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Logansport Pharos Tribune and Press Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1968 - Page 1

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Publication: Logansport Pharos Tribune and Press

Location: Logansport, Indiana

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   Logansport Pharos-Tribune and Press (Newspaper) - November 27, 1968, Logansport, Indiana                                Home Paper Of 41 Communities LOGANSPORT, INDIANA, 46947 Founded in Pren International Photo Wlrtu________ WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 27, 1968 All 76I-75J1 Ptf Copy. Ten Cong May Challenge Saigon At Paris Cost Of Living Takes Biggest Jump In Six Years WASHINGTON VUPI) The cost of living to Americans leaped by six-tenths of 1 per cent in October, the largest one- month advance in six years, the government reported today. A Labor Department report showed the consumer price, index hit 122.9 last month, meaning it cost for the same goods and services that bought 10 years ago. The statistics showed that it now costs to buy the same items that would buy in 1939. The six-tenths of 1 per cent gain was the largest of any month since a similar advance in September, 1962. Labor Department spokesmen said prices advanced on a broad retail front. Increases in the cost of cars, clothes and food set the pace. Arnold Chase, assistant com- missioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, called the October increase significant and indicated he could see no evidence of a slackening in the price spiral. Chase said the October gain brought the 10-month advance for the year to 4 per cent. That is larger than any advance for a full year since a 5.9 per cent increase in the index in 1951. The increase for all of 1967 was 3.1 per cent. Retail prices for clothing averaged 6.5 per cent above a year earlier with an October gain of nine-tenths of 1 per cent. Higher prices for women's winter coats, dresses and men's winter suits accounted for much of the increase. Prices for new automobiles rose 4.5 per cent during the month compared with a 1.7 per cent gain over the last year. Introduction of 1969 models and an over-all price increase averaging were key factors, the report stated. FBI TRAINING SCHOOL ENDS Certificates of graduation were presented to 30 Cass County law enforcement officers at the conclusion of Wednesday's session of an eight-day FBI sponsored police training school held at the city buikiing. Pictured above, Walter Valentine, FBI agent at Kokomo, congratulates Police of-, ficer Jerry Eskew, while Patrolman Lloyd Pusey, and Police Chief Michael Long look on. (Staff Photo by George Hagene) Cass ABB OK's Renewal Of Permits The Cass County Alcoholic- Beverage Board Wednesday morning approved the renewal of five beverage permits, but withheld action on a new license request. Held in abeyance was the re- quest of Sarge Boles, Inc., seek- ing a beer and wine retailer's license for a new restaurant to be constructed at 714 Ninth St. The applicants are Donald L. Boles, 1600 Woodlawn Ave., and E. Earl Hornbeck, Rt. 4, Monti- cello. The board said it could not approve the application until blueprints of the proposed new restaurant had been okayed by the state board in Indianapolis, described only as a "formali- ty." Licenses were renewed for The Sportsman, Royal Center; Perk's Cafe, Walton; Ambers, 931 W. Linden Ave.; Joe and Pinky's, 317 Court St.; Krieg's Tavern, 1417 13th St., and Mel- ody Bar, 1638 Erie Ave. French Politicians Shout, Students Stir PARIS react- ed today to President Charles de Gaulle's billion "pain, effort and discipline" austerity drive to save the franc. Prices rose. Politicians shouted. Students stirred. What Prime Minister Maurice Couve de Murville called "the war to save the franc" sent the cost of automobiles, gas, electricity and consumer goods jumping. Food held the line. Students at a suburban branch of the University of Paris pelted their dean with tomatoes when he refused to explain a faculty appointment they did not like. On another campus, students seized a lecture room. The leader of the Communist party in France's National Assembly deplored De Gaulle's austerity program as a "men- ace to the workers of our country." Couve de Murville outlined the program Tuesday to a raucous session of the National Assembly. He appealed for "pain, effort and discipline." The white-haired premier's 42- minute speech was punctuated by the jeers' of opponents unhappy with the changes. Travelers reported police inspecting wallets and purses to enforce currency restrictions designed to halt ruinous specu- lation in francs. The austerity program cut billion from the 1969 French budget, to be made up partially by increased taxes on profits. It sacked the nation's nuclear testing program for at least a year. France's big four automakers blamed the increased taxes on profits for hiking their prices 5 to 6 per cent on domestic sales. Gas and electricity faced a 4.8 per cent increase. De Gaulle's austerity program also cut off million in government subsidy to industry and cut to the "bare minimum" the budget for the Concorde supersonic jet transport plane scheduled to make its maiden flight in January. Couve de Murville's speech said price hikes would be curbed and "infractions will be firmly punished." He did not elaborate and the automakers went ahead and announced their increases. Cleaver May Be Sent Back To San Quentin BERRIES OPEN CAGE SCHEDULE The 1968-69 basketball sea- son gets underway tonight in Logansport when the Berries play host to the Winamac Warriors. The B game will begin at p.m., the varsity match at 8 p.m. After taking Thanksgiving Day off, the Berries will re- turn Friday night to Berry Bowl to meet the Frontier Falcons. Winamac, defending Logan- land cage will bring an 0-1 record to Berry Bowl. Frontier will put a 2-2 record on the line against the Berries. SAN FRANCISCO Eldridge Cleaver, minister of information of the Black Panther party and unsuccessful candidate for president of the United States, faced the pros- pects of returning today to San Quentin Prison. He was scheduled to be taken into custody for violating parole granted him Is 1MB after he served nine years of a 13-year sentence for assault to commit rape, assault to commit murder and assault with a deadly weapon. Cleaver's wife, Kathleen, told a news conference Tuesday she didn't know where he was and did not know what he would do when the deadline arrived. She said she hoped her author-husband, whose best- selling book "Soul on Ice" recounted his prison experien- ces, would oppose efforts to return him to prison. "He has always said he is not going back to the Mrs. Cleaver said. "I would like to have him not go back to prison." When asked by what means he could prevent it, she replied: 'Any means necessary." "If they use guns to force she said, "he should use guns not to go." NO PAPER THURSDAY There will be no edition of the Pharos-Tribune and Press Thanksgiving Day. The pub- lication will resume with Fri- day's paper. The Weather Forecast with occa- sional rain north and central- and rain likely, possibly mixsd with snow north tonight. Cloudy with occasional rain east and south and rain likely northwest Thursday. Lows tonight in the 30s. TUESDAY WEDNESDAY lla.m noon 1p.m. 3 4 5 7 9 p m 19 p.m llp.m. p.m Mid Stormy Sessions Expected PARIS said today Saigon's acceptance of a seat meant the expanded Vietnam War talks might get underway next week. The Viet Cong indicated stormy sessions ahead by announcing it will challenge Saigon's legality. As expected, South Vietna- mese President Nguyen Van Thieu named Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky, the Viet Cong's Public Enemy No. 1, to supervise the Saigon delegation. A spokesman for the National Liberation Front (NLF) the political wing- of the Viet Cong, denounced this beforehand and said Ky's presence simply proved the South Vietnam regime was an "American puppet." The NLF said it would take part in the talks but would challenge Saigon's claim to be legal spokesman for the south- ern half of the country. Thieu said in Saigon the South Vietnamese delegation would arrive within I'O days. Diploma- tic sources said if the Saigon representatives got here later this week, or at least some of them, the expanded negotiations which began last May between the United States and North Vietnam might get underway next week. Saigon planned to ienore the NLF. But the NTF delegation, said it would attend as "an enual nartner." A short .time later a Vietnamese spokesman told United Press Infernat'onnl Hanoi forces- will shcot dovm all planes checking on how North Vietnam u-es the Ameri- can halt that rowed the way for the Paris talks. "Our armed forces have received orden, to shoot down all American reconnaissance the Hanoi spokesman told UPI. "If ttiev keen coming they will meet with murderous fire. Our government will never agree with the American position to send plane; over our territory even after the total bombing halt." The United States lost two such scout planes Monday. Viet Cong spokesman Duong Dinh Thao told a news conference President Nguyen Van Thieu's Saigon regime is an "American puppet." He said the Viet Cong's National Liberation Front (NLF) political arm is "the only true representative of the South Vietnamese popula- tion." But he said the talks between the United States, North and South Vietnam and the Viet Cong should start. SANTA SLATES MALL VISITS The Logansport Mall will be the scene of the first visit by a Santa Claus this season Friday. Santa will make his visit there Friday at 1 p.m. and will have regular hours of 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. during six days of the week until Christmas and will be there from 12 noon until 5 p.m. on Sundays. Children will have the opport- unity to have their pictures taken with Santa at the Mall. JUST CAN'T WAIT Craig Mulledge, 2-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wen- dell Rutledge, 101 Schiele Rd., eyes a couple of Thanksgiving Turkeys destin- ed for the oven over the holidays and appears ready to grab a sneak pre- vjew (Staff Photo by George Hagene) Two Men Rob Bank At Atwood ATWOOD, Ind. (UPI) -r- Two armed men with mesh covering their faces tied up the wife and children of the assistant man- .ager of, an Atwood -branch bank Tuesday night and forced him to open the bank so they could rob it. The gunmen took between and drove home with assistant manager Larry Hoffer, bound him and left. Hoffer told authorities the men forced their way into the Hoffer home on Hoffman Lake, near this Kosciusko County town west of Warsaw about 9 p.m. They tied up and taped the mouths of Mrs. Hoffer and the couple's children except for a 9-year-old son, and ordered Hof- fer and the boy to drive them to the bank in Hoffer's car. The boy went into the bank and the gunmen robbed a small safe and'lock boxes of an unde- termined quantity of money. They could not get into the main vault because of a time- clock. They then took Hoffer and his son back home, tied up Hoffer but left the boy free. The loot included about in new uncirculated currency of M to KO denominations, a small of silver dollars and other bills. Police said the men were de- scribed as Negroes 150 to 160 pounds and 5 feet 9 to 11 inches tall. National Debt WASHINGTON sury accounts for the fiscal year through Nov. 22: Withdrwls Deposits Cash balance Public debt Gold Loganland Thanksgiving Loganland residents will gather in various churches Wednesday night and Thursday morning for traditional Thanksgiving services. The Post Office, City Building, Courthouse, Auto License Branch, in- dustrial 'plants and most business places will be closed all day Thursday in observance of the strictly Ameri- can holiday. Special holiday feasts are being planned at local hospitals and other public institutions and many family reunions are .scheduled for the holi- day- Many people are expected to be on the highways during the brief holi- day and local law enforcement offi- cers have issued a warning to motor- ists to use extreme caution. The Cass County Chapter of the American Red Cross has cleared a total of 53 families to receive Thanks- giving baskets. The selection of names is based on the greatest need, accord- ing to Red Cross officials. Several Logansport organizations will distribute the Thanksgiving bask- ets, which are being delivered today and Thursday. Santa Due Here Saturday That roly-poly man with the twinkling eyes and snowy-white beard, Santa Claus, will arrive via the North Pole in downtown Logansport Saturday. Traveling in a modern version of the traditional sleigh, St. Nick's heli- copter will land at 1 p.m. Saturday at the city parking lot at Fourth and High Streets. After a brief tour of downtown Logansport, atop a Logansport fire truck, Santa will go to his castle lo- cated between Broadway and Market Street on Fourth Street where he will remain to greet children until 5 p.m. A complete schedule of castle vis- iting hours will be released later this week, according to Chamber of Com- merce officials who maintain close contact with the idol of the younger set. Brooke Says He Turned Down Cabinet Position Red Kettle Drive Friday NEW' YORK chusetts Sen. Edward Brooke indicated today he had been offered a cabinet position in the Nixon administration but de- clined it so he could remain in the Senate. "As I have said before, I think I can best serve the country and Mr. Nixon in the said Brooke who traveled extensively with Nixon during the campaign and was considered a close political advisor. Brooke met with newsmen after an hour and 15 minute session with Nixor. during which he said they discussed "the possibility of my coming into the cabinet." Brooke said he expected to "serve the administration in some other role in keeping with my position in the Senate." He did not specify what role this would be other than to say it would be defined later. He said he discussed a number of cabinet appointments with Nixon and put forward several names. He would not say specifically what cabinet position war discussed for him. "We discussed individuals. Democrats and Republicans and some independents as well." Brooke said. He said he thought Nixon was "moving rapidly" in preparing programs for the new. administration. The opening ceremony of the an- nual Salvation Army Red Kettle Drive will be held at a.m. Friday. Mayor Eugene Monahan will speak at the ceremony at 10 a.m., and the Rev. Alfred Gernie will speak on "Sharing." The Rev. -Father Clarence Shuer- man will give the dedication prayer. All organizations who will have volunteer bell xingers are to have rep- resentatives at the ceremony. Following the dedication cere- mony, the ringers will take their places at the Red Kettles at Kresges, Kesling Drugs, Hooks Drugs, and. Garden City.   

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