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Kokomo Tribune Newspaper Archive: February 7, 1994 - Page 1

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   Kokomo Tribune (Newspaper) - February 7, 1994, Kokomo, Indiana                                Vol 143 No 155 KOKOMO Kokomo Ind Monday Feb 7 1994 50 cents Teamsters strike UPS despite court order Kokomo state workers on job By Kokomo Tribune staff and The Associated Press Despite a court order banning a strike Teamsters walked off their jobs at the United Parcel Service today after the company raised the weight limit on packages to 150 pounds Teamsters spokesman Matt Witt said the strike began at 8 and UPS workers are out all across the Witt said the walkout was expected to spread to UPS facilities nationwide Picket lines were up at several locations in Atlanta where the company has its headquarters and in Augusta Ga But workers in Indiana and nearby Louisville ignored the strike called to protest what the union called abnormally hazardous working Youre talking about a differ ent kind of worker out here than in some of those places where theyre going out on said a man in Indianapolis who identi fied himself as a UPS manager He did not want his name used The manager said he phoned offices around the state and could find none that had been hit by the strike called after the company raised the weight limit on pack ages to 150 pounds At the companys Kokomo dis tribution center on North Touby Pike workers appeared to be on the job with no strike pickets visi ble The president of Teamsters Local 135 which represents the companys union employees in Indianapolis was out of the state this morning Vice President Ron Foster said union members were reporting for work but he had no other information Were disappointed that some union employees have chosen to respond to the recommendation of the Teamsters leadership and defy a federal court order pro hibiting the union from taking a job said Gina Ellrich a spokeswoman at UPS headquar ters in Atlanta At this point we continue to believe that the majority of our people will report to work today and were going to continue to provide service as best we Bob Kenney another UPS spokesman in Atlanta said We expect our employees to report to Lining them up Steve Presley Kokomo was out washing his truck in Koko mo Sunday afternoon in Kokomo and a long line was form ing behind him as other area residents had the same idea Sundays sunny skies and warm temperatures provided a good opportunity to remove the salt and grime from vehicles Sundays highs were 47 degrees in Indianapolis 55 degrees in Evansville 45 degrees in Fort Wayne and 43 degrees in Kokomo Winter weather returns to central Indiana Tuesday with the possibility of snow freezing rain land rain in the fore cast Tribune photo by Anne Farrar Accident claims one mans life DELPHI Ind A Lafayette man died Sunday in a onecar accident here A report from the Indiana State Police Lafayette post said Dallas Kenworthy of Lafayette died when a 1990 fourdoor Pontiac left the roadway around here Sunday Kenworthys age had not yet been determined as of the fil ing of the state police report but he was a passenger in the vehicle according to Trooper Dave McDowells report The trooper said he believed Kenworthys cause of death was a broken neck The report said the Pontiac driven by Michael J Cramer 39 Lafayette was eastbpund on Ind 18 east of 421 the north junction when it went left of center overcor rected sharply right and drove off the south side of the road The car then went airborne over an embankment flipping end over end four times and coming to a rest on its top Cramers blood alcohol con tent tested to be percent more than twice the legal limit for intoxication in Indiana McDowell said Cramer sustained cuts and lacerations McDowell said that the dri ver was taken to St Elizabeth Hospital in Lafayette for treat mem but there was no record this morning that he was there Victims laid to rest chief seeking NATOs OK for bombing runs SARAJEVO BosniaHerzegov ina AP Victims of a weekend of carnage were hurriedly buried today because there were so many bodies and the cemeteries were exposed to snipers and shell fire Gravediggers laid the coffins of many of the 68 bombing victims in the ground at dawn Mourners were only able to spend a few minutes in the mist at the gravesites before leaving The soc cer fieldturnedcemetery on the north side of Sarajevo is danger ously exposed to Serb positions The chief has asked for the authority to order NATO bomb ing runs on Serb mortar positions around Sarajevo although Presi dent Clinton played down the prospect of retaliation for the shelling Saturday that killed 68 and wounded 200 in the deadliest attack on the Bosnian capital in the 22monthold war In an apparent policy shift Britain today called for more muscular action than hitherto by the United Nations to end the killings in Sarajevo Its purpose must be not merely to punish or retaliate but to improve the situation in Saraje said an official from Prime Minister John Majors office He spoke only on condition of anonymity NATO foreign ministers will meet Tuesday u emergency ses sion to consider the bombing request by SecretaryGeneral Boutros BoutrosGhali a Dutch Clinton unveils budget trillion plan cuts hundreds of programs WASHINGTON AP Presi dent Clinton presented a tril lion budget for 1995 to Congress today that would shift billions to job training high technology research and other priorities pare hundreds of programs and drive federal deficits to their lowest level in six years Unlike his first budget a year ago Clinton unveiled no sweep ing new policy overhauls for the fiscal year that begins Oct 1 Instead the president proposed savings required by the near billion deficitreduction plan he outlined a year ago and congres sional Democrats passed last sum mer As promised he would raise tobacco taxes and slow the growth of Medicare and Medicaid to help finance his plans to revise the nations healtncare system The package would provide cash infusions for highway con struction the Head Start program for poor preschool children and dozens of other programs Clinton says will help the economy grow But because of the snug spend ing ceilings imposed by last years deficitreduction package Clinton would pay for those increases by eliminating a weather office in Samoa and 114 other small pro grams and by holding hundreds work and to obey the court Witt said the walkout will end once the company agrees to work out a safe way to handle these 150pound Informal discussions with the company were continuing despite the walkout said Witt speaking from the unions Washington headquarters Were having tele phone conversations with the company back and he said Teamsters President Ron Carey whose union represents UPS workers says that raising the limit from the current 70 pounds will cause injuries If Kent Nelson the chairman of UPS had to spend this week lift ing 150pnund packages UPS would decide to negotiate a the Teamsters said in a statement Sunday Kenney responded that This new weight limit is absolutely safe its a standard our competi tors all use and we think its only going to involve packages out of 11 million that we handle every Nobodys going to be dead lift ing 150 pounds he added Carts and longtime customers will help in making the switch to heav ier packages he said Board to consider teachers status Garner Its just a big weight off my shoulders By LISA FIPPS Tribune Tipton Bureau TIPTON Ind Northern School Board will meet Wednes day in closed session to discuss the status of TriCentral Elemen tary teacher Donald W Garner Friday a Tipton County grand jury cleared Garner of allegations that he had inappropriate contact with four female sixthgrade pupils during the 199293 school year The grand jury declined to return an indictment according to a Tipton Circuit Court document Garner has been on paid leave since Dec 10 1993 Garner has maintained that he is innocent The Indiana State Police investi began in December ISP gt Gary Boyles who investigat ed the allegations would not tell the Kokomo Tribune why the girls waited to report the alleged inci dents or what the alleged inappro priate contact was Indianas Open Door Law allows school boards to meet in closed session to receive infor mation concerning an individuals alleged misconduct and to dis cuss prior to any determination the individuals status as an employee However the board must vote in public on Garners status When asked to comment on the grand jurys findings Garner said Im not going to say much Its just a big weight off my shoulders Right now Im just in the waiting phase to find out about my Garner also said he was glad the ordeal was over adding You would never want to go through Garner said he loves teaching and coaching and would like to continue doing both Hes been a teacher at Northern for 14 years and coached various sports for 25 years Hes coached junior high girls and boys track and AAU Ama teur Athletic Union teams Gar ner was also the TriCentral varsi ty girls basketball coach TriCentral named Jim Mullins as the interim coach Mullins was previously the assistant coach Giant soybean plants may feed cows soon official in today Jfle too spoke on condition named The United Nations and NATO have threatened air strikes for more than a year now but many in the West fear they would only intensify the fighting while endangering troops on the ground and shutting down relief efforts This offers little consolation to the residents of Sarajevo who have been under Serb siege for nearly two years Many are enraged by the worlds inaction and impotence in stopping the war The Europeans remain particu larly divided over the issue WASHINGTON AP Soy bean plants that grow up to seven feet tall could provide feed for dairy cows that produces more protein and needs less nitrogen fertilizer than corn says a researcher The experimental plants bred from longneglected haytype soy beans open the way to a new dairy silage for sustainable farm ing systems I think theyll find a useful niche especially in the midAtlantic says Thomas Devine a geneticist with oGTSDAs Agricultural Research Silage is plant material main ly leaves and stems that is pickled by natural microorgan isms to yield longlasting nutri tious feed Devine explained in a recent edition of Agricultural Research magazine Plants grown for silage are cut slightly dried chopped then enclosed in a chamber such as a bunker After natural microorgan isms use up the chambers oxy gen other microbes produce lactic acid that pickles the forage Soybean silage varieties based on his experimental strains could be available in about three years Devine said He will begin testing a few of the best experimental lines for yield and nutrient value in Iowa Pennsylvania and Vir ginia this spring Corn is the number one silage but soybeans potentially can pro duce more he said And soybeans are a legume which need less commercial nitrogen fer tilizer than corn Symbiotic bacteria on soybean roots capture nitrogen from the air and the roots slowly release it as they Devine said After harvesting soybean silage in summer a fanner could plant a small grain like barley or wheat that would use this free nitro Soybeans first became popular in the United States as a hay crop Devine noted with 70 percent of the 1924 crop used for that pur pose But that use dropped to 3 percent by 1964 with the rest used for grain The drop in hay use happened Devine said because quality was erratic The plants dried slowly and rain often leached out The few farmers who do grow soybeans for silage have to plant varieties bred for their grain pro duction and therefore produce much less foliage of other programs at or below this years spending We have ended drift and bro ken the gridlock of the Clin ton wrote in a message accompa nying the fourvolume spending plan A Congress and a president are finally working together to confront our countrys Thanks to a robust economy and last summers deficitcutting package the president projects next years shortfall at bil lion the best showing since the billion gap of 1989 That is also billion less than Clinton hacLfixpected for 1995 just one year ago Inside todays Tribune Local College Goal Sunday points way to a college education Page 2 Style Mardi Gras is heading into full swing in New Orleans Page 9 Sports Purdue stays in Big Ten race by beating Iowa on the road Sun day Page 12 Also inside Business Classified Local News of HUNTED WITH SOVINK f   

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