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   Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel (Newspaper) - April 26, 1915, Fort Wayne, Indiana                               Ajpleasant smile brings the largest return on the smallest investment PROBABLE RAIN WEATHEE FORECAST FOB FORT WAYNE AND VICINITY, UNSETTLED TONIGHT AND TUESDAY; POSSIBLY SHOW- ERS; CONTINUED WARM. Newspaper in For! Wayne Receiving the Associated Press News Dispatches ESTABLISHED 1833. MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 26, 1915. DAILY. 1 CENT. 6ATURDAY, 6 CENTS, ONE CENT IT COSTS ONLY ONE CENT PER WORD. Aftt YOU QET JUST WHAT YOU WAHT THROUGH THE. -Vs. V i fi- 3 COAL OPERATORS ACCUSED. H t M M H M H H 4 H M M M H M M Two Bands and Eotary Club German Dash to Reach French Coast Cities Brings Desperate Encounter on Yser Canal Today's War News' Given in Summary. ,The new German offensive in Bel- gium, styled by some British com- mentators the greatest battle of the war, is being pushed on with all the power of the army Germany is re- puted to have assembled along this front. The official announcement from Berlin today reports impressive J victories, although no admissions to this effect are made at Paris or Lon- don. The German statement makes no specific claims as to further territory conquered but just described attacks in which it is said large numbers of prisoners were taken including Canadians. The Belgian statement of yesterday that Lizerne had been recaptured is characterized as untrue. The official Paris statement gives out few details of the fighting in Bel- gium. It is said German attacks were checked by the British. The German attack is developing with great force over a large part of the western front. Berlin announces the re-capture of Hartmans-Weiler- kopf in the mountains near the east- ern, end of the lines which the French took-recently after several weeks of J fighting. In tie the Meuse a severe battle has begun. In the east there was no change so far as the German statement reveal- ed. It is said Russian attacks near the east Prussian border were defeat- ed. London, April some mili- tary critics are inclined to pronounce the "greatest battle of the war" is now un- der way on the Yser canal. Official reports are both meagre and contradictory, but it is generally be- lieved in London'that the Germans again ure making desperate efforts to break through to the French channel, ports. Some such recrudescence of the German offensive has been anticipated by the war experts but this movement, fore- stalling the long predicted allied offen- sive comes as a. distinct shock to the general public. It is impossible as yet to get a clear idea of the extent of the German move- ment, but some special dispatches to London papers describe it as so import- ant that the Germans are oven credited with bringing field Marshal von Hinden- burg from the east to conduct the opera- tions, and Emperor William himself is reported as proceeding to the Yser front. Again in Carpathians. In the eastern arena of hostilities the Carpathians compete with the Yser for interest. The gateway into Hungary formed by the Uzsok pass again is be- coming the scene of sanguinary fighting with neither side making any great gains. Warsaw as a German objective is dimmed by the importance of keeping the Russians out of Hungary, aJid the Germans are reported as withdrawing their lines from in front of the Polish capital for new concentrations along the fronts of Cracow and in the Carpathians. Peace Delegate Halted. The fairway between England and Holland is still being kept clear of com- mercial shipping with the result that the Steamer Noordam, bearing the women delegates to the peace conference is marooned in the Downs. Some of the delegates have sent an appeal to Ambassador Page. Answering the appeal of Miss Addams Mr, Page said it would be impossible for the em.' bassy to aid the delegates to reach The Hague. All shipping -to Dutch ports had been stopped, lie explained, and it was not even possible for the members of the embassy to make the trip. Operations in the North sea are still a deep mystery, but speculation concern- (Continued on Page 9. Column 2.) ILL AT EIHIE Evansville, Ind., April A. B. Anderson, of the Indiana district of tho United States district court, is ill here of bowel complaint. Physicians say his condition is seri- ous, although not critical. Judge Anderson's postponed the annual local spring session of the United States court. THE LIPS THAT COMMAND. GEN. 3ffi JOHN. FRENCH GRANDDUKE MCHOUS EARL KITCHENEB. GKflilMOM VOK TRBTZ GRN.VdNKLUCK -W EMREBOB WUHELM The lips from which come the commands of eight forceful men in the great war. Sir John French is the field marshal commanding the British land forces; Ben. Joffre, the French commander-in-ch ief; Grand Duke Nicholas, the Russian commander-in-chief; Grand Admiral von Tiniitz, the German naval chief; Earl Kitchener, British secretary of war; Gen von Kluck, German officer In charge of Turkish operations; Emperor William of Germany, the great figure of the war; Admiral Jellicoe, chief of the Br itish Big Force of Troops to Back Up Attack on Dar- danelles. WABSHIPS AGAIN BELCHING DEATH Fleet Renews Attempt to Drive Through Turkish Stronghold. London, April p. following official announcement given out in London today: "The general attack on the Darda- nelles by tho fleet and the army was re- sumed yesterday. "The disembarkation of the army, covered by the fleet, began before sun- rise at various points on the Galliopoli peninsula, and in spite of serious oppo- sition from the enemy in strong en- trenchments, protected by barb wire, was completely successful. "Before night fall large forces were established on shore. "The landing of the army and advance continue." The last concerted effort on the part of the allies against the Turkish forti- fications on the Dardanelles straits was over a month ago, March 19 and 20. This action was entirely from th'c sea, and from the standpoint of the allies it was a failure. A more or less persistent .bombardment covering several wepks left the straits still firmly in the hands ;of allies Jpst in this fighting, the British battlifshajvi'' Irre- ststable'and Ocean and" the French bat- leship Bouvet. The last five, weeks have seen naval activity of only minor importance in the straits. There have been _ mine sweeping and occasional scouting, but no important endeavor to penetrate this waterway FORT rani IN J MIRY Cumerford and Dubois and One Other Saw Out of Bluffton Bastile, (Special to The Sentinel.) Bluffton, Ind., April Cum- erford and Clyde Dubois, of Fort Wayne, in jail here awaiting trial for stealing chickens in this county, and Ambers Butler, held on a charge of associating with prostitutes, but under investiga- tion on more serious charges, escaped from the Wells county jail at 2 o'clock this morning. The three men had help from the out- side._ A ladder was placed against the outside of the jail wall and the bars of one of the windows were sawed off. Cumerford and Dubois were captured by the sheriff and an armed posse two weeks ago, when they were detected rob- bing a poultry house in the country. Cumerford and Dubois recently com- pleted long jail terras in Fort 'Wayno for stealing chickens in St. Joe town- ship. AMERICAN UNDER SENTENCE TO DIE. Washington, April E. McCleary, an American news- paper correspondent at Vera Cruz, has been imprisoned and sentenced to be shot by Carranza authorities for having sent out un- cencored news dispatches. Secre- tary Bryan instructed Consul Sil- liman to make the question up at once with General Carranza. JOHN BUNNY, MOVIE ACTOR, PASSES AWAY New York, April Bunny, whose antics as a moving picture comedian have made mil- lions laugh, died at his home in Brooklyn today. He had been ill for about three, weeks of a com- plication of diseases. Members of his family were with him when, ho died. For a week he had appar- ently been on the mend. A strenuous month of work, it is be- lieved cause the breakdown which resulted in his death. Coal operators against whom labor leaders have asked warrants charging responsibility for murder of men and women during Colorado strike battles. ML BE H1JHE8DAI Coming to Review the Ee- port of Captain Watkins on Proposed Canal. Members of the board of army en- gineers will not arrive in Fort Wayne until Tuesday, when they will review the report of Captain L. H. Watkins on the proposed Toledo, Fort Wayne and Chi- cago barge canal connecting Lake Erie with Lake Michigan. The members of the board are Major P. S. Bond, Colonel W. V. Judson and Colonel John Millis. Captain Watkins expects tho board to be here for the remainder of tho week. Work on the survey for the proposed canal was started on Dec. 20, 1913, and was completed but a few days ago. Ac- cording to the report twenty-three locks will Have to bo constructed in the event the northern route is selected and eighteen locks If the southern route la accepted. The Jlaumec river will bo fol- lowed from Toledo to Fort Wayne. From Columbia street bridge, Fort to Michigan the northern route is a total of 133 miles, while tho southern route irohi tho same point to Indiana Harbor is 150 miles. Captain Watkins recommends that single locks bo used throughout tho entire canal. FIRE ON ROOKHILL STREET, A call at o'clock Monday morning summoned the city fire department to the residence of James E. Clifford, 708 Rock- hill street, where sparks from tho chim- ney caused a small blaze on the roof. Tho damages amounted to SHOAPF NEXT SPEAKER. Fred Shoaff will bo the principal speaker Tuesday at the noon luncheon of the Fort Wayne Real Estate ex- change to bo held at the Commercial club. He will take for his subject: "Ex- amining Abstracts." FATHER DIES IN GERMANY. John and Fred Weleoh, of this city, re- ceived word Monday morning that v their father, Kurt Wesoloh, died at Hanover, Germany, at the age of SS years. Besides the two sons of this city he IB survived by a daughter, Miss Anna Weseloh, of Webster City, Iowa, aha four children at Supreme Court Takes Up Terre Haute Matter in Chambers. Indianapolis, Ind., April for tho impeachment of Eli H. Redman, as judge of the Vigo circuit court, was taken under advisement by the state here today, following a conference between members of the court and Richard M. Milburn, state's attorney general, who filed the petition for impeachment. The proceedings wore in chambers and their nature was not made public. Judge Redman was one of the men convicted with Mayor Bonn M. Roberta in the Terre Haute election conspiracy case here in the federal court. He is in the federal prison at Lcavenworth, Kan., to which he was sentenced to serve five years by Judge A. B. Ander- son. Mr. Milburn filed the proceedings with the state supreme court, asking the removal of Redman last Saturday. As there are a few more points of law which he desires to look Into, D. 0. Mc- Comb, county superintendent, will not give a decision in the famous Washington township school controversy until 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. He was to have given a decision Monday afternoon. Many questions are Involved In the matter and the county superintendent wants to know to a cer.talnty that he Is right before rendering his opinion, which will probably determine whether Wash- ington township is to have a school building sufficiently large for the con- solidation of a number of other schools In that section of the township. PETITION IN BANKRUPTCY. Ira D. Odle, Fort Wayne Merchant, He Cannot Pay His Debts, Scheduling his liabilities at and assets at Ira D. Odle, a Fort Wayne retail merchant, filed a petition In the federal court Monday afternoon, ask- ing that he be declared a bankrupt. Odle's principal Indebtedness Id for merchandise, the Fort Wayne Drug company largtst creditors scheduled. to Make Baseball Noise on Tuesday. LINE OF MARCH. Form on Harrison between Wayne and Main; south on Harrison to Washington; east on Washington to Hanna; north on Hanna to Wayne; west on Wayne to Barr; north on Barr to Columbia; west on Colum- bia to Harrison; south on Harrison to Berry; west on Berry to Fair- field; south on Fairfield to DeWald; east on DeWald to Calhoun; north on Calhoun to park. The Rotary club will form on Wayne street, west of Harrison, Auto Dealers" association on Wayne, east of Harrison, and city officials on Harrison between Wayne and Washington. Secretary Charles Biedcnvolf, of the Fort Wayne Commercial club Monday afternoon announced the line of march for the baseball parade which Tuesday afternoon will open the baseball sea- son in this city. He has been prom- ised 150 automobiles for the paiade, and the new home-owned Cubs will begin their march to glory to the inspiring tooting of several bands and a couple of hundred automobile horns. The Rotary club, which has taken in hand the opening day festivities, shar- ing the honor and the work with the Commercial club, will attend the game in a body, and some forty cars will convey the members of the club. The parade will start with the Sherraan- White auto truck carrying the Elk band, and following the music will be members of the city departments, with police, park, board of works, fire, and other commissioners and officials in line. Then come the heroes, and fol- lowing the ten cars which they will grace another band .will toot. Then the Commercial club and Rotnr-" club mem- bers will ride, and tho Allen County Automobile Owners' association will bring up the lengthy rear. At the park Mayor Hosey will fling the first ball in the general "direction of the plate, and Secretary Charles Bieder- wolf, of the Commercial club, will pre- tend he's trying to catch it. Capt. Thierfelder Soon to Decide on Dash or Interment. Newport News, Va., April German auxiliary cruiser Kron Prinz Wilhclm, which put in here for repairs two weeks ago, after her commerce raiding cruise, was towed from her an- chorage to a coal pier early today. She will take aboard betweent and 000 tons of bunker coal, it was stated at the pier. The Wilhclm also will take on a ten days' supply of water and provisions. That is the estimated time she would icquire to make the nearest German port. Installation of boiler tubes and other inside repairs were completed day and very BOOH Captain Thierfelder will decide whether to attempt a dash to sea or to interne with the Prinz Eitel. In marine circles it is said the date limit for the Wilhehn expires Fri- day or Saturday. AT LEflSI 11 OF II Early Season Hot Spell is Setting New Records Washington, April least 48 hours more of the early season hot spell was predicted today by the weath- er bureau. Extraordinarily high tem- peratures for the season were reported today from all points east of the Mis- sissippi river and new records for an April hot spell were made in many places, including Lexington, Ky., Wash- ington, D. C., Detroit, Grand Rapids and Columbus. Chicago today reported an official temperature of 72 at 7 a. m. Washington at the same imo had 65 degrees. In the New England and mid- dle Atlantic coast states a rise in tem- perature tonight and Tuesday was in- dicaed. The absence of rain, except for some scattered showers, ia being felt in many and crops ate Colonel Roosevelt Says So, and Admits Consulting Him Freely. MORE LETTERS GO IN EVIDENCE1 Conferences with Platt Not "Invisible He Says. Syracuse, N. Y., April series, of confidential letters taken from thef files kept by the late Thomas C. Platt, while he was representing the state! of in tho United States sen-, ate were today read to the jury trying, Wm. Barnes'' suit for alleged libel. against Theodore Roosevelt in the su-, preme court here. Some of the letters, were signed by Senator Platt while others were signed by Col. Roosevelt. In nearly nil of them the writers dis- cussed candidates for office in the state government and in reply to a question; by Mr. Barnes' counsel, the former presi- j dent said without the slightest hesita- j tion tha ho consuled freely with Sena-1 tor Platt, about affairs at Albany, know- ing and realizing at all times that he' was the "boss" of he republican pary this state. One of the letters read during thei forenoon session contained a postscript.' which read: 'All right I'll change the whole board of tax assessors." The letters were brought to Syracuse by the former senator's son and turned over to counsel for Mr. Barnes. Al- though the colonel could not say whether he had ever made it known to the pub- lic that he was conferring with Mr. Platt over appointments he denied em- phatically that such conferences consti- uted "invisible government." ''My the witness asserted, "were as visible as they could RESUMES HIS TESTIMONY. Syracuse, N. Y., April Roosevelt resumed his testimony on the witness stand today for further cross examination by counsel for William Barnes. It was the former president's fifth day as a witness. When court opened a stipulation be- tween counsel that depositions of four unnamed witnesses outside the state should have the same effect as if the witnesses had appeared on the stand, was read into the record. Mr. Ivins, Mr. Barnes' attorney, then put into the record letters written by Mr. Barnes to Col. Roosevelt and by.Colonel Roose- velt to Mr. Barnes and to Herbert Par- sons. The latter letters, dated August 21, 1908, were nearly identical in contents and phraseology. Jn one letter Mr. Barnes discussed Governor Hughes. In it he said if Gov. Hughes was elected he would set up a political machine and all who opposed him would have to 'sneak in the hack door or get out of politics." Roosevelt to Barnes On Sept. 10 Col. Roosevelt wrote this letter to Mr. Bnrnes: "I am very glad you joined in making the nomination of Hughes unanimous. I think it was the wise and patriotic thing to do. After the election 1 shall want to see you in Washington and talk over matters with you.'' Replies hy Mr. Barnes to some of the- colonel's letters were also read to the jury. The colonel identified nil the let- ters and declared them to be authentic. Col. Roosevelt said his favoring Gov. Hughes was not due to any personal reasons. "It was because I though the people wanted lie added. "Do you regard it as any evidence of corruption that Messrs. Barney Hen- dricks and Parsons favored some other man than Mr. Hughes "I can't answer that collectively." Later Col. Roosevelt answered in the negativo when asked specifically about each of tho men named. Mr. Ivins then told Justice Andrews he wished to put into evidence corres- pondence between Thomas C. Platt and Col. Roosevelt between 1898 and 1005. While attorneys for both sides were dis- cussing these letters, Col. Roosevelt op- ened some mail and sat in the witness chair reading it. Letters to Platt. The first letter, dated Oct. 21, 1898, was addressed to Senator Platt. In it Col. Roosevelt said: "I was misquoted. I never discriminate against any -mau because of his religion or his race." In tho second letter he said; "Can I see you Friday The third was dated from. Albany. The colonel told of a conference "with Gov. Black over the appointment of a judge. He said further: "I would like to see you about the matter." The name of a Mr. Hill was mentioned in the letter. "Did you consult Boss Platt about the appointment of Mr. Hill as a district attorney of Erie asked 'the cross-examiner. "I consulted Senator Platt about nil matters he wished to be consulted about and then did >hat I thought bes.t. I. xflhCiilVt'iCO t--> __   

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