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Logansport Pharos Tribune and Press Newspaper Archive: January 24, 1975 - Page 1

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Publication: Logansport Pharos Tribune and Press

Location: Logansport, Indiana

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   Logansport Pharos-Tribune and Press (Newspaper) - January 24, 1975, Logansport, Indiana                                Home Paper Of 41 Communities Founded in LOGANSPORT, INDIANA, 46947 FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 24. 1975 Phone 219-753-7511 Price Per Copy, Fifteen Cents First Fatality Recorded Here First Fatal Logansport and Cass County recorded their first traffic fatality Thursday night, when the car (1) in which Mrs. Velma Lucille (Judy) Bisacchi, 52, of 1311 Erie Ave., was riding, was struck by a car (r) driven by David L Sturgeon, 25, Box 65, Onward, on N. Third Street at the entrance to Marsh Supermarket. (Staff photo by George Hagene) Demos Long-Range Tax Program To Be Unveiled INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) House Speaker Phillip E. Bainbridge, still irked by Senate Republican leadership rejection of his proposed moratorium on the sales tax, said today the Democratic long-range tax program will be unveiled next week. "It doesn't look too promising for compromise when the Senate says it will not consider something that hasn't even passed the House Bainbridge said. "I doubt if many of the senators have even. read it." His reference was to a bill, expected to pass' the Democratic-controlled House today, that would create a 30-day sales tax holiday for all purchases and a longer moratorium for new car sales. Simultaneously today the Senate, controlled by Republicans, prepared to pass on final reading and send to the House a five-bill "help the taxpayer" program developed by Gov. Otis R. Bowen and other GOP leaders. It would return nearly million to-Boosters out of the state surplus that proved bigger than predicted, partially because sales tax collections were boosted by inflation. The GOP package survived 17 proposed Democratic amendments Thursday that covered some of the ideas the Democrats have been discussing .for their "phase II" tax program. Phase I is the short-range plan including the sales tax moratorium and increased unemployment benefits bill on which Labor Committee hearings were held today. However, Bainbridge said "there was no concerted effort" to run the long-range Democratic plan past the Senate in the form of the amendments that were offered Thursday. "Some of those ideas have been discussed as alternatives but we haven't gotten them tied down yet. We will meet Monday to start doing he added. He said it might be "Tuesday or Wed- nesday" before any final decision is made. The sales tax moratorium bill had been slated for final passage Thursday in the House but after a news conference in which Senate Republican leaders an- nounced they would kill the moratorium bill as lacking any economic value to the state, the Democrats reacted by pulling the bill back and saying they wanted to see what -happened first in the Senate to the proposed Democratic amendments. Bowen Plan'Unchanged What happened to 17 proposed 'Democratic amendments to the five Senate bills first outlined by Gov. Otis R. Bowen as a way of returning ap- proximately million to taxpayers was defeat on partisan, votes. .The five GOP bills advanced to final passage today. They include a rebate to individual income local revenue sharing, exten- sion of renters' income tax credit, ex- pansion of aid to'elderly and disabled and elimination of sales tax from false teeth, eye glasses and hearing aids. But of more significance to puzzled Hoosiers trying to determine the outcome from the 1975 Legislature battles between a 56-44 Democratic House and a 27-23 Republican Senate were -two'" casual' 're- marks by Senate Finance Chairman Lawrence Borst, R-Indianapolis, and Senate Minority Leader Robert Fair, D- Princeton. Fair, in-answer to a question as had been charged during the four-hour debate on the GOP tax help Democratic amendments were a preview of the rest of the Democratic tax proposals said: "Substantially, yes." Congressman Hillis To Talk At CC Dinner Why Is Local Divorce Rate Up The divorce rate is soaring in Loganland. Pharos-Tribune Press Staff Writer Jackie Rosen probes the causes and ef- fects of divorce in a three part series beginning Sunday. The stories are based on Interviews with divorced people who reside in Cass and surrounding counties. Logansport' recorded its first traffic fatality of 1975 late -Thursday night. Mrs. Velma Lucille (Judy) Bisacchi, 52, of 1311 Erie Ave., was pronounced dead at p.m. at Memorial Hospital by Cass County Coroner Louis Marocco, following a p.m. two-car accident in which she suffered head and chest injuries. The cause of death -was not readily known, Marocco said, and the coroner ordered an autopsy which was in progress at press time. was a passenger in a car driven by her husband, Yato J. Bisacchi, 57, of the same address, according to in- vestigating officer Jerry Arnold. Arrested on charges of driving under the influence of alcoholic beverages and failure of duty in a fatal accident is the driver of the other car, David L. Sturgeon, 25, Box 65, of Onward. Sturgeon was admitted to. Memorial Hospital, where he is being held for ob- servation suffering from a laceration on the lip and a broken tooth. Yato Bisacchi suffered minor abrasions on his face, and John C. Casey, 22, of 511- 14th Street, owner of the car driven by Sturgeon, suffered a head laceration. Casey, who also is being held for ob- servation at Memorial, was arrested for public intoxication, disorderly conduct and interfering with a police officer, while being treated at Memorial Hospital, ac- cording to Sergeant Arnold. The accident occurred on N. Third Street at the'entrance to Marsh Supermarket, according to Arnold. The Bisacchi auto was enroute south on N. Third Street and attempting to 'turn left into the supermarket, when the nor- thbound Casey auto strjick it in the passengerls side, Sergeant Arnold stated. Casey vehicle skidded some 100 feet before striking the Bisacchi auto in the passenger's door, Sergeant Arnold said. Arnold said the force of the impact spun the Bisacchi auto around to the northeast 21 feet, and the Sturgeon auto continued 23 feet. Following the accident, Sturgeon allegedly got out of the car and began running, for which-he faces-the failure of duty charge, Mrs. Bisacchi was born July in Logansport to Herny and Verna Knight Wells. She was married to Yato Bisacchi on April 12, 1947. She was an employe of the Supermarket for the past 14 years and a member of the local clerk's union No. 725. She also was a member of St. Vincent's Catholic Church. Surviving with her husband are her Mrs. Verna Helvie, 1716 Meadlawn Ave.; one daughter, Jodene Bisacchi, 2403-High St.; one son, Kenneth, Francesville; one brother, Curtis, 1800 Meadlawn Ave.; two sisters, Mrs. Geneva Smith, 1504 Clifton Ave., and Mrs. Jean Pfeiffer, 1608 Treen St., Friends may call after. 7 p.m. Saturday at Marocco Funeral Chapel, and the Rosary will be said at 8 p.m. Sunday. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at St. Vincent's Catholic Church with Father Maurice Miller officiating. Burial will follow at Mount Calvary Cemetery. Flu Epidemic Still Apparent In Schools A wave of influenza which began sweeping county schools last week shows no county-wide trend toward receding. Two of the county's four school corporations, however, reported a slight decrease in absence rates at the end of this week. Southeastern School Corporation, where absence rates hit a high of nearly 11 percent on Monday, showed only a nine percent rate on Wednesday and Superintendent Meredith Thompson said Friday's attendance figures would reveal the rate had fallen below the nine percent level. Caston School Corporation also had a number of students back in class at the end of the week after crossing the 20 percent mark. A total of 215 Caston students were absent Monday and the figures reached 222 on Wednesday. Superintendent Byron Bunker said only 170 students were absent on Thursday which would indicate attendance may be returning to normal. Pioneer attendance figures show the absence rate is still on the increase. Pioneer had been affected perhaps the'least of any of the four corporations earlier in the week. Superintendent Clyde Zeek reported Tuesday the absence rate was hovering in the neighborhood of eight percent. Although there was a minimal change in absences at Pioneer Junior and Senior High School, the rates had jumped to 10 percent at Pioneer Elementary, 12 percent at Noble Elementary and more than 20 percent at Lake Cicott Elementary by the end of the week." Logansport schools still were reporting unusually high absence rates in certain areas by the end of the week. The rate at the high school had changed only slightly, from 10 percent to 11 percent during the course of the week, while Lincoln Middle School had dropped back to a six percent rate. McKinley dropped from 17 percent on Monday to 14 percent on Thursday. Washington School dropped significantly from 17 percent on Monday to eight percent on Thursday. However, six corporation schools, besides the high school, were reporting rates in the 12-14 percent range. Fairview Middle School and Elementary reported a 16 percent rate on Thursday which was high for the corporation. County health officials have requested corporation schools to report daily- attendance figures beginning Monday in order to keep an eye on the inroads of the virus. Ford Sees Chance Of Mideast War WASHINGTON (UPI) President Ford spoke of last resorts, of many "if's." the nation's economy is still grim in 1976, Ford suggested he might not run for President, being "realistic" in the face of "tough odds." But, he quickly added, he thought the economy would rebound. "I'm planning to be a he said. Ford had not ordered an increase in the imported oil tariff that'could raise the cost of a gallon of gasoline 8 to 10 cents, Congress might have delayed his entire economic and energy program. The order was signed a few hours before Thurs. day's broadcast interview with NBC. Congress has not acted in roughly three he said, "I can, of course, remove the import duty I have imposed." Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is not successful next month on his return to peacemaking in the Middle East, Ford said "I think we undoubtedly would be forced to go to Geneva." He said all his advisers consider the chance of war in the Mideast is high. there is war, if there is an embargo by all the oil producing nations, the United States Would be forced into drastic fuel allocation and conservation. Gasoline ra- tioning, Ford, said, would' be "a last resort" which could last 5 to 10 years. the Western industrialized nations faced strangulation, the United States "would be prepared to take the ap- propriate action." He did not comment on a report that three American divisions were either being sent or prepared for the 'Middle East. there were moves to have the FBI get rid of unnecessary, derogatory infor- mation on congressmen, "I would have no opposition to having it disposed of." Fifth district Congressman Elwood (Bud) Hillis will be a guest speaker at the annual Chamber of Commerce dinner meeting Saturday. Congressman Floyd Fithian, of the second district, also has been invited to attend. Highlighting the evening's program will be the traditional passing of the gavel to the new Chamber president Fred Sabatini from immediate past-president Walter Myers. Retiring directors Dick Babb, Bill Cox, Jack Davidson and Jim Hendricks will be honored with special plaques. The new Chamber directors are Norb Adrian, Jack Barton, Charles Kingery, Bill Pfarrer and Keith Erny. Ned Grable will serve as master of ceremonies for the evening. President-elect Sabatini stated that the business meeting will be divided into three categories. The first category will deal with con- tinuing a number of projects which the Chamber feels important. The second segment focuses on new projects which the Board feels must be dealt with because of immediate im- portance. The third category deals with new proposals from members. Discussion will be held to designate the importance of these proposals. Members will then be asked to indicate their areas of interest. Also on the business agenda, members will vote on by-law changes. This year's meeting at the K of C Hall will begin at 7 by a cocktail hour at p.m. Music will be provided by the Notables from 9 p.m.- to midnight. A special advertising section portraying Chamber of Commerce activities in the community will be included in the Sunday issue of the Pharos-Tribune and Press. F o r e c a s t The Weather INDIANA Increasing cloudiness and a little warmer this afternoon with 30 per cent chance of light rain late in northern and west central portions. Cloudy tonight with 30 to 60 per cent possibility of rain, greatest chance northern third of state. Mostly cloudy and not much temperature 'change Saturday with 30 per cent chance of a few light showers northern third. Highs this af- ternoon mid 40s to near 50. Lows tonight low to upper 30s. Highs Saturday mid 40s to near 50. Becker Fails In Attempt To Amend Bargaining Bill Thursday's high was 35. at 3 p.m. The overnight low was 30 at. 1 a.m. Construction In Cass Jumps Million The construction of Krause Milling Company and Indiana Grain Company buildings-shot the 1974 construction figure in Cass County to The '74 figure was an astounding more than the 1973 con- struction figure of However, the number of new single family dwellings dropped noticeably from 89 in 1973 to 53 in 1974. The 1973 figure in family dwellings construction was while 1S74 was only The yearly report issued by Cass County Planning Commissioner Floyd Stafford also shows drops in home additions, family garages, and. the number of permits. Home additions fell from 21 permits and to only six permits and 'Family garages fell from the 1973 total of and 11 permits, to an', even and six permits. The total number of permits fell from 158 to 99. The mercantile buildings division in- creased from to a.healthy and the other structures division increased from in 1973 to in 1974. One division which did not appear on the 1974 report was recreational buildings. However, only one was constructed in 1973, that one accounting for Thirty mobile home permits were issued in 1974, compared to 24 in 1973. Ten Planning Commission meetings were held during the year, the board of zoning Appeals met six .times during the year, and three public hearings were held. Bridge Bill Is Approved A bill paving the way for Logansport's new 18th Street bridge passed a House committee unanimously Thursday. The Roads and Transportation com- mittee approved the bill 9-0 after hearing talks in its behalf by County Attorney John O'Neill and Ned Fairman, consulting engineer. The measure, H.B. 1280, had been in- troduced by State Rep. Nelson Becker to permit construction of a bridge over a railroad without the advance payment of the railroad's 20 percent share of the cost. It was necessitated because of the bankruptcy of the Penn Central railroad, making it unable to help pay for the 18th Street bridge. The bill is now ready for 2nd reading in the House, which Becker anticipates will come next Monday or Tuesday. bill permitting public employes to strike was pushed toward final passage in the Indiana House today. The Democrat majority beat down at- tempts by Rep. Nelson Becker and other Republican legislators to amend the collective bargaining bill Thursday. Representative Becker, who sponsored a collective bargaining bill for public em- ployes in the 1974 sesson, today explained why he tried to amend the agency and union shop clauses out of the Democrat collective bargaining bill. His amendment lost 38-53, He said the union shop and agency shop clauses should be matters for negotiation in labor contracts rather than to be spelled out in law. The collective bargaining law should only set up the procedure to be followed in determining union representation, the items subject to bargaining, and a board to establish fair labor practices, the Cass legislator said. He said he opposes strikes by public employes. As the bill now stands, a minority of public employes could force all of them to pay union dues to hold their jobs, he reported. The bill provides if 30 percent of the employes of a public agency sign a petition, an election must be held to determine if that union shall represent all of the employes. It takes only a majority of those voting in the election to bind all of the employes to support the union with regular payments of union dues. Thus, if a city has 100 employes and only 25 of them vote in the election to determine union representation, 13 employes could force all 100 to pay union assessments in order to hold their jobs, Becker pointed out. Under the union shop clause, all of .the employes also could be forced to belong to the union if city officials agree to it. If they refused to join they would lose their jobs. The Democrat majority in the House not only voted down Becker's amendment to remove the union and agency shop clauses, but also rejected amendments aimed at banning strikes and to at least forbid prison guards and hospital per- sonnel from striking.- The no-strike amendment lost 46-48. The bill was amended to include nurses. Excluded are teachers, firemen, policemen, university professors and professional engineers. Police and firemen asked to be excluded because they have their own collective bargaining bill. Teachers already have such a law. Republican legislators warned that the bill would lead to walkouts by garbage men, snow removal workers, prison guards, and hospital workers in tax sup- ported public hospitals. Rep. Robert Bales, Danville, reminded members that Gov. Otis Bowen has said he would veto any such collective bargaining bill unless it forbids strikes. Mt. Hope Building Plans Completed By Architect .Blueprints of the proposed Mt. Hope Cemetery Chapel and Service Building have been completed. Architect Thomas Medland presented them to the Board of Public Works and Safety Wednesday. The building, which measures 100 feet, eight inches by 50 feet, will be located in the extreme northeast corner of the cemetery. It will .feature a mansard front with brick facing. The brick facing will utilize the bricks that have been taken from downtown buildings that have been demolished, and will serve as a type of memorial to the downtown district, .according to City Engineer Robert Minnick. Included in .the building will be the chapel, which measures 50 feet by 48 feet, and an ample garage area. Also included are a sexton's office, storage room, janitor's room and public and employe restrooms. "Our primary concern for building the chapel is to provide residents with a site to hold graveside commented Mayor Martin Eugene Monahan, "Our great need for a vehicle storage area and a sexton's office also are important factors in the construction of this building." The inside of the building will be block wall with carpeting in the sexton's office and the chapel. Tentatively the plans and specifications are to be advertised within the next two weeks and bids taken until February 26, according to the board. The price on the City Code books was set at A record of each person who pur- chases the book will be made and the money received by the city will be deposited into the General Fund. The board approved claims of expenses transfers, and investments,   

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