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Fort Wayne Weekly Democrat Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1870 - Page 1

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   Fort Wayne Weekly Democrat (Newspaper) - September 14, 1870, Fort Wayne, Indiana                                 V.W  MBEMOCBA^.  PpÉÌbiialÌed Every Wednesday,  JR. jp. X>Xj\3ki:M; CO.,  «•i*®i:Cai»aiiM and Wayne Streets,  f j ' iTOBT WAiNK, INDIANA,  Terms, Per Annum, In  . Advance.  Kattos of Lenrat AdTertisiUKi li«nl AaTettUemntB, §1 60 per Bqharc, first in " ' i 15 cents, per 8qo«ro e«ch saoseiineii type <nonpareJl)con  '"eS^AU^leg^ailYortiBeinenU clMWd to the " Attorneys handlhg them in for pnbliotion, and no proof of publication will be made out nutil pgyment has been made therefor. '6»,AUUttMNwhetlWirfor publkaUon or on  R. D. DUMM & CO., • • DMOOSAT " OF* ICE, Tort Wayne, lud.  t:  Í -  FORT WAYNE  BIISISE-M™-  THB'NAHB, B0SINESS ANO LOCATION OF THK ¿BÀDINQ HOUSKS OF FT. WAYNE.  i:TÍxoM Ot: 0«t »«adiBni who make pnrchaaes in Fort Wayne, by eniting tWs ont and uaing it a« a reference, will saTO time aud-tronble. The selec-Lion has been caroinlly made, and i« strictly flBSTCLASS.!  liaööW  VOL,. 37.  FORT WAYNE. INDIANA. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1870.  NO. 34.  TKEDEMOCßAT.  iirASitlA'S IIAUKFOOT BOT.  b v a. h . foe.  ARTÄAT.T.RRIES.  J B. SAUNDERS^  y: 3 Phœnix Block.  J A .SHO ~A FF,  O ver Palace of Fîishion.  BXNÖCRS.'  »AVIS &líIiO.,  54 Galhoua St, ,opp. Court House  :K ö.J)ÜMM & GO^  : (ÜBCcetaors to W. fi. Norton.)  ConCÄlhoun «& AVayne Ste.  BOOKS, STATIONCRY. &C.  • ,(irnoi,XBAU: and sstaiu)  V. P. STOCJKBKIDGE,  ■ ' . 98 Colombia Street CEIL&BROn  2 Phceuix Block, Calhouu St. lEMOJT BBO. & CCU  • 77 Columbia Street  BRASS WORKS.  A. HATTEBSIiEY,  48 East Main Street-  BOOTS AND SHO£S.  E. VOllDEUM ABK & SONS,  4 Phœnlx Block.  Lonjj he liptened to the story  Of the poet's "B.nreioot Boy;" Listened »ilently and earnest,  Caring naught for ball nor toy; And the eye» of brovni grew browner,  And the cheeks of pink grew red. And npon blahand he rested. Thoughtfully, his cnrly head.  For awhile he seomed to ponder.  Then he slowly went away To a dim, nnnotlced comer, - Where he sometimes hid in play. There at tasseled shoe and stocking. Bravely tugged with all his might; OS ther came, at last, revealing Dimpled balls of pink and white.  Softly, softly, o'er the carpet  Strayed the little pearly feet. Till he rested close to mamma. Rested blnshincly and sweot; Half abashed and half emboldened. Raised his eyes so brown and coy: "Mamma," and the lips were smiling, " Isn't 1 'oor barefoot boy?"  IN THE NICK. OF TI HIE.  BY E. H. KELLOGQ.  (WHOUSAU Ajn> BSTAIL.)  JOHN McDOUGAii, ,  73 Columbia Street-  , CBnrAWARE.  (wholícúú AKO BXTAIT.)  , 48 G»moún Street B TBESTMAir & SON,  ' 86 ColumT)ia Street.  CI.OTHING.  (.wbolxsais axn betaii-  M.E. WOODWARD,  4$ Calhoun St., opp Court Ilouse.  ^ BRT GOODS.  C.OKFP&CO.,  : 103jDolumbia Street.  FRANK & THA3TH0USEE,  - ■ No. 7 Keystone Block  -. V - rBRITGOISTS.  WBOIMAU AHS BZIAIL.)  l£BYB» «KO. ifir CO,  2 Kevstone Bl'k & 118 Columbia St. BIDDLB & BRANDETFF,  : Golum1)ia Street^ corner Calhoun. DANIEL VOLLMEB,'  ^ Calhoun Street, corner Berry FOOTB & WOOSTEB,  S- W.Cor. Maiir and Calhoun Sts  rZLE-CUTTERS.  HARRIS ifc GROTHEN,  Calhoun St-, south of AVashin<?ton-  : rUBNITDRB.  EMERICK & PIERCE,  2G and 28 East Main Street,  OliOVi: * UlTTEK FACTORY. H.A. DANIEL,»,  80 Calhouu Street-  GROCERS.  (WaOL«8AI.sJ)  HUESTIS & HAMILTON,  83 anxlSii Columbia Street.  B TRENTMAN & SON,  56 Calhoun Street.  rBXTAII.)  P.P.BOLTZ&BRO.,  - 88 Callioun St.  TERRENCE MARTIN,  74 Barr St., op. Market House.  GEXT^^fXTTRKISHJNG GOODS  MODiat^LL & FOWLEE,  ' ; 62Csdhonn Street.  HARDWARE.  -i ^IvmOIMAIX AIIP BXTAIi.)  rMcCULLOCH&RICHEY,  ,87 Columbia Street. MORGAN & BEACH.  89 Columhia Street. B W. OAKLEY & SON,  79 Columbia Street,  KCIOP. SKIRT FACtOKT.  JOSEPH'BLACf,  91 Columbia Street. .  - CAPS & FURS.  JAS. HARPER & CO«  3 Phoenix Block, Calhoun Street.  HARNESS, SADDI^ES. &C.  L TRABB,  ; dlj^ Columbia Strett-C. B. NEIREITER,  ' 122 Columbia Street.  A young physician has great diiB-culty in attaining pre-eminence in his profession amidst a^ast city like New York, and Doctor Cavender found this to ba hia case precisely in starting in life; nevertheless he struggled bravely with a determined will to overcome all obstacles, and finally succeeded in establishing himself in a limited position which promised, with attentive application, a living for the present, and the prospects of a good income in tho future.  .. His office was on a side street liear the Noith river, and much of his prsc-tioe being among the poorer cl^es was necessarily gratuitous. While pa^g one of those visits of mercy an mcidc^ occurred which raited most fortmuttely for him.  He hod just left a poor colored family who resided in a rear tenement hous3 on W——street, and on reaching the main thoroughfare stood gazing at the miserable surroundings of the wretched neighborhood with a sad heart; that any of God's creatures should be necessitated to live m such vile slums.  While thus occupied ho saw two young ladies, bearing a basket between them, approaching him. Although plainly dressed in dark alpacas, there was something in the innate gentility of their manner which denoted that they were not inhabitants of the locality. The elder was apparently twenty, while the other was some two years younger. As 'they wore no vails, the young practitioner saw that they were strikingly handsome.  On reaching him they paused, and  the elder inquired where No. — W-  stieet was.  MERCHANT TAIZ.ORS.  C. G. VOGEL : & SON,  E. S. Calhonn St., opp. Phoenix Bl'k. JOHN G. FLEDDERMAN,  25 East Main Street.  .Bm.UN£RY ¿b NOTIONS.  (Wholesaleinà Ketail;)  tTPDEGRAFF & CO.,  94 Callioun Street.  NOTIONS. TOYS, &C.  (Wholesalo and Retail.)  JAS. M. ICANE & BRO..  No. 9 Calhoun Street.  PAINTS AND WALL PAPER.  O L STÄRKET, .  No. 12 West Berry Street-  PICTURE FR^ES, MIRRORS,  W.S.WOOD,  132 Calhouu Strcet-  PAINTERS-HOUSE ANS SIGN.  O. J. KOVEF,  Corner Calhoun & V< ashiii^ton Sts.  SEEDS.  DE GROFF NELSON & CO.,  60 and 08 Callioiin Street.  SEWING MACHINES.  GP.OVteR & BAKER, L- Lnmbard, Ag't,  14 West Berry Street. SINGER'S, - - L. P. Griggs, Ajrent, 60 Calhoun St,.McDougars Block.  STOVES AN'5D TINWARE. J. J. JOCQUEL,  ITOXJalboun St-, op- Cathedral.  TOBACCONISrS.  (WU0I.E3AI. p..)  EiVING, HOOD & CO.,  Main, corner Clinton Street rt^.B. SMITH & CO..  17 Columbia Street  TRUNK MANUFACTUBERS.  (wnOLESAI.li ant. itetaii..  H. LINGENFELSERRllO-  51 East Main Street.  ROOFING.  t  JOHN CRAMER A BRO.,  SliATE ROOFERS,  And Dealers in Slate,  Southwest Gonier of Lafayette and Wallace Sts., f»UT tVAYKE, IK». All work warranted. P. O. Box 142«. junT'lOdawly  "It is a couple of blocks up," ho replied. "I am going in that direction, and, if you prefer, will lead the way."  l^ey thanked him with an easy grace and followed.  On reaching the number, the doctor recognized the house to be one of ill-repute; and, apologizing, inquired if they were aware of the nature of the place they sought. To which he received a negative reply, and the elder, who acted as spokeswoman through the whole interview, said they had seen a notice in the last night's paper to which she and her sister had responded, and were taking some provisions to the suffering family. She handed him a ^p of newspaper and ho read, "Any kindly-disposed young persons desirous of alleviating the wants of an almost starving family will please oblige by calling at No. — W-street."  "Tl^ is either a mistake in print or the vile subterfuge of an evil mind to deceive benevolent persons," said tho young physician, indignantly. "This house is one of the worst in the neighborhood, and it is fortunate, ladies, that I met you as I did, otherwise you might have been flagrantly insulted;"  "It scarcely seems possible.that any one could so far lower himself as to bo guilty of such an outrageous action. Sir," said the lady.  "Nevertheless it is demonstrated by the paper in your o^ hand," was the  anything the matter?" Tho voice, was soft and musical, and the tno turned to the speaker in surprise. He was a tall, elegantly dressed young man, but an air of languid abandon pervading bis handsome countenance, together with the cold glitter of his snake-like eyes, would certainly have warned any one possessing a knowledge of human nature not to trust him implicitly.  "I^waa inerely warning these ladies d£ the nature of the house," replied the doctor, "^me scamp has inserted an radyertisement, stating that w Carving family resided here, and these ladies, ^th womanly sympathy for suffering humanity, have brought provision to the needy family. YOu can substantiate my statement as to the premises. Sir." Ho handed the advertisement to the new-comer.  "Most assuredly," was the ready reply, as the man's eyes perused tho beautiful faces of the ladies with an air of uneqiuvocal admiration; he then read the paragraph.  "Abominably shameful!" he muttered ; "it was indeed fortunate, ladies, that you met this gentleman; these printers are responsible - for many mistakes. I know the family this referred to; thpy reside two blocks farther below."  "O, thanks. Sir," said the elder lady; "I am so glad that it is not false. I should have been deeply grieved to have been convinced that any one could be guilty of so cruel a jest as this gentleman supposed it to be. He thought some one had done it to deceive benevolent persons."  "Thanks for humanity's sake I am able to disprove that theory; if you please, I will lead you to this really deserving family."  Th6 ladies signifying their willingness to accompany him, thanked the young physician for his kindness, and followed the stranger. Doctor Cavender stood looking after them for a moment, as they proceeded down town, and then sorted homeward. But a vague perception of impending da an intuitive something which no could hot comprehend, a feeling that tho proceeding was not all right, caused him, after moving a short &tance, to turn and follow thepartyhohad just quitted. They were but a few steps in advance, and proceeding leisurely, when he saw a carriage stop close to them, and the next moment two men sprang hastily from an allejrway and cast two heavy hoods over tho heads of tho ladies, who struggled bravely, but were easily thrust into the carriage by the assailants. As the tall stranger was preparing to follow, the doctor seized his urm and hurled him backward. A quick sign passed between the inmates of the coach and their foiled comrade, when the driver, whipping up his horses, drove furiousljr down tho street. With a lithe spring, the baffled scoundrel dismantled, leaving his coat in the hands of his assailant, at whose head he launched a fearful blow. But the Doctor, who was no novice at the manly art, received the stroke on his left arm, which was guarded by tho coat, and returned the compliment with a stinging left-hander, which felled his antagonist msensible to the pavement. Not pausing to see the result, our hero cast away the impeding garment, and hastened  after the receeding vehicle, which turned into Canal street, t<iward the river.  On reaching the comer he recognized two saddle hones standing fastened to a lamp-post as belonging to 'Fred Cranston, an old colle^ chum who was near by. Ho hastily com-mii^nicatod.his adyenture, a^d in a few minutes thoy were mounted aiid~8peed-ing after the carriage at a swinging gait. They ovorhanled the abductors before reaching the Desbrosses street ferry, and commanded the driver ^to halt on penalty of his life, which order he was obliged to comply with. Tho abrupt stoppage of the carriage caused one of the promising inmates to lower a window, through which his pugnacioas visage protruded to demand the cause. He saw at a glance that the game was blocked,, and the next instant both worthies endeavored to escape by the other door, but the unpleasant click of a revolver in the hands of Cranston soon brought them to their semes, and they were placed in the hands of a policeman, who convoyed the three to the nearest station, wbero they were committed for trial.  After promising to appear against them at tho proper time, the complainants were ^rmitted to depart. Tho terrified laues, under the d^ec-tion of their intropid deliverers, Vere conducted to a Sixth avenue car, in which the doctor placed them, and was preparing to follow when a heavy hand on his shoulder caused him to torn. He was arrested on tho charge  of murdering a stranger in W-  street.  The next daj'. through the combined efforts of Cranston and Mr. Wilson, the young ladies' father, he was released on bail. At the inquest, a verdict wivs rendered of "death by apoplexy, caused by ablowglvenmselt-delencc-"  The stranger was recognized as B-  a prominent W- sharper, one of  those elegantly-dressed individuals, with ambrosial curls and dainty mustaches, who may be seen any afternoon on our prominent thoroughfares, like ravenous wolves seeking whom they mar devour.  At the trial of the three other scoundrels, one of them admitted that he had  been engaged by B-to assist in the  abduction of the Miss Wilsons-  He had made the acquaintance of the servant girl, and placed the paper con-talnv the advertisment in her hands to be shown to the young ladies, who were known to be extremely kind to the poor. If responded to in person, they Avere to be seized and borne off to a place of security; otherwise soma other plan was to be adopted. It is needless to state that it would have been successful had not some one been providentially in the nick of time.  The adventure resulted in Doctor Cavender's becoming a frequent aud welcome visitor at the residence of Mr. Wilson who appointed him familv physician, which proved but a foundation-stone to a brown front which he now occupies on a street near Madison square.  But there was a still more powerful magnet in the house of the rich merchant to attract the young M- D. thither ; namely," Love Eyes." Only a few weeks since he repeated to me with burning pathor the following stanzas from Oliver Wendell Holmes' exquisite poem on that theme:  "Gaze not npon his shield of jet The shaft npon the string Is set; Look nM beneath his azoreveil, Though every limb were caMd^in mall.  Bat that Is dearest all the while. That wears for ns the sweetest smile."  The way of all flesh, I thought, " Love's voung dream." I was right-The other day I saw him proudly passing from the verandah of a Fifth-avenue church, with lovely Fanny VVllson, the youngest daughter, fair as the orange blossoms on her queenly brow, with checks like blush-roses, clinging tO' his maulv arm a happy, smiling bride.  THE PEDMiEB'S SO».  trade, for houses in. cities are sometimes seven stories high, and Knmer might break his leg or neck. And so Komer did not go to the city, but kept watching the old cow.  But for all that, this gentlemen, and others to whom he showed Komer's drawing, did not forget him or them, but kept on talking (^ut tho wonderful child, and what was more to their credit, tried to help him.  They sent for him to take lessons with their children, in French, Latin and music. And that he need not be ashamed to come among them, they gave him better clothing, and the gentleman who first saw him, brought him to eat with his family at his own  A BBIDAI. CHAHIBEB INVADED.  A Briae Stolen From Her Husband'. Arma.  ast week 3Ir. Sarah Evans ouse of J. n. ¡ase in Fr-mk-Iv&nsls about eel when he that he was as.^l8sued by king- affidavit I parents were 9 4jMered the ak the  Do you know what might there is in the little words "I will5'" Let me tell you a story : In a poor hut in Germany lived a lad. This hut had only one room, with a Replace in it, and no stairs. Instead, a ladder in it went up to the xoof. Besides the lad of whom I have spoken, was the usual supply of a poor man's children.  The principal support of the family was a cow, and the principal employment of Komer, the name oi my hero, was to collect, in the spring, the sedges which had been thrown up by -the waters, to make Utter for the cow. After the meadows had become green he passed the long summer days in watching her, sometimes alone and sometimes in oQmpany with other boys. He also brought wood to bum, and helped to glean in harvest time, and when the autumn winds shook the -trees roughly he gathered acoms and sold them to those who kept geese.  When he grew larger he helped his father, who was a peddler, to carry his bundles from hut to hut. There was a small school, too, where Eomer learned to read and write, but that was all he learned the^e.  One evening (Eomer never forgot that evening) he was sitting at a table with his parents. A small lamp was burning upon it, and his father, who had just come home with his peddler's pack, was talking to his mother about his business. The old peddler loved smoking, and had brought home with him a packet of tobacco, the wrapper of which lay upon the table. On it was the picture of a horse.  Little Komer idly took up the picture. This is very good, thought he; I wonder if I could draw one like it if I should try ? Who knows but I might ? Little Komer looked at his father, who was very busy talkng; so lie took pen, ink and a piece of paper, and shyly began.  When he had finished, he looked at it; it seemed to him very perfect, and his little heart swelled with a new, strange delight. Then Komer showed it to his parents—one can't be happy alone—and they praised and admired it, more because Komer did it than anything else.  By and by Komer went to bed. It was very dark, but still he saw his horse—^lie could not sleep for thinking of it. He tossed and turned, and longed for daylight that he might see it with his bodily eyes again—for he was not quite sure, atter all, but that he was dreaming. Morning came. It was no dream ; there was the horse ; but Komer was never again the same Komer. All that day fie was excited and restless, and the next, and the next. How was he to become a real painter?  Near his father's house there lived a potter, who had some outlines as models for painting hi» plates and dishes. Little Eomer went to him and begged the loan of these outlines for a little while. Then he made a blank book, and very caretully copied them into it with pen and ink.  The people in tho huts around thought it wonderful, and they were handed about, till at List they came to a man who was a sort of mayor of the place where Komer lived. He was so pleased and astonished that he sent for the boy, made him presents, praised his drawing, and asked him how ho would like to be à painter.  Like it? Of course .Eomer nearly jumped out oi his skin for joy. Like to go to a.gfeat city to a master paint.^. er, and learn to be one himself. Of course ho could not find his tongue to tell all the joy that fiUèd.his heart.  ISiere was no need—his glowing face Was enough. Thé gentleman said ha would talk of it to his parents. Now, his parents never heard of any kind of painting save doorâ and houses, and when the gentleman asked them, they answered that it was a very dangerous  table.  -Little Komer did not think, as you do, that it was a hardship to study— not he. He flew at his books with a will, and till he was sixteen years old, never spent an idle moment in lesson hours. After this, he did some co]pying for a gentleman, besides other writing, in order to earn money.  Then, for the first time, he went to a great city, and gazed on splendid paintings till ho was nearly b<«side himself with rapture. Now indeed, nothing could stop him. Ho made tho acquaintance of a young artist and commenced immediately, weeping that he had not been permitted to do so when he first had the offer.  So hard did he work, so absorbed was he with this one idea that he grew sick; his hands began to tremble like those of a palsied man, and he could no longer hold a pencil. Now, indeed, ho must rest if ho would not die. But ha was too active to lie upon the shelf and be quite idle; if he could not draw he would read. He took up a volume of poems; why could he not write— he, Komer ?—^why not ? He siezed his pen, he wrote poem after poem. They were copied, . praised, and set to music!  Now Eomer turned his attention to writing books. CKf ted men were proud of his friendship; he could talk with them on any subject. His twenty-fourth year found him famous. The old cow, were she living, which was doubtful, must take care ot herself—he had browsing" of his own to do.  I hope he kept that horse he copied from the tobacco paper; I hope ho made a drawing of the old hut where he was bom, and the peddler, with his pipe and Iiis pack, and the green meadows where he used to dream away the lovely summer -days. whUa oia Brin-dle switched the flies and winked lazily at the patches of blue sky as she lay under the broad tree shadows. I hope he did not forget his old mother, if she was ignorant, because she knew enough to love him, and perhaps, had she not praised that horse, because her little Eomer drow it, he might have tended cows all his life—who knows? ^^_  mrbat Next 1  Is the European war at an end? This question is one that is not easily answered just now. The people of Paris—and that means France—^ifwe are to judge by the tenor of the cable dispatches, ore determined to defend themselves to the last. It is not to be presumed that Prussia will relax hostilities until a request for a respite of arms is made by the French authorities, a request which they express a de.> termination not to make, at least at present.  Should the Regency be continued^ the war will be continued upon the original basis, with perhaps slight modifications, upon which it was inaugurated. Should it be abrogated and a new French govcmment established in its place, the whole phase of political and milituy affairs in Europe will be suddenly changed, and the different powers will be compelled to assume a different attitude than at present occupied.  Let us suppose that a Republic is declared, which shall either carry on war against Prussia, or ask for just and equitable terms of Peace—^what is to be the result ? In the first place, can Prussia consistently or jusÜy refuse to treat with a French Republic for peace? Second, will the other powers of Europe permit Prussia, should she be willing, to recognize a Republic in France ? In the event of a declaration of a Republic, theso will be the first questions to arise. Passing the question whether a monarchy will recognize the existence of a Democratic gov-emment along its own border, we came to thg other, will the other powers permit a Repilblic?  In the first place, a Republican form of government would likely prove a fiailure, and in the second place, if the people of France should aosiro to establish it theji^would have all monarchical Europe to contend with. Monarchy is the same in all a^es and countries, and is imwilling to concede anything to a free and representative government. Neither England, Austria, Russia or Pmssia would consent to a Repnblie of forty millions of people to bo established in the heart of Europe. Should it prove successful, their own forms of government would be speedily overthrown, and the government oi the people substituted.  But suppose the house of Orleans succeeds to the throne of France. The Napoleonic dynasty no longer enters into the contest. Yet the war must go on. The house oi Orleans, or any other claimant, cannot establish a claim to the throne, without redeeming the lost prestige of the French arms. The question oi dynasty disposed of in the overthrow of Napoleon, and a "legi-mate" monarch upon the the throne of France, then comes up the vexed question of territorial limits, a question that France and Prussia will not settle of themselves, but to which all the leading • powers will be parties, and which will undoubtedly result in some material changes in the map ofEurope-Though active hostilities cease at once, there w^ill arise perplexing questions touching the conclusion of a treaty of peace, which will not only tax, but require the active ^rticipation of the ablest diplomats of Europe.—Pittsburgh Post.  TIte Oblo Campaiam.  The Boston Post says:  "In Ohio the Democrats are organizing for an earnest conflict with Radicalism, in hopes of a result largely in their fitvor at the polls. The strongest talent of the party has been ]^aced in nomination in several of the Districts —the Third, Fourth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Fourteenth; and tiie Fifth, Ninth, Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fifteenth the symptoms betoken marked improvement in the vote over the last one thrown against the Radicals. We mention such names as Denver, Campbell, McEinney, Jewett, Hnbbell and Critchfield, representing men who are of great strength in their own Districts, and who are expected to shake, if not overthrow, tho majorities heretofore secured for the dominant party. A general deten^ation is being aroused to vote up reform by voting down high taxation and the accompanying cor  ruption and extravagance. The canvass is to be made on living questions, and not on tho resurrected memories of the Radical party as paraded in the address of the Congressional Committee. The West is waking up to the im-poitant issues pending, and a Like itpir-it everywhere will work splendid results for good government in November." _  Latjba C. Holioway says that" the female sex in America are in a transitory state." Yes; the season is about over, and most of them are transitory-ing home from the watering-places.  Early one mOrnin] Shedrack Ncel aud I were mairifei^ *át. thi Doming, J^ptÎQ!^»! Un county, Qnp^'311 twenty years secured the licélW, stal over age. The licensèi Judge Pugli, on Neel cm to this fact- Miss EvanS opposed to the match, as  young lady not to si_____ _____ ....  young man. The youn|; lady showed her contempt for this ^der by going off with Ned Sunday içbrning and becoming his wile- Alteif.;thc ceremony at Justice Deming's hojâfsc, the newly married pair went to the house of Mr. Bsadford Ned's step-father at North Columbus, or near therc¡ where the two brothers of Miss Evans .tracked the wedded jjair to the brid.^1 chamber, made a raid on the Bradford establishment, carried their sister out of the house by mai-i force, put her in the buggy, tied her hands and feet with the lines, and in spite ofi:3ier cries aud struggles and the resistance of the woman of the house, carrid her back in triumph to her father's house. There she was kept until the next day locked in a room. Mr. Neel then made application for a writ pi habeas corpus,  clelmmg-A«*-hl&_3KÍfti foroihly de^-  taincd by her parents. The writ was issued, served by the Sherifl", aud the young lady produced in Court. Tho marks were still on the woman'.s arms where she had been tied, and there were other signs of rough treatment-She told her story a little nervously, with a defiant; said she went away from home boldly, and took nothing but what belonged to her.  After hearing the testimony of the different witnesses, Judge Pugh sustained the writ, discharged Mrs. Neel, and ruled that the defendants in the case, the Evans' should pay costs of prosecution, as they were the first offenders in kidnapping another man's wife. ^  Bismarck'« Terms of Peace.  The New York Tribune's correspondent had an interview with Bismark at the Eing's headquarters, near Sedan, on the 2d of September. In respect to his inquiry what were likely to>bo the conditions of peace demand by the Kng of tho Prussians and tho Government, the Count replied : " There are two ways of stopping an attack on Paris and settling the question of the ^inc provinces. First, wo might make .Alsaco and Lorraine a neutral Btate, liko Iiiûxëmhurg or Belgium, extending from the former country to Switzetíand, and so separating France and Pmssia by a group of neutral States; but I confess it appears to me that tho neutrality of existing small States is already so difficult to protect, and is at every moment capable of so many and such very dan-gorous compUpations, that I do not think it would bo worth while to make more neutral States, with new borders and dangers.  "Secondly, \Ye might annex Alsaae and Lorraine, and hold them as conquered territory ; but 1 am sure that this would not be looked on favorbly by a majority of my German fellow-countrymen. We are all most anaious to complete our unity, but we do not want any people among us who are unwilling members of the German nation. That the Alastiaus would be most disloyal subjects of the King of Prussia, in spite of the great majority of them speaking the German language and being of Teutonic origin, there can be no OOTfbt.  ^"Thirdly, there remains to us, then, as^a third course, to take Metz aud Strasbourg, and to keep them. This is what we shall do. Strasbourg particularly, is absolutely needful for the protection of South Germany, which is at the mercy ot the French army- So long as France has Strasbourg nothing is to stop a French invading army. Now it would be very unfair if we were -¿o leave our South German friends unprotected, after they have fought so bravely aifd weU by our side in this campaign. Then again, by holding Strasbtirg wo could always prevent any movement on the Rhine. • We should be able not only to march an army by the Valley of the Main on Paris, but to take a French army marching on Mayenco or Coblentz in the flank and rear. So we have besieged Strasburg vigorously, and when we have got the ola German town back again we shall make a Gibralter of it."  But allow mo to suggest, I said, that the cession of Strasburg is not a thing to which France will be easily recon-dled, aU the more because it is, as you say. the key of France on the East.  "My dear sir," was the reply, "you haVe been with us continuaUy since our entry into France. I have heard you constantly talking French ; now, have you not clearly seen that it would be difficult for the French to be more angry with us for our victories over them than they already are ? No, not if wo were encamped in the Bois de Bologne itself, and just because they are and will be for many a year to come very .soro against us we must take care not to leave in their hands the means for doing us a mischief. When you meet a dnmken man in the stireets what-do you do ? If he is mis-ohievous you call a policeman,don't you ? WeU, Strasburg and Metz will havo to be our poUcemen, and good, stout ones, too." It is curious, I remarked, how much the French do hate the Prussians, and what stories they, toU and believe about you ! I have lived a great deal in Paris, and I know there aro told there'as facts some fables that are aU but incredible.  "Yes," answered Bismarck, "We have taken thç place of the English thirty, nay, twenty years ago ; but, as they have come to forget their hatred of perfidious Albion, so fhey will have to find, some day or other, that thero is some good in us also. It would seem as if the French nation stood in constant need of a bugbear to vent their wrath upon for the moment. We ere the bugbears." I ventured then to say, "I sea that the people are in a great fright in England, lest Your Excellency should cast a covetous eye on Holland." "Yes, I am aware that is another English idea," replied the Count, "but, like other English ideas, it is not accepted out of the country of its birth. We want nothing in Germany that is not German, and HoUand certainly is not German. Already Posen is looked upon with no friendly eye by many of my countrymen as a non-Teutonic province. There is no fear of our taking Holland, as there is Uttle of the French taking Belgium."  A Negro Ontraces a Tonnir Wltitc  I<ad)r, and la Hnuff by a JHob.  [From theMarysville (Ky.) Republican, Aug. 27.] WilUam H. Damall, residing about one and a half miles from Elizaville, together witii his wife and several members of the family and some visitors, had gone to a neighbor's on Tuesday to spend tho day. They loft at home three daughters, the eldest abou 18 years of age, tho others younçert About 3 o'clock in the afternoon there* was a call at tho front door in which the elder Miss DamaU answered. It proved to be a gentleman who wished to see on* of her brothers on business, and not finding him at home he went away. Shortly after another call was made, and Miu D., supposing he had returned, a|;ain went to the door. She had some difficulty in turning the latch, from the fact that the party outside had hold of the knob. Aa soon as the latch was turned, however, the door was pushed open and Misa D. seized by a starlwart negro and thrown violently upon her back in the doorway. We  have no desire to state what followed. Suffice it to say, the young lady was rendered unconEcious by the shock, and was unablo to call for assistance until tho scoundrel was taking his leftve. Attracted by the screams of the^ young Iftdj', a colored woman residing on the place reached the scene in timo to see tho course of hia fight through a field of weeds near by. The alarm spread like wildfire, and soon prge parties were organized for the purpose of scouring the country. Though several negroes were pursued on suspicion, and one or two arrested, it wos not tiU about ll.o'clock on Tuesday night that tho proper party was secured. He was in bed at Ms father's house, about two miles from where the outrage was committed. Our informant states that the negro's father was quite wilUng to have his son shot if he was guilty of the crime charged against him. The accused was named Frank Timborlink, aged about 22 years. He was not a resident of thé neighborhood, but had been seen prowling about there for several days, and was especially noticed in the vicinity of Mr. Dam-all's residence. He is reported to have been a worthless character. After his arrest ho was taken to Dr. D.'s house, but it being late at night it was thought best not to tako bim in tho presence of his victim. Accordingly he was taken to Flemingsbiirg and lodged in jail.  About noon on Wednesday he was again taken to Mr. Damall's, and at once recognized as the person who perpetrated tto crime. It was with the utmost difficulty that some of those present could be restrained from-ehoot  ing tho demon at once, but better counsel prevailed, and he was returned to Flemingsbuig in charge of tho Sheriff. A preliminary examination was had, and the case continued until Saturday. Tho prisoner was remanded t:> jaU, and a guard placed over him. The excitement knew no bounds, and in spite of exhortations to let the law take its course, an outraged and infuriated populace repaired to tho jail about midnight, on Wednesday, overpowered tho guard, took the criminal from his ceU, and hung him to a tree near tho outskirts of the town. His body was left hanging until about 9 o'clock on Thursday morning, when the authorities took charge of it.  state Items.  The horses are dying at Ligonior of some strange disease.  Eight burglaries were chronicled at Michigan City last week.  Iron ore has boon found in the railroad cut south of Oxford.  The Waterloo Air Line has been enlarged to a seven column papor.  Diphtheria is prevailing in some parts of Laporte county.  The old settlers of Cass County hold heir first annual meeting on the 13th.  The Northeastern Indiana Medical Society meets at Waterloo on tho 6th.  VANDEBBUBa countyseut sixrecmits to Jeffersonville on Thursday.  THELafayet£e «Tonz-naZ says one of the churches in that city has a dress circle.  Mabshall Cottnty has not increased in population for tho last two years.  The Christian Church at Knox has been sold and converted into a bUliard-room.  M. M. Bbuillext died on Thursday lubt. He wus u piomiueut cillzen of Vincenncs.  Two foolish young men in Adams county propose to fight a duel—"all about a woman."  Amanda Ckain, of Lagrange county, was found dead in her bed last Saturday moming.  Caterpu-labs are very seriously damaging the vineyards about Jeffer-sonviUe.  The colored people of Marion will celebrate emancipation day on the 22d inst.  LEAyENWOBTH, Crawford county, is anxious to become an incorporated town.  The national convention of spiritualists will be held at Richmond, on the 20th.  ViGO county farmers are making sales of new com, for future deUvery, at forty cents,  The new German Evangelical Church in New Albany, was dedicated on Sunday last.  The SuUivan county Fair, which closed on Saturday, was a decided success.  D. Resor, who served in the war of 1812, died at Galena, Floye county, on last Wednesday.  Father Fisher, an old pioneer, and estimable citizen of Laporto county, died last Wednesday.  The journeymen shoemakers of Waterloo are on a strike for an increase of wages.  The Northoastom Indians. Medical Society held a meeting at Waterloo on the 6th.  Many of the most beautiful shade trees in Terro Haute aro dying, from no assignable cause.  The members of the old Nineteenth Indiany regmient aro talking of holding a re-union  The potato bugs havo nearly cleaned out tho potato crop in tho counties of Northern Indiana.  St. Joseph has shipped 2,500 bushels of raspberries, and 3,5d4 bushels of blackMrries this season.  A DAtrOHTSR of Harrison Walters, near Frankfort, undertook to kindle a fire with coal oil, last week. She did it.  L. Napoleon Brown, of Jay county, was wanted in three different quarters, to father fatherless youngsters. He left.  The indignant owners of "dorgs," in Elkhart, offer a reward of f 210 for the person or persons who have poisoned their pets.  The advocates of tho woman's suffrage movement wiU hold a meeting at Dublin, Wayne county, on tho 7th.  Fall apples are selling in Decatur at fifty cents, and potatoes at sixty cents per bushel.  The next session of the Indiana Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, will be held in New Albany.  Coal boats are lying three abreast^ for a space of seven miles along the river about JeffersonviUe, waiting for an opportunity to get over the faUs.  Tbe Germans Have lionir ^memories."  It is very amusing to notice the sudden and remarkable friendship the Know Nothing RepubUcan party has just now for the Germans. But the Germans understand the "Uttlegame." One of them remarked in our office this week: " De Dutch has long memories. Dey don't forget de Enow Nod-dings gwite so gwick nnd easy. In 1855 dose Repooblicans vash aU d—d E^ow Noddlngs, und said 'vemoos  Tbe Josb Billinars Papers — EiOnir Brancb In Slices.  Long Branch iz the eastern terminus ov sum real estate on the west side ov tho AtUntik Oshun, and iz lokatid close down to the edge of the water.  The populoshiin is homo genus, women genus, girl and boy genus, young one genus, and divers other kind or genus.  The divers genus aro sum plenty. They go into the Atlantik Oshun, hand and hand, man and wife, pheUow and gall, stranger and strangeresses, drest in fiowing robes, and cum by and by like statuary in a tito fit.  The Atlantik Oshun iz a g^eat success. The author and proprietor ov it never makes snny blunders.  There iz a grate deal <Jv morality here at Long Branch. Thare iz sum isolated cases of iniquity, and a clever sprinkling ov innocent deviltry.  I am pleased to state -that the iniquity iz prindpally in fust hands, and finds but few takers.  Tho fluid ov the Atlantik Oshun iz salt, and haz bin so 'for more than 300 years to my knowledge. I state this as a stubborn fakt, and the "oldest inhabitant" may help himself if he can.  The ookashun ov this ps^tness has bothered the clergy for years. Sum uv them say that large lumps ovpsalt wuz deposited in the oshun, at an early day, bi the injuns, for ¡-aie kecpin, and sum sp,iy that tho grate number of -kodfish-and them number 2 makrel tirairtravcl in its waters, fcaa flavoured the oshun-  I ondorao tho kodfish and makrel job not bekauio I think it iz true, but it iz the weakest, andlhavcalway57tr^in tho habit uv standing up for the T^teifc-andr-op-pressed.  Flirtashuns aro thick here, but prin-cipaUy occur among thozwhohav wore the conjugal yoke until their necks hav begun to git gaUed.  These flirtashuns are looked on az entirely innocent, and are called "re-cmiting."  They are konsidered by sum (who are kaUed good judges) more bracing than tho sea-airing.  Millionaires are numerous, besides others who put on a miUyùn of airs, more or less.  Now and then yu will see a' forrin snob, just over from the other side ov the Atlantik Oshun. They wear long shirt coUars turned down, iftid short noses tumed up.  The landlord tolls me they hev aU paid their bills thus far, and he sez tho last thing he duz at nito, before he goes tow sleep, iz to pray that they wiU kon-tinue on to do so.  The prayers ov tho righteous are eed tew be heavy and weigh woU, and the landlord being ov a- righteous turn ov mind, I think he will win.  Tho Continental Hotel iz tho principal one here, and iz infested, just now, by 850 innocent creatures who eat 3 meals per day.  The female portion ov theso dear innocent creatures rool up their sleeves and go down once a day, to the keel ov their trunk, and drag out bi tho nap ov the neck, some clothes that would make tho Queen of Sheba sorry that she had not postponed Uving until Long Branch had bin invented, so that she could hav got the style.  I advise aU ov mi friends to come to the Continental Hotel, and bring their best klose with them.  Long Branch haz menny things to interest tho i^chollar, and the philan-t>,mpi«i., nn<»ng( wHinh À» the raco-korso-just built.  I attend this race-course lately, and see some very good rotary movements on it.  I didn't bet, bckause I hav always been principled against loseing enny money.  I think I could win lots ov money, spile mi morality, but the loss ov a fu dollars would git my virtu out of fix for ages.  Long Branch is also the home ov the miserlanyus crab and tho world-re-nound musketer.  Tho crab is kaught in endless confusion at Plezzure Bay, cluss by Long Branch.  He iz kaught bi tieing a hard knot on the other end of a string, and then dropping the string down in the water and ticlding the bottom ov his feet with tho knot ; in this way some times ne is kaught, and sometimes ho is not.  Tho musketer is az natral to Nu Jer-sce as Jersee Utening iz.  The musketer is a marvelus kuss, but whi he over waz allowed tu tako out his papers and travel, is unknown tew me, or even tew enny of my near rela-shun?.  If ho haz any destiny tow fill, it must be hiz stummuk, for he is the biggest bore, akording tew the size of hiz gimlet, I have ever met seldom. It don't look weU for a philosopher tew be' fraoktious at enny thing, not even a bug, bu if enny boddy ever hears me swear (out loud) he may know thare been a kussid muakeeter on mi premises.  I cum to Long Branch (in company with mi wife) at the opening of the season and put up at the Continental Hotol, and intend now to keep putting up thare untU the house shute up, if I hav tew kUmb the flag-staff tew dew it.  Every boddy who puts up at this hotel, iz allowed to put up regular, once a week, for hiz board and promiskuss things.  This iz a blessed privilege, which sum folks kant never enjoy, until they are deprived ov it.  It well then bo forever tow late.  I am one of them cunning crittcrs, who, whon thoy find a good hotol, a 225 pound landlord, and poUte officials, dwell with them heavily.  I hav sed before (in writing about hotels) that almost enny boddy thinks they know how tew keep a hotel, (and they do know how,) but this ackounts for the great number of kussid poor hotels aU over the country.—New YorJi WeeUy.  bones being entirely gone. The animal was camiverous as in the location of its stomach were found a number of bones, apparentiy the wing or leg bones of large birds. At tho point where first discovered tho bones wore only a couple of feet below the surface, but lay latterly into the steep hUl.  They went not in the rock but in the clay between the strata. At tho time of its death, or when deposited, there' was no deflection of the body beyond a idip at one point of six feet, but it immediately rose again to the original level. It is more than propablo that the serpent belonged to the Saurian ose, and may have been tho once famed fththy-osaurM; but of this there is no proof, as no indication of legs or arms have so far been found. The formation in the vicinity gives every token of former -vohianic eruptions, though the bed upon which tho remains rested was quite smooth.  The professor is inclined to the opinion that the serpent" was not indigenous to this country, but was deposited there by an iceberg when they swept over this country thousands of years ago. Additional interest is lent to this discovery by the fact that it is the first of the kmd ever made in America. The matter is to bo thoroughly investigated by scientific gentlemen.  A Tennessee Conrtsliip-  "T^rtrrrr'^th mntnnt m f-ir-nfrr ii.mitj by WiUiam Pickens, Esq., BiU'Rogers to widow Nancy E. Bailey. "This," says a correspondent, "was one of tho moot 03ctraiirdiTuoj*y- Jua —  titnde and determination, on the part of tho two persons interested ever exhibited in East Tennessee. Mrs. Bailey was" a widow of two months' mourning. She was fair beyond the usual fairness of her associates. BiU Rogers was, himself, a comoly rough country youth of about nineteen years of age. A week before the marriage, tho widow Nancy visited the reaidenoe of BiU's maternal parent, and luckily found her in tho field and Bill in the house. Nancy is to aU intents a practical business woman, and went to work at once. Drawing a stool to BiU's feet, says she, "BUI Rogers, how'd you Uko to marry ?" Says BiU, in reply, "fust rate." Says Nancy, straightening herself up and throwing out her magnificent chest, "BiU Rogers, how do you Uko this?" Says BiU, "bnUy." Says Nancy, "Bill Rogers, get the license and it's yours." Says BUI, "I'U have 'em or die." He was off in a moment for SeviervUle, for the Ucense. But alas! BiU hadn't the necessary sum when he reached the clerk's office to procure the Ucense. So ho tramped home again, entered his house before his family, and, without saying a word, took from its rack the rrao gun, and placing it on his shoulder, again left. No one seems to know any further particulars. It is known that Bill got the license, but brought no gun ba^ with him. At twelve o'clock at night. Esquire Pickens was caUed for most imploringly, to perform the marriage ceremonies, and he did'it in tho most imposing form before the brUUant pine-knot firo that blazed on the hearth, and in tho presence of the select audience who had assembled. -After the vows had been made, and the record tendered that they were man and wife, BiU's firat ejaculation was, "Nancy, we've had a hard time, but I told you Pd bring 'em. Loss go home." And they went.  A Cltr far Boymtd »h« TkntOar mt •f tit« IiocomottT«.  rProm the New T«k Son.]  South Pass City, Wyoaiing Territory, Aug. 15.—As tho majority of those who may read this letter wiU not-be able very readily to locate-the mining camp from which I write, let me ask you to take a map of the Union PaoiSc Railroad, and beginning at Omaha, on the western bank of the Missouri river, trace the course of the great trans-continental raUway eight hundred and fifty-eight milOT westward, untU you reach tho Uttle town of Bryan, high up on the backbone of our continent. Here you leave the iron horse to wend his way to tho Pacific shore, while you resume your journey in a northerly direction forty mUes by the old-fashioned stags coach and four, bearing the long £a-miUar name of Wells, Harge & Co., to what are well known in our great West as  the sweetwaxeb'jilkbil.  Bryan is the chief freight and passenger outlet for this mining county. Almo^ on the vej^ oref^ of the Bivk^^ Mountains, between; e^ht r aoid: 'aht« thousand feet alrare ^e level (rf the sea, Ues South Pass City, in a ca^n. through which runs a creek oalfed ^Ulow Creek. It has one principal street, known as South PasaAvene, running its fhU length from east to west, on both sides of which are found its -stores, hotels, and dniiB shc^, the latter being in a large majority. At ' this time' wo have two billiard saloons, two hotels, eight grocery Btora8,~^o dry goods stor^ a postoffice and newt room, one jail, ooimty &nd\diatziet clerk's offices, and* an ^^iscopal church. There is .also an institution dignified with tha-title.of a bank, whoso principal business is to lend money-at from three to five per cent.-a month. All tno fa^dingavoiic'iftae aypTinn Inn-a hnving, frmnn frnnfe. -with a occasional exception of a .baild-ing whoUy of frame. On the sidus of the hills are the residency mofrtHy  country, the roo& ore made of .slabs placed close together and covered witii, dirt to the depth of three or four inches. i Such roo&- are oomidete protection against fire. Inmds our houses are lined with cotton t^pth, and occa-sionaUy covered in  stead of plastering.  .JTTSTTOB Oy THE PgACB.—  Important Discovery of Oreunic Be« mains.  From the Dayton (Ohio) Journal. Wo were shown, yesterday, by Professor J. W. Glass, who is interested in the stono quarries on the hUls of the Patterson farm, south of tho city, tho bones of an enormous serpent. Some time since the Professor, whUe superintending a force of men engaged in the quarries, discovered, lying immediately on the top of the upper stratum of the lower sUnrian rock, a few bones, apparently the vertebra of some animal. Being of a scientific turn of mind, his curiosity was exdted, and he at once commenced inspecting the remains, and well ho has been repaid, as his discovery has tumed out to be no other than the remains of an immense serpent deposited there in primeval times. Mr. Glass has already secured over fotir hundred joints of the vertebra, and has not yet reached the end of the huge serpent. ^  Specimens of tho joints have been sent to Professor Lsidy, of the College of Natural Science of Philadelphia, who pronounces them as undoubtedly belonging to an immense serpent of the antediluvian age. Tlie length of dry oop, und datve has no right to vote the serpent, so far as traced, is almost in dis kuntry.' Now dose same feUers twenty-five foot, and judging from tbe coom round nnd hoorah for de Dutch usuid proportions, it is estimated that und Peesmark. Dose RepoobUcans u its original length could not have been  a freynt Uke do tuyfel shoost before de de election." Then taking a pinch of snuff, and laying his forefinger by the side of his nose in a significant manner, he exclaimed: " Me watch um de game-^6 Dutch has long memories!" —Pucyrus Forum.  short of forty feet. The bones of this vertebral are large, and would indicate that the reptile must have been at least •ix or seven feet in circumference. The bones undoubtedly have lain here for thousands of years, and consequently much decomposed by time, tho rib  Wyoming Territory is theparadlMof women's rights. By law mani^ women, notwithstanding theu solamn vows at tho altar to love, honor and obey their husbands, are free ondequaL Women here can vote and hold office, and in consequence we have that r^ bird, "a woman justice of the peace." Among the" first aj^inteer to office under the Woman's Rights Law, passed by a Democratic Legialatttro. and approved by a Republican GoronuH't'was Mrs. Esther Morris, of South Pass City. In her judicial capadty, though net an expert in abstruse questions of law, she manifests a disposition to base all her jud^ents on the broad prindple of justice and right, without regard to technicaUties or quibbles of law. 7o pettifoggers she shows no mercy; and though by no means popular, her decisions are regarded as just.  state Items.  Typiioid fever is the prevaUing disease about Terre Haute.  Moses Harper died near Georgetown, Floyd county, last Friday. He was one of the pioneers, having moved to what is now Floyd county, when it was, comparatively, a vast wUdor-ness.  The teachers of Perry county, following the example of those in numerous other counties of the State, have organized a Teacher's Assodation'rand wm hold their first meeting at TeU City on the 17th.  The body of a boy, apparently about fourteen years old, was found floating in the OMo river about fifteen miles below New -Albany, on Sunday evening. It is suOTosed he was drowned at LouisviUe or JeffersonviUe.  On Friday morning tfie store of T. D. Kent, at Mansfield, in which tho post-office is located, was entered by burglars, who carried away about g400 worth of dry goods, and $30 worth of stamps and $50 in money, belonging to the posoffice.  The Stark county Ledger says most of the com in that county is out of danger from tho frost, and that the 3riela wiU be one of the best ever realized. It adds that the farmers of Stark design putting in more wheat this faU than ever before.  Thomas Harrison, a respectable and weU-to-do farmer, who lives some four mUes west of Aurora, was shot dead by his son-in-law, McDonald Cheek, on the 5th. The immediate cause of the •murder is unknown, but is supposed to havo been premeditated.  The Mount Vomon Democrat tells of the marriage in that town, on last Wednesday evenings of a youthful couple who had eloped from Kentucky. They were aged eighteen and fourteen, respectively, and were to havo been sent to school on Monday, but having hadafaUing out, with their parents concluded to get married and set up for themselves.  Horace Greeley has been fishing in tho Adirondacks. He reports having caught a few trout, but their "marvelous beauty and grace" so wore upon him that ho relented, reeled up his line and went off, leaving the rest of the trout " in the cool depths which they inhabit." Wc reaUy thought Horace was above such humbug as this. He may teU it to marines that he qtut fishing because the trout were pretty, but the elect aU know that it was bccause they wouldn't bite.  The idolatrous festival of Juggernaut has again this year been marked by loss of life. -At Hurripal, a shrine about; forty nules from Calcutta, in tho interior of tho Hocghly district, and dedicated to the Hindoo .^culapius, a comparatively smaU car of Juggernaut was being puUed along amid great crowds. On approaching a narrow portion of the road, between a tank and a wall, the car was suddenly dragged so that it feU on tho waU and crushed three elderly people to death. The priests wiU be tried. The last acddent occurred at the much more popular festival in Serampore, when four people were sacrificod imder tho wheels, through their own carelessness or that of the poUce, as it appeared on an official investigation. Tho crowd at Serampore was unusually smaU on this occasion, save on tho last day, when the cars retumed to the temples.  A Boston young lady ou a visit at Louisville has fallen in love with a negro coachman, and is bound to wed him though her parents object a Uttle on account of color. Their Boston neighbors arc trying to induce the famUy to let the girl have her way, and thus have a sensation in Boston society. They to think- the thing over and let them know soon.  the mines.  This is one of the richest mining countries in the world. Our hills are fuU of lodges of gold bearing quartz, which wiU pay from $10 to $150 a ton. AU that we need is capital to work these mines. Poor men are not able to work them with profit. Yet the majority of our best ledges are in the hands of men of littie means. There are three mines, the Miners' De^ht, Curiso, and Young America, in foU blast, and they are paying well. There are many others that in the hands of capitaUsts might pay largely on their investments. I would, however, caution all persons against inyffldÜMyntiu-.— oa^BTfeiatr"ejüBtQnatibnWtne nunc offered for sole, either by themselves or ■ome one in whom confidence can. h» placed.  ottlch mining.  We have a few gulch mines which pay from $3 to iflO a day. whore they con be worked. Within a ndle or two of town ^ch mining is carried on, paying fair wages. But the bes^laoes are on the Strawberry and &aver Creeks, where rich paying dirt can be found. The sole ol»tacle to the pro^ cution of this work is the Indian raiding. Few choose to risk, thsir scal^ when they know that the country is ' full of hostUe Indians, and do not know at what moment they may bo attacked. Could the minerabe asrared of ample protection, gnlch . mining would be not only extensively prese-cuted but pay largdy.  INDIAN DEPBEDATIONS.  When I came to these minies in March last there were from two to three thousand persons here, aU anxionfly looking forward to the coming spring to enable them to work their ledges, or prospect for new paying quartz and gulch mines. Everything seemM to look forward to a prosperous season. The Arrapahoes who were prihcipaUy feared, had come into our place, and made professions of their wish to be friendly. Their chiefs, Friday, Medi» cine Man, YeUow Owl and Cutfoot, had been treated kindly by our citizei^ as late as March 12, when they wei^ in ' South Pass City. We were relying upon their professions of a friendly disposition, when on the 30th of March we were startied with the report of the attack upon Dr. Irwin's son, not half a mUe from Atlantic City, and the subsequent discovery that  SIX KEN BAD BEEN KILLED by theso same friendly Indians. Prom that time untU now these depredations have continued, at intervals of two or three weeks. In the last raid 140 head of stock (horses and mules) were stolen, and three men horribly tortured and mutilated. They were D. Barr, Harvey Morran, and-Mason. Harvey Morran had a bolt of iron driven through his head from ear to ear, and the sinews cut out of his back to make^__ bowstrings for their bows. The otiteW' were alsobrntaUy mangled, and tortured while yet alive. In this raid the hostUe Indians came within fifty rods of town. The consequence is that our population does no exceed three hundred at this time, if so many. Onr town is  ALMOST DESEBXED.  I have stood on our main street and seen not over two or three men at a time, where a few months ago the same street was alive with men. FamiUes are going away, where they can get awav. Our bakers and raUkmen have gone. Two of onr hotels have closed, and many of our business men ar^re-parin^ to remove their stocks. From this tune until spring I do not think ^ there will be 200 hundred persons in camp-  The only Indians we can trust is the Indian who has been weU whipped. Swietwateb.  The testimonial business is still indulgi in. .On Sunday last the convicts in the Jeffenonviue penitentiaiy  E resented the Chaplain, Rev. J. W.Sul-van, with a beautiful watch as a testimonial of regard.  If the Republican stump speakers who are now eloquent in boasting of the economy of Grant's administration, and the reduction of the Pubic Debt, will be mmewhat less gener^ In their statements, and give a few facts regarding expenditures for the fiscal year ending in June, we .«shall have less of vaporing and more of honest discourse in the country.  They wiU also enUghten the people on a point which is how envtloped la a dense fog, 'if they wiU reveu what Grant has to do with the administration of the finances. What suggestion has he made, or polipy brought forward, or hint given to any person, or Can-gress, concerning the revenue, or a financial measure of any kind, which has not been treated with contempt by Congress? The Democracy do not think of censuring Grant for anything connected with the (not his) administration, bccause he is of no weight in It __  A SON of Amos Adney fourteen years old, had an arm and past of the shoulder blade blown away by the accidental discharge of a gun in his own hands, on Friday afternoon. Tbe extent of the wound rendered it necessary to amputate the shoulder joints and part of the scapula and clavicle.   

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