded the girls and women em ployed and those who hung back yester day they were a majority of the promptly bulldozed into going out with the rest Mulders Lead the Movement The first to strike were the molders at the Chicago Malleable Iron works where 700 men banked the fires and quit Their demand is eight hours a day and pnyand ahalf for qvertirne The other employes of the concern then struck out of sympathy The Deering Reaper works next fell into line and the Illinois Steel companys men wpuld have quit but the cornpauy conceded the demands The men m the Wells French Cos car works the Ajax Iron works and several other iron manufactories also quit work to the num ber probably of 2000 more WoodWorkers Follow Suit Tiiese man had hardly been heard from when the planingmill men started the ball but the strike was not general less than 500 men going out The furniture factory men also took the strike fever and several factories had to closedown pending negotiations The men employed at the Goodwillle box factory struck for eight hours At noon their demands were ac ceded to and they returned to work The men at the Cooper Lumber companys yards were also victorious The firm agreed to grant the eighthour day and the men went to work at noon Lumler Men Growing Restive Trouble is brewing in the lumber yards ami the prospect is that unless grauted eight hours and more pay the lumber thousand quit work If these men strike it will shut down work in most of the yards and tieup all the southwestern lumber trade The union waiters are also threatening to strike unless certain demands are com plied with Four hundred men employed by Demma Sc Durkiis furniture factory struck for eight liouro Seven hundred men em ployed by the Cottage Organ company are also affected by the strike fever and re fuse to work until granted the eighthour day IUtle Progress with the Carpenters The carpenters strike is still on and the situation remains exactly the same as when the arbitration committees were ap pointed At a meeting yesterday after noon tiie bosses conceded eight hours but when it came to granting 40 cents an hour there was a hitch as there was also in the apprentice question While discussing the latter question the subject of the ability of the uew bosses association to employ enough men to justify the carpenters in completing the negotiations was brought up The carpenters insisted that the bosses furnish a guarantee to employ 5000 men within thirty dtiys To this the bosses ob jected 3eeision of tho Umpires The umpires decided in favor of the strikers limiting the number it is under stood to 4000 men The carpenters pro tested and finally demanded a statement fropi the bosses showing exactly what each could do They were not prepared for this and ilnally after a heated discus sion the conference adjourned to meet to day The bosses held a meeting last night aucl it is understood completed arrangc rnents for the conference The umpires in these negotiations are Judges Tuley Briggs and McConneli Other Strikes Settled The Garden City Springs works compro mised with their men by granting them an eighthour day with uiue hours pay and the Morgan Sash Door and Blind company settled with their employes on a similar basis A strike at Maxwell Bros Box factory was settled by the employers agreeing to consider the grievances of their employes at an early date They are now working eight liocirs No Grievances Formulated Everything was quiftt on tlw black road at latest reports The striking mold ers have made effort to procure a meet ing with the employers the latter are in absolute ignorance of what is demand ed The bulk of the men also do not seem to know their own ruiud and say that they struck because ordered by their lead ers to do so ThD whole affair has the appearance of being a simple case of strike fever The authorities apprehend no fur ther disturbance but the neighborhood is well patrolled by officers and any incipi ent outbreak will be speedily repressed NO WORK FOft COAL MINERS The Men iind Operators Fall to Patch Up mi Agreement CHICAGO May will be no more coal dug in any of the northern nor in some of the southern coal districts of Illinois for an indefinite period of time This is the result of the three days confer ence between the operators and miners which has been in progress at the coal exchange in the Temple Court building When the joint committee met Thursday morning it was thought that all it had ip do to bring about aii settlement of all differences between yie two parties and so prevent any striSe dAiring the com ing year was to adoptinfi profitsharing system An Important Omisftiop During the night however the operators discovered that they had left out of their calculation the daylaborers and if ttey too had to have a share of the profits at the figures upon which the plan ifas based there would be no profit left satisfactory to the mineowneia After three hours of discussion the committee through A L Sweet reported to the convention ft had been unable to accomplish anything Prvsident Rae said the profitsharing sys tem was a success in other states and he hoped it would bo adopted here The dia ctvssion lasted for two hours and then the joint convention udjournecl sine die tittle Hope for a Compromise The miners went into executive sessioj 3nd after four hours deliberation Strike They faoee t9 rebjjen tions and can do so as soon ae they can secure the cooperation of the southern miners They will lay the whole matter before the executive board of the National union and their decision will determina whether or not the strike will be pro onged The operators and miners of the Indiana bituminous fields were present at the convention but took 110 part They met and decided that they could not give an advance in price for mining The Irreconcileable Julian NEW YOPK May Most was at work all day Thursday in The Freiheit office and took no part in any of the labor demonstrations Before him upon a desk at which he labored were two gallowses reminders of Chicago He said he would not attend the meeting in Union Square This is a scheme of capitalists entirely this whole eighthour business Most said It is all stuff aud nonsense Politicians only are anxious for aworkday of eight hours because they believe they can get the workingmeus vote if they preach eight hours It is not so much a question of hours as it is the overturning of the present condition of society No make shifts will do The whole thing hHis got to go No halfway methods will bs per mitted when the Anarchists begin work Situation at Milwaukee MILWAUKEE Wis May yesterdays developments indicate the final outcome the eighthour movement iu Milwaukee will result in a victory for the carpenters The strike which it was thought might occur yesterday did not materialize the change from thu tenhour system to thu eighthour system was effected with out any excitement and without any pub lic demonstration whatever There will still be some uncertainty however until after the massmeeting of tho unions to be held Sunday evening at the West Side Turner hall Apprehension ut Boston BOSTON Mar is now feared that there will be a general strike iu all the buildiug trades or at least n very serions disturbance in work Some time ago the Building Laborers union asked the Master Builders association for a conference with regard to fixing wages no rate having been fixed for tour years They asked for 25 ecu ts an hour bat said nothing about the number of hours per day This com munication was laid on the table by the master builders Bosses yielding at Detroit DETiiOiT May boss carpenters are yielding find by Monday eight hours will constitute u days work Cor Detroit carpenters Today there are 2000strikers here but this includes the employes of those who have given iu to the demands of the menThose actually lighting do riot exceed 200 TRIAL OF MRS VANDERGRIFT Mejjhis to Look tike u Case of Keekless Slamler MOLXT HOLLY IsT J May the trial of Mrs Yandergrift for attempting to poison her son Norman Professor O C Wood of the University of Pennsylvania testified yesterday that Normans symp toms could have been produced by gastro intestinal catarrh as well as by an irritant poison He said Dr Hulls treatment was all wrong and doubtless made the boy worse Professor William Pepper of the same institution gave similar testimony A Point Aguinst the Medicos Young Morgan was recalled ancl testi fied that one night during his illness the doctors gave him up saying he could not live twentyfour hams but after they left he went down stairs and ate a heaity meal He afterward Mrrote a letter to the doctors thanking them for their opinion The testimony for the defense thus far has been very sitrong and public opinion is less severe against Mrs Vandorgrift than it was Hoard To Be the StlinUurtlBearcr MILWAUKEE AVis May Payne of the Hepubliean state committee was asked yesterday what the course of his on the Bennett law would be He said I do not know the central committee mny recommend I have no doubt that such a course will be mapped ont as every Republican in the state may follow without a sacrifice of one iota of principle I should suppose Mr Hoard would be the party candidate for govern or I have no reason for believing other wise The position of Hoard on the Ben nett law is well known Not Drifting Wider Apart NEW YORK May Heralds cor respondent says he is able to positively deny the statement telegraphed from Washington City to the effect that the governments tbe United States and Great Britain are drifting wider apart on the Bearing sea question He says he is informed by competent authority that the negotiations rest where they always have a tripartite agreement among the United States Great Britain and Rus sia and that though delayed by various causes they are making some progress An Arkansas Election Incident LVJTLE ROCK Ark May the Clay tonBrepkinridge investigation Thursday Vf Hobbs one of the election ju dges at said that as the count was beginning our masked men appeared and thrusting revolvers in the judges fates said us the box No resistance was made nnd the maskers departed with the Box AVitness was near the house where Clayton was killed and heard the fatal shot but did not see the assassin Lutherans ajid the Bennett MrtWATTKEE Wis May meeting of German Lutherans including many clergymen was liejd yesterday in this and Decided to hold a conven tion Jim i Resolutions were adopted de claring that the Lutherans will not sup port any candidate who will pot pledge djtaself ajjamst the Bennett law Among the speakers Selected to address the June convention is exCrtjrernor HoJJman The Irish itillwajStride DUBLIN May Walsh has Accepted the rhocUfied terms submitted by the directors oj llhe Southern ajjd westerfi men will bly fgsttnil woflt oil ISol 3f Bank of Bengal lacs of rupees In the Base Ball Field CHICAGO May base ball scores recorded yestesday were as follows League At 7 New York 6 at 11 Brooklyn Sj at 1 Cincinnati 6 at 7 Pitts Brotherhood At 6 Ifew York 8 at phia 3 Boston 6 ivt 1 Buffalo 4 at 4 Chicago 10 American At 9 Btooklyn 3 at 8 Athletic 6 at 13 Colnin at Si JignisSt Lpflis 11 9 OCEAN MAIL SHIPS Provisions of Fryes Bill for Subsidizing Steamers SOME THEM TO BE WAE VESSELS When Occasion Seeius to Deniand It Like the Elnglisli Atlantic House Defeats the International Copyright Bill iind tle Senate Agrees to the Cus toms Administration Measure Cul louiVIEeport on Canadian Hallway Com Notes WASHINGTON CITY May 3 Senator Frye has been authorized to report the bill known as theShipping League Tonnage bill already favorably reported from the committee ou merchant marine of the house of representatives with amend ments He will also report with the sanc tion of the committee a bill to provide for ocean mail service between the United States and foreign ports and to promote commerce which has been known as the Frye bill and which was prepared by him with a great deal of care and after consul tation with leading ship owners aud build ers in the country Some Provisions of tile Hill This bill authorized the postmaster geu eraf to make contracts for a term of ten years with American citizens for the car rying of the United States mails in Ameri can steamships between ports of the United States and ports of foreign nations It provides that the steamships so em ployed shall be built in the United States omied and officered by American citizens aud upon each departure from the United States shall during the iirst two years of a mail contract take a crew at least one fourth of whom shall ut American citi zens during the next three years one third and during the remaining time of the continuance of the contract at onehalf An Auxiliary Xavy Provided for The bill divides the ships into four classes according to highest be ing twenty knots an provides that all steamships of the first three classes hereafter built shall be construct ed with particular reference to prompt and economical conversion iutoauxiliary cruis ers aud according to plans and specifica tions to be agreed upon by and between the owners and the secretary of the navy and shall be of sufficient strength and sta bility to carry four effective rifled cannon of a caliber of not less than six inches These steamers may be taken and used by the United States as transports or cruisers the government paying therefor a value to be ascertained if the parties dis agree liy impartial appraisers Tho Amount of Subsidy The compensation provided for is 6 a mile for the first class ships and S3 a mile for the second class by the shortest prac ticable route for each outward vojnge for the third class 4150 for the fourth class SI a mile for the actual number of miles required by the postoQice department to be traveled on each outwardbound voyage The bill also provides that each of these steamships shall transport free of charge a government mail messenger and furnish suitable rooms for himself and the mails DAYS WORK IN CONGRESS Semite Passes the Kejeets International Copyright WASHINGTON CITY May intro duced a bill to amend the interstate com merce act in the senate yesterday so as to place all express companies under that law and require from them a full state ment of their business annually including their profits etc A resolution was offered asking the treasury as to the importation and exportation of gold and silver dur ing 1880 The concurrent resolution for negotiations with England and Mexico to prevent the entry of Chinese from Canada and Mexico were agreed to The service pension bill passed by the house was refer red to the pensions committee The cus toms administration bill then came up and after the rejection of several amend ments and the adoption of a couple of un important character agreed to but one aye The silver bullion bill was made special order from Wednesday next and until disposed of and after a short executive session the senate adjourned The house adopted the conference re port on the Lafayette Ind public build ing bill limiting the cost to The international copyright bill can4e up and after a long debate was rejected the vote being in no sense partisan neither was the debate Lhe general opposition being based on the grounds that it would result in a book monopoly and ruin the industries which supply cheap reading matter for the people The vote was 120 to 98 and Breckinridge of Kentucky moved a recon sideration Hopkins of Illinois moved to table Breckinridges motion and Adams to take a recess but before that could be decided the chair ruled that as the hour of 5 oclock had arrived the house was in re cess until S p m The night session passed seventeen private pension bills Leaves of Absence for Railway Employes WASHINGTON CiTr May house committtee on postoffices and postroads yesterday authorized a favorable report on the bill introduced in the house by Ketch am granting leaves of absence to the clerks and emploves in all first second and thirdclass postoffices with pay for not less than fifteen days in any one fiscal year after service of one year AN OLD CONTENTION REVIVED What Wivs the pf the Circulating Meillam in tfie Tear 1866 WASHINGTON Crrr May Windorn yesterday addressed a letter to the editor of The National Economist of Washington in reply to a recent editorial in that paper commenting on the volume of the currency The secretary alter re producing statistics showing that th cir culation per capita of the leading coun tries of Europe with the exception 6f Prance is less than that of the States says The concluding paragraph of the article kinds of cur rency said to be in use June 30 1866 The total LS stated to be which divided among 3SSi9j3Sl Inhabitants would give per Capita Unfortun ately no less than six ont of the ten items enumerated were interestingbearing obli gations of the government which were not al that time and have not since been in general use as money A Deduction of Sfearjy TwoThirds aggregate amount of these obliga tioos which shpuld be deducted from the total of socalled currency aWcre given is SUSMrr leaving only as imijunt of circriljpiqlj and his oAA cash held In the trie S8i2Sl6S9 exclusive of gold coin n this amount be dedncted as it should be the actual circulation could be showajby Thfe Economists oivn figuresto have been on June 301866 little more than QOQOOp This amount divided among 92Sl inhabitants would give ony CommerclBl with Canada WASBDGTOX Crrr May from the interstate commerce committee presented to the senate yesterday the re port of the committee on the investigation by direction of the senate into the rela tions of Canadian railroads with United States railroads etc The committee says that the laws regulating the traffic of American ships in Canadian ports and in the fisheries areiii open viola tion of the treaty of HlSR and that the difficulty in the railway busi ness is not one alone of commercial com petition but of governmental policy hav ing in view the building up of Canadian commerce at the expense of American commerce The committee recommends a toll on Canadian vessels going through the Sault Ste Marie canal to meet the Canadian toll ou American vessels through the Wcilaud canal and either a license system for railways owned iu Canada do ing business in the United States or some other plan which shall enable American roads to compete with those of Canada BUTLER ON THE FARMERS WOES He Presents a Treatlful Picture of TUelr Condition to the Butler Club BOSTON Mass May the annual dinner of the Butler club Thurday even ing Gen Benjamin P Butlar made a lengthy speech which was devoted almost wholly to the present alleged deplorable financial condition of the farmer of the country He referred to the Farmers Alliance and said that with its formidable proportions if held together it will be ir resistible It claims to be nonpolitical but if it is successful it will destroy both political parties and become a political party itself The general compared the condition of the farmer as a workman with that of a carpenter showing that while the farmers profits would be for his crop the carpenter for a less ex penditure of time and energy would get fflCO figuring upon the basis of the present value of corn within twentyfour hours ride of Chicago A Financial Cyclone Predicted Referring to the mortgage debts of the farmers Gen Butler said that taking simply the agricultural lands of the west ern states the mortgages amount to the stupendous sum of 3450000000 the in terest on which is at rates averaging from 7 to 9 per cent The payment of these mortgages is simply impossible and they never will bo paid for the simple reason that as all statistics provethe average prof its on farming industries are only between 4 and 5 per cent The general presented some other startling statements showing the hopeless condition of tho farmers and predicted a financial cyclone among them before many years Propositions liiilicnleil He ridiculed the project of the govern ment building storehouses and loaning the farmer money on his garnered crops The storage certificates given by the gov ernment would be bought up by speculators who would thus con trol the market for the grain as they do now He concluded by saying that when tho bill was introduced in the senate that the government loan the farm ers to relieve them from their financial difficulties he calculated that the full amount would only pay twothirds of a mill on each dollar of western farm mortgage debts alone or in other words would only pay the interest on those mort gages for five days A fmmly Auditor In Trouble CoLrjinrs O May state auditor has hud investigated the financial condi tion of Henry county and it is found that exAuditor ChiirlesEbers has appropriated and otherwise disposed of about SiOOOO of the countys money THE MARKETS Clircico JIas2 Following are the quotations on the board of trade today May opened 02c floscd Wvic Juue optiied closed OSli July opened 9Uc closed Xo Mav upenerl IJ3c closed June opened 3 J4e close i July opened i Mis May opened closed June opened 5c closed 25Mc July ripened 5c closed opened closed 81310 June opened closed S13 July opened S1355 closed S35 Lard Hay opened closed S637W Live stock yards prices were quoted as follows I opened active and strong with prices c higher light ffriules S4J05430 rough packing 40 mixed lots heavy packing and shi ping lots i420 quiet about stead beeves jiiSO cows and mixed SI6 8340 stock ers nid feed rs S260 112Q cornfed Texans Shu pWeak 10S25c lower muttons SSOUitU55 lambs 85505090 Produ e reamery per Hi fiiKSt diiry 7lac packing stosk KxKSSiritly frehllc per doz Poul ckens tKJSOc per Ib spring chickens SOOrj50 iedoz turkeys per Ib duiks USlc KCSO per doz Pota toes ou track Currmon and per bu ICLIc s3J We per bu Beauty of Hebron pcr bu Ijurbauk3 per bu nti noi sweet potatoes aood to choice bb ApplesFair to choice 3300at30 per bbl Xeiv York NEW YoRif May 2 red winter S101J4 cash do May We do June 98jc do July 95Hc Corn 2 mixed cash 41Kc do May 41c do June do July but steady No 2 white cash do May 33c do Jqne for new Lard Dull July August 2898 Live Stock firm aud Iflc 100 Ebs higher on cattle of all descriptions poor to prime steers jou fts bulls and dry cows 25 Sheeg and Market steady with firmjr feeling unsiiOJta sheep S8SOS7SO 5 100 ibs clipped do SSOJg 100 tushOrb yearlings ir303JSjo clipped Spring lambs S IW Bis steady live hogs CREAM D IJV W From Top to Bottom The house is best cleaned that is cleaned with Pearline It is done with little labor and with great re ease to yourself and with no possible injury to anything that is cleaned To use Pearline once is to want it always you will want it always because it does what you want Peddlers and some unscrupulous grocers will tell rou thw the same as Pearline ITS 1 Pearline is never peddled and if yourcrocer ser Js vou Uungmlaceof Fearline do the honest it teck 77 rffffi More Goods Marked and Placed Upon Our Countersl All at Wet Goods Prices DEWENTER The Hatter EDELWE1S Equal to any Imported Beer Made Delight ful Beautiful Try Edelweis Beer made from the Best Im ported Hops and the Finest Select Hop Malt to be had Warranted Pure and Old in all Places ToDay for infants and Children CaUorUiaao well adapted to children that I Caatorla cores Oolic OonKpaHcn I recommend it aa superior to anyproscription I Sour Stomach Diarrhoea Eructation to cie H A Aacnra M D I Kills Worms aleep aad U t11 Of Ou M T I known to o me H A ABCHTO M D s orms and 111 So Oxford 8t Brooklyn N mirlimttm THE CENTACR COMPUY 77 Murray Street K Will Sell You Lawn Mower Refrigerator OR oioe Stove At a Trifle More than Factory Prices The above cut shows the Circulation of air In our Alaska i Refrigerators from which we guarantee a PURE DRY COLD AIR For Sale only by OTTO MEINSHAUSEN Coffee Its superior excellence proven in of homes for siore than quarter of a centurj It is need trjthe United States Government En dorsed by tbe beads of the grat an the Strongest Pnrat and most Healthful Tlfr Cream Baking Powder does not oontait Ammonia Lime or Alum Sold only Ineun PBWJBBAKINGPOWDKBCO KnrTork HIMI Best Coffee Perfection of Guaranteed absolutely SOLE AGENT   

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