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Logansport Pharos Tribune: Friday, January 24, 1890 - Page 1

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   Logansport Pharos (Newspaper) - January 24, 1890, Logansport, Indiana                                LOGANSPORT DAILY PHAROS 15TE YEAR FRIDAY EVENING 24 1H90 NO JOHN BRAYS Corner On tho following Standard Corsets Dr Coralinc Tandem Good Juck Health Nursing Perfection Waist Dr IJall8 IvHbo Corset Thompsons Glove Fitting urset Duplex Corset Dr Warners Misses Coraet Children Corset I s the abovo excel lent brands of corsets are guaranteed in every partic ular V KtMEMKXTH D OIANS OPKKA HOUSE Wll IOIAS MANAGKK Just One Nijtlit Monday Evening Jan 27 BEACH BOWERS Am lirest Inltorincil Burnt In tliu World 25 TWENTYFIVE DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 25 25 25 A organization Beyond question greater letur ami superior to till minstrels of the pust nci1 present talclng It ati idea ami real mot Dl all monarcbi of the Minstrel wiriil Ausslituly in en ire o prj our last iisit WateSi for oir iiiinl liiil Street puradc at noun in 1X nnl 7j Kcsorvud fJits KRQEBERii STRAIN Tel jpliono No Calls Promptly flfctendfcfl fco Day cr N PURMITURE Prices tho Lowest OUR DESIGNS fIRE NEW None but tiie best workmanship al tn IPHVP Oir salesroom I IV Henders llhSt FINE PERFUMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS AT PAR YINS 2 i Street Drug Store Ordinance An 07 Jlfiince tlxiiiR1 the location of tlo hay iiml wicd tnsrkot in the city of Loffflnspoi t rctioii I Ho it ordained by the common the city of opansport state of In illina ttat it siill bo unlawful tor any person ir persoi to permit or allow nnv orher YoiiKle loaded with wood or hry to be or nniiiin for tho purpose of procuring a pur chaser tiiorcfor on nny of tho streets or allevs of saitl c ty except as follows Thv enst skteot Sixth street from the south Broadway stre t running south n dis tance of one hundred and sixtytlve dt5 feet tho care of nny such vehicle shnll buck the same cloe to or sulcwtilk on the stdo of Sirt street beore mentioned ami cause the o o touuiin until sod or otherwise dis Of be the duty of the eouirisMoner to cuise suiil part of reft rrtsi to in section one ilk of this ordinance iunl so oiviiiiei therein provided to bo fcfuHvsCTaticdand cleaned uiul tho dirt an tilh to le removed or disp scd of in such ti to cause no unaovnncc to the cit uoiis of said city Ae 3 Any person or perwas violating any of the provisions cf this ordinance or anv si c lion orvlausc thereof shall UIKMJ conviction before the mayor be fined in any sum not ex ctjertmiten ollars Sec 4 ThU ordinance shall take effect and be in foiee frumuiui after its passageand legal pubiicatim by the common council this ISth daj of December F CITMEK Mayor Attest JOHN J TAQGAHT City Clerk CAUSTICINGALLS The Kansas Senator Talks on the Race Problem AK ARRAIGNMENT AND A WARNING Delivered Kofore it lul Senate uuil Crowded KoglandComes in for a Slap or Solution Abandoned by tho North uil tlio South Lelt to Flglit tliu BtUtlB to tho A Suggested as a Sine tjua Non of Xortliorn Sympathy WASHINGTON CITY Jan the man in the United States senate who can Jraw the biggest audience when announced to make a sot speech is tho senior senator from Kansas Ingalls His terse caustic santences catch the popular ear and reach the popular understanding His opponents listen to what ho sayis for although he is at his best when giving somebody a raking over the very vigor polished as it is of his invectivo compels attention and enchains in terest Such was the case yesterday in the senate Ingalls had been announced to de liver a speech on the race question and the only part of the chamber not crowded vras tho diplomatic gallery On the floor wore a number of prominent men besides full at tendance of senators Among those present were Secretary Rusk and Gen N P Banks and when at 2 p 111 the senator rose there scarcely standing room As ho rose the hum of conversation ceased and from that time on every ear was strained to catch what the Bjxakor said Tho Inclonif t able Caucasian He began by saying that the Caucasian raco arrogant exclusive pretentious and indomitable It either ruled or anni hilated other races It assimilated with no race but its own Its contributions to the state were undividualism liberty fraternity and equality In the United States these contributions had been most marked Here cvtry creed found a sanctuary every wrong a redress But now we were confronted with the greatest probem ever presented to a free people Ho eulogized II W Grady mad had the clerk read a long extract from that gentlemans speech at Boston in December last Continuing he called atten tion to the increase of the colored population between 1860 and 1870 which was only 80000 while the increaso between 18TO and 1880 was put at 2100000 a figure which he de clared represented a gigantic and premedi tated fraud committed with a purpose that is selfevident Opposed to Amalgamation Mr Ingalls then discussed the question of amalgamation Ho credited the ability of FrcJ Douglass to the reinforcement of white blood iu that illustrious representative of the negro race and antagonized tho conclu sion stated by Mr Douglass that when preju dice disappeared tliu races would become homogeneous This was impossible and if possible was undesirable The white and black never eouio together except by compulsion and then it was always the black woman who was the chil dren had never had white mothers it was al ways white fathers Adulteration of race was a poison No Superiority at Virtue North He proposed to accede to the request of the senator from South Carolina that in discuss ing the issue there bo no animadversion it it was not needed the facts were criticism sufficiently bitter for the state of affairs in the south The north had no superiority of virtue to boast of Tho speakers ancestors had owned slaves and the New England conscience did not prick it until slave own ing ceased to bo profitable Neither uas the war for tho Union a fight for the freedom of the slave so far as a large portion of the northern people were concerned Also the al legation that tho negro had been enfran chised to perpetuate the Republican party was a calumny that was old enough to be superanuated StuttiB of tile Colored Man Proceeding Mr Ingalls said that proba bly if it wero possi ble both races would prefer that the negro should not ba here But he was here and he was of ancient lin eage in this country quite an F P V in fact Laughter By their sobriety and steadiness they had justifled the judgment oi those who believed them better than tho brute race But to what did their riedom amonnU Their citizenship was a name The black vote of the south was practically sup pressed Senators editors and the leaders of the south had announced their intention of breaking the control of the negro A Reply to H W Grady Henry IV Grady had said When will the negro cast a free ballot On that point Ingalls said he had other testimony to offer and he would call only southern mem and Democrats as witnesses Mr Ingalls read an extract from Tho Memphis Avalanche on what was called the elec tion iu Mississippi last fall Laughter Tho Avalanche had stated that Chalmers could not get the office of governor how ever large his majority might be The senator said he would not go into archcttologi cal research for illustration He would ex hume no cadavers This extract was printed in October last On the 16th of that month The Avalanche had said deliberately that the south did not propose to be governed by the negro under any conditions On ac count of this condition of affairs Oen Chal mers hod withdrawn from the race for governor Ingalls quoted at length from Gen Chalmers address to the Republican voters of Mississippi He considered that address ho said one of the most tragic ut terances that had ever occurred in political history The Electlou at Jacksou alias Seventeen days ago there had been an other election in Mississippi with which the country was somewhat familiar He sent to the clerks desk to be read an extract from Tha Jackson Clarion of Jan 2 In this extract was the constant reiteration of the announcement that the regulars tha bulldozers etc would be on hand to see that was a fair election At the end of the reading Ingalls remarked sienten tionsly They were all there Mr Presi dent Laughter Ingalls then read an ex tcaot from correspondence about the elec tion telling that it had been controlled by Winchester rifles and that no negro had been allowed within 100 yards of the voting place He also read a letter from a federal pfficer stating that two sons of Senator George niul been hi tha crowd of regulators armed with Winchestersand wearing badges headed Supremacy Was it any wonder he said that Democrats thopiselves bad become alarmed at this condition of affairs Predicting a The south said Ingalls evidently in tended to deprive the negroes of their vote and erf their independence and practically the north had acquiesced in this Attempts had been mads to pats civil rights laws and fed eral election laws but thay had ftdltd Tha negro had been abandoned by the north But he wished to warn the psople of the south that the north the west the east would not allow their commerce their manufactures and their social condition to bo modified by executive and congressional majorities ob tained by the suppression of the colored vote or of any other vote No ona could tell how Song this patient endurance of the north would continue but that the crisis would come in peace or in blood was the Inexora ble decree of fate Armed Collision Inevitable If this condition of affairs continued noth ing could avert armed collision between the races in the south Ultimately the colored race would bo strong enough to resist vio lence and intelligent enough to resent fraud The south was standing on a volcano It was sitting on the safety valve It was breeding innumerable John Browns and Nat Turners Already the use of tho torch and the dagger was advised He deplored it but as God was his judge no other race in the history of the world had submitted to tha wrongs heaped upon the negro in the last twentyfive years without revolution and bloodshed Ingalls sent to tho clerks desk to be read newspaper extracts to show that the theory of extermination was already being put into practice In one of these it was stated that 155 negroes were lynched in Mississippi last year A Warning to the South The negro the senator said was no cow ard Ho had been brought here a prisoner of war The Athenians had erected a statue to JEsap who was born a slave The Amer ican nation should also place the slave upon on eternal pedestal1 His conduct had been most admirable Despotism made nihilists tyranny communists injustice was the greatest manufacturer of dynamite The murderer wounded himself when he stabbed his victim The south should remomber that there was nothing so unprofitable as injus tice and that God was a relentless creditor The south was in greater danger than the enfranchised slave It had loaded itself with heavier manacles than those with which it had burdened tha negro No Heal Conciliation Yet There was no affection between the north and the south Tho south had not forgiven tho north for its supremacy and its superior ity If the south could hold tha purse and the sword it was patriotic Tho south had not accepted the amendtnents to the consti tution in good faith They had their own heroes and universities They exalted their leaders above the leaders of the Union cause Until these conditions wero changed coop eration in solving the southern problem could not be expected from the north Tho south must tread tha press alono Ho could understa d the reverence of the south ern people for JefEersou Davis He honored them for their constancy to that heroic man Ideas could ever be annihilated No man was ever converted by lxng overpow ered Davis had not crooked the pregnant hinges of the knee that thrift might follow fawning The Incident in Aberdeen On the occasion of tho death of Jefferson Davis the town of Aberdeen iu the state of Mississippi was shrouded in mourning The court housa was draped and as one evidence of their grief the people of that town had strung upon a cabla an effigy which they hadlabled Red Proctor Laughter The senator then recounted the facts regarding the assault on a man named Paute a tinner who in mending the roof of the house moved the cable and let it fall He protested that it was an accident but a man named McDonald gave him 200 lashes with a whip Tho citizsns bought Fautz a ticket and sent him out of town while Mc Donald was fined S30 the citizens raising 860 for him to pay his fin Said tho senator If such an outrage had been perpetrated on an American citizen in England a million men would have sprung to arms to avenge the insult He had sail that ho did not ba lievo in tho Africanization of this country or any part of it but if this was a specimen of Mississippi justice he ivould rather a thou sand fold that that stato should be inhabited by negroes than by tho people now living there The Negro Capable of Civilization The bluck race he said was capable of civilization It had already made greater progress than could well havj been expect ed There was nothing in his origin or his tory to justify tho belief that the African could compete with the Caucasian in art or practical affairs but there was no reason to believe that he was not capable of high civ ilization Measured by the standard of the race that still existed in indescribable deg radation and inexhaustible fecundity on the dark continent his development had been magnificent Coining Down to Solutions There were five means of solving this raco problem Tho first was amalgamation the second extermination the third separation and the fourth disirouchiiammt The fifth the universal solvent of all human difficul ties had never been proposed or tried and that was the solution of justice for which every place should be u temple anil all places sanctuaries He appealed to tha south to stack its guns and to register every voter black and white And if when the experi ment had been fairly tried it should be proved that the complexion burned on the negro by an African sun was incompatible with freedom he pledged him self to unite with the people of the south in finding another way out of this difficulty Till then nothing could be done Those who freed the south ask nothing more they will be content with nothing less said he The experiment must ba fairly tried This is the starting point and this the goal The longer it is deferred the greater will be the exasperation and the more doubtful will be the final result Ingalls finished his speecli at 4 p m and upon taking his seat was loudly applauded Thei senate at once adjourned until Mon day Still Stuck In tlic Rut DES MOIXES la Jan The dead lock in the lower house of th e legislature is solid as a rock Yesterday nothing was done except to take eight unfruitful ballots for temporary clerk The fight still hangs on tha question whether the Democrats if they arc conceded the sjpeaker will shut out the thirteen contested votes of Republicans Many of the Republicans would consent to a Democratic temporary speaker if assurance was given on this point while others hold oat for speaker Fourteen years ago day the only othar deadlock in the history of the legislature was broken by lie election of Gear but the present lock Is not built that way apparently CBOSSINGHOEROES Two Funerals That Resulted in Terrible Accidents AWTUL CALAMITY HEAB CHICAGO Was Not the Miminc Boat LONDON Jan 9t Cape Darling of steamer Creole at Bremen from Sew Orj leans which reported sighting and bringing i alongside a lifeboat supposed to belong to the National line steamer Erin that i the oars etc token from tha boat I lashed fast to it and had noli usied i Capt Darling thinks that the beat had been trashed from its fastenings Ths officials of tie Sat ional line to which the Erin belongs stato that all small boats belonging to the Erin are marked Erin while boat by martud fcln LowteB A Father aud Mother Going to Bury Their Babe Instantly Other Persons Fatally Wounded By ilug tittle Daughter left an Orphan by the Awful o llho the Occur rence CHICAGO Jan most distressing accident which resulted in the death of four persons occurred at Rose Hill cemetery a few miles from here on the Chicago and Northwestern road yesterday afternoon Mr and Mrs Fred Payne were on their way to bury their 5monthsold babe with a few friends who were accompany them to the cemetery There were only four carriage io procession Mr and Mrs Payno were in the carriage immediately following the hearse and with them were Mrs William Reprogel and Grace Payae thair little daughter As the Paynes carriage came squarely on tho track the Milwaukee ex press which was four minutes behind time and was uearing the city at a high rate of speed struck the carriage hi the center tearing it into splinters and instantly kill ing Mrs and Mrs Payne and so seriously injuring Mrs Reprogel and Simon Ander son the driver of the carriage that they died within two hours afterward Scene After Disaster A cry of horror arose from the people aa soon as the extent of tho tragedy was real1 iyed Some of tho women in the carriages fainted while others wrung their hands as they ran distractedly over the snow Sev eral hundred feet to tho south was the train at n full stop with curious passengers scrambling out of the coaches Men hastily began tho work of recovering the dead and wounded The shock that had shaken the Bowers on the little white coffin had hurled the mother of the dead baby into a barb wire feacs where she hung by her head o corpse with tho blood streaming through the black veil which she wore In the ditch and close to the track of the railway was the young father with his skull crushed and the blood trickling over tho snow and peb bles He too was dead Father and mother had perished instantly They rever uttered a word after the crash came Mrs Payno was taken from tho fence by her brother who carried her in his arms and eriod hyster ically as he sought some place to put her Mrs Replcgol lay near the track So did old Simon Anderson the driver Orphaned Little Oracle Through theagonizing shrieks of men and women there came a shrill voice crying j Papa Wheres ray papa Standing j on the platform was little Grade Payne the i only one occupant of the carriage not mor tally wounded in the crash How she got j there nobody knows It is probable that she was hurled there by tho locomotive Her dress was sprinkled with blood which came from her bruised head Sao was dazed but I not unconscious Friends carried the little orphan to the train their arms The Funeral Went Its Way The white horse with 13io body o the baby continued its journey to the grave yard where ths coffin was placed in tho vault The victims of tha express train wero borne to one of the coaches Mr and Mrs Payne ware horribly mangled All who witnessed or know anything of the occurrence agreo that no warning what ever of its approach was given by ths flying train Engineer Itfahoney says that it is prohibited by law to whistle at tho crossing where the accident took place but that tha bell is rung by an automatic arrangement and was ringing at tin time He was ar rested and jailed Only Married Months William Raplogel husband of Mrs Rp logel was notified o E his bereavement They had been married but four mouths and wera very much devoted to each other The hus band is 111 years old and his wife was younger They were keeping nous aad she had taken a boarder to aid in swelling the receipts She had made the humble home very pleasact and attractive She was highly respected by all her acquaintances for her chuirity to the poor of the vicinity and for assisting the sick Both the Victims Wero Deaf NORWALK Conn Jon and Mrs George Comstock an agd and wealthy couple of Walton were returning from the funeral of a relative yesterday when their carriage was struck by a train on the Dan bury and Norwalk railroad at a dangerous crossing near South Walton and both were fatally injured Both were deaf and could not hear the train The tracks are hidden by buildings and thereare no gates or flag men THE NATIONAL CRUSADERS of the New Womans NonPartisan Temperance Organization CLEVELAND O Jan nonparti san temperance union convention yesterday adopted a constitution which provides that temperance work shall be the new organiza tions sole object and that neither its offi cers nor its representatives in national con vention shall either individually or collect ively pledge its support to any political philanthropical or other organization or party The name chosen is National Cru saders The Pledge and Officers Bylaws were adopted with a pledge simi lar to language to that of the W C T TT Mrs E J Phinney of Cleveland was elected president of the new society and Mrs T B Walker of Minneapolis vice president Mrs Phinney is not likely to serve cut her full term Additional con gratulatory letters and telegrams were read from Judge Tourgee John GWhittier Wlien the Devil Wms Sick etc RcOTJOtrr Jf T Jan Lock wood the selfconfessed forger of Shokan who recently when believing himself to be dying summoned friends to his bedside and admittsd having forged their names to com mercifd paper in considerable amounts has left for parts unknown His James Dubois is also mining and it is thought they have fled for safety to Canada Every day brings additional forged notes to light and it is believed ths entire amount in volved will reach Brotherhood Schedule PnvsBtJBG pa Jan schedule committee of ths Players National league was in session here last night The moit re liable information obtainable U that the ses sion optras April 21 Chicago opens in Pittt burg Few York in Philadelphia Beaton in Brooklyn and Cleveland in Buffalo Deco ratiion day the olnbs will play with tbH July 4 autarn clubs will play the TMtara Xumbcr of during the naioo 140 IMUOQ first week in Octo ber THE MINERS CONSOLIDATION Upon TVliiicli iiu Agreement fTM Been Reached ECoLiTUBtrs Ohio Jan joint coil van tion of ttha National Progressive Union of miners and mine laborers and Na tional District Assembly Xo 135 Knights of Labor assembled in the city hall yester day morning John B Rae was chosen chairman and Patrick McBryde secretary John McBride was made vice president The preliminaries were soon got out of the way then the circular issued by the Indianapolis jo int convention was read with the agree ment adopted there A good deal of talk was then indulged in partly over a resolu tion indorsing the plan of amalgamation laid down by the officers of the two organiza tions and partly over another proposing a dissolution of both bodies which was adopt ed Wendesday by the National Progressive union c onvention Result oF tho XMscussion The discussion grew so warm that a recess wasi taken to enable the leaders to put their heads together aad when the joint conven tion reconvened both resolutions were with drawn and tho convention adopted what has been looked forward to as the culmination of all efforts thus first section of the joint circular which provides that they shall unite under one head and not give up the essential features of cither organization Agreed on Four Points The convention agreed late yesterday aft ernoon on four points which practically settle the controversy in favor of amalgama tion shall bo one organiza tion shall be ono set of offi cers taxation thall be one common defensa fund A com mittee of three members of each of the two old organization together with the president and secretary of each was appointed to draft a constitutions This they were doing last night It must bo ratified by three fourths of all the members of both organiza tions A CASE FOR INGERSOLL What Ho Da with This Sort ol Brutal Coward NEW YORK Jan Petrikovsky a pretty goldenhaired girl of 19 was shot dead Wednesday afternoon in her brothers apartments at 1C3 Stanton street by John a handsome but dissolute Russianaged 23 who boarded there and whoso attentions Miss Petrikovsky had rejected PopofT took up his residence with the famity of J M Petrikovsky and became cmitten with tho charms of his hosts siatcr who often visited tho house Ho forced his company upon her though she told him that she wished nothing to do with a man of his habits The Dastardly Crime Popoff came in while Mrs Petrikovsky her brother Henry Jachnovich and Mary were playingcasino Popoffs jealousy was aroused He drew a revolver and Mrs Petrikovsky and her two children fled screamiug from the room Jachnovich seized Popoffs hand but Popoff retained con trol of the weapon and told him he would surely shoot him if he did not let go Jach novich released his hold and Popoff quickly turned toward Mary who had calmly re mained seated Ho fired and the bullet passed through the girls temple She fell to the floor and died without a sound Tho murderer walked into his room and appar ently meditated suicide but delayed too long and a policeman arrested him while he yet held the revolver in his hand FATAL EXPLOSION OF POWDER Filve Men Killed and a Dozen or Blore Wounded CHARLOTTE N C Jan 24 reached hero last night of an explosion of powder in Wilkes county where blasting is going on for a railroad A great quantity of rock was thrown up by a premature blast and fell upon a number of workmen ilsny were injured and five were killed as fol lows Samuel Culls aged 23 Thomas Euroy aged 38 J R Falls aged 20 George Heud ley aged 41 Eugene Moore aged 10 It is impossible to obtain a lUt of the wounded at this writing but reports say that thirteen are hurt among whom is Superintendent Elber Proceedings iu Congress WASHINGTON CITY Jan was little business done in the senate yesterday owing to the speech made by Ingalls on ihe southern question and as soon as he had con cluded his twohours address the senate ad journed to Monday TLe credentials of Clark andMaginnisDemocraticsenators elect from Montana were presented by Vest and all four of the claimants from that stats given ths privileges of the floor until the matter is decided A bill placing Gen George Stone innn on the retired list was passed In the house a resolution was adopted asking information of the condition of the Rock Island Ills arsenal and as to utiliz ing it as a gun factory McKinleys customs administration bill was taken up in commit tee and amended in a few particulars Tho election committee reported as to the ma jority in favor of seating Smith Repub lican from the Fourth West Virginia dis trict in place of Jackson Democrat Novel Flea In Behalf of MINNEAPOLIS Minn Jon Jour nals Sioux Falls S D special says A local law firm has applied for writs of habeas corpus in the cases of a number of government prisoners in the stats peniten tiary The prisoners were sentenced to terms in the United Stntes penitentiary at Sioux Falls When South Dakota was ad mitted as a state the government wing of the penitentiary was turned over to the itate and the prisoners were removed to the state portion The prisoners claim that the government penitentiary has been abolished and that the authorities had no just power to turn them over to any other place of im prisonment Arrested a Rascally roital Clerk PITISBCBG Pa Jan In Holmes of Cincinnati last night ar rested W D Lane of Indianapolis a postal clerk on the Pittsburg St Louis and Chicago railroad running between St Louis and Pittsburg He is charged with stealing S425 and had three rejisttred lettars one of them a decoy on his person when arrested He is an old employe who was discharged some time ago but was reinstated last June Huntinjton Wants 123 Years Credit TViSHlxGTOlf Crrr Jan P Eunt ington of the Central Pacific railroad ap peared before the house committee on Paci fic railroads yesterday and explained his proposition to settle the indebtedness of the Central Pacific with the government The proposition as embodied in a bill introduced this session aims to secure tha refunding of tha Central Pacific debt in 125 years A Fatal Spree ATIAKTA Ga Jan Wilson a printer tnown all over the country was found dead at the top of The Constitution building yesterday Wilson had bioa en a protracted spree and tad crawled up a dark uleep off the effects Dewenter THE HATTER CASTOR i A for Infants and Children so well adapted tochildren that I Caatoria cores Colic Coutlpatlon recommend it as superior to any prescription I Stomach Diarrhoea Eructation imown to me al AscHun M D I d 111 So Oxford St Brooklyn N T injurious THE CiNTitTB CoitpJiKT Ti Murray Street X T FOEEPAUGH DEAD The Great Showman Receives the Imperative Call SUDDENLY STBIOKEN W HIS OHAIB Incidents in tlio life oC Only Rival of tlio Be gins us u Bulolicrs Iloy and Closes His Cnrcer Worth Growth of Ills Iciiagcrio SAiicc 1801 His PiiiLADiiLPUiA Jan Foro patigh the veteran sbowman diej peacefully iu this city shortly Lcfore midnight Wednes day The causo death was heart failure superinduced by pneumonia which was brought on by an attack of tho grip He was out attending to lis work at his winter quarters and repair shops a week ago yester day Dr D Hayes Aguew was called into consultation Wednesday and it was thought the tkk nuvi would pull through Ho MUS taikinj with Adam Wednes day night alout pLim for perpetuating the circus Ho then wont to an nrtuchair drank a glass of aiilk arid iu three min utes He simply went iuto a perpetual sleep and neither suffered nor knew bis cud bad come Mr Forepaugh owned 211 houses in this city aud other real estate His proflt froui his circus ran from 8200000 to Ho was just finishing u sumptuous house near his present residence and expected soon to move into it His father four brothers and one sister survive him IVgaii IiTe us u IJutchers Boy Mr Forepaugh was born in Philadelphia in 1820 He went to work when a small boy for John Kinckle a butcher at a salary 4 a mouth and his board and remained Hiuckle for several years When 16 old the boy ran away and went to work for a butcher in Cincinnati staying there two years receiving S50 for his first years work and a mouth during the re mainder of tho time With some short in tervals in which he followed other business Adam stuck to the butchers trade until i 1S43 when he started a stage line and ran it until 1S54 This business lad him to buy and sell horses and from this he drifted into the cattle trade His business grew as the man developed aud in a single year ha bought and sold as many as 10000 horses Takes an Interest in a Sliovr In the course his business hi dealt with John OBrien who was then running a small circus and in 1S61 he sold him sixty two horses for and took an interest in the show as part payment This was Mr Forepaughs first step iu the circus business in which he was to bacome so famous After a fesv months he bought OBrien circus and then bought Jerry ilables menagerie and combined them Mables menagerie con sisted of two elephants and eight other ani mals for which Mr Forepaugh paid This was in 1SG5 Big Salary for Dan Rice He hired Dan Rico at a week In or der to advertise that then wellknown name as an adjunct of his show and kept htm at that salary for three seasons This was a big expenditure at that time but the ven ture was successful For eight years Mr Forepaugh continued to enlarge his show investing all profits in increasing and better ing his plant Other showmen predicted speedy ruin when he had got together twenty cages oC animals but he kept on un til in 1S70 he had fortyfour cages At that time he gave up trying to move his show by wagon and had trains built expressly for his aggregation as he called it Goea into a Trust with Harnum Since that time he had kept on building up and amplifying his show until be was a recognized rival of the perennial Barnum After some little competition the two show men came to an understanding and planned their tours so that they would not cross each others lino march and for the last few years Barnum has never exhibited in Phila delphia which town alvrayi called his home In the eariy tJC3 Fore paughs show was about the only one travel ing through the country that might claim to have a firstclass menagerie Birnum at the time was conducting his at the corner of Broadway and Ann street New York end so did not come into competition with the Philadelphisn Always Had Good iuck Show printing was not then the art that it is today and Forepaughs sixsheet posters were considered a marvel During hii whole career Mr Forepaugh never had aay bad luck monevwise He bought improved real estate freely in Philadelphia and Brook lyn and some years ago his houses and lands were worth 5500000 His wealth at the time of his death is estimated at He was a careful manajrpr and oaid Mrsoaal attention io nil tue tic kails of his business He was a rough illiterate man but was possessed of great energy and shrewdness and was notably fair and generous in his dealings Ho was a despotic master but mew how to reward good service and was a groat favorite with all his subordinates lie leaves a widow and one son Adam Fore augh Jr McKinloy Our Next President WASUIXOTOV CITY Jan 24 At a ban quet given by tho Xatioual Potters associa tioii at Willurds Wednesday night Maj Mo Kinley chairman of the ways and means committee was the gust of honor Several time s enthusiastic speakers retViTed to Mi Kinley as the next President of tho UuiUd States which Irought out loud applnus but was not acknowledged by McKiul y IVesUlU Railways Getting In Order DEVVEII Colo Jan en tiro Uo Grande system is now open the snow blocic adj having bwn raised late Wednesday The Portland branch of the Union Pacislo tvas opened Wednesday nui tho Iirit iruiu from Iortlanl anivcu hero yesterday Tha Ban Frunciicj route was opened yesterday and ebe iirst through train lor the coast left Denver yesterday THE MARKETS CHICAGO Jan Z On the board cf trade today iuitatioa3 raupcHl as follows lcbruary opened TGJfic closc1 oiBc closed 7SJ6e May upvned S closed 80565ie lebiuary npeuel closed March opcnc closed 3uXe May opened aiMSj Bc 2 February opened cioio March opened My opened closed opened closed SDK5 March oed Sl005closed J10CU May opened S104 closoil Ltrdlcb ruary oponel J597J6 closed 3V5 Lvo fo lowing w re tiiiquota tions at ihe Union nnck yurile cpened active and firm a parties buying and prices fully lOc higher light grades Sj705i 395 rouRU packing STOt3J mixed lots heavy packing ami shipping lots 400 steady baevce choice to extra J490S5Co me ium to rood inferior to fair cows stockers aad feeders native muttons lambs western cornfed 540 Produce Elgin creamery 25 27c to finest dairy packing stock taSc fresh dot ice house lOgllc Live iflte turkeys ducka geese 500 doz of Hebron STc bu on track common and mixed lots K to fancy p bbl per New York KEW YORK Jan SJ 2 red winter cash do February S6Hc do Starch STHc do Apr 18Se do Mar mixed cash do January 37J4c do February do May No mixed Mc cash do January 3Dc do February do March 29c do ItyeLrall Xominal PorkDolliues9 1L2S for new Ifii May LlYeStoc trading in dreiMd beef dull and unchanged sides 7J4o V ft Sheep and tJi r with an upward tendency sheep V 10 lambt livo hogs npPRSCEs CREAM BAKING mv Its mperiorexcellence proven m ot boa for more than a quarter of a century It is reed by the United Statee Govern ment En dorsed or the beads of the Lnlverilies and mot Heaittful Dr Prices Crcxa Buklig Powder does not contain laimonla Limn or Alum Sold onl In cans PB1CE BAKIJtO POVTDEB CO Mew Turk Chicago Fnociico St   

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