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Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel Newspaper Archive: December 15, 1909 - Page 1

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   Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel (Newspaper) - December 15, 1909, Fort Wayne, Indiana                                 afulwiifUfuiiUM ' ' ■ ) ''-^ili^'i  -IT?8 THE SOUR ÔAINT8 THAT 'MAKE THE CHEERFUL SINNERS.  .fi ^ f- J- - X t"'- . ■> '  -THE; GREAT REv.HAD FOI« LABOR 18 STR^NQTH FOR MORÌÌI.  £S!tABiil8il£D 1833.  WEDNESDAY  -F.ORT'V/A YiNE^S GREATT. ?T î '  DEC. 15,1909.  Managua rises  against zelava  Exeited Crowds Fill Streets Crying Down With Zelaya and Long Live the United States.  LEOPOLD IS m E By SUB6EIIY  BELGIAN MONARCil WHOM OPERATION : GIVES NEW CHANCE FOR LIFE.  POLICE WBII0T5T0P OEMONSTBATIOII  Managua, Nicaragua, Dec. 14.—Rebellion has broken out at the ca pital. The streets are flllfed with unrestrained demonstrations. Shouts of "Long live Liberty, the United States and Estrada" fill the air. The police have made lio;. move" to check the mob. It is said that President Zelaj-a has promised ti) «lake public todaj- the announcement oiP his résignation from the presidency. / ' ÏV>r 'the first time in sixteen years a iBtreét meeting of malcontents has , been permitted without-police interfer-«tìce. The demonstration began last ntièht and continued for hours.  This forenoon comparative quiet had bWû restored, but the scene of the «rents of the last few hours admitted ©f lout one interpretation. The antl-Zelaya feeling was so strong that the government did not dare to attempt its Bt^pKsslon.  Congress Turns on Tyrant.  The climax was reached last night when the government attempted to put through congress a bill conceding to ceitaln exploiters ■ mining rights covering vast undefined areas irrespective of the private ownership of the surface «f the property. Congressman En-ri^pie Corda, opposed the measure in a •jijpilicb that aroused the wildest enthu-iia«^ " The government seeing that was in danger of being lost; i^cipitately adjourned the session. It iW tcio late, how to head off the btirst .¡of Indignation that had swept oyer the legislative body, supposed to hay« iieen friendly to Zelaya. The an-IRÓUXiéement of the adjournment was «rêéte4;^^with hisses and when Corda left the building he was given an ovation.  Frotn the meeting place the con-il^i^n who dared publicly to voice tl^'iirst protest against the govem-iâent was followed to his hotel by a '»ob -which alternately cheered Corda lind crrisd "Long live liberty," "Down  oppresiion."  Crowds Grow to an Army.  îfewii of what had transpired In con-grifèB« spread rapidly, and the crowd of Iriaihifestanta grew to the strength of  Mknrty.  rioters gathered in front of the Mexiiîàn; legation and called upon the Mexican minister to Nicaragua for a B^èéch. The diplomat asked to be ex-fcused.  Ramon iBostràn attempted a concil-fatoty speech and was hooted for his $>ain8. Occasionally there was a cry of "(Jive us Madriz." In a fiery speech Hildebrando Gastillon predicted a new èra jot liberty and his auditors shouted tppfovai. Responding to insistent eçLlls, Corda made a speech which was à bitter attack upon Zelaya. The spibiker said that he had Intended to Interpellate the government on the «niìjéct of its preparations for war in the -face of its protestations of peaceful Intentions, but he had desisted on thè .assurance that a formal declaration by Presiden tZelaya resigning from the,-presidency wouid.be published in the morning. While these speeches were being made to the angry crowd the. P<511ce made no show of interfer-ence.  ^^^^ • t Wild.  La.tei- Dr. Madriz arrived in the city and his advent was the signal for a demonstration that niade the earlier òutbréàk appear temperate in comparison.  The crowd had become emboldened by the non-interference of the police, and violent denunciations of the pres->nt régime were voiced apparently without thought of a poissible consequence.  ' In the confusion of shouts one could make out "Viva Mexico," ''Long live the United States," "The handwriting is on the wall."  Corda was released but recently from the penitentiary.  Following a demonstration at Cor-da"s hotel the crowd moved to the home of Henry Caldera, the United States vice consul. Here they cried "Live Estrada." "Live the revolution. ' "Live the United States." Still the police did not interfere and the tramping and shouting went on until the people had tired themselves out.  There is a rumor here that General Estrada was raptured during a battle at Rama, but no confirmation of the story is possible here.  INSURGENTS TAKE CITIES.  10 GIVE AÏÏEIITIOII TO WHOLESALE  Puse Food Inspector Here tobeling Up the Preservatives.  15ef«rty State Food and Drug In-•|>eC|toir F. W. Tucker, of Peru, arrive^ - itt the 6fty on Tuesday and expects to «j^d^ day or two in Fort' Wayne an'investigation " of--food pro-^uMw^iii' wh^h behzt^te of "soda has  lesS of governmental finding the use of this preservar "^il-ViiiJlll'<3W:tai|i Instan^esr the state of have none : of it. How-r to . not work too .eicces-ip^ujxin ^d^ers w^ have )i»tnned rontoining  ;thte .order "iiasibeeh .given the stock al-^ prope^y ^J^Her'Jhdt' pT^K^i^ioi-rmit ' MiiAt /thty  Bluefields. Nicaragua, Dec. 14.—An official telegram at the insurgent headquarters announces that General Morales at the head of a band of insurgents. has captured Tortuga, Orisi and Supoa, three small towns on the Costa Rican frontier. Morales proclaimed Estrada president of Nicaragua and continued his march to attack the important town of Rivas.  Gen. Estrada and his followers have taken courage at the prospect of assistance from the United States in their efforts to overthrow the government of Nicaragua.  Will Put Marines Ashore, The United States cruisers Des Moines and Tacoma and the collier Leónidas with their crews on board are still lying outside the harbor. A cablegram reports that seven hundred ad' dltional marines from the United States have started for Colon and this fact is interpreted as assurance that marines will be sent here to re-inforce the blue jackets now. in the harbor.  United States Consul Moffat is making tentative arrangements for shore quarters for the American fighting men. The consul is in hourly communication with Commander Shipley, of the bes Moines and Commander Niblack, of the Tàcoma, aftd is also exchanging long cablegrams with Washington. The présence of the Americans here affords the people of (he citj- a sense of great security. It is noted with satisfaction that since the arrival of the Des Moines, General Vasquez, of the government forces near Rama, has redoubled his efforts to obtain a compromise with Estrada.  Estrada Now Has 2,400'Men. Gen Estrada now has 2,400 men and looks forward to an early engagement that will result in a decisive victory for the insurgents. Estrada announces that his first step preliminary to joining Morales and other leaders in a combined attack upon Managua, will be the surrounding of "Vasquez, which movement Estrada thinks is partly accomplished now. General Vasquez has reconcentrated his troops in the hills overlooking the Mico river, a few miles from Rama.  ■\''asquez's right is threatened by General Luis Mena, who has taken up a position nine miles south on the Rama river. On the other flank of the government army is General Fornaz Diaz, whose troops occupy a strong position on the Sigua river. As the Mico river flows between the Ram and Sigua rivers, Vasquez is hemmed In on either side.  Estrada's Plans.  Estrada plans simultaneous mo-^e-ments by Diaz and Mena cutting off the retreat of the enemy to the north or south, ]n-hen Gen Chamorro delivers a frontal a.ttack. The plan is complete and the inauguration of the campaign awaits only the arrival of artillery and additional ammunition, which are'expectced daily by steamer.  General Vasquez apparently recognizes the advantage of the insurgents as he continués to send messengers to the rebel camps, seeking a compromise. These messengers Invariably are turned back with the statement that Gen. Chamorro will consider nothing save unconditional surrender.  Operation Adds to Chances of Belgian Moriarch to Defeat Deathr  NO TRAGES OP A TUMOR ARE POUND  King Perks Up Quite a Lot When Doctors Tell Him of That Pact.  URGES 7ELAYA TO RESIGN.  New Orleans, ■ La., Dec. . 14.—Special mall advices from iPort Limon, Costa Rica, state' that reports have reached there .that Dr. Madriz, Nicaraguan member of - the court, of Cartago, has made a vigorous appeal to Zelaya to lay down the presidency. It is stated that Dr. Madriz urged Zelaya to do this "not only for the integrity of Nicaragua, .but-for that of all : Central America.  The advices say. that thé action of Dr. Madriz is construed ■ to, prove that the court' of Cartago has inside information In regard to the attitude which the United States, government will assume toward Nicaragrua and which, according'to the opinion of iBome Cèntral American- statesmen, will place' the* integrity of the- whole of Central America: in-danger.- ^ .  An .antl-Amerlcan>,meeting was: held in San Joséi Costa Rica, severs,! days: ago tor^rotest against' the landing Hsf troops In ,iilcssragna by-, the UniteH is-rsported.' r ^  ICf. visfoi'niicfon,/ newspaper- pub-lia&d ^t SiMi Jrose, declared: , - - '  bui^^J^tiyv thé,blow Hït^a foceti» ^În-i  hmii ' '  mm-. ___  Brussels, Dec. 14.-:—King Leopold was operated upon successfully todày. The surgeons found no trace of a tumor, the presence of which in the intestines had been feared. His majesty's illness was due to a simple obstruction. The king is resting quiet-ly.  At 3 o'clock this afternoon the physicians issued this bulletin:  "The king's condition is very good as a result of the operation."  Felt Much Relieved.  When, following the operation, his majesty regained consciousness, he was told of -what had been accomplished and expressed. satisfaction. He said that the removal of the obstruction in the intestines afforded him marked relief.  The physicians are more hopeful of the ultimate recovery of thè royal patient. They met in consultation again this afternoon. The resort to surgery was made only as a last chance and the medical men had not been optimistip. Improvement in the king's condition followed at once, but whether he has the vitality to resist the after effects of surgery is a question. Leopold was under the effects of choloroform for forty minutes. When these had passed hé asked the surgeons for the details of the operation.  Joy Lights His Face.  They replied that they had discovered neither a tumor nor an abscess, but had removed , an ■ accumulation from the intestines. At the -words än expression of joy lighted the features of the aged monarch, who feebly, but with eagerness, inquired, "Then there is hope for my life?" ; "Yes, your majesty," responded Dr. Thirar, "there is hope, but the greatest care must be exercised."  The gravest danger now is in the possibility of fever developing.  KZr7ß LEOI^ZJJr CFL ßELÖIWii.a^  "sssrsrs^ivSsssr^^SM^  BEGmS BIG H6IÌT  Federal Government Seeks to Recover the Des-Plaines River.  COMPANY HOLDING WATER POWER SUED  the  SE  Quarrel of Tenants in Cincinnati Ends in Awful Fire Tragedy.  Cincinnati, Dec. 14.—Seven persons lost their lives, seven others were injured, two probably fàtàlly, and about fifty others had narrow esçapes from instant death in a fire which destroyed a four-storj' tenement 'and. lodging house -at Third and Sj^camore streets early today.  The dead:  William Grant, S4 yéars old, a laborer.  Isaac Rucker, 35.  Thomas Wilson, 3.  Mrs. J. Henderson,. 35.  Mrs. Norah Hehderson Coy le, 18, daughter of Mrs. J.. Henderson.  Ruth Henderson, 1?, another daughter of Mrs. J. Henderson.--  James Henderson, son of - Mrs. JF. Henderson. Probably fatally injured: Mrs. Emma T#al, 27; Mrs. Laura Wilson, 27. .  The fire started on the second . floor of the building . and ■ was- due to thè upsetting of a kerosene lamp during a quarrel betwéen tenants. •  The building was old and of wood and the flames spread rapidly to thé stairways and hallways, cutting off escape.  When the sleeping, inmates awoke they found the building full of smoke. Many rushed to the windows and othr ers to the roof. The firemen and po.-licemen rescued some, but others were too frightened t? heed the^ criés of the rescuers and threw themselves from the -windows. Some of these were caught in blankets hold below, but others fell to the r' Jewalk. F«ur of the dead, were found on the tipper floors of the building. Mrs. Henderson was clasping her dead child Ruth in her arms. Her two other, children were discovered in: an .adjoining room. They had been suffocated by smoke.  LOOSE AFFIDAVIT BE A FRA  Danish Scientists Amazed by New Assault on Explorer Cook  SEE BIG HOLES IN SWORN STATEMENT  Seaman Says That for Price He Fabricated Cook's Polar Data.  BEVERIDGE HAS BEGUNIO GRIND  First of a Grist of 100 Postmasters is Turned Out by Senator.  STEINER HAS THIRD TERM AT PLYMOUTH  Copenhagen, Dec. 9.—^A summary o the affidavits of persons claiming to have aided Dr. Frederick A. Cook Ui the preparation of his polar data, published in London and New York today.' was read here with' amazement Scientific circles are inclined to be incredulous regarding the charges and some persons like Dr. Carl Burrau, the astfonomer, consider them so improbable that their effect will be to strengthen confidence in Dr. Cook. In an interview Dr. Burrau said: "Passages in the story telegraphed here give me the impression that the matter' is thoroughly untrustworthy. Take for instance the statement about Capella. Capella neither rises nor sets in the polar regions but remains fixed over the horizon. In order to make observàtions at the north pole, a more extended and a more detailed knowledge is necessary than is enjoyed usually by the average ship's captain. Will be Easy to Determine.  "It will, however, be easy for the university to determine the truth or otherwise of the charges."  The' committee of ' six under the presidency of Prof. Stromgeren; the astronomer, which is to examine the north polie records of Dr. Cook on behalf of the Uni-versity of Copenhagen, will begin its workji^t the' end of the present -n-eek.  Affidavits of two men asserting that' Dr. Frederick. A. Cook hired them for 14,000 with J promise of an additional bonus of $500 to one of them, to' fabricate astronomical observations and calculations of latitude and lohgtjtude for- submission to the University- of Copenhagen, were, published in- the New "iork Times this: morning.  ■ The men : who say they helped Cook in preparing, records of â joyrney to the north pole—George H. Dunkle, an insuritnce :brol6er, and Captain August Wedei Loo.se, a seaman—admit th^t their reason for. making the affidavits was tlïat the explorer paid them only $260 for their work.  LOOSE 18 NOW HEDGING.  \?A>i>r  HAD FORTUNÉ IN HANDBAG.  Woman With Wealth Lay Sick Streets of Monterey. '  in  Monterey, Cal.,', Dec, 14v-^Holding fast to a handbag In-Whléfit-^'Titeire $12,-OdO worth of diamúnds an^-.other jew-.  elry, $2$,000 in rat bonds, and insura':^ 000 on V property dreslied woman,^: Ina L.' Cuthmi ííóttnd^Iast nil ^fhi^'Cppman ihèrself." S  ' Fr,om. paperi  itW  landT industrUl 'ÍWfor $80,-ánVa wei;i be, Mr*.  Wító-  ""---cduntW  »t-iCareli;  •New, Tork, Dec. 9.—Captain A. W. Loose, the master pilot and navigator, whose affidavit stating that he had formulated á Ipn? series of observations and data lor X>r.- Fred^erick A. Cook, at Dr. Cook> request upon his return .from the. arctic region, ,was ■published today, talked^ today at his homé , in Brooklyn "concerning the statements made in the davit: , "I went to Dr. Cook," said Captain Loose, "thinking that I might be of some little assistance to him,-but I never expected when I ajipittached him to do such extended work as I have ; done. After a short,talk with' Dr. CJook I Tii[as convinced'he kne-(^ almost nithing abo'^.t'navigation. He was ignorant ;o£ isome- of the essentials of the seience.  Í"At first I considered' it at least UHe-ly .r-'tlíatí-JJr.VvGookí-had been nei^r. thel to^S9 degrees .or within sixtjr :nille* 'of ; tbe poleV ) ^l^ven- ;K1s .-.observa;«; t^OQii .woutd hijm that 'sie*  /qlitiicy. I^ater I yf^a toróeü to change t^t dpiniW " ' - '  Fire Starts During Christmas Behearsal and Gruts Valparaiso Church.  Indianapolis, Dec. 14.—The grinding of the grist of about 100 appointments to the office of postmaster in cities and towns of Indiana at the disposal of United States Senator Beveridge began today when the senator announced from Washington that he had recommended the following: Plymouth, jVIonroe Steiner, who has already served two terms; Vincennes, John W. Emi-son, present incumbent; Vevay, Thomas E. Kincaid; Carlisle, A. R. Orr.  VALPARAISO CHURCH GUTTED.»  Fire Breaks Out During Christmas Re« hearsal.  Valparaiso, Ind., Dec. 14.—While the childre nof the Sunday school of the Presbyterian church were rehearsing their Christmas entertainment today the furnace in the basement set fire to the building. All the children escaped. The interior of the church was destroyed, causing a loss of several thousand dollars.  Suit Part of Plan for Lakes to Gulf Deep Waterway.  Chicago, Dec. 14.—The United States government has entered the controversy over the Dresden Heights dam of the Economy Light and Power company and the enormous -w^ter power rights claimed along the Des Plalnes river, suit being filed here today in the federal circuit court to enjoin the Economy Light and Power company from constructing the dam and for a decree compelling the restoration of the Des Plaines river to its condition before the building of the dam was begun. This is the first step in the deep waterway program for a lakes-to-the-gulf highway and the suit of the government if it successfully establishes , title to the Des Plaines river bed, \ would a long stride toward the final I completion of a commercial water  route from Chicago to New Orleans. I Government Behind SMit.  I The suit which was filed by District Attorney Sims at the direction of the attorney general is based on two main contentions—first that the title to the bed of the Des Plaines river is vested in the federal government and second that under the correct rule of navigability the Des Plaines river is a navigable stream and the construction of the dam could only be accomplished with the permission of the secretary of war and the chief of engineers of the federal government. The state program for a water way from Chicago to St. Louis via Sanitary canal, the Des Plaines and the Illinois rivers was halted by the action of the canal commissioners of the Illirtois and Michigan canal moving for permission for overflow of some canal lands paralleling the Des Plaines river near the site of the dam.  State Supreme Court Against It.  In the state courts the governor and the attorney general of the state of Illinois vainly sought to secure title to the stream but the supreme court of Illinois ruled the Des Plaines river is not navigable.  Adthorlty to appeal from the sfate court to the federal supreme court is part of the program for the present state legislature at Springfield. In the present suit the government contends that the Illinois supreme court has not laid down the correct rule' for determining the navigability of streams, in holding that a stream to be navigable must be proved to be navigable in Its condition natural.  VOL. LXXVnt NO. 9  $1000 OHIGE  ACTl ON TIL  ---■ % •  Fay Bossier Gives Testimony from Wheel Chair  in Court. "^ìiì  THINKS HOSPITAL  1'  BADLY AT FAXTLT  Judge Anderson Convenes the December Term of Federal Court Here.  I  Ï  PREFERS DEATH TO BLINDNESS.  Newcastel, Ind., Dec. 14.—Preferring death to blindness, Aftdrew Hall, a farmer, 80 years old, drowned" himself. His body was found floating in Buck creek, .near Dunreith. today. His -eyesight had been failing rapidly and he often, told his daughter, with whom he lived, that he wished he were dead. He had laid his ¿oat and-hat upon the bank of the stream before entering the waten  HEAD-ON COLLISION.  Lawrenceburg, Ind., Dec. 14.—In head-on collision at North Bend, Ind., today, between an eastbound passen-r ger train on the Baltimore and Olilo road from St. Louis, and a westbound passenger train to Louisville,. both engines -»-ere wrecked and mail cars telescoped, Engineer Chadwick was slightly injured. No passengers were hurt. - The train, men and mail clerks jumped* before the crash.  STATE GRANGE * MEETS.  Columbus, Ind., Dec, 14.—The ^Indiana state grange opened its thirty-ninth annual convention here today. The master, Aaron Jones, of South Bend, pointed out in hiS address to the 150 delegates present that much le^s-lation urged by the grange had- been brought-about. -  Future objects sought by the grange, he jsaid, -were'a parcels post, government ownership of the telegraph' and telephone, waterways from Chif:a^o,to the great lakes and bettreen .other/ points,i as planned, and -government supervision of all means oOransportaV tion. Former Governor N. J. ..¿aohel-der, of New -Hampshlrer master* 9f' the National «range, wiir deliver - an ad-^ dr^ss tonight. ^ ^ .  yftUL C0NTE8T> MAYORACTY.  ELECTION UW III NOIS  Grovemor Deneen Sends a Special Message to the Legislature.  Springfield, 111., Dec. 14.—Governor Deneen today in. a special session of the ' legislature laid particular stress upon the necessity for a new primfiry election law as the most important subject for legislative è:.uctment. The governor refers to the decisión of'the supreme - court invalidating the Ogles-by primary act of 1908 arid in an au-pen^lx to the message details the rt;-fiisal of the supreme court jUMsts to draft a primary mfeasure' -which would be constitutional.  Closing^ the statement of the "primary election reforni, : the chief executive says: '"I, therefore, renew my recommendation for the ehactihent ot a direct primary law and urge. its passage at the present session'." -  Other recoinrtiendatlonff are:- Passage of a corrupt practices act, limiting campaign ; expenditures and requiring publication of campaign expense. accounts. -  Creation, of a commission to take charge Of the construction of the proposed lakés-to-gulf deep waterway, a $20,000,000 bond issue for this project having been approved by the pieople, and;the development of \«ater power.  Amendments to nïinin.K laws to prevent, -if possible, à: repetition . of the Cherry disaster', »an appropriation . for relief of the sufferer;^ at Cherry; a cpmmisaibh to study the subject of employe,i:s' liability. ; : ; . - ^  in recommending the adaption of the amendment to the federal constU. tùon permitting the imposition. of an income' tax, the governor says: "A nation which, possesses the",power to call upon its citii^ens for service upon the battle field shQUld. possess the^ power to imposé an income, tax eVei^ it may be necessary to meet national emengenjcies." . , .  INJU^kp IN A^LL. r7  Dr. Bfnl^H Siiffsi« Fracture of  8syer«l-.RIbs..v. ■ í.-:."; '■ -. Dr." J.l Stpp. , Smith,tdt 'sostened »  Speaking from, a wheel, chair. Fay Bossier, of "Wood county, O., apparently a hopeless cripple, Tuesday p. m. gave his testimony in the United States court in this city in the action in which he seeks to recover damages in the sum of $10.000 from theMiincie Hospital company and William D. Whitney.  It was the flrst case called for trial when ihe December term of the federal court convened at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon. Judge Albert B. Anderson arrived in the city shortly before noon from Indianapolis. He was. accompanied by Noble C. Butler, the clerk. Harry C. Pettit, the United States marshal, and Alonzo A. Boyd, deijuty United States marsh'al. Others on duty at the session are' Deputy Clerk T. J Logan and A. R. Walter and S. J. Errington. who are officiating in the capacity of bailiffs.  Alleges Unskilled Treatmsnt.  Bossier was employed in ^e oil fields at Selma. and on February • 7, 1907, he was caught in a flywheel at a pumping station and frightfolly . injured about the back and legs. He wá» removéd to a hospital at Muncie, and in his action makes the contention that his case was not given proper treatment there, and that as a result he is a permanent cripple. He asserts that medical authorities at Toledo told him that a surgical operation at the proper time would have made a complete cure possible. Mr. Bossier is represented by Attorney P. V. Hoffman, of Auburn, while Leonard A Townsend appear for the Muncie Hospital company and Sol A. Wood for William D, Whitney.  In his opening statement, Mr. W<wJ asserted that the evidence would sjjow that the medical and surgical ca>re given Bossier at Muncie was competent and proper, while as to the Muncie Hospital company Mr. Townsend set up an alibi. He asserted tliat the Muncie Hospital company was not in fact the owner of any hospital;' thát it ceased to exist some years ago, and that it had never been in fact anything other than an insurance organization which provided medical and surgical care for its policyholders^ biit that Bossier had never held a policy in it. Judge "Anderson is hearing the case without a jury.  Several Cases Dismissed.  Several old actions were dismissed from the" docket, among them being -the case of the Potter Manufacturing company vs. the Julius Keller Construction - company. Tomorrow the arguments in the dental cuspidor case will be taken up. and it ii expected that the work of the session will- be completed in the two days.  Deputy Marshal Boyd is the officer Avho was in charge of the delegation of former Indiana bank clerks recently transijorted to Fort Leavenworth penitentiary to begin their terms of five years each.' Mr. Boyd. said he was there but a short timé and did not learn the nature of the employmeptt that had been given the men.  "They were á well-behaved lot of fellows while under rny charge." Said Mr. Boyd today, "and I felt mighty sorry for them. I ejn)ect to make another^ trip to Leavenworth in the spring and I am going to call on every one of them." . ^. , ..  WILD Ai  Tame Wolf, Pet of Kcin-tucky Hòiis^ld, Attempts to Kill Babe.  • Owensboro, Ky., Dec. 14.—The i^-sistible call of the wild siidden^r brought the thirst for human.blood to a pet wolf belonging to, Reuben« Masters last night, and the animal escaped from its kennel, ^^shed into the ho^use and sprang at ' the throat .-of Masters' young daughter. Masters hurled himself between his daughter and the enraged animal... The teeth of ' the animal closed like'a vIm on ^é man's arm. . With... bis - free 'hand he. grabbed the Wolf by thè ^ throat,'and '-the two went to the floor in 4 struggle. The nSah fln^Uy chOke<l th^ wòlf tiU released its hcâd^on.his arm. J " '  lA'iiefghbor ra'n-'ln witli/a .-haînnjier* and killed the wolf ¡while Mastert.heW iti .The wolf was sent to" him-^m Idaho a year ago and the:; aniiik! ]^^ always been gentle,/ ' ~ .  òr WILSON IS diiao..  A  Fiölfissr -'B»i;risti»r  'lOiwíÑsá, ' InÁ^^'i^í 'liíí»   

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